Author Topic: Bike Mojo needed  (Read 11804 times)

Xtal

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Bike Mojo needed
« on: June 26, 2012, 12:12:15 PM »
Please help!!!!

I live 15 miles from my work.  I like my job, it pays the bills, and I have awesome benefits.  I used to live closer to work, but I got married last year.  :D  The home I share with my new husband (who is a born Mustachian) is only 1.5 miles from his job and he's been walking to work every day, rain or shine, extreme heat or freezing cold, for the past 13 years, so, moving is not really an option.

I am ***desperate*** to start biking to work, but I'm having some issues with my ride.  My current vehicle is a somewhat un-Mustachian 2009 Hyundai Sonata with a 6-cylinder engine, heated leather seats, and automatic transmission.  I've had urges to start bike commuting even before I started reading MMM, but now those urges have become even more desperate.  Every time I drive my gas-guzzling family sedan into work, belching carbon into the air, I feel like a BAD PERSON.

I've made a plan for the 15-mile commute that incorporates some awesome features of Minneapolis city life.  I'll be riding my bike 1.5 miles to get to downtown, then loading myself and my bike onto the Light Rail for 8-9 miles, then getting off the train and riding the remaining 5 miles to work.  As I get stronger and more badass, I'll probably ride the entire 15 miles each way.

So.

I have two bicycles.  One is a 3-speed Raleigh cruiser from the 70s that my dear husband got me via Craigslist.  I love this bike.  It is very cushy, comfortable, and stylish, and is great for riding around town.  However, I do not want to use this bike for my commute as it is 1) heavy, 2) only has three gears, and 3) is old and made of steel (I think) and I really do not want to get it wet.  It's just for riding around for fun.

My other bike is a 1998 Trek Multi-Track hybrid that I bought new in 1999 (at quite a discount since it was a previous model year bike).  This bike is very light (it weights less than a very fat cat my family used to have) and has 21 speeds, all of which I use.  It's not quite as comfy as the Raleigh, but it is quite zippy.  HOWEVER, it is not set up for commuting.  It lacks 1) fenders, 2) a chainguard, and 3) cargo capacity.

I partially solved problem 3 -- cargo capacity -- by buying a basket and attaching it to the front of my bike. 

But -- now -- I cannot attach a headlight to the bike!!!!  The front basket gets in the way.  Driving without a headlight in the dark is illegal and dangerous.

There's no way to attach a rear rack to the bike just because of how small the bike is and how it's set up.  My DH tried to attach a rear rack last night, but the seat got in the way, and also there was no place to put a rear light.  So it looks like I can have lights OR cargo, but not both.

I am seriously starting to get bummed.  I JUST WANT TO RIDE MY BIKE TO WORK.

The problem with my Trek hybrid is that it has a very small frame and also I think it just was not made with commuting in mind.  There doesn't seem to be enough space on the frame to attach everything I want attached -- rear rack and/or front basket, fenders, and front and rear lights.

I would like to maybe buy a new bike for commuting that either 1) has everything I need already attached or 2) is easy to attach stuff to.

My husband is against me getting a new bike at this point as it would cost in the neighborhood of $500 and I have not even commuted to work once yet. 

The OTHER problem is that I am very eager to sell my car.  There is about $14,000 left on the loan, and we just refinanced at the credit union for a 2.99 APR.  However, now that I've become an avid MMM reader, I am very, very eager to sell it and become a one-car household.  My husband has a 2003 Honda Civic, with a manual transmission, that he gets 40 MPG on, when he drives it, (which is about once a month).  Right now my husband thinks we should keep both cars, but I am quite eager to ditch the car and start biking everywhere.

Sorry to make this so long!!!!!   I just need to know

1)  how can I make my existing bikes more commute-worthy, or

2) how can I talk my husband into letting me buy a commuter bike* 

*(please note I can pretty well do what I want, but I'm happier when my DH is on board for purchases.)

grantmeaname

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2012, 12:35:04 PM »
You can't put the light on the basket?

You may also want to reconsider ruling out the hybrid. Even for incredibly strong, fast, and avid cyclists, the weight difference between heavy steel frames and new, light aluminum, steel, or carbon fiber frames is insignificant. Think about it. Even if you're incredibly small (like 110 pounds), a 20lb fitness/sport bike and a 30lb old clunker are still only 7% different, and even that weight doesn't matter unless you're accelerating or climbing a hill. So the heavy part isn't an issue. If you clean it after wet rides to keep grit from collecting everywhere, which you should really do with any bike, the wet isn't any different than anywhere else. That only leaves the gears as a problem, and the more you ride hills, the less you need gears. Have you tested your plan by riding to and from work to see just how bad it would be?

Either way, you could make it work without dropping $500 on a new bike.

velocistar237

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2012, 12:44:22 PM »
Could you not look around for a different rack to fit the Trek? Try using a Toba rack.

Once you have the rack, you can usually attach a light to the back of the rack.

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2012, 01:18:29 PM »
There are a whole lot of rear rack designs out there, so I'm sure that at least one of them would fit your bike, but without being able to actually see your bike/setup, I can't really make recommendations.  One general class of racks I can suggest that might offer more flexibility would be a seat-post rack, that connects only to the seat-post and not to the bike frame at the hub.  I don't normally recommend them, but maybe it's necessary in your case.  And then yeah, often you can/should be able to mount your rear light on the back of the rack.

Alternatively, if the basket works for you and your only problem is the headlight, how about a Cronometro NOB?  Depending on the headlight you have, it ought to let you mount your headlight on one of your fork legs.  $11 is a lot cheaper than a new bike, but a lot of a little piece of plastic, so you might also be able to jury-rig your own.

Then it looks like the Trek should have no problem taking fenders, and a chainguard isn't really necessary. I'd say the vast majority of commuters don't have one; a rubber band, a fancy version of a rubber band, shorts, or tights will keep your clothes out of your chain.

Sounds like a great plan, I love bike+transit solutions!

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2012, 01:20:03 PM »
Thanks for the replies.

To be honest, typing out that long screed helped clarify my thinking.

I looked at the Toba rack.  I honestly do not know enough about bikes to know whether it will attach to my bike.  I feel very frustrated because I feel like this should be easier than it is.  I just want a sturdy rear rack that I can attach panniers to, but it doesn't seem to be an option.  Maybe I can upload a picture of my bike later.

The headlight I have doesn't really have any way to attach to my front basket.  The headlight grips around the handlebars.  The basket is a fine wire mesh that covers the enter space in front of the handlebars and doesn't really have a good place for my light to attach to.

I think I'll try riding my hybrid bike to work a few times and just haul my lunch and other supplies in my backpack.  That way I can ride with front and rear lights.

Once I've ridden my bike to and from work a few times, maybe then I'll revisit whether to get a new bike for commuting, or maybe take my hybrid to a local bike shop to see if they can help with a rear rack, or I could even try my other bike.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2012, 01:23:41 PM »
Skyrefuge, thank you for the link to the Nob.  I'll look at it and show my husband and see what he thinks.  Not sure whether mounting the headlight on the front fork will provide enough visibility.  If so, you may have solved all my problems!  Thanks.

gooki

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2012, 01:28:11 PM »
If you want to keep the basket, you could switch to a helmet mounted light.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2012, 01:35:19 PM »
Yes!  A helmet mounted light.  I just found one on Amazon for $12.70.  This is the kind of obvious (but-not-to-me) answer I came here for.  Thanks!

Matt K

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2012, 01:51:40 PM »
While I disagree with Grant regarding the extra effort in commuting by old heavy cruiser vs new(er) hybrid, I do feel the need to mention that steel won't just rust away because you get it wet. The paint prevents that. Areas where paint has chipped off can be covered with new paint, or nail polish. Three gears isn't a lot, but if it is one of the old internal hub systems, then you're extra golden: those were expressly designed for riding in the rain. So, in a nut shell, don't fret about getting the bike wet and dirty. Just give it a wash every now and then (and don't forget to oil the chain after riding in the rain).

I will second the "no need for a chain guard". Seriously, you don't need one. If you want ot be uber cheap, stick your pant leg into your sock. Failing that, you can cut up a used inner tube (inner tubes stick to themselves very well, so you only have to wrap it around your leg and tie half a knot in it, and it'll stay).

For carrying stuff, baskets are okay, rear racks are imo better (but need pannier bags, which cost more), but backpacks work too. If you've got an old backpack that works, don't put off riding until you get every detail sorted out. Throw your change of clothes and lunch into a backback, grab your transit pass, and enjoy the good weather.

15 miles is a solid bike ride. Working up to it by using mass transit is a fantastic idea.

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2012, 01:52:38 PM »
Not sure whether mounting the headlight on the front fork will provide enough visibility.  If so, you may have solved all my problems!

I've had mine mounted on my fork for the last couple years, it works great for me.  My fork actually has a hole through it (for mounting a front rack), so I just screw a Lucite rod onto a bolt pushed through the hole to do the job that the Nob does.  That hole is relatively low on the fork, so that means the tire blocks some of the beam pattern on the opposite side of the tire, but it's not a big deal, and I mount it on the left fork blade where it's most visible.  And since I use my light more for "seeing" than "being-seen", having it mounted low actually helps light up the road better.

Depending on how low your basket hangs, the Nob could also work if you mounted it on your head tube (the tube that your fork connects to).  Or, remove your front reflector from its bracket, bolt a small section of PVC pipe in place of the reflector, and mount the light to that.

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2012, 02:14:07 PM »
I do feel the need to mention that steel won't just rust away because you get it wet. The paint prevents that. Areas where paint has chipped off can be covered with new paint, or nail polish.

Yeah, I was going to mention the same thing, and furthermore, that "very light" Trek is also steel!  Poor steel, it gets such a bum rap!  (the bike-material wars tell me that aluminum is lighter than steel, but weaker, so you need more of it, so in the end a steel frame doesn't weigh much more than a comparable aluminum one).

While I tend to side with grant saying that the *weight* of the bike won't make much of a difference (except for loading on/off transit!), I still think making the Trek work is a much better choice, primarily because of the gearing (the OP says she uses the full range), and secondarily for riding position, particularly since a 6.5 mile commute is not insignificant, and a 15-miler is definitely significant!  If she managed to do the 30-mile round-trip on the cruiser, then she would be faced with a new problem: figuring out how to mount that giant flashing neon light that says "BADASS".

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2012, 02:30:14 PM »
Quote
Yeah, I was going to mention the same thing, and furthermore, that "very light" Trek is also steel!  Poor steel, it gets such a bum rap! 

Hmph!  Your assertion sent me running to Teh Interwebs... and it turns out... you are right!  It is "chromoly" which to my younger self sounded like an exotic space-age alloy.  It is indeed an alloy... of chromium, molybdenum, and steelhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/41xx_steel

It is still lighter than a very heavy cat! :)

Chemistay

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2012, 05:07:22 PM »
You can also buy very cheap pants protectors from any bike shop. Yes, a sock will work but I really like mine that has velcro because it's easy to get on/off and is reflective. It was about $3 and I haven't caught anything in the chain since i got them. This isn't exactly what I have but it's similar: http://www.gearbuyer.com/products/deuter_pant_protector.html

Russ

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2012, 07:44:42 PM »
Quote
I have two bicycles.  One is a 3-speed Raleigh cruiser from the 70s that my dear husband got me via Craigslist.  I love this bike.  It is very cushy, comfortable, and stylish, and is great for riding around town.  However, I do not want to use this bike for my commute as it is 1) heavy, 2) only has three gears, and 3) is old and made of steel (I think) and I really do not want to get it wet.  It's just for riding around for fun.

It has been mentioned that both of your bikes are made of steel, so the following applies to your Trek as well. Rust is not a problem for steel frames, as long as you take some small precautions. You are correct in thinking that wetness leads to corrosion, but rust takes a lot longer to form than most people realize. If your bike gets wet on the way to work, sits out all day, and you dry it off when you get home that is absolutely no problem. Any corrosion that may have taken place during the day will be so small you won't even be able to see it. The big problem is when water gets inside the frame unnoticed and sits there for months. That's when your frame will rust out.

Keeping the outside dry is super simple. Anything that is painted will not rust, and doesn't really need drying, though you probably still should on principle. Anything that is not painted (chain, sprockets, handlebars, any metal exposed by scratches in the frame's finish, etc.) should be dried within 12 hours of getting wet (just towel it off). All the components in your drivetrain should be oiled regularly (once every hundred miles or so), and this oil will help hold off the rust. You can oil or, even better, wax the remaining nonmoving steel parts for a little extra rust protection.

Keeping the inside dry is another story. You won't be able to get a towel into all of the tubes to dry things by hand, so we'll have to rely on a couple other methods to keep the water off of the exposed metal. First and most important is air-drying. When the bike gets wet, take out the seatpost and flip the bike upside-down. Any standing water will pour out. Now filp the bike back right-side-up, leave the seatpost out, and let the inside air-dry overnight. In the morning, reinstall the seatpost and ride to work on a dry bike!

Second, and a little more complicated, is to keep water out of the frame in the first place. While you may not see them, there are small gaps between the seatpost and the frame at the seatpost clamp. This is where nearly all of the water enters the frame. To keep water out, get a cheap tube of grease, take the seatpost out, and slather the inside of the seat tube with grease. When you reinstall the seatpost, the grease will create a seal between the frame and the seatpost, and, if done right, will keep out any water. If you're out in a downpour, you'll still want to air-dry just in case, but in drizzles and showers you won't need to worry.

The final method is creating a protective layer on top of the steel, similar to what the paint does for the outside of the bike. There are two main products that do this: JP Weigle's Frame Saver (made for bikes), and Boeing's Boeshield (made for aircraft, but works just great and is even sold in many bike shops). To use these yourself, you must be comfortable with removing and reinstalling the bike's seatpost, bottom bracket, and as much of the headset as you can without pressing out the cups. A lot of that is beyond the average home mechanic and requires special tooling, so if you want your frame frame-savered, you'll probably want to pay a shop mechanic to do it for you. Using Frame Saver of Boeshield will prevent rust even if there is standing water in your frame, but it is not perfect and is no excuse for not actively taking care of your bike, so you should still grease the seat tube to prevent water entry and air-dry if you think water got in. If you take care of your bike with the other two methods, Frame Saver really isn't necessary. I don't use it, and I've been rust free for a year after riding in the rain and snow and whatnot.

If you already have rust, dilute oxalic acid is the preferred rust reducer. It'll chemically react with the rust to turn it into something nonreactive and ceramic-like (I forget exactly what), while not messing up your paint or decals. It can be found at most hardware stores as "wood bleach".

Quote
There's no way to attach a rear rack to the bike just because of how small the bike is and how it's set up.  My DH tried to attach a rear rack last night, but the seat got in the way, and also there was no place to put a rear light.  So it looks like I can have lights OR cargo, but not both.

There are very few racks that fit perfectly on any bike. The seat being in the way is one thing that may not be avoidable, but if one of the connecting arms doesn't go to quite the right place to be bolted onto the frame, don't be afraid to bend it to where it needs to go.

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2012, 08:29:35 PM »
Rust is not a problem for steel frames

heh...wouldn't it have been a lot easier to just stop right there?  You definitely posted a lot of useful information, but useful information for a thread at a bike-nerd forum asking "how do I make this bike that Eddy Merckx rode to victory in the 1969 Tour de France retain its value for another 40 years while I use it as my daily commuter?", not for a thread at a finance forum for someone just trying to commute to work on an old Trek.   Simply writing all those words gives the impression that it's a real problem actually worth being concerned about, when it's really not.  It's like holding weekly seminars on what to do if confronted by a mountain lion in Ohio; suddenly Clevelanders are going to start having mountain-lion nightmares for no good reason.  To pull a random number out of my ass, I'd guess that 95% of all bike owners in history have never so much as wiped their bike with a towel (much less removed the seat and flipped it upside-down!) and were no worse off for it.

Russ

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2012, 09:51:10 PM »
haha yes it certainly would have been easier to stop there, however I think we have differing perspectives on how the average bike rider takes care of their bike. I live on a college campus where, if I had to pull a number out of my ass, I'd say that 95% of all bike owners think that "bike maintenance" means buy a new bike every spring, after last year's bike and the bike rack it was left on have rusted together inseparably. With that in mind, I'd rather overinform than underinform. That is, if I told Joe College Student that rust was no problem, he'd say "ok!" and continue to leave his bike out and not take care of it, so I'd rather tell him all about how to take care of his bike properly. I'd also guess that most cyclists only take their bikes out on nice sunny days for little rides around the park. These people probably will never be out in the rain, snow, or (heaven forbid) "wintery mix", and will really never need to deal with this. Someone who wants to ditch her car for a bike for much of her transportation, however, is bound to be caught in bad weather sometime and should know how to deal with it.
 
I certainly didn't intend to give the impression that rust is a huge problem, but I do I feel that it is something one should be concerned about. If you ride in bad weather and ignore your bike, it will be less pleasant to ride by the end of the year. Dumping the water out of a bike and wiping down the outside after a wet ride takes one wrench that many people already have, an old rag, and under a minute of your time. I believe that this is a necessary part of regular bike maintenance, similar to lubing a chain. It's a simple thing to do that will prolong the life of your bike and save you money. Greasing the seat tube every install could be considered over the top, but I like to do it so I thought I'd share. The bit about Frame Saver was purely informative, and I see how it could be unnecessary. I did try and explain why I think it's too much trouble for what it does, especially for someone who might not want to take their bike all apart. After re-reading I realize I didn't make this clear, but the part about oxalic acid for rust removal was intended for things like handlebars or seatposts or other easily removable things like that. It keeps things pretty, and most people like riding pretty bikes. If there's rust on the inside of a frame it's really not a big deal, and certainly not a big enough deal to mix up a bathtub's worth of OA to soak your frame in. That would be sillier than using the Frame Saver, which I already recommended against.

It doesn't matter whether it's Eddy Merckx's bike or an old Trek, it's important to maintain your things. Both bikes could easily outlive any of us, if they were to be properly maintained their entire lives.

To the OP: Rust really isn't a big deal, and I hope my long post didn't make it seem like it is one. Just take care of your bike, and it will take care of you. When you start commuting, keep your chain lubricated. This will prevent nearly every problem that ever happens with bikes. Do also try and keep it dry, but know that corrosion takes place over months, not hours. If you're riding home, get caught in the rain, and don't feel like messing with your bike that night, that's just fine. But please try to get to it in the next day or two. Happy bikes make for happy bike riders, and I'd hate to see you stop commuting just because of preventable problems.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2012, 05:50:39 AM »
I came home to find out my husband had rigged up this!


bike lite rig.jpg by spacewaitress, on Flickr

So now I have a basket and a light!!  That's a hose clamp, and a random piece of foam we had lying around.  I told you guys he was a born Mustachian.

I even got groceries on my bike last night !  (OK, I picked up some popsicles, yogurt, and a couple bananas -- hardly a full grocery run.  But at least it was something!)

Russ, thank you for the info on rust.  I agree with skyrefuge that it was a little... overwhelming... but it was still good info.  I got caught out in the rain a couple weeks ago and I did wipe down my bike with a rag, and also sprayed the chain.  I didn't know about taking the seat out and turning the bike upside down.  I will do that next time it gets wet.

I'm working from home today.  Tomorrow, I will ride my bike to work.  I will report back in tomorrow.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2012, 06:17:22 AM »
I did it!!!  I rode my bike to work this morning.  It took me almost two hours, but part of that is because I didn't really know where I was going once I got off the train.  Also, I stopped to take a couple of pictures. :)

I feel great!  I think the ride home will take less time.  Also, it will be lovely to be sitting on the train during a part where I'm usually stuck in my car.

igthebold

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2012, 07:01:08 AM »
I did it!!!  I rode my bike to work this morning.

Great! Getting out there the first time is probably the hardest.

Matt K

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2012, 08:47:46 AM »
I did it!!!  I rode my bike to work this morning.

:) congrats

I like the light mounting. I think you need a second one on the other side with a big cresent smile pasted onto the front of your basket (smiling bike ftw).

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2012, 09:08:51 AM »
I like the light mounting. I think you need a second one on the other side with a big cresent smile pasted onto the front of your basket (smiling bike ftw).

haha, yeah, that would be awesome, it would look like something out of Wall-E.  I was going to mention that maybe putting the light on the left side would be better, because it could be more visible to oncoming traffic, but then I didn't know if that's more or less important than being visible to traffic coming from your right side.  I guess the easy answer is just getting two lights!  :-)

igthebold

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2012, 11:09:51 AM »
I like the light mounting. I think you need a second one on the other side with a big cresent smile pasted onto the front of your basket (smiling bike ftw).

haha, yeah, that would be awesome, it would look like something out of Wall-E.

Or...

$_gone_amok

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2012, 11:37:12 AM »
I'm joining the thread late, but I think bike panniers are much more convenient and safer than a bike basket. If you ever want to upgrade your commute gear, look into bike panniers. Not only they can be water proof, they also distribute the weight toward the rear so you have improved maneuverability.

Enjoy the ride!

Mrs MM

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2012, 02:01:53 PM »
Great Job!!  Glad you're doing it! 

I have to admit that I read this earlier and thought to myself: I've never had a basket/pannier or a chain guard and I'm doing just fine.  :)  The bike light is obviously important when biking in the dark.  We used headlights, which I prefer since they follow your head when you look around.  I usually carry a backpack and roll my pant leg up or put an elastic around it or use my fancier reflective velcro strap.  I rarely bike in the dark now, but when we used to bike to work, we had a lot of flashing lights on our bikes to attract attention, plus some super bright ones in order to be able to see on the bike path.

Anyway, I'm glad to hear you're all set up and ready to go!  When in doubt, just start and figure out what you need as you go.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #24 on: June 29, 2012, 08:41:43 AM »
Well, my bike ride home ended badly. I was whipping down a hill about as fast as I could go when I hit a crack and my front basket popped off.  It went skidding before me a short way and I ran over it. I was thrown from my bike, landing on my face, elbows, and one knee.

My upper lip got torn up, my chin is scraped, my elbows are scraped up, and there's a scraped-up patch on my knee about the size of a paperback novel.

I walked off over to the side of the trail and howled like a little animal. I was hurt, but mostly I was disappointed that my ride had been cut short. I was also somewhat afraid.

Presently, another bike commuter came along. I told him I wasn't sure whether to try to ride home or have somebody pick me up. He said I should definitely call someone.  So I called my husband to come pick me up. The nice fellow-rider walked me to a nearby gas station, where I waited for Mr. Xtal to come get me and my bike.

The first thing I felt when falling was my nose going squish and my mouth hitting the ground. I was terrified that I'd broken a tooth. Thankfully, that was not the case. My nose is just a little scraped up, and my teeth are fine. My helmet got broken in front. I am so, so lucky I was wearing a helmet. I think things would have been far worse, had I not been.

My husband and I were going to patch up my wounds at home, but neither of us knows anything shout first aid, so we went to Urgent Care and they cleaned and dressed everything and told me how to care for it all.

I still want to ride my bike to work!! I'm going to wait a couple weeks, then try again.  The trails were pleasant and beautiful, and seemed very safe.

Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #25 on: June 29, 2012, 08:45:25 AM »
I wanted to add this at the end of the above pst but my phone is being wonky. Anyway:

1) Don't buy a quick-release front basket, and

2) Wear a helmet

arebelspy

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #26 on: June 29, 2012, 10:09:29 AM »
Sorry to hear about your fall.  =/

I'm glad you're okay.

Hope it doesn't dissuade you from riding.

I wanted to add this at the end of the above pst but my phone is being wonky. Anyway:

1) Don't buy a quick-release front basket, and

2) Wear a helmet

My wife does the opposite of both of these.  I'll certainly tell her your story, but I don't think she'll change her mind.

To each his own.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 10:11:14 AM by arebelspy »
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Xtal

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #27 on: June 29, 2012, 11:57:15 AM »
The only reason I was wearing a helmet is because my husband implored me to.  I worry about him so much; it didn't seem fair to make him worry about me.

arebelspy

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #28 on: June 29, 2012, 12:00:10 PM »
The only reason I was wearing a helmet is because my husband implored me to.  I worry about him so much; it didn't seem fair to make him worry about me.

I wear a helmet.  My wife chooses not to (after extensive research on the subject).

Well I'm glad you were.
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darkelenchus

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #29 on: June 29, 2012, 12:11:13 PM »
My upper lip got torn up, my chin is scraped, my elbows are scraped up, and there's a scraped-up patch on my knee about the size of a paperback novel.

Ouch! As arebelspy said, hopefully this doesn't dissuade you from riding. Accidents will happen from time to time, but they're usually not this bad. It's unfortunate that this was your first experience while commuting, too.

Just for future reference, when you're comfortable getting back out on the road: It sounds like the basket was the trouble. Perhaps a smaller trailer or saddle bags would serve your better.

I hope you heal up quickly!

skyrefuge

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Re: Bike Mojo needed
« Reply #30 on: June 29, 2012, 04:29:05 PM »
Oh crap, that sucks.  And it's so totally the opposite of ET flying past the moon.  :-(

So yeah, if the basket got wrecked or cannot be solidly attached (or even if it can), it might be time to see again how to get a rear rack on that bike.  Like $_gone_amok said, even if the basket stays solidly in place, having weight up front and up high like that can really make your steering wonky vs. having it on a rear rack.  Normally not a deal-breaking issue, but I didn't realize what a hardcore divebombing cyclist you were.  :-)