Author Topic: Electrical question  (Read 1084 times)

MMMdude

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 323
Electrical question
« on: December 29, 2016, 12:08:16 PM »
I had a pinhole copper leak that was fixed by a plumber recently.  Had to cut section of ceiling on main floor.  Anyways the space was quite tight and while soldering the pipe a very tiny section of electrical wire nearby got slightly charred.  I asked him if I need to worry about that and he said "that's not a problem".

Since it's so close to the pipe and if the pipe ever leaks I'm abit concerned about it.  I can see the actual wires that's underneath the sheathing - probably 1/8th an inch type section.

Is it possible for an electrician to replace a small section of wire like that?  Or would they have to replace that entire line?  Or should I not worry about it like this guy is saying

OttoMatic

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: Electrical question
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2016, 12:24:48 PM »
I'd say that certainly if you can see the underlying copper wire that it's a problem. Sure, it may work without a problem for years, but it's definitely not right, and it's a hazard. Even if the insulation is apparently intact, it's still compromised by the heat of the flame. I would have an electrician look at it if you're not comfortable fixing it yourself.

Most codes dictate that electrical cables be terminated within a junction box. A junction box is where a lightswitch or an outlet might be installed (among other things). So, you can replace a patch of cable, but its ends should be in a j-box, and the j-box should be accessible to the user (i.e., not buried under drywall).

Now, maybe it's just the external 'romex' sheathing that's been cooked, and you're seeing the individual wires withing (black, white, green, maybe red). That's more of a gray area for me... I'd have an electrician look at it either way.

Note: I'm not an electrician per se, but I've done lots of my own remodel work and have never failed an inspection. Good luck!

swick

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2884
Re: Electrical question
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2016, 12:30:18 PM »
I'd say that certainly if you can see the underlying copper wire that it's a problem. Sure, it may work without a problem for years, but it's definitely not right, and it's a hazard. Even if the insulation is apparently intact, it's still compromised by the heat of the flame. I would have an electrician look at it if you're not comfortable fixing it yourself.

Most codes dictate that electrical cables be terminated within a junction box. A junction box is where a lightswitch or an outlet might be installed (among other things). So, you can replace a patch of cable, but its ends should be in a j-box, and the j-box should be accessible to the user (i.e., not buried under drywall).

Now, maybe it's just the external 'romex' sheathing that's been cooked, and you're seeing the individual wires withing (black, white, green, maybe red). That's more of a gray area for me... I'd have an electrician look at it either way.

Note: I'm not an electrician per se, but I've done lots of my own remodel work and have never failed an inspection. Good luck!

I was just discussing with hubs, he is an EE and not an electrician. He basically said the same as above. And added an expletive or two about the proficiency of your plumber.

As far as it meeting code, it depends on your jurisdiction. He said at the very least you should tape it up with electrical tape, but there is no way to know if there is damage to the internal insulation. It could cause a ground which would blow a breaker, or it could arc and start a fire.  To be on the safe side, it'd be best to have an electrician come in and take a look.

seattlecyclone

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4723
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Electrical question
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2016, 12:41:26 PM »
Agree with swick. Wrapping electrical tape around the individual copper wires and then around the cable is about the minimum you should do. Replacing the cable or doing a splice inside an accessible junction box (would likely need two boxes unless there's a lot of slack in the cable) would be the better solution, although electrical tape is probably fine.

MMMdude

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 323
Re: Electrical question
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2016, 12:51:58 PM »
Is all black tape electrical?

OK will get buddy who is journeyman electrician out ASAP.  Have a couple other things I want changed over so may as well be on safe side