Author Topic: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!  (Read 2598 times)

Dicey

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Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« on: February 07, 2020, 11:33:33 AM »
Hi folks,
DH and I just bought a new-to-us RV. It's a 2012 Leisure Travel Serenity on a Sprinter Chassis. It has 25k miles on it and has been garaged its whole life. It was expensive, but a comparatively "good" deal. We flipped a house last year and spent some of the profit on this, so we can definitely "afford" it, lol. We're both experienced campers. DH has owned RV's before; we have a lot of the outdoor stuff on hand (tools, Coleman stuff, folding tables and chairs, etc.).

We plan on doing lots of short-ish trips to start and then extending when DH actually retires in a year or so. Full-timing for an extended period is a definite possibility.

What I'm looking for advice on is how to stock the inside. What's bullshit and what's really useful? I'm too mustachian to walk into a Camping World with a huge shopping list, and I'm positively allergic to IKEA. I also don't want to fill it with a bunch of old cast-off towels, because this rig is nice and we plan to keep it that way. What do you find really useful and what is a hard pass? I don't want to fill it up/load it down with a bunch of crap that we never end up using. Oh, and I already have enough white Corelle dishes from thrifted sources, and a set of sturdy plastic glasses purchased on sale at Costco. What else do I need?

What are your must-haves and your don't-even-bother suggestions? It doesn't matter if it's indoor or out. For example our Coleman lanterns are older, battery operated models. Should we keep them or go with LED's? We're not coffee drinkers, but I do love my decaf tea. Any small electric kettle suggestions?

Any and all tips and tricks are appreciated.
Thanks!
Dicey

ixtap

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2020, 11:57:26 AM »
First, I am a little jealous. We haven't bought because we don't have time, but we do rent occasionally and plan on RVing at some point. This line looks awesome and I love the Serenity lay out.

-Use the lanterns you have until they give out. You will have your other lantern and your cellphones for back up for a night or two, you won't even be much inconvenienced.

-Get a hand vac. It will help enormously in keeping the place clean. If you really want to be mustachian, get a dust broom for surfaces and a more standard broom for the floors. But seriously, just invest in a great hand vac. I am in love with my dyson car&boat - it even has dc charging. We use it so much more than we used any previous option on our boat.

-Levelling blocks

-If you can store them, use choose the best pots and pans for your use. This might mean that you get a sauce pan with a built in spout, rather than getting an electric tea kettle.

-Unless you generally use towels, remember the pot holders and trivets to protect your hands and surfaces.

-Once you have the absolute basics, stop. Don't buy anything else until you have missed it. Don't buy anything just because it might be nice to have until after you have take a couple of trips and you know exactly how you would use that item. This might result in a bit of shopping on your first trip, but you are more likely to get exactly what you want, rather than something that works for other people.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2020, 11:58:59 AM by ixtap »

Fishindude

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2020, 12:10:13 PM »
Don't forget a well outfitted tool box.

Dicey

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2020, 12:27:45 PM »
Don't forget a well outfitted tool box.
Haha, DH is a DIY king. Tools were the first thing I named on the list of things we saved. Check. Double check.

Thanks for the list @ixtap! This rig is so fancy, it has built-in automatic levelers, but I'm sure DH will toss in some of the plastic kind, just in case. He's a "Be Prepared" kind of guy. The electric kettle idea came from a You-Tuber who says it's a more efficient way to heat water. I've been surfing there, but too many of those folks have 40 foot trailers and are absolutely NOT mustachian, hence my plea for help here.

I should have mentioned that there is RV porn on the last couple of pages in my journal for any of you who like this kind of thing. The link's in my siggy line. I just popped back so I could add a mention of this new thread there, so I'm tickled to have help so soon. Thanks!

Caoineag

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2020, 01:02:18 PM »
Well we are on the road full time and your will pry my electric hotpot ($15 at Bed Bath and Beyond) from my cold dead hands. But we drink coffee and/or tea daily and occasionally when it's cold it heats up soup as well. That said, a couple of trips are the best way to know what you need since everyone has a different way of rving. What I will recommend since you are in a small rig is one of those large dog food containers that seal up completely as a trash bin. Think screw top lid. In a small rig, any trash can get stinky fast and trash service isn't always a step away from your rig depending on where you camp. We do that plus have a small one for dirty dishes but again that depends on whether you do dishes after every meal or wait to do a sinkful. Smells are your enemy in small spaces.

My other recommendation is to check your carrying capacity and not to overload it. There are a lot of RVs that can hardly carry anything. Food and water are usually your greatest weight loads.

JoJo

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2020, 01:52:36 PM »
I'm a van camper, but very small van - ford transit connect.  I traveled about 3.5 months out of 2019.  It sounds like you're pretty much set.  I'd recommend instead take it out for a trip and see what you miss/need.  There's always a walmart or thrift store nearby.  I'm hoping to hit the road again soon, debating either New Mexico and remote areas of Utah, AZ, and NV or a grand trip across Canada. 

If you're going to some very remote areas, including camping off road, it's worth having some road repair necessities, like things to jump your vehicle or repair the tires.  I actually wrote about some of the things that were useful on my 10,761 mile trip to Alaska and the Arctic Ocean last year here.  I luckily didn't have any problems but it was nice to know I had just in case, especially since I was solo.  I used my jumpstarter multiple times to charge devices so that was probably my favorite purchase, especially since it had a regular 110 volt plug in rather than just USB.   https://thehotflashpacker.com/alaska-road-trip-packing-list-13-essentials-for-driving-to-alaska/

DaMa

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2020, 01:53:46 PM »
Magnetic strip for knives mounted on the wall - You don't want them knocking against everything else in a drawer.
Command hooks - There is never enough storage, hang things you use frequently.  We put a line of the clear ones, every foot, just above DH's head, everywhere there was wall space.
Collapsible colander
Cutting mats instead of boards - lighter and take up less room
Scott TP breaks down better than any other brand we used.
Collapsible laundry totes
Comfortable outdoor chairs.  You'll sit outside a lot.
I made a fabric cover to go over the roof vent and used peel and stick velcro dots to attach it.  This was to make it darker for sleeping, but still get air flow through the fabric.
Clothes hanger thing that goes over the back bumper or something self standing to hang towels on.  A lot of parks won't let you string a clothesline.
Good mat to place outside your door for wiping feet.

We did a lot of camping, and these are the things I remember as being the most useful.

Cassie

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2020, 01:58:15 PM »
Some places donít have tables so we bought a small one that folds up. I furnished ours with old stuff from the house.

FINate

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2020, 01:58:48 PM »
Fun!

Wine/bottle opener :) Rummage through your kitchen drawers and make note of the doodads you use: knife sharpener, garlic press, etc. These things take very little space, great to have on hand. Do the same with your junk drawer at home: batteries, chargers, tape, etc.

For the kitchen, get a set of plastic nesting mixing bowls with lids (e.g. https://www.target.com/p/5pc-plastic-mixing-bowl-set-with-lids-blue-made-by-design-8482/-/A-76465690). Again, a space saver and great for mixing salads, pancake mix, marinating meats, and so on. And the lids mean you can use them for storing leftovers.

A large collapsible tub for washing dishes, and a soft sided collapsible water bucket for washing clothes and extinguishing campfires.

An outdoor rug for just outside the trailer/under the awning. In dusty campgrounds this does wonders to keep the dirt down in the camper.

I never go car camping without my zero gravity lounge chair...hard to beat kicking back outside in the woods with a cold one and a book.

Stuff for emptying the grey/black tanks: rubber gloves, a cheap garden hose for cleanup (must be separate from the hose used to fill the water tank!), and the few adapters for the different types of dump stations/hookups.

Finally, electrical adapters for the different types of outlets you'll encounter.

Happy trails!


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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2020, 02:26:47 PM »
Collapsible colander
Cutting mats instead of boards - lighter and take up less room
Scott TP breaks down better than any other brand we used.
I'm a boater instead of an RVer, but I heartily agree on these items.

I've also learned to love the multi-pot, which has a lid with a built in strainer and often has measurements on the inside. They look like this:


Quick drying clothing and towels are great to have. No need to buy anything special, just keep that in mind when packing.

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2020, 02:40:19 PM »


We have one of these for heating water for coffee, but we have also used it to make soup/noodles when it is nasty/cold out and I don't want to cook outside: https://www.amazon.com/Proctor-Silex-48507-Hot-WHITE/dp/B07BN67KJM

If you plan on hooking up to water in campsites, get a water filter and a pressure regulator, I have heard horror stories about people hooking up in areas where the water pressure was too high and caused leaks in the rv.

Get pot protectors to go between plates and pans. You will find out really quickly if anything rattles and it will drive you nuts: https://www.amazon.com/Pot-Pan-Protectors-Ecowares-Scratching/dp/B01E1SFRHW/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=2YE653MXVMJHV&keywords=pot+protector+divider+pads&qid=1581111212&s=home-garden&sprefix=pot+protect%2Cgarden%2C340&sr=1-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUFYRVExT0Y0Tjk0Sk4mZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAxMzY5OTExN0lDS0lHSFJJUEtTJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTA5NjEzMzlQUFEwVVhYU1pJNUomd2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl


Lastly: pay attention to your OCCC weight. There should be a little yellow sticker inside your RV telling you what it is:
Occupant and Cargo Carrying Capacity (OCCC): The value equal to the GVWR minus UVW and full LP Gas weight. In other words, OCCC is the amount of weight in occupants, cargo, water and trailer tongue weight that can be added to the motorhome without exceeding the GVWR.

You may want to stop at a truck scale once you have it fully loaded before you go on your first trip, that way you know if you need to cut things.



thedigitalone

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2020, 04:14:03 PM »
We full-timed for a year in Europe, so I have a bit of experience.

It's all about organization living in a small space, get a system in place for everything and then fill in the missing bits as you go on trips, it gives you something to do at the locations you visit.  Bring a much longer power cord than you think you need, same with a garden hose and a ladder is super handy.

I would highly recommend two small family band radios, they are invaluable when maneuvering into a tight space when the spotter is outside so you don't have to yell back and forth.

STEMorbust

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2020, 04:16:21 PM »
The things I've found the most useful are:

- Jetboil type stove for when I don't want to use propane or A/C power for coffee/tea (your setup may vary)
- Similarly, the instant Starbucks coffee packets for when we don't want to clean up grounds (your tea preferences negates this one)
- Big thermos for when we make coffee and want to immediately pack it up and hit the road
- Insulated growler for brewery stops
- A packable down blanket is always handy
- Variety of nesting tupperware
- Dedicated towel for the dog!
- Spice blends (we bring Montreal spice and TJ's everything bagel, as well our own mexican and italian blends)
- Protective egg case
- Silicone pot pinchers
- Camp Suds for when we want to do dishes with cold water (easy at campgrounds)
- Axe for splitting wood
- Helinox camp chairs and table

Two build related suggestions:
- Extending the heater control wiring to the bed
- Custom, highly effective blackout curtains/window covers

Hope that's helpful!

the_fixer

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2020, 06:25:19 PM »
Best item we have purchase is a toothbrush holder that sticks to the side of our medicine cabinet. I could not find the exact one but but it is a 2 toothbrush holder. The brushes stay in place even on ruff roads.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Wall-Mount-Stainless-Steel-2-3-Hole-Toothbrush-Razor-Holder-Toothpaste-Dispenser/192874711211?_trkparms=aid%3D1110001%26algo%3DSPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20180213162448%26meid%3Df646a1681c73479e82210c28c8b2e712%26pid%3D100930%26rk%3D9%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D333457099359%26itm%3D192874711211%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2332490&_trksid=p2332490.c100930.m5375



We have a couple of sea to summit x mugs they are collapsing silicone mugs that also have lines for measurements inside them.

https://seatosummitusa.com/collections/mobile-outdoor/products/x-mug

Some really nice thick nitrile gloves for dealing with the dump station.

We also purchased this small ceramic heater. We use it instead of the propane heater when we are at a site that has power. It heats our 19ft camper in minutes and we save on propane. If you are going to be on fulltime it might be a nice thing to have.

https://www.qcsupply.com/pelonis-brown-ceramic-disk-heater.html

And as much as we tried to be good and use our plates I have found that having paper plates and bowls has been a real water saver. Probably not the best for the environment but we have a limited amount of water capacity and washing dishes 3 times a day by an through our limited supply.

Will second the cutting mat we have a couple and they take up no space.




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Villanelle

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2020, 06:54:38 PM »
I'm not an RVer, but since you mention towels, I'd recommend considering a Turkish towel.  IMO, the dry better and faster than regular terry towels, which is good both for drying your body faster and for not getting mildewy.  They also take up less space because they aren't fluffy, but they are larger than a regular bath towel and can be used as table clothes, picnic blankets, an extra bed blanket, etc. if needed. 

RWTL

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2020, 04:01:11 AM »
Lot's of good suggestions so I won't duplicate them.

Some things I didn't see:

1. Surge protector - a must!
2. Different connectors for electrical (dog bones)
3. Happy Camper tank sanitizer (a game changer).

Have fun!

K_in_SoCal

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2020, 09:08:07 PM »
I think we're pretty minimalist in our Roadtrek E-Trek.  I hate clutter so we have to make it all fit in the storage we have.

Do you have a propane stove or induction burner?  We have induction, so that is the fastest way to boil water for us.  We actually have one of those instant hot water dispensers as part of the van's specs, but it uses more energy (and is slower).  Second choice is the microwave with a glass measuring cup, which has multi-purpose uses in the van.

I bought a set of nesting induction cookware with detachable handles to save space, and I'll admit they were a waste of money.  I use them as mixing/serving bowls more than I cook in them. Since I have a major electric system, I prefer to use a vintage electric Dutch oven for cooking.  I also sometimes take an Instant Pot, but it's harder to find space for on longer trips when we need more stuff.  For the induction burner I prefer a vintage (lead free) enameled tin saucepan with a spout.  It takes under a minute to boil enough water for one travel mug of tea.

I raided our home stash for various linens, but we also had some microfiber towels from previous camping, which fold up small and dry quickly.  I don't like how they feel though, so I have regular towels.

Instead of a drying rack, it was recommended we use a silicone drying mat since it takes up less space and can cover the induction burner, meaning we don't scratch the burner when we rest things on it.  It doesn't take away any counter space.  We always hand dry the dishes anyway, since space is at a premium and I like things neat.  But you always throw down an extra kitchen towel.

Skip the fancy RV sewer tank packets -- your black tank is likely much smaller than most RVs.  We use Happy Campers RV tank treatment because it's a natural powder we can measure out proportionally for our tank.  I've been using the same small container for nearly 5 years.

I might want a hand vac if we full-timed, but we don't do I use a cheap hand broom and dust pan.  I think there's a folding regular broom in the back storage, but I don't use it in the van.  Sometimes the guys use it to sweep the RV mat/rug.

Speaking of which, depending on where we are going, the RV mat is essential because it keeps so much dirt outside and gives the dogs a place to lie down that isn't dirt or mud.  We've had the same one for almost 20 years.

Hmm, I keep a sunhat in the van at all times, and sunscreen too.  I actually keep a toiletries kit in there even though we don't FT -- you never know when you might want some dental floss or Tylenol.

We splurged on Helinox chairs for the van, and they are worth it!  We only carry large camping chairs on day trips, when space doesn't matter as much.  Even then, the guys mostly prefer the small chairs.

IIRC, your LTV is a B+, so you probably have a lot more storage than we do.  For clothing on longer trips, we use packing cubes since we already had them, but for the weekend I put my things into a small duffel that fits in an overhead bin.

This is a tip that some RVers won't like, but with a small black tank, I prefer to keep any toilet tissue used only for urine out of the tank.  I have a zipper storage bag I put the tissue into, and keep it along side the commode.  It really doesn't make much different to dispose of it this way, and I'm going to wash my hands anyway.  Doing so has more than doubled the length of time we can go without dumping the black tank (oh how I wish a cassette toilet had been standard!).

Have fun!

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2020, 09:15:50 PM »
Just a thought: you may want to look into replacing the house batteries with Lithium. If you have AGM or Lead Acid, you will be able to cut the weight in half and get more usable power(lithium can be drained lower than agm/lead acid without damaging the battery).

GreenEggs

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2020, 11:50:56 PM »
Dicey, glad to see you started an RV thread.  :)


We bought a Sprinter van last year with the intent of converting it for traveling, but life's been busy and the conversion hasn't happened yet.  (It's been great for moving furniture, and hauling motorcycles & dogs.)  So, I don't have any experienced based knowledge to share, yet.


I did mention a WiFi hot spot is nice to have on your other thread.  We just bought a Netgear MR1100 Nighthawk cellular router and are using an AT&T data plan for $35 per month, which we purchased on eBay for $4.50.  It's been working well at the house. 
Does your Sprinter have a diesel heater built in?  If not, there are good Chinese clones available for about $150 (about 80% less than the European brands).   They tap into your diesel line & only use about a quart per night.


I'm curious about what kinds of toys people carry along on their travels.  On short trips you know the specific destination, so it's easier to envision what you'll want to have when you get there.  On long trips, or even full-time traveling you have to be a lot more mindful about what you'll really want, and how much it weighs and how bulky it is. 
Do most folks invest in folding bikes or just hang regular bikes on a carrier? It seems like you'd want bikes about anywhere you'd travel to.


 I've always wished for a boat whenever we've vacationed at the coast or anywhere there's water to explore.  So, last Black Friday I ordered an inflatable dinghy for the van.  It's 12' long, but folds down to 2' x 4' x 16" & weighs 90 lbs.  (After buying it I discovered an even lighter catamaran style...) I got a small outboard motor that weighs about the same.  I doubt most folks would want to carry quite that much boat along full-time, but it seems like inflatable kayaks or SUPs (stand up paddleboard) would be popular with RVers.


I figure we'll carry swim fins & goggles.
Fishing rods & basic tackle.
Frisbee & a kite.
Tennis raquetes. 


What am I forgetting?






LovinPSDs

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2020, 11:24:33 AM »
Dicey! While we can all admit RVing isn't the most Mustachian, we love it so much, I don't think we'll be giving it up.  Great call on the Sprinter, I'm actually considering a downsize in some form or fashion because we currently have a 5th wheel and 1-ton truck.  My excuse is that it's our one big escape, and a safe place for us to go with my daughter, who suffers from pretty severe food allergies, eliminating much of your "normal" kids events and pretty well all family events.

Sooooo that being said...

One things I'm super glad we did right up front was spent the extra money outfitting the camper completely.  This kept us from shuffling anymore more than food and clothing from the house when we head out.  It really made the entire thing more enjoyable when we were getting ready to leave, and coming home from a trip. 

Another things is to not pack for a crowd.  We keep just enough silverware and such for our family of 4 and if we need more it's paper and plastic from there.  a 50 piece plates and 50 piece box of silverware is a good backup without needing to keep to much forever.

Magnetic knife strip on the wall instead of knife block.  3-4 good quality knives is all you need.

I 2nd the "Happer Camper" scoop tank treatment.  Ours has lasted a long time even for a big camper like ours.

Get a small electric heater, anytime you have "free" electric take advantage and save on propane - could also consider diesel heater, great for boondocking.

Deck of Cards/small games

For Iphones - HMDI to Lightning cable - we download stuff to the Ipad/use unlimited data on the phones when the weather is crap or we wanna watch a sports game

Have fun!! Look forward to more info in this thread.

Cassie

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2020, 03:03:38 PM »
We furnished the RV from our house and leave everything in there. I put the dishes in slip lock bags so they stay clean.

Bernard

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2020, 03:28:39 PM »
Hi folks,
DH and I just bought a new-to-us RV. It's a 2012 Leisure Travel Serenity on a Sprinter Chassis. It has 25k miles on it and has been garaged its whole life.

I never understood how a vehicle could accumulate tens of thousands of miles inside a garage. It just boggles my mind.

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2020, 04:25:41 PM »
Hi folks,
DH and I just bought a new-to-us RV. It's a 2012 Leisure Travel Serenity on a Sprinter Chassis. It has 25k miles on it and has been garaged its whole life.

I never understood how a vehicle could accumulate tens of thousands of miles inside a garage. It just boggles my mind.

it was a very big garage.

Dicey

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2020, 05:28:51 PM »
Hi folks,
DH and I just bought a new-to-us RV. It's a 2012 Leisure Travel Serenity on a Sprinter Chassis. It has 25k miles on it and has been garaged its whole life.

I never understood how a vehicle could accumulate tens of thousands of miles inside a garage. It just boggles my mind.

it was a very big garage.
Hahaha! It is in fact, massive. The building used to be part of a steel mill. Glad to see it's being repurposed. And while I get the funny, an eight-year-old rig with only 25,000 miles on it spent a helluva lot more time in the garage than on the road. Which is why DH bought it, of course ;-)

Caoineag

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2020, 09:12:38 PM »
Hi folks,
DH and I just bought a new-to-us RV. It's a 2012 Leisure Travel Serenity on a Sprinter Chassis. It has 25k miles on it and has been garaged its whole life.

I never understood how a vehicle could accumulate tens of thousands of miles inside a garage. It just boggles my mind.

it was a very big garage.
Hahaha! It is in fact, massive. The building used to be part of a steel mill. Glad to see it's being repurposed. And while I get the funny, an eight-year-old rig with only 25,000 miles on it spent a helluva lot more time in the garage than on the road. Which is why DH bought it, of course ;-)

Which is good so long as they were able to keep the rodents out of the garage. You don't want to know how many rvers have stored their rigs for a couple of months only to find out that the rodents got into the wiring. Also a good reason to keep all food items an RV in rodent resistant packaging. Baggies and cardboard boxes tend to be kept in storage containers to avoid appealing to rodents in our van since we don't want to encourage them to wander in.

LovinPSDs

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2020, 08:09:10 AM »
Dicey - I started looking at the LTV's as I'm trying to learn the way of the Sprinter Vans, WOW what beautiful rigs!  Congrats

fatcow240

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2020, 08:47:35 AM »
We have been in a 5th wheel since May.

  • Sewer hoses, sometimes the length has been 20+ feet (We have 15ft+15ft from Walmart)
  • 90 degree sewer adapter
  • Fresh water hose - usually white or blue
  • Fresh water filter
  • Hose gaskets
  • Water pressure regulator
  • Septic safe toilet paper (Costco is septic/RV safe and hasn't given us issue)
  • Black tank treatment
  • 50-to-30 Amp OR 30-to-50 Amp adapter
  • Leveling blocks
  • Wheel chocks
  • Tire inflator - keep tire pressure optimal
  • Space heater
  • Basic toolset
  • Small vacuum
  • Broom
Nice to have
  • Camping/beach chairs
  • Small outdoor grill
  • Bikes + rack
  • Coffee French press mugs
  • Hatchet
Kitchen appliances used
  • Instant Pot
  • Blender

SpecialSnowflake

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2020, 03:02:30 PM »
We are Fulltimers, but in a 41 foot class A, so very much the opposite end of the spectrum 😄

Baskets for drawers and cabinets are great to hold small or like things together so they arenít flying around.

Your tires could be 9 or so years old and need to be carefully checked and maybe replaced. RV tires most often age out before they wear out, garaged or not.

Have fun and good luck!

Cassie

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #28 on: February 12, 2020, 03:29:29 PM »
We replaced our tires 4 years ago and they cost 1300.

GreenEggs

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #29 on: February 12, 2020, 04:26:16 PM »
For tires I've seen some of the 4x4 owners on the Sprinter-source.com forum selling almost new OEM take-offs for very reasonable prices.  The stock Sprinter tires & wheels aren't "cool" enough looking for some folks.  It might be worth your while to see what's listed on the classified section there.  It seems that most of the posts are on the West coast and in the Rockies. 


My 2016 2500 4x4 model has Continental Vanco Four Season 245/75 R16" tires on it. 

Dicey

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2020, 09:48:12 AM »
Great input, everyone! Please keep these wonderful ideas coming.

Funny that this thread turned to thoughts of tires. I posted the quote below in response to a question in my journal about where to look for rigs. That question was asked by the person who has a current thread called "I Want A Camper". If you want to share your RV shopping tips, feel free to add them to either or both threads. It might be a little confusing, but the more info the merrier. I'm not always positive what I've said where, which is a fun MPP. I love the way this community is so generous with their knowledge!

Our rig has six brand-new tires and a fancy tire pressure sensor system that shows the pressure of each tire on a handheld device. It also has all new batteries. It has a built-in pressure regulator, and automatic leveling jacks.

OMG, @ohsnap, we have done some of everything. This is DH's second RV, so he has more experience than I do. When I was a kid, we family camped in a tent trailer, which doesn't count, IMO. DH wanted something short enough to get into National Parks, but not too small, like a van conversion. (See Cassie's comment above.) We're too damn old to crawl into an upper bunk, so that format was out. DH didn't want a trailer, so that decision was easy. We wanted a quality builder. We discovered Leisure Travel Vans at an RV Show three or four years ago. They're hand built in Canada, and crazy-ass expensive.

We surfed the internet like mad. Craigslist and RV Trader are two good resources. If you identify something you like, Google the year, make and model, and follow wherever Google leads. YouTube is another great resource. A lot of dealers post very informative YT videos. OMG, Ken, the guy that does the Leisure Travel Van videos is hill-airy-ass and super knowledgeable. That guy can sell!

There's a site that sells repos called Cranky Ape. I spent tons of time there, because they sell a wide variety of rigs and  post lots of pictures. If you have any big RV dealerships nearby, and are resistant to salespeople, go there and look around. One tip is never give a salesperson any numbers (income, budget, etc.) or your driver's license. Oh, and don't go to a dealership before, during, or immediately after a large RV Show in the region, because the rigs will be gone #askmehowiknow.

Decide if you want gas or deisel. Slide-outs or not. (Hint: slide-outs are almost always problematic. If they aren't, just wait a while, they will be.) Oh, and we helped an internet friend choose his RV, which was fun, because we got to go RV shopping, but it wasn't for us, so we didn't have to activate our force fields to repel salespeople. We added to our own knowledge, which made it even more fun.

If you live near a large senior community like Leisure World or Sun City, look there. Retired people with lots of money buy rigs then don't use them, for lots of reasons. Then they need to sell them. People with cash can get screaming deals that way. Sometimes RV Storage lots have bulletin boards or the managers know of rigs for sale.

Finally, there is no perfect rig. Take your time, do the research, and you're likely to end up with something that fits your needs well.

Oh, and a word about tires. RV tires tend to age out well before they wear out. Driving on old tires is dangerous. A new set of shoes for your rig could easily set you back a grand. Don't buy an older rig with original tires unless it's a screaming deal even after you pay for new tires.

spartana

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2020, 12:45:56 PM »
Congrats on the Sprinter RV @Dicey . I haven't had a chance to read the posts yet and am not an RVer but do camp a lot and think having one of those attachable screen rooms are great to keep bugs out of the RV and also allow for pest free outside sitting. I just have the non-attachable kind for tent camping, but they make ones that attach directly to your RV or van side door. Have fun!

Dicey

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2020, 01:10:54 PM »
Congrats on the Sprinter RV @Dicey . I haven't had a chance to read the posts yet and am not an RVer but do camp a lot and think having one of those attachable screen rooms are great to keep bugs out of the RV and also allow for pest free outside sitting. I just have the non-attachable kind for tent camping, but they make ones that attach directly to your RV or van side door. Have fun!
Ooh, I like that idea!

sourdough

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2020, 03:14:07 PM »
Posting to follow.....and learn.  Congrats on the RV and the great adventures to be had with it!

Cadman

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2020, 07:36:26 AM »
Tons of great info so far so I won't dwell on what's been said.  A couple of organizational aids...We keep a small whiteboard mounted inside a cabinet door which is useful for jotting down things you forgot and want to add to your checklist next time. AND, it's useful for putting down your location in case of emergency (park name, spot number, etc.).

For pre-trip planning, I have a spreadsheet with columns divided into common groups. One column is perishable food to stock, another is tools/supplies normally not kept with the rig, another for things that -should- be kept with the rig but may have gone walking, etc. Easy enough to print a hard copy before a trip and check off as you go.

LovinPSDs

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #35 on: March 03, 2020, 09:42:39 AM »
My wife laminated a pre trip list so we could cross stuff off each time and then just erase for the next time

Cadman

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #36 on: March 03, 2020, 10:40:16 AM »
My wife laminated a pre trip list so we could cross stuff off each time and then just erase for the next time

That does remind me...most RV's and travel trailers have very poor electrical documentation. Breakers and fuses often are incorrectly labeled, and harness drawings are non-existent. I ended up creating AC and DC layouts along with new fuse legends, battery info, etc. and made laminated copies to take along. Very handy when trouble strikes.


Padonak

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Re: Experienced RVers - Need Help The Mustachian Way!
« Reply #37 on: March 03, 2020, 11:09:00 AM »
Just curious, how much did you pay for the RV and what's the market price for it?