Author Topic: corrective eye surgery  (Read 8003 times)

Silverwood

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corrective eye surgery
« on: September 09, 2015, 12:44:32 PM »
Hi Everyone


I know people have talked about lasik surgery  on here before but has anyone had the Visian procedure? Where they insert  a contact lens into your eye. ( I took the word out of the heading but Visian is what the procedure  is called. Sorry if that was confusing)

I  don't qualify for lasik and this is more expensive :/ finally saved up the money and now I need more lol story of my life.  Anyway from what  I understand they cut into your eye and place a contact lens.  I'm not sure I'm comfortable  with that.  Google comes up with lots of Dr's. I'm looking for people that have had this done and how they feel about it.  Thought I'd ask here.

http://www.imageplus.ca/treatment/procedures/visian/
« Last Edit: September 10, 2015, 10:45:53 AM by Silverwood »

Guses

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2015, 03:07:19 PM »
Do you qualify for PRK?


Silverwood

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2015, 03:46:23 PM »
I'm not sure. I'm thinking no? The girl there only talked about visian as my option. I have to go in for more testing but at $8000 I wasn't sure it was worth it. Also the whole cutting into my eye.

Meowmalade

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2015, 03:49:07 PM »
I was told that the "lens implant" was my best option (would have had to do it in a city 2 hours away), until I got a second opinion.  I got PRK earlier this year-- went from -9 in both eyes to practically 20/20 and it's been amazing!!

Silverwood

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2015, 03:54:23 PM »
Ok. I can check out the other place here.  This was the one that was recommended  by my optometrist. 

I know.  Everyone says it changes your life. I was so excited and then really bummed to hear that I can't. I can say that I wasn't too impressed with the vague answers I got when I asked why. But I wasn't speaking to the Dr. 

Meowmalade

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2015, 04:24:39 PM »
I wasn't eligible for LASIK because my corneas were too thin.  PRK takes longer to heal but is supposed to be more stable afterward (I heard that athletes and military have to get PRK).  Good luck!

Guses

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2015, 08:59:33 AM »
Lasik is the equivalent of installing a zipper in your cornea. It never heals fully.

PRK takes much longer to recover but the eye recovers fully.

I recently had PRK and would definitely recommend it.

Since it is "older tech"* it is also cheaper.

*The important part, the laser technology, is the same regardless of the procedure at most places. Drs. thought that people preferred a quicker recovery versus cornea long term health. So they push Lasik much more.

MayDay

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2015, 09:23:01 AM »
I really want to see better, but just thinking about knives and lasers in my eye gives me hives. 

Maybe some day I will get over it.  Not today.

tvan

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2015, 09:28:06 AM »
Is PRK something that you can pay for with HSA funds?

Guses

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2015, 10:28:32 AM »
I really want to see better, but just thinking about knives and lasers in my eye gives me hives. 

Maybe some day I will get over it.  Not today.

Waking up .... turning over ... and seeing the time on the clock is a wonderful feeling.

NO RAGRETS!

Also, my health insurance covered a very very significant portion of my cost which was already low because I shopped around and most places offer price match policies.

Find the cheapest price for equivalent technology, get a quote, and go to the place you want to go with it. You do have so sit through a couple of 2-3 hour measurement sessions but the savings are so worthwhile! Most places give free coffee in the waiting room.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2015, 10:32:18 AM by Guses »

tyd450

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2015, 11:42:47 AM »
I actually chose to have the PRK procedure over LASIK even though I was eligible for LASIK.  I just figured that I could handle a little longer recovery time to reduce the long term risks of flap complications.

I went to one of the best in my area and the price was the same as LASIK-  there are more checkups post-PRK because they have to monitor how your eyes are healing and adjust the eye drops accordingly.

They want you to have LASIK because it is much quicker for them to send you on your way and you are also satisfied more quickly because you heal up so fast.

My tips for quick healing would be Fish oil, vitamin C in addition to your normal multi-vitamin, and drink shitloads of water the week before your procedure and continue this until you are 100% healed.  I also bought a bunch of coconut water and drank tons of that as well because I wanted to be as hydrated as possible to help with the healing.

FLA

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2015, 12:35:59 PM »
this is not you situation but a few things to consider.  I had a detached retina that could not be totally repaired.  I have very bad vision to begin with so I go to the best ophthalmologist around.  When this happened, my doctor got me into see the surgeon he considered the best that same day. Saw him, surgery next day. He has an excellent reputation and it was not his fault that my retina snapped and I could never get good vision in that eye again. It ended up requiring more surgery over the years.

This happening was a huge PITA and adjusting to one eye seeing well and the other just really seeing colors was very hard to adjust to. After this experience, I feel obligated to suggest to people getting very basic things done, like lasik, to not fall for the ads with lowest prices.  Rather, find out who is considered the best in your area, see him, get a second opinion, and pay more, even if it seems like a lot, to get the best guy. Do you really want the guy who has eye surgery discounts in the paper to touch your eyes?

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2015, 12:55:32 PM »
find out who is considered the best in your area, see him, get a second opinion, and pay more, even if it seems like a lot, have the best guys match the price of the cheapest place.

FTFY

Don't go for the more expensive place just because it is more exensive (and therefore better! - not). I have friends that paid several times what I paid (for PRK) to get LASIK done and they ended up with serious problems post surgery. A cheap place can also be a reputable place. If they do a lot of volume, they can afford to charge less.

FLA

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2015, 01:37:41 PM »
I did not intend to sound like "go to the expensive, fancy place". I am solely saying find the best doc you can and he's probably not going to be found in a newspaper offering a "sale". And I did not mean pay more as in go to a place that offers you limo transport to and from.  I meant you probably will pay more for the reputable doctor because of his skill, asking him to price match is a great idea, did not think of that. My main point is that you are dealing with your eyes, do you really want to take a chance? Having ended up with crap vision in one eye was very difficult and I would not want anyone to go through a bad experience.

Ironically, for me, price made no difference, it was paid for by my insurance because it wasn't cosmetic. So I could've gone to a less expensive guy, but if I could have the best and pay the same, why wouldn't I?

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2015, 02:03:15 PM »
I am going to one of the top doctors in the county for custom LASIK.  I disagree with whoever said they try to sell you lasik and move you along.  If you go to reputable doctor at the top of this field, they will recommend surgery based on your needs, not convenience or price tag.   I am getting the more expensive custom lasik because I need correction of visual distortions beyond what basic lasik or PRK can correct.  Also, your eyes do recover and the flap does heal.  Any kind of flap complication occurs in less than one percent of patients and can corrected.

Meowmalade

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2015, 02:21:35 PM »
I also went to one of the top doctors for my PRK.  I only found out after the fact that he's offered Groupons for a really great deal in the past (bummed that I missed that)!  The follow-up care has been stellar.  So, don't discount a doctor because they offer deals, but definitely find one with a great reputation.

Dicey

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2015, 02:37:45 PM »
Full disclosure: I am very nearsighted, farsighted, astigmatic and have glaucoma. I have worn glasses or contacts since I was ten. It is my dream to wake up and see the world around me clearly. Every year, when I see my ophthalmologist, I ask her if the surgery has improved enough for me to consider it. One visit, she did some additional tests. She then said, "You know that money you have saved for eye surgery? Spend it on some other body part." This cracks me up even as I type it. Seems my corneas are too thin for surgery. That, coupled with the earlier laundry list, make my eyes terrible, horrible, no good, very bad candidates for eye surgery. Who knows? Perhaps Visian will give me new hope. Because, you know that, as a mustachian, I will not spend that money on another body part, but I still have it set aside.

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2015, 03:06:37 PM »
I am going to one of the top doctors in the county for custom LASIK.  I disagree with whoever said they try to sell you lasik and move you along.  If you go to reputable doctor at the top of this field, they will recommend surgery based on your needs, not convenience or price tag.

If you are eligible for both type of surgery I bet that most Drs will recommend LASIK because of the easier healing time. They won't really get into the drawbacks of LASIK (see below).

   
Also, your eyes do recover and the flap does heal.  .

If this is what the Drs told you it is really troubling because it is false. See this study:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16209440

Quote
CONCLUSIONS:

The human comeal stroma typically heals after LASIK in a limited and incomplete fashion; this results in a weak, central and paracentral hypocellular primitive stromal scar that averages 2.4% as strong as normal comeal stroma. Conversely, the LASIK flap wound margin heals by producing a 10-fold stronger, peripheral hypercellular fibrotic stromal scar that averages 28.1% as strong as normal comeal stromal, but displays marked variability.

Translation: At best, on average, the area of your cornea that they cut will heal to about 30% strenght of untouched cornea. The "marked variability" part is also scary, maybe you heal 40% or maybe you heal 10% and a light hit will lift your flap right out.

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2015, 03:19:21 PM »
I am going to one of the top doctors in the county for custom LASIK.  I disagree with whoever said they try to sell you lasik and move you along.  If you go to reputable doctor at the top of this field, they will recommend surgery based on your needs, not convenience or price tag.

If you are eligible for both type of surgery I bet that most Drs will recommend LASIK because of the easier healing time. They won't really get into the drawbacks of LASIK (see below).

   
Also, your eyes do recover and the flap does heal.  .

If this is what the Drs told you it is really troubling because it is false. See this study:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16209440

Quote
CONCLUSIONS:

The human comeal stroma typically heals after LASIK in a limited and incomplete fashion; this results in a weak, central and paracentral hypocellular primitive stromal scar that averages 2.4% as strong as normal comeal stroma. Conversely, the LASIK flap wound margin heals by producing a 10-fold stronger, peripheral hypercellular fibrotic stromal scar that averages 28.1% as strong as normal comeal stromal, but displays marked variability.

Translation: At best, on average, the area of your cornea that they cut will heal to about 30% strenght of untouched cornea. The "marked variability" part is also scary, maybe you heal 40% or maybe you heal 10% and a light hit will lift your flap right out.

First, nothing you'd posted supports your original statement that the flap doesn't "heal."  That's quite misleading.

Second, my doctor developed the laser technology currently being used for LASIK.  I am well aware of the drawbacks and complications that occur in less than 1% of patients.  I am eligible for PRK, but custom lasik is recommended because PRK would not be able to correct my vision to the extent that the lasik will.


Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2015, 03:40:59 PM »
I am going to one of the top doctors in the county for custom LASIK.  I disagree with whoever said they try to sell you lasik and move you along.  If you go to reputable doctor at the top of this field, they will recommend surgery based on your needs, not convenience or price tag.

If you are eligible for both type of surgery I bet that most Drs will recommend LASIK because of the easier healing time. They won't really get into the drawbacks of LASIK (see below).

   
Also, your eyes do recover and the flap does heal.  .

If this is what the Drs told you it is really troubling because it is false. See this study:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16209440

Quote
CONCLUSIONS:

The human comeal stroma typically heals after LASIK in a limited and incomplete fashion; this results in a weak, central and paracentral hypocellular primitive stromal scar that averages 2.4% as strong as normal comeal stroma. Conversely, the LASIK flap wound margin heals by producing a 10-fold stronger, peripheral hypercellular fibrotic stromal scar that averages 28.1% as strong as normal comeal stromal, but displays marked variability.

Translation: At best, on average, the area of your cornea that they cut will heal to about 30% strenght of untouched cornea. The "marked variability" part is also scary, maybe you heal 40% or maybe you heal 10% and a light hit will lift your flap right out.

First, nothing you'd posted supports your original statement that the flap doesn't "heal."  That's quite misleading.
Second, my doctor developed the laser technology currently being used for LASIK.  I am well aware of the drawbacks and complications that occur in less than 1% of patients.  I am eligible for PRK, but custom lasik is recommended because PRK would not be able to correct my vision to the extent that the lasik will.

Well, it's right there.

Also, don't drink the Dr's kool-aid. The "laser" is the same whether they do LASIK or PRK.

Maybe the place you went offers Wavefront (aka Advanced) LASIK but not the same for PRK. Make no mistake, it is a choice made by the Drs, it's not a drawback of the surgical procedure. 
« Last Edit: September 10, 2015, 03:46:06 PM by Guses »

FLA

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2015, 05:22:12 PM »
I also went to one of the top doctors for my PRK.  I only found out after the fact that he's offered Groupons for a really great deal in the past (bummed that I missed that)!  The follow-up care has been stellar.  So, don't discount a doctor because they offer deals, but definitely find one with a great reputation.

maybe he would honor the Groupon and give you money back? 

Meowmalade

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2015, 05:36:56 PM »
I also went to one of the top doctors for my PRK.  I only found out after the fact that he's offered Groupons for a really great deal in the past (bummed that I missed that)!  The follow-up care has been stellar.  So, don't discount a doctor because they offer deals, but definitely find one with a great reputation.

maybe he would honor the Groupon and give you money back?

The Groupon had expired by the time I saw them.  But if I had known that he puts out Groupons from time to time, I would have kept an eye out!  But no regrets-- I needed to use some "health account money" that goes away if my husband leaves his job.  And now I can see!!!

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2015, 09:07:28 AM »
I am going to one of the top doctors in the county for custom LASIK.  I disagree with whoever said they try to sell you lasik and move you along.  If you go to reputable doctor at the top of this field, they will recommend surgery based on your needs, not convenience or price tag.

If you are eligible for both type of surgery I bet that most Drs will recommend LASIK because of the easier healing time. They won't really get into the drawbacks of LASIK (see below).

   
Also, your eyes do recover and the flap does heal.  .

If this is what the Drs told you it is really troubling because it is false. See this study:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16209440

Quote
CONCLUSIONS:

The human comeal stroma typically heals after LASIK in a limited and incomplete fashion; this results in a weak, central and paracentral hypocellular primitive stromal scar that averages 2.4% as strong as normal comeal stroma. Conversely, the LASIK flap wound margin heals by producing a 10-fold stronger, peripheral hypercellular fibrotic stromal scar that averages 28.1% as strong as normal comeal stromal, but displays marked variability.

Translation: At best, on average, the area of your cornea that they cut will heal to about 30% strenght of untouched cornea. The "marked variability" part is also scary, maybe you heal 40% or maybe you heal 10% and a light hit will lift your flap right out.

First, nothing you'd posted supports your original statement that the flap doesn't "heal."  That's quite misleading.
Second, my doctor developed the laser technology currently being used for LASIK.  I am well aware of the drawbacks and complications that occur in less than 1% of patients.  I am eligible for PRK, but custom lasik is recommended because PRK would not be able to correct my vision to the extent that the lasik will.

Well, it's right there.

Also, don't drink the Dr's kool-aid. The "laser" is the same whether they do LASIK or PRK.

Maybe the place you went offers Wavefront (aka Advanced) LASIK but not the same for PRK. Make no mistake, it is a choice made by the Drs, it's not a drawback of the surgical procedure.

You meant that it doesn't heal back to it's original state, not that your eyes never heal from the surgery. 

MayDay

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2015, 09:44:18 AM »
Now that I read those descriptions of eye scars, I am definitely never doing it!  You people are ruining everything for me. 

Distshore

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2015, 10:11:05 AM »
I was shortsighted with a slight astigmatism and had LASIK done at 24 (?), somewhere around then.  I figured I'd get almost 20 years out of it before needing reading glasses :) - early mustachian decision!

It has been great.  I have never regretted it for one moment.  Whatever they say on the internetz about it, I don't know.  But for me and all others I've known who've done it (who have of course been screened as good candidates, about 8 people), it has been successful.  Not data, just experience.  Flaps healed well and left minimal trace; can only be picked up when I go to a new opthalmologist for eye exam.

I guess it's probably not a great idea if you want to get punched in the eyes regularly.  But then, who would? 


tyd450

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2015, 11:19:42 AM »
With LASIK the flap does "heal" but it never fully heals back to it's original strength.  If you get poked in the eye just right it could possibly come back open.

Jezebel, your doctor is just telling you to do LASIK because it heals faster and you will be satisfied faster.  PRK and LASIK do the same thing- they reshape your cornea using the exact same laser.  The difference is how they get to the cornea to do the reshaping.  With Lasik, they use a laser to cut the flap and peel it back.  After they reshape the cornea they fold it back down.  With PRK, they scrub it away and it has to fully heal and replace itself.

tyd450

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2015, 11:21:28 AM »
Jezebel, my doctor straight up told me that if everyone healed as fast as I did with PRK they would only do PRK and never do a LASIK procedure again.

daymare

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2015, 11:21:42 AM »
Quote
I was shortsighted with a slight astigmatism and had LASIK done at 24 (?), somewhere around then.  I figured I'd get almost 20 years out of it before needing reading glasses :) - early mustachian decision!

It has been great.  I have never regretted it for one moment.  Whatever they say on the internetz about it, I don't know.  But for me and all others I've known who've done it (who have of course been screened as good candidates, about 8 people), it has been successful.  Not data, just experience.  Flaps healed well and left minimal trace; can only be picked up when I go to a new opthalmologist for eye exam.

It's funny because we have almost the same experience - I got it done about a month ago at 25, everything went great. (Had astigmatism and about -5 vision in each eye before).  I was really excited to never have to wear contacts/glasses (annoying though never had actual issues), and to be able to see when I wake up, and basically to not have the weakness of relying on an implement to see.  But I'm really surprised as to how quickly I adapted to and take for granted my new vision.  I kept the same glasses for many years, got the cheapest contacts and wore them for longer (never had any problems, wouldn't do that if it caused any damage to my eyes), so my break-even for lasik is ~15 years, so not necessarily that Mustachian of a financial decision.  I don't think I regret it, per say, just that ... I dunno, 4K was a lot to spend on something I don't feel like I appreciate day-to-day.

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2015, 11:34:51 AM »
With LASIK the flap does "heal" but it never fully heals back to it's original strength.  If you get poked in the eye just right it could possibly come back open.

Jezebel, your doctor is just telling you to do LASIK because it heals faster and you will be satisfied faster.  PRK and LASIK do the same thing- they reshape your cornea using the exact same laser.  The difference is how they get to the cornea to do the reshaping.  With Lasik, they use a laser to cut the flap and peel it back.  After they reshape the cornea they fold it back down.  With PRK, they scrub it away and it has to fully heal and replace itself.

My doctor has not told me to do LASIK.  I don't know where this assumption is coming from.  As I said, my doctor is at the top of the field and developed the current laser technology.  He personally had LASIK in one eye and PRK in the other.   I know how the process works and both options are available to me. 

I was correcting the misinformation that your eyes never heal after LASIK.  That's preposterous, I guess for those who actually know what it means.

You can list the numbers about the strength of the healing, but there are cons to both procedures that aren't limited to the recovery period.  The bottom line is that the outcome and long term experience for the patients of both procedures is virtually the same.  The incident of flap disruptions is very rare and almost always treatable.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 11:45:03 AM by jezebel »

tyd450

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2015, 12:34:16 PM »
My doctor is also at the top of the field and also developed the current laser technology.  He was still trying to push for LASIK over PRK but then after I had the PRK procedure and healed very fast, he told me that they would never do LASIK if everyone healed like I did with PRK.

bottom line is that this is a money making machine for them and they want to get you in and out as quickly as possible with minimal follow-up appointments and care, which is why they push LASIK over PRK.

Most people are fine with LASIK and will be fine, but I really do think there is something to the fact that they recommend PRK over LASIK to the military, law enforcement, etc as the risk for complications in the future is less.  I view LASIK as more of a quick fix.  The possibility of flap complications will always be there for the rest of your life. With PRK, that isn't the case.  Granted, the risk is small, but there is still a risk.

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2015, 12:40:48 PM »
My doctor is also at the top of the field and also developed the current laser technology.  He was still trying to push for LASIK over PRK but then after I had the PRK procedure and healed very fast, he told me that they would never do LASIK if everyone healed like I did with PRK.

bottom line is that this is a money making machine for them and they want to get you in and out as quickly as possible with minimal follow-up appointments and care, which is why they push LASIK over PRK.

Most people are fine with LASIK and will be fine, but I really do think there is something to the fact that they recommend PRK over LASIK to the military, law enforcement, etc as the risk for complications in the future is less.  I view LASIK as more of a quick fix.  The possibility of flap complications will always be there for the rest of your life. With PRK, that isn't the case.  Granted, the risk is small, but there is still a risk.

I'm sorry your doctor pushed LASIK over PRK.  That wasn't my experience, but I can see why you might make that assumption.  My sibling receive PRK through military and I am aware of the recommendation.

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #31 on: September 11, 2015, 12:41:53 PM »
You can list the numbers about the strength of the healing, but there are cons to both procedures that aren't limited to the recovery period.  The bottom line is that the outcome and long term experience for the patients of both procedures is virtually the same.  The incident of flap disruptions is very rare and almost always treatable.

Jezebel, if I rear-ended your car with mine and then proceeded to reconstruct the bumper of your vehicle using duck tape in such a way that it did not appear to have been broken (unless looked at very closely) and such that the "strenght" of your bumper was only 30% of an OEM bumper, would you consider that I have repaired your car fully?

Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #32 on: September 11, 2015, 01:02:42 PM »
You can list the numbers about the strength of the healing, but there are cons to both procedures that aren't limited to the recovery period.  The bottom line is that the outcome and long term experience for the patients of both procedures is virtually the same.  The incident of flap disruptions is very rare and almost always treatable.

Jezebel, if I rear-ended your car with mine and then proceeded to reconstruct the bumper of your vehicle using duck tape in such a way that it did not appear to have been broken (unless looked at very closely) and such that the "strenght" of your bumper was only 30% of an OEM bumper, would you consider that I have repaired your car fully?

Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

That analogy is not factual similar in any instructive way.   If that bumper had a less than 1% chance of ever being disrupted, even taking the statistical likelihood of accidents, during the rest of its lifetime, then yes, I would.

Oh and, there is an higher risk of infection, inflammation and haze with PRK than LASIK.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 01:05:14 PM by jezebel »

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #33 on: September 11, 2015, 01:49:51 PM »
You can list the numbers about the strength of the healing, but there are cons to both procedures that aren't limited to the recovery period.  The bottom line is that the outcome and long term experience for the patients of both procedures is virtually the same.  The incident of flap disruptions is very rare and almost always treatable.

Jezebel, if I rear-ended your car with mine and then proceeded to reconstruct the bumper of your vehicle using duck tape in such a way that it did not appear to have been broken (unless looked at very closely) and such that the "strenght" of your bumper was only 30% of an OEM bumper, would you consider that I have repaired your car fully?

Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

That analogy is not factual similar in any instructive way.   If that bumper had a less than 1% chance of ever being disrupted, even taking the statistical likelihood of accidents, during the rest of its lifetime, then yes, I would.

That analogy is perfectly valid. What is the chance that you will get in an accident and that this part of your car will be hit? I am betting less than 1%.



I asked this:

Quote
Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

You answered with this:
Quote
Oh and, there is an higher risk of infection, inflammation and haze with PRK than LASIK.

I will ask again: Can you actually lend weight to your previous statement that there are long term, additional drawbacks to PRK not related to recovery period?
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 01:52:23 PM by Guses »

Silverwood

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2015, 02:02:06 PM »
So it seems like no one has done the surgery where they put in a contact lens. It's either PRK or Lasik.

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #35 on: September 11, 2015, 02:06:31 PM »
You can list the numbers about the strength of the healing, but there are cons to both procedures that aren't limited to the recovery period.  The bottom line is that the outcome and long term experience for the patients of both procedures is virtually the same.  The incident of flap disruptions is very rare and almost always treatable.

Jezebel, if I rear-ended your car with mine and then proceeded to reconstruct the bumper of your vehicle using duck tape in such a way that it did not appear to have been broken (unless looked at very closely) and such that the "strenght" of your bumper was only 30% of an OEM bumper, would you consider that I have repaired your car fully?

Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

That analogy is not factual similar in any instructive way.   If that bumper had a less than 1% chance of ever being disrupted, even taking the statistical likelihood of accidents, during the rest of its lifetime, then yes, I would.

That analogy is perfectly valid. What is the chance that you will get in an accident and that this part of your car will be hit? I am betting less than 1%.



I asked this:

Quote
Can you post evidence to support your statements about cons not limited to recovery period for PRK?

You answered with this:
Quote
Oh and, there is an higher risk of infection, inflammation and haze with PRK than LASIK.

I will ask again: Can you actually lend weight to your previous statement that there are long term, additional drawbacks to PRK not related to recovery period?

Infections can lead to long term consequences (I can't believe that I have to explain this) and the haze/halo can be permanent for some people.   The thing you said about the chance of hitting your bumper in an accident being less than 1% makes no sense so I can't comment on that.   Regardless of what you were trying to say, the analogy still fails.  Even taking the incidence of hits to the eye into account, flap disruption occurs in less than 1% of patients.

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #36 on: September 11, 2015, 02:32:20 PM »

Infections can lead to long term consequences (I can't believe that I have to explain this) and the haze/halo can be permanent for some people.   The thing you said about the chance of hitting your bumper in an accident being less than 1% makes no sense so I can't comment on that.   Regardless of what you were trying to say, the analogy still fails.  Even taking the incidence of hits to the eye into account, flap disruption occurs in less than 1% of patients.

Wait wait wait, I can't believe that I have to explain this, having a flap dislocation is a major infection risk! Well DUUUUUUHHHHHHHH. As you say, infection can have long term consequences! DANGER!!!!

To go back to the perfectlty viable analogy:

Car Example:
What is the chance that you will get in an accident with your car with the duck taped bumper(small percentage)? What is the chance that, in that accident, your bumper will be hit (smaller percentage)? What is the chance that this hit will break your duck taped bumper but would not be enough to break a regular bumper(smaller yet percentage)?

Vision example:
What is the chance that you will be hit somewhere on your body following LASIK surgery (>>>1%)? What is the chance that this hit will be in one of your eyes (>1%)? What is the chance that this hit will dislodge your flap but would cause no damage to the untouched/PRKed eye(=1%)?

I don't know what to tell you if you don't see the analogy.

Guses

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #37 on: September 11, 2015, 02:37:34 PM »
So it seems like no one has done the surgery where they put in a contact lens. It's either PRK or Lasik.

PRK is where they put a contact lense on top of your eye to minimize eye discomfort and possibly help with healing.

If you are talking about inserting a lense into the eye, this is a different type of surgery that is usually for those with very very thin cornea that are not eligible for the other two surgeries.

johnny847

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Re: visian corrective eye surgery
« Reply #38 on: September 11, 2015, 02:38:35 PM »
Is PRK something that you can pay for with HSA funds?

IRS publication 969
Quote
You can receive tax-free distributions from your HSA to pay or be reimbursed for qualified medical expenses you incur after you establish the HSA. If you receive distributions for other reasons, the amount you withdraw will be subject to income tax and may be subject to an additional 20% tax. You do not have to make distributions from your HSA each year.

Qualified medical expenses.   Qualified medical expenses are those expenses that would generally qualify for the medical and dental expenses deduction. These are explained in Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses.

Also, non-prescription medicines (other than insulin) are not considered qualified medical expenses for HSA purposes. A medicine or drug will be a qualified medical expense for HSA purposes only if the medicine or drug:

  • Requires a prescription,
  • Is available without a prescription (an over-the-counter medicine or drug) and you get a prescription for it, or
  • Is insulin.

For HSA purposes, expenses incurred before you establish your HSA are not qualified medical expenses. State law determines when an HSA is established. An HSA that is funded by amounts rolled over from an Archer MSA or another HSA is established on the date the prior account was established.
[Emphasis mine]
IRS publication 502
Quote
Eye Surgery

You can include in medical expenses the amount you pay for eye surgery to treat defective vision, such as laser eye surgery or radial keratotomy.
[Emphasis mine]

BeardedLady

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #39 on: September 11, 2015, 07:32:05 PM »
Hi Everyone


I know people have talked about lasik surgery  on here before but has anyone had the Visian procedure? Where they insert  a contact lens into your eye. ( I took the word out of the heading but Visian is what the procedure  is called. Sorry if that was confusing)

I  don't qualify for lasik and this is more expensive :/ finally saved up the money and now I need more lol story of my life.  Anyway from what  I understand they cut into your eye and place a contact lens.  I'm not sure I'm comfortable  with that.  Google comes up with lots of Dr's. I'm looking for people that have had this done and how they feel about it.  Thought I'd ask here.

http://www.imageplus.ca/treatment/procedures/visian/

Visian and other anterior chamber IOLs have higher risks than LASIK or PRK simply because the surgery is done inside the eye instead of on the surface. Risk of infection is higher, and there are also complications that can occur later. For example, the lens can block the drainage channels of the fluid in the eye, causing a form of ocular hypertensive glaucoma. This is rare, and will almost always be caught early enough to prevent long term damage as long as you keep up with annual eye exams afterward. People who have this procedure done usually have very high prescriptions that disqualify them for the laser procedures. The good news is that people who have this done go from seeing almost nothing (or at most a couple inches in front of their faces) to seeing everything. It is life changing for any corrective procedure, but for those with the highest prescriptions it is truly amazing.

I recommend finding out as much as you can about it, and if you are comfortable with the higher price tag and the risks then go for it.

A few things of note:
You will still need reading glasses beginning around age 40 just like everyone else. None of these procedures correct presbyopia, although there are others that come close.
Depending on your age, you may want to wait a while and do PreLEX. This is a procedure that involves removing the natural lens inside your eye and replacing it with a corrective implant. It is the same as cataract surgery without the cataract. Surgeons will likely not do this on someone who is not yet presbyopic (well after age 40). The price is similar to Visian.

I am not a surgeon, but I am an eye doctor who handles a lot of pre- and post-op care for these procedures. Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.

charis

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #40 on: September 11, 2015, 07:54:07 PM »

Infections can lead to long term consequences (I can't believe that I have to explain this) and the haze/halo can be permanent for some people.   The thing you said about the chance of hitting your bumper in an accident being less than 1% makes no sense so I can't comment on that.   Regardless of what you were trying to say, the analogy still fails.  Even taking the incidence of hits to the eye into account, flap disruption occurs in less than 1% of patients.

Wait wait wait, I can't believe that I have to explain this, having a flap dislocation is a major infection risk! Well DUUUUUUHHHHHHHH. As you say, infection can have long term consequences! DANGER!!!!

To go back to the perfectlty viable analogy:

Car Example:
What is the chance that you will get in an accident with your car with the duck taped bumper(small percentage)? What is the chance that, in that accident, your bumper will be hit (smaller percentage)? What is the chance that this hit will break your duck taped bumper but would not be enough to break a regular bumper(smaller yet percentage)?

Vision example:
What is the chance that you will be hit somewhere on your body following LASIK surgery (>>>1%)? What is the chance that this hit will be in one of your eyes (>1%)? What is the chance that this hit will dislodge your flap but would cause no damage to the untouched/PRKed eye(=1%)?

I don't know what to tell you if you don't see the analogy.
Where did I say LASIK that didn't carry that risk? 

I understand why you think the analogy works. I just said it doesn't. But more importantly, I answered affirmatively. So it really doesn't matter. Most importantly, I have no interest in participating in this conversation anymore.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 08:11:31 PM by jezebel »

ender

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #41 on: September 11, 2015, 07:57:30 PM »
I'm pretty seriously thinking about PRK in the next year or so.

Optometrist I know near me said it would run me about $4k though, that seems a lot...

Silverwood

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #42 on: September 11, 2015, 08:22:43 PM »
Thanks Bearded lady.   I pm'd you. Just to add to the post though  I'm 30 and I'm nearsighted.  My prescription  is somewhere around -4. It's different for each eye.  So Prelex might be better to wait for.

pbkmaine

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #43 on: September 11, 2015, 08:38:06 PM »
I put LASIK off for so long that I ended up having surgery for cataracts instead. I had monovision surgery - one eye for distance and one for intermediate (computer) distance. It is amazing to be able to see clearly without glasses. I use reading glasses for threading a needle, but that's it.

tyd450

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #44 on: September 12, 2015, 08:47:36 PM »
I'm pretty seriously thinking about PRK in the next year or so.

Optometrist I know near me said it would run me about $4k though, that seems a lot...

I'm not saying it isn't a lot but that is what I paid for my PRK last year :-)

justme

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #45 on: September 13, 2015, 09:43:18 AM »
I got ICL (Implantable Colomer Lens) surgery about two years ago and absolutely love it.  I had 20/15 or better vision immediately after the surgery and still do. My corneas were too thin to get enough correction via LASIK and my doctor offered this at the same price (first time for him doing the surgery, although he's been an eye surgeon for over twenty years). 

My nerves aren't in the normal places, so it hurt during the procedure, and the holes that they put into your eyes to relieve pressure healed too quickly so I had to have additional ones, but everything healed and I was perfect in about a week or two.

It's not something I think about all the time, but I've never regretted it and am thankful still to wake up and see clearly. I'm also thankful to my mom: before she died, she made sure to convince me to do corrective eye surgery with some of my inheritance (small though it was). Thanks, Mom!

Random fact, after ~30 years of wearing contacts, I now cry a lot when I slice onions, whereas I didn't with contacts.

ender

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #46 on: September 13, 2015, 03:45:50 PM »
Random fact, after ~30 years of wearing contacts, I now cry a lot when I slice onions, whereas I didn't with contacts.

I was talking to my wife about this - when I take my contacts out my eyes water SO BAD when I cut onions, but with contacts, never bothers me.

Hah!

Meowmalade

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Re: corrective eye surgery
« Reply #47 on: September 13, 2015, 03:50:59 PM »
Random fact, after ~30 years of wearing contacts, I now cry a lot when I slice onions, whereas I didn't with contacts.

I was talking to my wife about this - when I take my contacts out my eyes water SO BAD when I cut onions, but with contacts, never bothers me.

Hah!

I used to be impervious to lemon juice squirting into my eye as well!  Now I'm a crybaby.