Author Topic: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy  (Read 6883 times)

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1096
  • Location: Metro Detroit
The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« on: January 21, 2019, 10:48:56 AM »
This link popped up on a blog shortly after I finished watching one of those bananas Fyre Festival documentaries. Maybe it's because I was a working class Gen X kid, but I really don't understand any of this. Con artistry for the new millennium, I guess.

The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy: The Case of Caroline Calloway and her Creativity Workshop Tour

Piglet

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2019, 11:48:15 AM »
This link popped up on a blog shortly after I finished watching one of those bananas Fyre Festival documentaries. Maybe it's because I was a working class Gen X kid, but I really don't understand any of this. Con artistry for the new millennium, I guess.

The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy: The Case of Caroline Calloway and her Creativity Workshop Tour

Wow... I wanted to Purell my eyes after reading that article...

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1096
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2019, 12:00:24 PM »
This link popped up on a blog shortly after I finished watching one of those bananas Fyre Festival documentaries. Maybe it's because I was a working class Gen X kid, but I really don't understand any of this. Con artistry for the new millennium, I guess.

The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy: The Case of Caroline Calloway and her Creativity Workshop Tour

Wow... I wanted to Purell my eyes after reading that article...

Yes. And I'm still not sure what I read. It doesn't make sense!

LifeHappens

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5668
  • Location: SnowBirdLand
  • Downshifting from 5th to 3rd Gear
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2019, 12:01:35 PM »
Quote
Caroline Calloway is merely the sloppiest and most obviously incompetent version of the influencer economy run amok. She has had every opportunity handed to her, including a book deal that would be life-changing for most, but she had no intention of following through. The workshop tour merely exposes how unprepared and unwilling to learn she is for such experiences. Calloway’s main problem is that she doesn’t want to be an artist or a storyteller or a writer: she wants to have made art, to have told stories, to have been a writer, to have taught, and so on. But that requires work, research, planning, sacrifice, and an acute understanding that not everything you do will be successful or worthy of celebration. She has nothing to offer but is selling everything.

This paragraph, and especially the bolded sentence, sums up the so-called Influencer Economy perfectly. I don't know when the whole thing is going to collapse on itself, but it is a house of cards heading for a tumble.

honeybbq

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1103
  • Location: Seattle
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2019, 12:04:54 PM »
I hate to say it but i couldn't finish that article. Is there a TL;DR version??

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1096
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2019, 12:15:37 PM »
This one is less rambling:
How Instagram influencer Caroline Calloway's world tour fell apart


I think my favorite part is below. If I never heard the term "brand" applied to a person again, it would be too soon.

Quote
Some fans supported her efforts, but many more have begun to question their loyalty to Calloway, who has a history of backing out of commitments. Two of Calloway's many dedicated fan accounts changed their handles and said they no longer wanted to affiliate themselves with "a brand we do not trust or believe in."

"Sitting here I began starting to question that. Am I stupid for trusting you? Are we the real punchlines who spent our hourly wages to support you and see your 'workshop'? Is this an instance of blind faith? AM I IN A CULT?" one fan, Abigail Scott, wrote in an open letter to Calloway Sunday.

Miss Piggy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1280
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2019, 12:23:23 PM »
What the hell did I just pretend to read?

dang1

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 132
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2019, 12:37:34 PM »
thanks for reading it- i didnt bother clicking on the article, apparently it would have been a complete waste of time, lol

Not There Yet

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2019, 12:38:16 PM »
Quote
I think my favorite part is below. If I never heard the term "brand" applied to a person again, it would be too soon.

Ditto!  I've always hated that!

tralfamadorian

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1143
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2019, 12:54:47 PM »
I'm not sure I would go so far as to call her a con artist. A lazy, entitled, trust fund baby with the world handed to her on a silver platter? Definitely. And still managing to fuck it up? Yup!

She get a $500k book deal while in/straight out of college with a $100k advance. Then, surprise!, discovers writing a book takes more work than long form IG captions. She gives up halfway through and the publisher lets her keep the advance.

Next she decides to tour the US doing seminars where she talks about herself and takes pictures with her fan girls for a few hours. But that pesky work part keep getting in the way. Logistics? Programming? Venue? Too hard- better to just cancel the whole thing.

An Anna Delvey she is not.

prudent_one

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2019, 03:14:44 PM »
What I learned:
- Some people crave attention and use social media + a boatload of the hot cliches-du-jour to get it
- Others will spend time reading and looking at anything the above people post
- When the attention-cravers do stupid stuff, their fanbase ignores it because those who screwed up are being "authentic" and allows the fanbase to avoid entertaining the notion that investing all that time was not that smart
- Two parts to a fanbase: (1) real fans who endorse everything the attention-craver says/does; (2) those who might criticize the attention-craver are labeled stalkers
- "Authentic" is a get-out-of-jail-free pass for any misdeeds

What I have yet to learn:
- Why do so many people spend so much time reading about so-called internet "celebrities" who don't seem to actually sport any reason to be "celebrities"

I remember a friend talking about some girl named Lia a couple years ago who was apparently a super-popular internet celebrity at the time.  I asked him a couple weeks ago what Lia was up to and he said "nobody cares any more". Easy come, easy go. But when it's gone, what happens then. Do the Lias spend the rest of their lives in regular jobs with people  saying "Hey, didn't you used to be somebody? EPIC FAIL!"

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2560
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2019, 07:45:27 AM »
Hopefully Lia saved some money so she can FIRE! Or - at least keep the lights on until she finds a traditional job.

smileyface

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2019, 07:51:30 AM »
Quote
Caroline Calloway is merely the sloppiest and most obviously incompetent version of the influencer economy run amok. She has had every opportunity handed to her, including a book deal that would be life-changing for most, but she had no intention of following through. The workshop tour merely exposes how unprepared and unwilling to learn she is for such experiences. Calloway’s main problem is that she doesn’t want to be an artist or a storyteller or a writer: she wants to have made art, to have told stories, to have been a writer, to have taught, and so on. But that requires work, research, planning, sacrifice, and an acute understanding that not everything you do will be successful or worthy of celebration. She has nothing to offer but is selling everything.

This paragraph, and especially the bolded sentence, sums up the so-called Influencer Economy perfectly. I don't know when the whole thing is going to collapse on itself, but it is a house of cards heading for a tumble.

The bolded part is the key to all of her failures.  Everyone wants to be the noun (an author, an event organizer, etc) without actually doing the verb (writing, organizing, planning, etc)

NonprofitER

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Location: Texas
  • Reaching FIRE w/ High Purpose (Low Pay) Nonprofit
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2019, 07:56:30 AM »
I don't know who this Caroline person is, but I heard a super interesting story on NPR about how some brands are now hiring companies to make bots (computer generated fake accounts) as influencers. Apparently bots are easier to control, more malleable to specific subgroups/audiences, and obviously less likely to stay something inflammatory on Twitter or get a DUI and tank the whole brand association investment.

So essentially, Doritos or Coke or whoever can hire a bot-maker to have (just making up a number) 25 pre-fab Instagram bots -- each with a specific Target audience and existing following ("we need a black gay man who likes beaches, a redhead who lives in the city, maybe an environmentally friendly millennial mom...") to eat their chips or drink their Coke and the Instagram audience is none the wiser.  A spokesman from one the bot-companies implied it was the future of marketing.

Who needs real life influencers when we can have cyborgs to emulate? 

Psychstache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 731
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2019, 08:23:05 AM »
I don't know who this Caroline person is, but I heard a super interesting story on NPR about how some brands are now hiring companies to make bots (computer generated fake accounts) as influencers. Apparently bots are easier to control, more malleable to specific subgroups/audiences, and obviously less likely to stay something inflammatory on Twitter or get a DUI and tank the whole brand association investment.

Are there still bots out there that are drinking and driving? So shameful.  :)

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2560
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2019, 08:49:00 AM »
Yet another reason to avoid social media. Who wants a fake celebrity to define what's cool and hip? Oh wait...

AMandM

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 760
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2019, 09:28:48 AM »
What I learned:
- Some people crave attention and use social media + a boatload of the hot cliches-du-jour to get it
- Others will spend time reading and looking at anything the above people post

The bolded part is what baffles me.  What does a person like this Caroline woman do that made so many people follow her and then become her fans? I mean, I click on clickbait sometimes, but I don't subscribe to it!

calimom

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 800
  • Location: Northern California
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2019, 07:11:02 PM »
In the olden days, of oh say 1999 or so, smart, accomplished people, you know who actually were accomplished speakers, writers who actually wrote books, artists and thinkers were advised to take part in the online world and ended up on the emerging platforms if Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and the like. Now, people start out by inventing themselves online and hoping they'll become famous that way. Much easier.

MikeBT

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 213
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2019, 08:10:02 PM »
The rule of thumb now is to not believe anything you see 'published' online whether on Instagram or LinkedIn, because usually it's being published with an ulterior motive - it's no more trustworthy than a Revlon ad, or a leaflet for Herbalife. This includes the awful smarmy "Congrats" posts you see on LinkedIn.

In my industry advertising/marketing is frowned upon (in fact it used to be illegal to market yourself), and the most successful trial lawyers in my industry generally don't post their direct contact details anywhere, and have no online profile. I wish everyone remained as genteel - if your product/service is good, people will find you!

patrickza

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 541
  • Age: 40
    • The Investor Challenge
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2019, 03:10:03 AM »
That was the oddest read. From a few of the long instagram posts she did, it seemed like she could actually write. The book would have been interesting, and likely her best chance at a successful life.

If you get lucky in life, you should make the most of it. She  threw it away.

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2560
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2019, 07:01:30 AM »
Maybe the pressure of continuing "greatness" got to her. She was on a roll and then ran out of material or she had too many things up in the air at once (juggling metaphor).

NonprofitER

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Location: Texas
  • Reaching FIRE w/ High Purpose (Low Pay) Nonprofit
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2019, 07:36:21 AM »
I don't know who this Caroline person is, but I heard a super interesting story on NPR about how some brands are now hiring companies to make bots (computer generated fake accounts) as influencers. Apparently bots are easier to control, more malleable to specific subgroups/audiences, and obviously less likely to stay something inflammatory on Twitter or get a DUI and tank the whole brand association investment.

Are there still bots out there that are drinking and driving? So shameful.  :)

Ha! Touche.

Cool Friend

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 173
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2019, 11:20:54 AM »
Quote
Caroline Calloway is merely the sloppiest and most obviously incompetent version of the influencer economy run amok. She has had every opportunity handed to her, including a book deal that would be life-changing for most, but she had no intention of following through. The workshop tour merely exposes how unprepared and unwilling to learn she is for such experiences. Calloway’s main problem is that she doesn’t want to be an artist or a storyteller or a writer: she wants to have made art, to have told stories, to have been a writer, to have taught, and so on. But that requires work, research, planning, sacrifice, and an acute understanding that not everything you do will be successful or worthy of celebration. She has nothing to offer but is selling everything.

This paragraph, and especially the bolded sentence, sums up the so-called Influencer Economy perfectly. I don't know when the whole thing is going to collapse on itself, but it is a house of cards heading for a tumble.

The bolded part is the key to all of her failures.  Everyone wants to be the noun (an author, an event organizer, etc) without actually doing the verb (writing, organizing, planning, etc)

It reminds me of this lady (late 20s or early 30s) I met at a friend's birthday get-together.  She was writing her "memoir,"  and had even contacted publishers, but didn't know what in her life she would write about.  I probed her a little and she couldn't indicate anything about her life that was interesting enough to necessitate a memoir.  I think she wanted to be interesting without having done or experienced anything of interesting, and probably wanted to have written without actually writing.


dcheesi

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 774
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2019, 11:34:51 AM »
I remember a friend talking about some girl named Lia a couple years ago who was apparently a super-popular internet celebrity at the time.  I asked him a couple weeks ago what Lia was up to and he said "nobody cares any more". Easy come, easy go. But when it's gone, what happens then. Do the Lias spend the rest of their lives in regular jobs with people  saying "Hey, didn't you used to be somebody? EPIC FAIL!"
Andy Warhol was right, just a little ahead of his time.

What I learned:
- Some people crave attention and use social media + a boatload of the hot cliches-du-jour to get it
- Others will spend time reading and looking at anything the above people post

The bolded part is what baffles me.  What does a person like this Caroline woman do that made so many people follow her and then become her fans? I mean, I click on clickbait sometimes, but I don't subscribe to it!
At least some of them aspire to the same "celebrity" lifestyle that (they think that) their IG idols live. There's a recent-ish "dramedy" film, Ingrid Goes West, that revolves around this.


mckaylabaloney

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Age: 30
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2019, 12:13:04 PM »
She get a $500k book deal while in/straight out of college with a $100k advance. Then, surprise!, discovers writing a book takes more work than long form IG captions. She gives up halfway through and the publisher lets her keep the advance.

This is relevant only to the extent that it further fits the wall of shame and comedy, but the publisher did NOT let her keep the advance (which she had already spent entirely) -- they just decided not to sue her over it (yet), and are allowing her to pay it back over time. So she has six figures of debt because of her own laziness -- no wonder she thought this "workshop" venture was a good idea.

Proud Foot

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 952
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2019, 01:57:01 PM »
Quote
Caroline Calloway is merely the sloppiest and most obviously incompetent version of the influencer economy run amok. She has had every opportunity handed to her, including a book deal that would be life-changing for most, but she had no intention of following through. The workshop tour merely exposes how unprepared and unwilling to learn she is for such experiences. Calloway’s main problem is that she doesn’t want to be an artist or a storyteller or a writer: she wants to have made art, to have told stories, to have been a writer, to have taught, and so on. But that requires work, research, planning, sacrifice, and an acute understanding that not everything you do will be successful or worthy of celebration. She has nothing to offer but is selling everything.

This paragraph, and especially the bolded sentence, sums up the so-called Influencer Economy perfectly. I don't know when the whole thing is going to collapse on itself, but it is a house of cards heading for a tumble.

The bolded part is the key to all of her failures.  Everyone wants to be the noun (an author, an event organizer, etc) without actually doing the verb (writing, organizing, planning, etc)

It reminds me of this lady (late 20s or early 30s) I met at a friend's birthday get-together.  She was writing her "memoir,"  and had even contacted publishers, but didn't know what in her life she would write about.  I probed her a little and she couldn't indicate anything about her life that was interesting enough to necessitate a memoir.  I think she wanted to be interesting without having done or experienced anything of interesting, and probably wanted to have written without actually writing.

And this is why there is a whole subset of publishers called "Vanity Press". People paying publishers just so they can have their book published.

aasdfadsf

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 90
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2019, 05:23:45 PM »
I don't get it. How did this woman become a celebrity? I'm not going to waste time going through her entire oeuvre, but what little I did see wasn't particularly well written or interesting. She does not seem possessed of anything resembling creativity (Homemade salads! Hand-written letters! Jesus, if you get excited by that stuff you need to get out more.)

MikeBT

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 213
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2019, 06:29:08 PM »
I suggest that social media "influencers", like multi-level marketing schemes, do no overall harm to society because they simply get stupid people to spend money on harmless enterprises. Easier for them to be distracted by that, than to turn to drugs or gambling or something that would tax the public purse.

Fish Sweet

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 131
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2019, 10:50:59 AM »
One of the things I find most obnoxious about ~influencer~ culture is the way it's shaped expectations, goals, a sense of entitlement for a lot of younger folks.  Now I'm not here to bash on millenials/Gen Z or what have you, and I'm still a young'un myself, but the rise of e-celebrities around media presences on Youtube, Instagram, Twitch, etc. and fame and the approval and idolation of their peers based on likes and followers, has created some really toxic ideas of what success and wealth look like, and the kinds of behaviors aligned with people with that kind of success.  I feel like I'm seeing it already with certain podcasters and costumers that I follow-- the kind of fame that generates loyal followers who are happy to hurl money at you and indulge your off-the-cuff requests, and instead of taking a mental step back like "alright, I've got a semi-celebrity persona that I need to cultivate and also grow like a particularly needy plant for the success of my brand and my work," it's "hey guys, i really need this expensive stand mixer, just like REALLY NEED IT" one day and "ohhhh I know I mentioned this beautiful cashmere sweater I CAN'T BELIEVE YOU GUYS SENT ME THREE OF THEM WOWWW" the next.  The semi-begging expectation that their followers will just produce whatever they ask for on demand is really a turn-off, and it does worry me that they're going to come to expect that kind of indulgence and entitlement all through life.

Another example: I was selling at a media convention a couple of weeks ago, and saw a pair of teenagers making their way around to all the artists' tables.  When they got to mine, the conversation opened with "do you know what a social media influencer is?" and then went straight into, essentially, asking me to give them free stuff so they can "showcase" it on their social media feed and give me "exposure." 

Even more annoying than the two of them treating this as if their offer was some kind of equivalent transaction (my hard work & cost for supplies for two seconds of their time taking a picture and uploading it to instagram or whatever) was the way they acted like it was already a done deal-- talking between themselves about how "oh yeah, I can totally review soap," (I'm a soap-seller) and telling me that I should take them up on their "offer" now, so that I don't have to spend extra on shipping stuff to them later down the line (that's not going to be a problem) and their clear surprise and disappointment when I told them I would pass.  I hope none of the artists at the convention actually took them up on it, but who knows... maybe some of them have also bought into shitty social media influencer culture and think it's actually going to help their sales.

Linea_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4543
  • Location: Norway
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2019, 07:45:00 AM »
I suggest that social media "influencers", like multi-level marketing schemes, do no overall harm to society because they simply get stupid people to spend money on harmless enterprises. Easier for them to be distracted by that, than to turn to drugs or gambling or something that would tax the public purse.

Some influencers have strong influence over people to not vaccinate their children. They do harm those children, although indirectly.

letsdoit

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 337
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2019, 10:18:17 AM »
i wonder if that colloway girl grew up in an emotionally abusive household.  she is a gaslighter . 

I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7747
  • Location: United States
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2019, 11:31:01 AM »
I don't get it. How did this woman become a celebrity? I'm not going to waste time going through her entire oeuvre, but what little I did see wasn't particularly well written or interesting. She does not seem possessed of anything resembling creativity (Homemade salads! Hand-written letters! Jesus, if you get excited by that stuff you need to get out more.)

It sounds like her posts while she was at Cambridge were interesting; selling Americans on the idea of a fairy tale life abroad. 


JoJo

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1278
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #32 on: January 30, 2019, 04:49:34 PM »

letsdoit

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 337
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2019, 01:46:01 PM »
I don't get it. How did this woman become a celebrity? I'm not going to waste time going through her entire oeuvre, but what little I did see wasn't particularly well written or interesting. She does not seem possessed of anything resembling creativity (Homemade salads! Hand-written letters! Jesus, if you get excited by that stuff you need to get out more.)

It sounds like her posts while she was at Cambridge were interesting; selling Americans on the idea of a fairy tale life abroad.

the little i could stand reading was about making out.
you can say a lot about americans but we know about making out 

wild forest

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2019, 02:07:57 PM »
"Influencer" on the net is another word for lazy, lousy, and spoils rotten people have nothing else better to do. Wasting their time becoming someone who they're not.

And the people who followed this Caroline woman probably looking for something to fulfill their fantasy dreams, and so they've lost their common sense during the process.

libertarian4321

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1361
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2019, 11:47:07 AM »
A world where one Tweet from anyone even remotely associated with the vapid twits of the Kardashian/Jenner clan send tweens and millennials into hysteria is empty indeed.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6265
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2019, 12:48:14 PM »
Quote
No, Calloway is not the worst scammer on the internet. Plenty of people have been quick to tell me they don’t think she’s a real scammer, just an incompetent dolt who got in way over her head. But I’m not sure that option is much better. All the warning signs were there and she powered through because there was money to be made. She harnessed that fan devotion for profit based on skills she did not possess and services she could not provide, and anyone who dissented from that loyalty was ‘inauthentic’.

I skimmed that.  Sad for the 10 minutes I won't get back.  But this is the part that spoke to me.

She seems completely incompetent.  One thing for sure, she doesn't have a future in event planning!

swearwolf

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Denton, TX
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2019, 03:07:19 PM »
Lord, what a cringe-fest.

In an attempt to approach my fellow human beings with empathy, I think perhaps the people who idolize "influencers" and take their classes with the dream of being influencers themselves are ultimately after the same thing we're after: being free from a lifetime of 9-5 desk jobs.

Now, if only we could teach them all how to cook their own food, sell their SUVs, and pay themselves, then maybe the whole influencer economy would collapse... Anybody wanna host a workshop with me? We can charge $165 for tickets and I'll overpromise about it on my Insta. ;)

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2560
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2019, 08:49:54 AM »
I guess there are groups of idolizers every generation. Music stars and movie stars. Not sure how these You Tube personalities measure up enough to send anyone into a tizzy but okay, whatever.

Psychstache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 731
Re: The Empty Mason Jar of the Influencer Economy
« Reply #39 on: February 22, 2019, 09:19:24 AM »
I guess there are groups of idolizers every generation. Music stars and movie stars. Not sure how these You Tube personalities measure up enough to send anyone into a tizzy but okay, whatever.

I think it just makes the dream seem more attainable to them. Most people know the don't have the looks/skill/talent/whatever qualities to be the movie or music star, but the YouTube personality seems like a possible dream.

I remember reading an article a few years ago where they talked about this idea as it relates to Steph Curry of the NBA. It hypothesized that kids found it more fun to emulate Curry, a scrawny beanpole type (relative to other NBA players anyways) than LeBron James, a genetic and physical freak. You could grow up to be a Curry, but couldn't rewrite your genes to be like LeBron.