Author Topic: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain  (Read 54432 times)

Ebrat

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 233
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #250 on: December 31, 2016, 09:47:03 AM »
Does anybody have gray or black grout (I mean grout that is meant to be that color not just dirty)?  I'm thinking about using it for tiled kitchen backsplash.

We used gray grout when we had the living room tiled in 2009 during the Great Recession (super cheap. Total was like $2.10/square foot installed) - we sealed it at the time and it still looks great.

We have gray grout with gray tile around our tub.  I like it, and it's fairly easy to keep clean.  I've seen some installations of white subway tile with black grout, and it always looks a little messy because the grout lines are never going to be perfectly straight, and the black on white makes them stick out.

Cassie

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3718
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #251 on: December 31, 2016, 05:12:51 PM »
In May I decided I had too many sheets, towels, etc. So I now only have 2 sets of sheets for each bed which is plenty.  I did keep more towels then sheets because we like to host people to spend the night when they are visiting and this summer I had 6 people come at once.  Reducing the nik-naks helped too and now I can actually see and appreciate the items I kept. I got rid of my dolls and only kept my 3 favorite ones.  It is amazing how much faster I can clean.  When I was raising my 3 boys I always kept the lonely socks hoping for a mate:))  At one point I had a big garbage bag full of lonely socks.  Finally I threw it out. Who knows what boys do with socks! I have a huskie/shephard mix dog that really sheds. My roomba does a good job at getting the hair picked up. I love it.

TomTX

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2497
  • Location: Texas
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #252 on: December 31, 2016, 05:28:33 PM »
In May I decided I had too many sheets, towels, etc. So I now only have 2 sets of sheets for each bed which is plenty.  I did keep more towels then sheets because we like to host people to spend the night when they are visiting and this summer I had 6 people come at once.  Reducing the nik-naks helped too and now I can actually see and appreciate the items I kept. I got rid of my dolls and only kept my 3 favorite ones.  It is amazing how much faster I can clean.  When I was raising my 3 boys I always kept the lonely socks hoping for a mate:))  At one point I had a big garbage bag full of lonely socks.  Finally I threw it out. Who knows what boys do with socks! I have a huskie/shephard mix dog that really sheds. My roomba does a good job at getting the hair picked up. I love it.

My son loves wearing mismatched socks.  He's 3.

I think we still have all the pairs, though.

Credit card signup bonuses:

$150 bonus on $500 spend for Chase Freedom:
https://www.referyourchasecard.com/2/MU4TDQ1N3K

$50 bonus (no min spend, just use it once) plus double all cash back at the end of 1 year for Discover, including the initial $50:
https://refer.discover.com/s/37e3u

$500 bonus on $4,000 spend for Chase Sapphire Preferred:
https://www.referyourchasecard.com/6/Z8JIP66H7G

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6270
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #253 on: December 31, 2016, 05:29:39 PM »
Sealing grout is important - when I had a floor re-tiled several years ago I was told 48 hours between grouting and tiling.  That sealed grout survived house-training a puppy.  My latest tile job has coordinated grout that is self-sealing, no need to paint over the grout with the sealant.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

Freshwater

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #254 on: December 31, 2016, 05:31:19 PM »
Anyone have a Roomba style vacuum and pets? When I've googled it seems none can cope with the hair, and that would be the main reason I'd get one. We need to vacuum about 3 times a week when the dog's hair is long.

How long is long? My roomba-style vacuum can do short (2-5 cm / 1-2 inch) hair but struggles with my long (30 cm / 1ft) hair. I tend to shed in one place, so I use a slightly damp rubber glove (I've heard good things about rubber brooms also) to pick that up before I set the robot vacuum going.

My dogs hair grows to about three inches long but the bits that moult are shorter undercoat mainly. My hair - I brush it only before I wash it (frizzy mess) and do it outside. If I see one of mine on me or on the floor I pick it up and put it straight in the bin.

What brand is your vac? It could change my life!

Freshwater

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #255 on: December 31, 2016, 08:47:14 PM »
In May I decided I had too many sheets, towels, etc. So I now only have 2 sets of sheets for each bed which is plenty.  I did keep more towels then sheets because we like to host people to spend the night when they are visiting and this summer I had 6 people come at once.  Reducing the nik-naks helped too and now I can actually see and appreciate the items I kept. I got rid of my dolls and only kept my 3 favorite ones.  It is amazing how much faster I can clean.  When I was raising my 3 boys I always kept the lonely socks hoping for a mate:))  At one point I had a big garbage bag full of lonely socks.  Finally I threw it out. Who knows what boys do with socks! I have a huskie/shephard mix dog that really sheds. My roomba does a good job at getting the hair picked up. I love it.

Hello, what Roomba model do you have? I'm looking on our version of Craigslist and there's a lightly used one going for a good price.

Linda_Norway

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1362
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #256 on: January 03, 2017, 05:03:30 AM »
Anyone got any tips for cleaning dust on the bookshelves behind the books? The shelves are open at the back (Ikea Expedit) but almost against a wall so I can't reach behind. I just took all the books out today and it was so thick it was gross, plus there was mould. Maybe I should just get a different bookcase?? I thought the airflow would reduce the mould, but then on another thread MPGH told me that mould feeds on dust so...

Critically go through all your books. Which ones does you really intend to read again? Maybe only a quarter of them. Give away the rest of the books. Store the remainder on a shelf in a dry and ventilated room.
Then buy an eReader and buy your next books electronically. No more shelf space needed.

Tasty Pinecones

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 762
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #257 on: January 05, 2017, 12:06:18 PM »
Roomba sells a version specifically for garages and pets. I know nothing about those versions first hand though.

We have an older 400 series (red). It has been a trooper. I need to tear it down and do a big cleaning. the side brush is struggling. Our bagless vacuum (different brand of course) also needs TLC to keep the filters cleaned. I clean its filters with the garage shop vac and air compressor outside.

That's the problem with vacuums and roombas IMHO - the need to tear them down and clean the machine occasionally might outweigh the effort to just sweep with a broom and dust pan.

GuitarStv

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8556
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #258 on: January 05, 2017, 12:18:19 PM »
Anyone got any tips for cleaning dust on the bookshelves behind the books? The shelves are open at the back (Ikea Expedit) but almost against a wall so I can't reach behind. I just took all the books out today and it was so thick it was gross, plus there was mould. Maybe I should just get a different bookcase?? I thought the airflow would reduce the mould, but then on another thread MPGH told me that mould feeds on dust so...

Critically go through all your books. Which ones does you really intend to read again? Maybe only a quarter of them. Give away the rest of the books. Store the remainder on a shelf in a dry and ventilated room.
Then buy an eReader and buy your next books electronically. No more shelf space needed.

I've slowly been reducing our book collection from several thousand to a few hundred over the past five years, all because of a rediscovery of a magical place called the library.  It made me feel really stupid when I realized that nearly every book I paid for was available for free.

rpr

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #259 on: January 05, 2017, 12:51:49 PM »
I've slowly been reducing our book collection from several thousand to a few hundred over the past five years, all because of a rediscovery of a magical place called the library.  It made me feel really stupid when I realized that nearly every book I paid for was available for free.

There are at least two categories of books that are difficult to get rid off.

1. Some (a lot) of work related technical reference books. Some are starting to be available in PDF format but are quite expensive to repurchase usually ~$100 per book.

2. Foreign language books. Don't have that many but there are still a few.

The hardest part is actually trying to convince my OH to get rid of a lot of english language fiction. We have quite  a few of those but can't get OH to part with any of them. Any suggestions on how to start convincing your partner to join in the declutter. 

sw1tch

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 263
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Middle of no and where
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #260 on: January 05, 2017, 01:26:28 PM »
subscribing for tips!
<|> My Strava <|>

I, sw1tch, will become a millionaire!

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #261 on: January 05, 2017, 01:42:26 PM »
I've slowly been reducing our book collection from several thousand to a few hundred over the past five years, all because of a rediscovery of a magical place called the library.  It made me feel really stupid when I realized that nearly every book I paid for was available for free.

There are at least two categories of books that are difficult to get rid off.

1. Some (a lot) of work related technical reference books. Some are starting to be available in PDF format but are quite expensive to repurchase usually ~$100 per book.

2. Foreign language books. Don't have that many but there are still a few.

The hardest part is actually trying to convince my OH to get rid of a lot of english language fiction. We have quite  a few of those but can't get OH to part with any of them. Any suggestions on how to start convincing your partner to join in the declutter.

My main suggestion for harmonious decluttering is to sit down together before you even look at what you have and decide how many is a reasonable number. It might be in terms of number of items (e.g. One towel per person plus a spare) or in terms of what volume of storage space you are willing to dedicate (e.g. We can keep however many books fit into these four bookcases). Then your OH is free to decide which books of theirs to keep and which to get rid of but you know that it won't be more than the pre-agreed number (which you came up with TOGETHER). I have a trunk and three drawers for my sewing stuff and if it fits in there I'm allowed to keep it - my husband is happy because it's corralled in one place and I'm happy because I can choose what I want to keep without him shoving his oar in or trying to get me to get rid of more than I want to.

rpr

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #262 on: January 05, 2017, 01:59:57 PM »

My main suggestion for harmonious decluttering is to sit down together before you even look at what you have and decide how many is a reasonable number. It might be in terms of number of items (e.g. One towel per person plus a spare) or in terms of what volume of storage space you are willing to dedicate (e.g. We can keep however many books fit into these four bookcases). Then your OH is free to decide which books of theirs to keep and which to get rid of but you know that it won't be more than the pre-agreed number (which you came up with TOGETHER). I have a trunk and three drawers for my sewing stuff and if it fits in there I'm allowed to keep it - my husband is happy because it's corralled in one place and I'm happy because I can choose what I want to keep without him shoving his oar in or trying to get me to get rid of more than I want to.

Thank you for these tips. A big part of the problem is likely that I'm not approaching my OH with the right spirit. I will think about what you have said.

Freshwater

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #263 on: January 05, 2017, 02:03:25 PM »
I've slowly been reducing our book collection from several thousand to a few hundred over the past five years, all because of a rediscovery of a magical place called the library.  It made me feel really stupid when I realized that nearly every book I paid for was available for free.

There are at least two categories of books that are difficult to get rid off.

1. Some (a lot) of work related technical reference books. Some are starting to be available in PDF format but are quite expensive to repurchase usually ~$100 per book.

2. Foreign language books. Don't have that many but there are still a few.

The hardest part is actually trying to convince my OH to get rid of a lot of english language fiction. We have quite  a few of those but can't get OH to part with any of them. Any suggestions on how to start convincing your partner to join in the declutter.

My main suggestion for harmonious decluttering is to sit down together before you even look at what you have and decide how many is a reasonable number. It might be in terms of number of items (e.g. One towel per person plus a spare) or in terms of what volume of storage space you are willing to dedicate (e.g. We can keep however many books fit into these four bookcases). Then your OH is free to decide which books of theirs to keep and which to get rid of but you know that it won't be more than the pre-agreed number (which you came up with TOGETHER). I have a trunk and three drawers for my sewing stuff and if it fits in there I'm allowed to keep it - my husband is happy because it's corralled in one place and I'm happy because I can choose what I want to keep without him shoving his oar in or trying to get me to get rid of more than I want to.

Good advice. We did go through our books, I was able to chuck half but he took most of them back. We only ended up getting rid of about 30. You've made me realise the bookcase is too big. He sees we have space, so we'll keep them, there's no reason (to him) to get rid of them. We sort of have a system for mementos - one trunk (I'd call it a box but it's bigger than that) each. If I could just contain his hobby stuff from spreading to every room in the house...

rpr

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #264 on: January 05, 2017, 02:09:53 PM »

Good advice. We did go through our books, I was able to chuck half but he took most of them back. We only ended up getting rid of about 30. You've made me realise the bookcase is too big. He sees we have space, so we'll keep them, there's no reason (to him) to get rid of them. We sort of have a system for mementos - one trunk (I'd call it a box but it's bigger than that) each. If I could just contain his hobby stuff from spreading to every room in the house...

This is similar to my problem. The house is big and there is ample space for just the two of us. One of the bedrooms is a library with 4 bookshelves plus another two bookshelves in the living room. The books are certainly contained without overflowing. But a royal pain to clean these. Someday, I'd love to go down to just two bookshelves of only essential books.
 

Freshwater

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #265 on: January 05, 2017, 02:12:52 PM »
Roomba sells a version specifically for garages and pets. I know nothing about those versions first hand though.

We have an older 400 series (red). It has been a trooper. I need to tear it down and do a big cleaning. the side brush is struggling. Our bagless vacuum (different brand of course) also needs TLC to keep the filters cleaned. I clean its filters with the garage shop vac and air compressor outside.

That's the problem with vacuums and roombas IMHO - the need to tear them down and clean the machine occasionally might outweigh the effort to just sweep with a broom and dust pan.

Hmm, I'm in such a quandry. Chances are I'll get one and the stupid dog will bark at it and I'll have to get rid of it...!

With This Herring

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Location: New York STATE, not city
  • TANSTAAFL!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #266 on: January 05, 2017, 03:21:55 PM »
I've slowly been reducing our book collection from several thousand to a few hundred over the past five years, all because of a rediscovery of a magical place called the library.  It made me feel really stupid when I realized that nearly every book I paid for was available for free.

*snip*
The hardest part is actually trying to convince my OH to get rid of a lot of english language fiction. We have quite  a few of those but can't get OH to part with any of them. Any suggestions on how to start convincing your partner to join in the declutter.

I specifically avoid getting rid of books that I will reread, even if the library has them.  The issue is that the local library system decides what gets cut from the collections based on what is not getting checked out within a certain time period.  So, that contemporary lit piece that is on the reading list for the local high schools will stay forever.  However, books by Asimov (one of the top classic sci-fi authors) are getting sold off because the public interest pendulum swung away from sci-fi for a bit.  There are many science fiction classics where not a single copy is left at any branch in the local system.  That is horribly depressing.  I can get lots of new stuff at the library, but the old stuff gets sold or stolen, and then it is gone.

This is similar to my problem. The house is big and there is ample space for just the two of us. One of the bedrooms is a library with 4 bookshelves plus another two bookshelves in the living room. The books are certainly contained without overflowing. But a royal pain to clean these. Someday, I'd love to go down to just two bookshelves of only essential books.

Can you add glass doors to the shelves?  Then cleaning is just a quick wipe if there are kids who touch the glass.
Because your toaster got hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender.

6-year CPA currently on hiatus.  Botched this.  Working again. 
Go soak your beans.  You know you keep forgetting.

mustachepungoeshere

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1572
  • Location: Sydney, Oz
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #267 on: January 05, 2017, 08:19:40 PM »
I specifically avoid getting rid of books that I will reread, even if the library has them.  The issue is that the local library system decides what gets cut from the collections based on what is not getting checked out within a certain time period.  So, that contemporary lit piece that is on the reading list for the local high schools will stay forever.  However, books by Asimov (one of the top classic sci-fi authors) are getting sold off because the public interest pendulum swung away from sci-fi for a bit.  There are many science fiction classics where not a single copy is left at any branch in the local system.  That is horribly depressing.  I can get lots of new stuff at the library, but the old stuff gets sold or stolen, and then it is gone.

Thus the headline:

Why a Fake Patron Named 'Chuck Finley' Checked Out 2,361 Books at This Florida Library Last Year

Library workers wanted to ensure the classics stayed on the shelves.

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-a-fake-patron-named-chuck-finley-checked-out-2361-books-at-this-florida-library-last-year

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #268 on: January 06, 2017, 02:15:22 AM »
Has anyone ever Nikwaxed their furnishing fabrics? You can get spray-on or soak-in versions and I'm wondering if it's worth doing to avoid those minor stains. But...

1. Is there any reason not to? Like, will it come off on our clothes?
2. How long would it last?
3. Do bought furnishing fabrics have something like that already? Even if they're not in their finished form? I'm planning to make some of my own cushion covers and might reupholster a chair myself.

Linda_Norway

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1362
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #269 on: January 06, 2017, 02:35:02 AM »
Has anyone ever Nikwaxed their furnishing fabrics? You can get spray-on or soak-in versions and I'm wondering if it's worth doing to avoid those minor stains. But...

1. Is there any reason not to? Like, will it come off on our clothes?
2. How long would it last?
3. Do bought furnishing fabrics have something like that already? Even if they're not in their finished form? I'm planning to make some of my own cushion covers and might reupholster a chair myself.

We have used something else than Nikwax, some set from Ikea. We don't use much and wipe it well in. Haven't gotten stains on clothes.

Text from Ikea's website:
Leather
Vacuum clean.
Protect from direct sunlight to prevent drying out.
For best possible result, wipe clean and treat the surface regularly with ABSORB leathercare set.

I can't find the product as a separate article on their website. But I wouldn't use Nikwax for shoes on a sofa. I presume any furniture store can sell you a suitable product for leather furniture.

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #270 on: January 06, 2017, 02:56:45 AM »
Has anyone ever Nikwaxed their furnishing fabrics? You can get spray-on or soak-in versions and I'm wondering if it's worth doing to avoid those minor stains. But...

1. Is there any reason not to? Like, will it come off on our clothes?
2. How long would it last?
3. Do bought furnishing fabrics have something like that already? Even if they're not in their finished form? I'm planning to make some of my own cushion covers and might reupholster a chair myself.

We have used something else than Nikwax, some set from Ikea. We don't use much and wipe it well in. Haven't gotten stains on clothes.

Text from Ikea's website:
Leather
Vacuum clean.
Protect from direct sunlight to prevent drying out.
For best possible result, wipe clean and treat the surface regularly with ABSORB leathercare set.

I can't find the product as a separate article on their website. But I wouldn't use Nikwax for shoes on a sofa. I presume any furniture store can sell you a suitable product for leather furniture.

Thanks, I'll look at the IKEA stuff. But Nikwax does products for fabric as well as leather, and that's what I've been looking at. We don't have a leather sofa - it's a damask.

marty998

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4595
  • Location: Sydney, Oz
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #271 on: January 07, 2017, 03:15:26 PM »
I specifically avoid getting rid of books that I will reread, even if the library has them.  The issue is that the local library system decides what gets cut from the collections based on what is not getting checked out within a certain time period.  So, that contemporary lit piece that is on the reading list for the local high schools will stay forever.  However, books by Asimov (one of the top classic sci-fi authors) are getting sold off because the public interest pendulum swung away from sci-fi for a bit.  There are many science fiction classics where not a single copy is left at any branch in the local system.  That is horribly depressing.  I can get lots of new stuff at the library, but the old stuff gets sold or stolen, and then it is gone.

Thus the headline:

Why a Fake Patron Named 'Chuck Finley' Checked Out 2,361 Books at This Florida Library Last Year

Library workers wanted to ensure the classics stayed on the shelves.

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-a-fake-patron-named-chuck-finley-checked-out-2361-books-at-this-florida-library-last-year

Arrrg... scratching my head trying to think where I remember the name Chuck Finley from...

It was adopted as the alter ago of Sam Axe in the TV series Burn Notice!


Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4057
  • Location: BC
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #272 on: January 11, 2017, 06:00:32 PM »
Has anyone ever Nikwaxed their furnishing fabrics? You can get spray-on or soak-in versions and I'm wondering if it's worth doing to avoid those minor stains. But...

1. Is there any reason not to? Like, will it come off on our clothes?
2. How long would it last?
3. Do bought furnishing fabrics have something like that already? Even if they're not in their finished form? I'm planning to make some of my own cushion covers and might reupholster a chair myself.

Well,  it smells like elmers glue, for starters, and weather proof fabrics for household furniture and items are readily available, but often the superior tech quality, but soft and wearable, outer wear garments still need help when they get dirty.

Also Nikwax is expensive!  You really have to have a strong need for it.

In the past, this was called "ScotchGuard" and came in a spray format (typically), and has been replaced with the improved quality fibres now available for carpets, furniture, etc.

MrsPete

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3241
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #273 on: January 11, 2017, 07:01:22 PM »
I specifically avoid getting rid of books that I will reread, even if the library has them.  The issue is that the local library system decides what gets cut from the collections based on what is not getting checked out within a certain time period.  So, that contemporary lit piece that is on the reading list for the local high schools will stay forever.  However, books by Asimov (one of the top classic sci-fi authors) are getting sold off because the public interest pendulum swung away from sci-fi for a bit.  There are many science fiction classics where not a single copy is left at any branch in the local system.  That is horribly depressing.  I can get lots of new stuff at the library, but the old stuff gets sold or stolen, and then it is gone.
This is reasonable, but I'd also point out that books -- even unique books -- are easy to find these days.  Ebay and Amazon make it super easy.  At worst, you have to wait a week or so for delivery.

You might be saying, "But it'll cost money!"  Yeah, but two points:  1) it'll only cost money IF you decide you want that book again AND the library has ditched it.  2) keeping books costs something too; it costs in terms of space, bookcases, and dusting. 

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #274 on: January 12, 2017, 02:44:50 AM »
Has anyone ever Nikwaxed their furnishing fabrics? You can get spray-on or soak-in versions and I'm wondering if it's worth doing to avoid those minor stains. But...

1. Is there any reason not to? Like, will it come off on our clothes?
2. How long would it last?
3. Do bought furnishing fabrics have something like that already? Even if they're not in their finished form? I'm planning to make some of my own cushion covers and might reupholster a chair myself.

Well,  it smells like elmers glue, for starters, and weather proof fabrics for household furniture and items are readily available, but often the superior tech quality, but soft and wearable, outer wear garments still need help when they get dirty.

Also Nikwax is expensive!  You really have to have a strong need for it.

In the past, this was called "ScotchGuard" and came in a spray format (typically), and has been replaced with the improved quality fibres now available for carpets, furniture, etc.

Thank you! Scotchguard is what I was trying to remember.

Poundwise

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 742
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #275 on: January 12, 2017, 08:26:25 AM »
I reupholstered part of a couch once, and since I was going through all the trouble I thought I would Scotchguard the fabric.  However, I read around a bit and decided I'd rather not worry about it being toxic or not; opted to starch the fabric the old fashioned way instead. Can't tell whether the results were better or worse than Scotchguarding or not bothering to do anything to the fabric at all. Basically I shriek at the family if they try to bring food into the living room, and that is my fabric protection.

HappierAtHome

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5250
  • Location: Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #276 on: January 12, 2017, 04:48:22 PM »
Basically I shriek at the family if they try to bring food into the living room, and that is my fabric protection.

And that's a frugal option, too :D

With This Herring

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Location: New York STATE, not city
  • TANSTAAFL!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #277 on: January 12, 2017, 08:36:16 PM »
I specifically avoid getting rid of books that I will reread, even if the library has them.  The issue is that the local library system decides what gets cut from the collections based on what is not getting checked out within a certain time period.  So, that contemporary lit piece that is on the reading list for the local high schools will stay forever.  However, books by Asimov (one of the top classic sci-fi authors) are getting sold off because the public interest pendulum swung away from sci-fi for a bit.  There are many science fiction classics where not a single copy is left at any branch in the local system.  That is horribly depressing.  I can get lots of new stuff at the library, but the old stuff gets sold or stolen, and then it is gone.
This is reasonable, but I'd also point out that books -- even unique books -- are easy to find these days.  Ebay and Amazon make it super easy.  At worst, you have to wait a week or so for delivery.

You might be saying, "But it'll cost money!"  Yeah, but two points:  1) it'll only cost money IF you decide you want that book again AND the library has ditched it.  2) keeping books costs something too; it costs in terms of space, bookcases, and dusting.

Actually, a lot of the lesser-known stuff I read (not Asimov etc.) has become harder to find on Amazon.  :(
Current absolute lowest price of The Complete Ivory by Doris Egan per BookFinder (great book purchase search aggregator): $14.54
Price at which I purchased years ago: $7.27 (and have read it at least annually since then)

1) I only buy books that I have either read multiple times or know the author's work so well that I know I will love to reread anything they write.
2) I have the space either way.  Bookcases are free on CL.  :)   And I don't dust enough anyway...

I see your point, but I really like my physical books.
Because your toaster got hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender.

6-year CPA currently on hiatus.  Botched this.  Working again. 
Go soak your beans.  You know you keep forgetting.

Linda_Norway

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1362
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #278 on: January 13, 2017, 12:16:09 AM »
Have you people tried to buy books at antique stores? In Norway we have a website where we can search online  for books in all antique stores. I have bought quite a few books there that are out of print, but very good books and not available elsewhere.

With This Herring

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Location: New York STATE, not city
  • TANSTAAFL!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #279 on: January 13, 2017, 06:33:09 AM »
Have you people tried to buy books at antique stores? In Norway we have a website where we can search online  for books in all antique stores. I have bought quite a few books there that are out of print, but very good books and not available elsewhere.

That BookFinder website would be our best bet for finding a specific book, I think.  I never thought of looking at antique stores for reading material, though.  That is a good idea!
Because your toaster got hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender.

6-year CPA currently on hiatus.  Botched this.  Working again. 
Go soak your beans.  You know you keep forgetting.

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #280 on: January 20, 2017, 04:35:10 AM »
Hey, I've started a new thread about being ready for guests! Hoping y'all have some tips for me!

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/advice-to-make-you-and-your-home-always-ready-for-guests/

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #281 on: January 22, 2017, 09:37:27 AM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

Rosesss

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #282 on: January 22, 2017, 10:16:34 AM »
AH-MAZING ideas here! We are moving in the Spring and I so badly want a fresh start! Decluttering seems to be my first logical step, pre-moving day.

If you have time, there is a decluttering system somewhere that has you basically cover everything you own in a sheet, and then you take out every item that you use and mark it somehow (sticker?). Anything that remains under the sheet you aren't using that often and the default is to get rid of it. Anyone remember the website?

I havent heard of using stickers before but the rest of what you said sounds like The Minimalists. One of those guys packed up everything he owned and covered larger pieces of furniture under sheets and only took out or uncovered things as he needed them.

Sailor Sam

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5257
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Steel Beach
  • Semper...something
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #283 on: January 22, 2017, 10:26:59 AM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

I use pyrex, and love everything about it. I checked, and they do sell in the UK. They don't fulfill your number 7, but they hit everything else.

TomTX

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2497
  • Location: Texas
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #284 on: January 22, 2017, 11:03:54 AM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

I use pyrex, and love everything about it. I checked, and they do sell in the UK. They don't fulfill your number 7, but they hit everything else.

UK pyrex may still be the original borosilicate glass, while modern US "pyrex" no longer is - it's tempered normal (soda-lime) glass.

Real borosilicate pyrex is FAR more resistant to temperature shock. Freezer to hot oven? No problem.  Modern US stuff is garbage, IMO.
Credit card signup bonuses:

$150 bonus on $500 spend for Chase Freedom:
https://www.referyourchasecard.com/2/MU4TDQ1N3K

$50 bonus (no min spend, just use it once) plus double all cash back at the end of 1 year for Discover, including the initial $50:
https://refer.discover.com/s/37e3u

$500 bonus on $4,000 spend for Chase Sapphire Preferred:
https://www.referyourchasecard.com/6/Z8JIP66H7G

Anatidae V

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6242
  • Age: 28
  • Location: West Aus yo
  • Naps for all!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #285 on: January 22, 2017, 04:21:58 PM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

I use pyrex, and love everything about it. I checked, and they do sell in the UK. They don't fulfill your number 7, but they hit everything else.

UK pyrex may still be the original borosilicate glass, while modern US "pyrex" no longer is - it's tempered normal (soda-lime) glass.

Real borosilicate pyrex is FAR more resistant to temperature shock. Freezer to hot oven? No problem.  Modern US stuff is garbage, IMO.
How do I check which type modern Australian pyrex is?

mustachepungoeshere

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1572
  • Location: Sydney, Oz
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #286 on: January 22, 2017, 04:29:41 PM »
UK pyrex may still be the original borosilicate glass, while modern US "pyrex" no longer is - it's tempered normal (soda-lime) glass.
Real borosilicate pyrex is FAR more resistant to temperature shock. Freezer to hot oven? No problem.  Modern US stuff is garbage, IMO.
How do I check which type modern Australian pyrex is?
[/quote]

My understanding is that new Pyrex here is the cheaper tempered glass.

I had a Pyrex baking dish explode straight out of the oven last year. No dramatic temperature changes, it didn't come into contact with water.

It's just not as durable as it used to be.

Freshwater

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #287 on: January 22, 2017, 04:56:26 PM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

I use pyrex, and love everything about it. I checked, and they do sell in the UK. They don't fulfill your number 7, but they hit everything else.

UK pyrex may still be the original borosilicate glass, while modern US "pyrex" no longer is - it's tempered normal (soda-lime) glass.

Real borosilicate pyrex is FAR more resistant to temperature shock. Freezer to hot oven? No problem.  Modern US stuff is garbage, IMO.
How do I check which type modern Australian pyrex is?

I just checked all my pieces - one made in England, one made in Brazil, one made in USA. I have a storage jar with lid here belonging to a friend which says made in USA. So is there Australian Pyrex?

I have only broken one when I dropped it on the floor :( They can all shatter under extremes. The only Australian exploding one I've heard of anecdotally had just come out of the oven and been put on the counter, this sometimes happens if it's put down on a wet counter or in the sink when hot and I think the instructions say so - use a cloth or trivet to be safe. No idea how old/ what type the dish was. I've never put a frozen container in the oven (I'd never imagined that would be possible, didn't know people did that!) only from the fridge.

gliderpilot567

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 172
  • Location: US
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #288 on: January 22, 2017, 05:16:50 PM »

Don't keep loads of bathroom toiletries in open storage, especially if they are rarely used. They get filthy and dusty.

Where does the dust come from in a bathroom? I know towels would produce some dust. Is the answer really gross?

Yes, towels are a major contributor. The other is TP. Most toilet paper, even (especially) the soft expensive kinds, is very friable. Rip off a square, and you unleash a cloud of fine paper threads into the air. This, like towel usage, probably happens several times a day. Every few days, I can wipe a thick sheen of particles off the counter and top of the toilet tank in each bathroom.

Bathrooms are smaller than regular rooms, so the dust concentration gets higher. And, most bathrooms have hard floors, lacking the air-filtering effect that carpeted rooms have. I'm not sure what effect the increased humidity in a bathroom has on dust accumulation.

I run the exhaust fan in each bathroom while using it, even if I didn't make a stinky. This helps pull some of the dust out. Also I do it because the kids refuse to run the fan, either because they are scared of the noise, or maybe they enjoy the smell of their own produce.

HappierAtHome

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5250
  • Location: Australia
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #289 on: January 22, 2017, 05:54:35 PM »
We had an Australian-bought pyrex dish shatter soon after Christmas when nothing had happened to it. It was sitting on the counter, hadn't been in the oven or fridge or anything, and it just... exploded in its own small, sad way. YMMV.

Bracken_Joy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6552
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #290 on: January 22, 2017, 06:07:02 PM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

In theory, you *can* do any glass from frozen to oven. In practice, it's a matter of WHEN, not IF, it will explode. There is no substance that exists that always will handle this temperature swing. Even the best original pyrex will still sometimes explodes with temp shock.

Sorry =( Just gotta plan ahead or switch containers.
My journal: Hiding in the Ferns
Like babies? Have kids? Want to chat about Babies and Pregnancy? Group Journal Here.

With This Herring

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Location: New York STATE, not city
  • TANSTAAFL!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #291 on: January 22, 2017, 07:00:02 PM »
I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!

I use pyrex, and love everything about it. I checked, and they do sell in the UK. They don't fulfill your number 7, but they hit everything else.

UK pyrex may still be the original borosilicate glass, while modern US "pyrex" no longer is - it's tempered normal (soda-lime) glass.

Real borosilicate pyrex is FAR more resistant to temperature shock. Freezer to hot oven? No problem.  Modern US stuff is garbage, IMO.
How do I check which type modern Australian pyrex is?
In theory, you *can* do any glass from frozen to oven. In practice, it's a matter of WHEN, not IF, it will explode. There is no substance that exists that always will handle this temperature swing. Even the best original pyrex will still sometimes explodes with temp shock.

Sorry =( Just gotta plan ahead or switch containers.

Here is a page that shows how to tell which "Pyrex" you have based on logo and where it was made.  From what I've read elsewhere, the borosilicate (old-style) Pyrex was good at hot-cold shifts, but would shatter more readily with an impact; the soda-lime (new in USA) Pyrex doesn't like sudden temperature shifts, but it is more impact-resistant and, when it does shatter, will be larger, less-sharp pieces.

shelivesthedream, what about stainless steel food storage containers?  I don't have any brands to recommend, but I would think that metal would be durable for freezer to oven.
Because your toaster got hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender.

6-year CPA currently on hiatus.  Botched this.  Working again. 
Go soak your beans.  You know you keep forgetting.

Bracken_Joy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6552
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #292 on: January 22, 2017, 07:07:48 PM »
Metal changes tastes majorly though, especially for acidic foods like red sauces. =(
My journal: Hiding in the Ferns
Like babies? Have kids? Want to chat about Babies and Pregnancy? Group Journal Here.

Poundwise

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 742
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #293 on: January 22, 2017, 07:11:07 PM »
If you think ahead, you can line your glass containers with foil before freezing them, then take the frozen block out of the glass later.  That way you can use the containers many times, instead of leaving them in the freezer. And I daresay they may be less prone to shatter, even if you plop a frozen block into a room temperature pyrex container, then put the whole thing in the oven. 

oops, just saw Bracken_Joy's comment-- is that true for aluminum as well?

Bracken_Joy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6552
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #294 on: January 22, 2017, 07:16:23 PM »
If you think ahead, you can line your glass containers with foil before freezing them, then take the frozen block out of the glass later.  That way you can use the containers many times, instead of leaving them in the freezer. And I daresay they may be less prone to shatter, even if you plop a frozen block into a room temperature pyrex container, then put the whole thing in the oven. 

oops, just saw Bracken_Joy's comment-- is that true for aluminum as well?

Yep, according to what I've read: http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/tools-products/aluminum-foil-dos-donts

Quote
Don't use foil to store foods that are high in acids. This means tart fruits and dishes made with vinegar, tomatoes, or tomato sauce. After a few days in foil, the acids in lasagna, for example, interact with the aluminum and erode the foil, says McGee. Small amounts of aluminum can then migrate into the food, creating both pinprick holes in the wrap and a metallic taste in the lasagna. Also, white spots (actually aluminum salts) can form on these foods when their acidity reacts with the aluminum. Theoretically you can cut these spots away; they're not harmful. But they are certainly not appetizing either, so stick to plastic storage for the acidic goods.
My journal: Hiding in the Ferns
Like babies? Have kids? Want to chat about Babies and Pregnancy? Group Journal Here.

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Location: UK
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #295 on: January 23, 2017, 04:56:15 AM »
The thing I don't understand about temperature shock, now that I have read about it a bit, is this: I completely get that putting a frozen container into a hot oven would put it under strain. But what if you put the frozen container into a COLD oven and then turned it on?

Also, the stuff I'm thinking about going from freezer to oven with would need to stay in a same-size-and-shape container - like lasagna or fish pie. So if I transferred, I'd have to buy a cooking container of some kind that was the exact same size and shape.

Pyrex is looking good, though. I'm slightly overwhelmed by their website! It's obviously expanded a bit since my parents bought theirs a few decades ago...
« Last Edit: January 23, 2017, 05:00:52 AM by shelivesthedream »

With This Herring

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Location: New York STATE, not city
  • TANSTAAFL!
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #296 on: January 23, 2017, 08:53:00 AM »
Metal changes tastes majorly though, especially for acidic foods like red sauces. =(

Well, shoot.  I knew that was the case for aluminum, but I thought stainless steel was good.  I've noticed that some cheap utensils/flatware taste bad when I'm eating, which is unpleasant and probably related.

The thing I don't understand about temperature shock, now that I have read about it a bit, is this: I completely get that putting a frozen container into a hot oven would put it under strain. But what if you put the frozen container into a COLD oven and then turned it on?

Not that you need to worry about this, as the UK stuff is still borosilicate, but in the US there are complaints from people who took new-US Pyrex hot out of the oven and put it on a wet countertop, causing it to shatter.  The countertop would have been room temperature, so for soda-lime glass, this is a really big issue.

I don't know if a cold oven would warm slowly enough to be okay for soda-lime glass, but maybe your borosilicate glass would work with that.
Because your toaster got hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender.

6-year CPA currently on hiatus.  Botched this.  Working again. 
Go soak your beans.  You know you keep forgetting.

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6270
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #297 on: January 23, 2017, 09:06:12 AM »
Sorry, this is long because of detail: Re storage, when my parents made big batches of stuff, they chilled it, then put it into the Corning-ware lined with aluminum foil which was then lined with plastic wrap, so the food was touching wrap not metal. Then they froze it, took it out of the Corning ware, and finished wrapping it for long-term storage (including labeling it because one frozen lump in foil looks like any other lump in foil).  They would end up with several frozen packages that fit a Corning ware dish.  When they wanted one they would take it out of the freezer, let it sit on the counter long enough that the wrappings would come off easily, slide it into the dish, let it thaw in the fridge, and then it was ready to go.  The containers were available because they were not being used for storage, but the frozen item could be heated easily.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

MrsPete

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3241
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #298 on: January 23, 2017, 09:10:07 AM »
1) I only buy books that I have either read multiple times or know the author's work so well that I know I will love to reread anything they write.
2) I have the space either way.  Bookcases are free on CL.  :)   And I don't dust enough anyway...

I see your point, but I really like my physical books.
I remember this being "a thing" when Kindles came out.  Some people were very against them, saying, "But I want to touch my books!"  I realized that -- with the exception of a few special books that were gifts or were signed by the author -- I don't care about touching paper.  In fact, I like the idea that the book doesn't take up space, doesn't grow old and brittle.  Here's what I've decided:  Some people love reading, and some people love books.  I love reading. 

In your case, I'd say be selective about the books you choose to house. 

I'm looking to replace my selection of inherited tupperware which is an eclectic mix of sizes and includes lids for which we have lost the containers and containers for which we have lost the lids. My ideal new containers will have the following attributes:

1. Come in the following three approximate sizes: 200ml, 1 litre, 3.5 litres.
2. Can buy lids and containers separately if required. (So we can replace just one bit if it's lost or breaks.
3. Suitable for the freezer and oven, and ideally can go straight from freezer to oven. (Container, not lid.)
4. Lid won't crack if I try and take it off straight out of the freezer.
5. Can buy each size as a single individual container, not as part of a set. (So I can get exactly the quantity and sizes I want.)
6. Compactly stackable.
7. And the ultimate miracle... the medium and large sizes take the same size lid.
8. Won't be discontinued in the near future.
9. Square, not round.

Do they exist?!
I don't know about your dream food storage ... but over the last year or two I've started buying vintage Pyrex refrigerator boxes.  I found a bunch to start with at an antique store, and I've bought more from ebay.  Sometimes they're reasonable; other times they're quite expensive.  They're rectangular (more efficient) and they stack nicely.  They're available in two sizes, which I think of as single serving vs. family serving.  The lids (within the same size) are all interchangeable.  And they're not plastic, which I like, and they can go straight into the microwave for single-serving lunches.  And with all the same size /brand, they fit efficiently into my cabinets for storage.   

Negatives:  While Pyrex is tough glass, it is glass.  The lids are not so secure that I can toss one into my tote bag and take it to work; I must hold it in my hand, or the lid will fall off.  They're not 'specially cheap. 




MrsPete

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3241
Re: Advice for making your home interior easier to clean and maintain
« Reply #299 on: January 23, 2017, 09:15:04 AM »
I havent heard of using stickers before but the rest of what you said sounds like The Minimalists. One of those guys packed up everything he owned and covered larger pieces of furniture under sheets and only took out or uncovered things as he needed them.
Yeah, I've heard similar suggestions:

Turn all the hangers in your closet backwards.  When you wear the garment, return the hanger back in the natural position.  At the end of a year (or whatever time you designate), donate anything on a hanger that's still backwards. 

Remove all the kitchen gadgets from your drawers and place them in a box somewhere in another room.  As you fetch them out and use them, return them to the drawer.  After X amount of time, throw away any kitchen gadget that hasn't been used. 

Hypothetically, you could use this type of system for anything in your house.