Author Topic: Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?  (Read 1307 times)

pennyhandlebar

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Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?
« on: August 09, 2015, 04:12:44 PM »
Hi folks, I'm just wondering how the skiers and snowboarders out there square that hobby with mustachianism. I ride lift-served and do some skinning on a splitboard. The last few seasons, I've skipped the season pass, done backcountry in the first half of the season, and gotten a $125 spring pass instead (shout out to Mt. Hood Meadows!), but it's still an expensive hobby in terms of fuel to drive to the mountain, punch me in the face car (Subaru Outback, almost paid for), and a ski trip or two to a different hill most winters.

I can't say I've tried to put a number on it, but when all's said and done, this hobby probably runs $1,000 or more a year. I never eat on the mountain (pack a sandwich and eat on the chairlift), and all the apres ski happens at home, but it's still an expensive hobby.

Anyone else out there into winter sports? Tips or tricks for saving money? Can you be a skier/snowboarder and still be mustachian?

Goldielocks

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Re: Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2015, 04:25:12 PM »
The best thing you can do is put a dollar number to it, and budget for it year round.

If it is important to you, you will make it work...  And you may supplement with lower cost alternatives like snow shoeing or cross country too.

Most MMM here do have one splurge hobby, such as travel, skiing, hobby cars, airplane, lots of kids, RV, computer stuff, organic foods, magic the gathering, scuba, you name it.  The trick is to know your number, your budget, stick to only one or two things, and enjoy the heck out of it.

kimmarg

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Re: Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 05:56:31 PM »
Look into joining a volunteer ski patrol (www.nsp.org). Amazingly a LOT of mountains have ski patrol done by a combo of professionals and volunteers. Oftentimes the resort needs more staffing on weekends, just when working smuchks have free time. A typical agreement is to work about 15 days a season in exchange for a free pass (sometimes a free pass or tickets for your family or friends as well, generally after your first year) And of course when you "work" you ski around! Varies a bit by mountain and workload of the day but generally expect to arrive 1 hr before lifts open, have a quick morning meeting and then head out to do a morning trail check and whatever signs/ropes/etc need to be fixed. This usually takes around 2 hours. Then 10-3 ski around and help people as required(could be nothing but free ski or lots of pulling toboggans depending on mountain and day) also  Sometimes with a designated hour to sit up in the building at the top of the lift then head back up between 3 and 4 to do a final trail check after lifts close at 4 (or whenever).

You should be able to ski the entire mountain comfortably (looking good or perfect form not required as long as you can get down safely). You will need to take the. Outdoor Emergency care course which will generally be offered by whatever mountain you want to work at. There is a generally small fee to keep up the certification ($65/year) which essentially means I ski with all my patrol friends all season for under $100.

Syonyk

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Re: Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2015, 07:12:50 PM »
Live in Seattle.  The mountains last year were mostly covered in grass with a few inches of snow, not anything actually worth spending any money to go to. :(

If you're doing it a lot, own your equipment, get a season pass, and have fun!
My random project blog - ebikes, DIY, fans, and more: http://syonyk.blogspot.com

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Anyone into lift-served skiing or snowboarding?
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2015, 08:26:56 PM »
Look into joining a volunteer ski patrol (www.nsp.org). Amazingly a LOT of mountains have ski patrol done by a combo of professionals and volunteers. Oftentimes the resort needs more staffing on weekends, just when working smuchks have free time. A typical agreement is to work about 15 days a season in exchange for a free pass (sometimes a free pass or tickets for your family or friends as well, generally after your first year) And of course when you "work" you ski around! Varies a bit by mountain and workload of the day but generally expect to arrive 1 hr before lifts open, have a quick morning meeting and then head out to do a morning trail check and whatever signs/ropes/etc need to be fixed. This usually takes around 2 hours. Then 10-3 ski around and help people as required(could be nothing but free ski or lots of pulling toboggans depending on mountain and day) also  Sometimes with a designated hour to sit up in the building at the top of the lift then head back up between 3 and 4 to do a final trail check after lifts close at 4 (or whenever).

You should be able to ski the entire mountain comfortably (looking good or perfect form not required as long as you can get down safely). You will need to take the. Outdoor Emergency care course which will generally be offered by whatever mountain you want to work at. There is a generally small fee to keep up the certification ($65/year) which essentially means I ski with all my patrol friends all season for under $100.

This is a great idea but only if you would make a good first responder.  Are you good with people in pain? Can you handle seeing an exposed fracture? What about dealing with family after a fatal accident.  Can you mentally manage it? Just some things to consider.

My local mountain has a disabled skiing program.  You can volunteer as a guide or helper for disabled skiers and get a free pass for another day in return.  There is some training involved.

I just study all of the deals around me.  I don't go to the best mountain.  One of my local mountains has a half off half day Sunday for residents of my state.  Basically, I can pay $25 or $35 to ski the afternoon.  A full day pass at fancy pants mountain is up to $90 now I think.  Ugh. 

The best deal I ever had though was when I had weds and thurs off from work and fancy pants mountain offered a weekday only season pass for under $300.  I definitely got my money's worth that year.