Author Topic: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)  (Read 50061 times)

wonkette

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #350 on: March 16, 2017, 12:37:05 PM »
My neighbors, a couple I like very much, invited me over for a drink last night. Sadly, they shared that they are seriously considering moving to Baltimore (we're in DC), where they can afford more house. They plan on having kids in a few years and they've both recently gotten jobs where they can work from home three days a week.

I mentioned that they'd still have to factor in the cost of the commuter train which is something like $7 each way and doesn't run very late, at which point they'd have to take the more expensive Amtrak. The neighbor confessed that it wouldn't impact their budget much because she ubers to and from work every day she goes into the office anyway! Their place is maybe 15 minutes to the metro at a leisurely stroll (which is ten minutes closer than my place) and even on the same line she needs. I was gobsmacked.

I've never used one of these ride services. Any idea what that costs?
Probably cheaper than owning a second car.
I use the services to get to/from the airport.  For a 10-15 minute ride, I pay between $7-$15.  It's about 6 miles.
This is right. Seven dollars at minimum, but probably more like $10 with traffic. But the train is right there! If they won't take a train now I have low confidence they'll actually take the one from Baltimore. Maybe they'll take an Uber from their house to the train station and from Union Station to work.

BTDretire

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #351 on: March 16, 2017, 02:28:06 PM »
I finished reading 'Happy City' (the one from MMM's latest blog post) yesterday and it said there are 8 parking spaces for every car in America.

Would it be possible to change the law to include mandated bike parking spaces?

Near my house, there's a formerly abandoned shopping center that's been renovated and re-occupied with tenants. It's wonderful to see the blight replaced with commerce, but I wish the parking lot had a legitimate bike rack somewhere onsite. I've tried mentioning the idea to store employees, and while they smile and nod I'm sure they're in no position to make that happen.

Anyone have an idea of what it actually costs a property owner to buy and install a bike rack?
I don't know, but I did see my local city put a bike rack in a fancy artistic bike rack in the
shape of a fish to the tune of $10,000.
Cost includes engineer time and installation by city employees.
 I worked the marina about 5 days a week and it was two years before I saw a
one bike in it and that was the only one over maybe
6 years before it was removed.
 I did see someone ride up to it once and I ask them if they were going use the bike rack,
the "no, just waiting for a friend to catch up.
 I saw two guys outside the Planet Fitness I use, inspecting an area,
I suspected they were contemplating a bike rack, so I ask. They were,
and I told them I would like that, I'm 3 miles from the gym and would like to make that ride.
 That's been a month, nothing yet.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #352 on: March 16, 2017, 03:27:47 PM »
My neighbors, a couple I like very much, invited me over for a drink last night. Sadly, they shared that they are seriously considering moving to Baltimore (we're in DC), where they can afford more house. They plan on having kids in a few years and they've both recently gotten jobs where they can work from home three days a week.

I mentioned that they'd still have to factor in the cost of the commuter train which is something like $7 each way and doesn't run very late, at which point they'd have to take the more expensive Amtrak. The neighbor confessed that it wouldn't impact their budget much because she ubers to and from work every day she goes into the office anyway! Their place is maybe 15 minutes to the metro at a leisurely stroll (which is ten minutes closer than my place) and even on the same line she needs. I was gobsmacked.

I've never used one of these ride services. Any idea what that costs?
Probably cheaper than owning a second car.
I use the services to get to/from the airport.  For a 10-15 minute ride, I pay between $7-$15.  It's about 6 miles.
This is right. Seven dollars at minimum, but probably more like $10 with traffic. But the train is right there! If they won't take a train now I have low confidence they'll actually take the one from Baltimore. Maybe they'll take an Uber from their house to the train station and from Union Station to work.

If they aren't using the train now, I doubt they'll use it if they move, though maybe they will when they factor in the cost. I can't imagine what it will cost if they take Uber to work from Baltimore to DC, even if it is only a few times a week. I imagine with rush hour they will be paying a price premium.

CptCool

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #353 on: March 17, 2017, 10:04:39 AM »
I finished reading 'Happy City' (the one from MMM's latest blog post) yesterday and it said there are 8 parking spaces for every car in America.

Would it be possible to change the law to include mandated bike parking spaces?

Near my house, there's a formerly abandoned shopping center that's been renovated and re-occupied with tenants. It's wonderful to see the blight replaced with commerce, but I wish the parking lot had a legitimate bike rack somewhere onsite. I've tried mentioning the idea to store employees, and while they smile and nod I'm sure they're in no position to make that happen.

Anyone have an idea of what it actually costs a property owner to buy and install a bike rack?
I don't know, but I did see my local city put a bike rack in a fancy artistic bike rack in the
shape of a fish to the tune of $10,000.
Cost includes engineer time and installation by city employees.
 I worked the marina about 5 days a week and it was two years before I saw a
one bike in it and that was the only one over maybe
6 years before it was removed.
 I did see someone ride up to it once and I ask them if they were going use the bike rack,
the "no, just waiting for a friend to catch up.
 I saw two guys outside the Planet Fitness I use, inspecting an area,
I suspected they were contemplating a bike rack, so I ask. They were,
and I told them I would like that, I'm 3 miles from the gym and would like to make that ride.
 That's been a month, nothing yet.

Haha 10k is ridiculous. Just give us $100 worth of steel bolted into concrete - it should take less than an hour to install and would be dirt cheap!

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #354 on: March 17, 2017, 01:07:59 PM »
I finished reading 'Happy City' (the one from MMM's latest blog post) yesterday and it said there are 8 parking spaces for every car in America.

Would it be possible to change the law to include mandated bike parking spaces?

Near my house, there's a formerly abandoned shopping center that's been renovated and re-occupied with tenants. It's wonderful to see the blight replaced with commerce, but I wish the parking lot had a legitimate bike rack somewhere onsite. I've tried mentioning the idea to store employees, and while they smile and nod I'm sure they're in no position to make that happen.

Anyone have an idea of what it actually costs a property owner to buy and install a bike rack?
I don't know, but I did see my local city put a bike rack in a fancy artistic bike rack in the
shape of a fish to the tune of $10,000.
Cost includes engineer time and installation by city employees.
 I worked the marina about 5 days a week and it was two years before I saw a
one bike in it and that was the only one over maybe
6 years before it was removed.
 I did see someone ride up to it once and I ask them if they were going use the bike rack,
the "no, just waiting for a friend to catch up.
 I saw two guys outside the Planet Fitness I use, inspecting an area,
I suspected they were contemplating a bike rack, so I ask. They were,
and I told them I would like that, I'm 3 miles from the gym and would like to make that ride.
 That's been a month, nothing yet.

Haha 10k is ridiculous. Just give us $100 worth of steel bolted into concrete - it should take less than an hour to install and would be dirt cheap!

Yup and if it gets broken, some Boston lads will be happy to fix it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhXPrYEp6pQ

Tasty Pinecones

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #355 on: March 17, 2017, 03:33:36 PM »
Their heart was in the right place! I think more beer would have made that easier!

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #356 on: March 18, 2017, 12:41:23 PM »
The US has some pretty aggressive ADA-based laws regarding number of parking spaces that are for handicapped that don't always make a lot of sense.  I worked for a small business that had no handicapped employees and had very few visitors, yet we had two handicapped spaces out front Just Because.  Plus all the handicapped spaces you see out in front of gyms or other places obviously geared towards the non-handicapped.  I don't begrudge anyone who needs one a spot (I've spent enough time on crutches due to sports injuries to understand) but I think the law can be a little over-prescriptive on this.

And you'll probably never have a disabled employee if they can't make it in to the interview.  Gyms typically have office workers, too.  In fact people recovering from injury can use many gym facilities to aid recovery.  You are ridiculous

Let me be more specific; there seems to be some rule associating capacity of a building with number of handicapped spaces.  So if you have one of those massive Lifetime Fitness buildings or something, you end up with an equally huge number of handicapped spaces outside.  Do they need SOME?  Probably, sure.  Do they need a dozen?  Probably not.  Same with the small business, there were <20 people there.  We had plenty of parking in a relatively small, level lot.  It was also a sports-related company.  We didn't need two handicapped spaces.  In fact, we had them clearly marked, etc, but just treated them as normal spots.

The challenge for city planners comes when city fitness closes down and a physio therapy shop, or retail store or a community church takes over the space.  Suddenly, the need for the calculated number of spots does not seem to be exaggerated anymore.

TomTX

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #357 on: March 19, 2017, 11:30:45 AM »
The US has some pretty aggressive ADA-based laws regarding number of parking spaces that are for handicapped that don't always make a lot of sense.  I worked for a small business that had no handicapped employees and had very few visitors, yet we had two handicapped spaces out front Just Because.  Plus all the handicapped spaces you see out in front of gyms or other places obviously geared towards the non-handicapped.  I don't begrudge anyone who needs one a spot (I've spent enough time on crutches due to sports injuries to understand) but I think the law can be a little over-prescriptive on this.

And you'll probably never have a disabled employee if they can't make it in to the interview.  Gyms typically have office workers, too.  In fact people recovering from injury can use many gym facilities to aid recovery.  You are ridiculous

Let me be more specific; there seems to be some rule associating capacity of a building with number of handicapped spaces.  So if you have one of those massive Lifetime Fitness buildings or something, you end up with an equally huge number of handicapped spaces outside.  Do they need SOME?  Probably, sure.  Do they need a dozen?  Probably not.  Same with the small business, there were <20 people there.  We had plenty of parking in a relatively small, level lot.  It was also a sports-related company.  We didn't need two handicapped spaces.  In fact, we had them clearly marked, etc, but just treated them as normal spots.

The challenge for city planners comes when city fitness closes down and a physio therapy shop, or retail store or a community church takes over the space.  Suddenly, the need for the calculated number of spots does not seem to be exaggerated anymore.

If you are refurbing a retail space into a physiotherapy shop, painting a few parking spaces blue is a negligible cost.

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #358 on: March 19, 2017, 12:01:24 PM »
The US has some pretty aggressive ADA-based laws regarding number of parking spaces that are for handicapped that don't always make a lot of sense.  I worked for a small business that had no handicapped employees and had very few visitors, yet we had two handicapped spaces out front Just Because.  Plus all the handicapped spaces you see out in front of gyms or other places obviously geared towards the non-handicapped.  I don't begrudge anyone who needs one a spot (I've spent enough time on crutches due to sports injuries to understand) but I think the law can be a little over-prescriptive on this.

And you'll probably never have a disabled employee if they can't make it in to the interview.  Gyms typically have office workers, too.  In fact people recovering from injury can use many gym facilities to aid recovery.  You are ridiculous

Let me be more specific; there seems to be some rule associating capacity of a building with number of handicapped spaces.  So if you have one of those massive Lifetime Fitness buildings or something, you end up with an equally huge number of handicapped spaces outside.  Do they need SOME?  Probably, sure.  Do they need a dozen?  Probably not.  Same with the small business, there were <20 people there.  We had plenty of parking in a relatively small, level lot.  It was also a sports-related company.  We didn't need two handicapped spaces.  In fact, we had them clearly marked, etc, but just treated them as normal spots.

The challenge for city planners comes when city fitness closes down and a physio therapy shop, or retail store or a community church takes over the space.  Suddenly, the need for the calculated number of spots does not seem to be exaggerated anymore.

If you are refurbing a retail space into a physiotherapy shop, painting a few parking spaces blue is a negligible cost.

Other way around, actually.  And the blue spots are a different size, and require ramps or other access, etc.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #359 on: March 20, 2017, 04:37:19 AM »
Density saves money in cities. It would be beyond ridiculous to waste a bunch of space on parking to allow for anything a building might one day become.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #360 on: March 20, 2017, 04:44:19 AM »
Yup and if it gets broken, some Boston lads will be happy to fix it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhXPrYEp6pQ

I think a tow rope and a vehicle would have been much more efficient.
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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #361 on: March 20, 2017, 11:33:54 PM »

Yup and if it gets broken, some Boston lads will be happy to fix it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhXPrYEp6pQ


That was fantastic.  It made my day.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #362 on: March 21, 2017, 04:33:51 PM »
Density saves money in cities. It would be beyond ridiculous to waste a bunch of space on parking to allow for anything a building might one day become.

Yep. The physiotherapist doesn't need every available lot in any given city to be suitable just in case they one day decide to move into it. They only have one office at a time.

Seriously, y'all, come to England. We don't have this shit here. Or, if we do, it's massively outweighed by our huge percentage of pre-car cities. We'll show you how to do it.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #363 on: March 21, 2017, 07:25:18 PM »
Density saves money in cities. It would be beyond ridiculous to waste a bunch of space on parking to allow for anything a building might one day become.

Yep. The physiotherapist doesn't need every available lot in any given city to be suitable just in case they one day decide to move into it. They only have one office at a time.

Seriously, y'all, come to England. We don't have this shit here. Or, if we do, it's massively outweighed by our huge percentage of pre-car cities. We'll show you how to do it.

It is not just the age of the city, my area of south east Virginia has had white folk cities since the early 1600's and they are all as car-centric now as you would find anywhere (maybe not wrt pure distance but in terms of alternatives to cars yes).  Come to think of it I cant think of an area around here that has a 'natural' UK-style downtown that is not based on driving in and parking near the store you want to go to.  Colonial Williamsburg has a parking lots a block or two off the main pedestrian mall.  There is one cool hipster area but its only sort of not really car-free, I would call it more of a walk to the bar and walk home area.  I think much of the US is in a chicken vs egg position of we build around cars cuz everyone expects to get around with a car and everyone has a car cuz that is the only way to get around. 

edit: The Colonial Williamsburg pedestrian mall is nearly all a tourist thing.  Over priced food, tri-pointed hat vendors, ye old time candle shope, etc
« Last Edit: March 22, 2017, 06:35:56 AM by AlanStache »
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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #364 on: Today at 01:38:26 AM »
I wonder if it is our walled cities that kept the cars out? I agree that it is the large percentage of pre-car cities that has kept the focus on people not cars. In the US then the way of life in most cities seems so pro-car that older cities change?

Also, our traffic laws are more pedestrian friendly. The pedestrian always has right of way and you can cross the road wherever you like (no jaywalking laws).

Linda_Norway

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #365 on: Today at 01:53:42 AM »
Also, our traffic laws are more pedestrian friendly. The pedestrian always has right of way and you can cross the road wherever you like (no jaywalking laws).

In the countries where I have lived cars need to stop for a pedestrian on a pedestrian crossing. Once when I was in Italy I got totally shocked. I could stand at a pedestrian crossing for 5 minutes without a single car stopping for me. And when I crossed until halfway, the cars on the other half still didn't stop. I'm very happy I live in a place that treats pedestrians better.

marty998

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #366 on: Today at 05:05:24 AM »
Also, our traffic laws are more pedestrian friendly. The pedestrian always has right of way and you can cross the road wherever you like (no jaywalking laws).

In the countries where I have lived cars need to stop for a pedestrian on a pedestrian crossing. Once when I was in Italy I got totally shocked. I could stand at a pedestrian crossing for 5 minutes without a single car stopping for me. And when I crossed until halfway, the cars on the other half still didn't stop. I'm very happy I live in a place that treats pedestrians better.

Yeah I remember Rome quite clearly. Cars would see you on a pedestrian crossing and they would speed up in order to get you to hurry and move along!

Having said that, the Italian (and European) concept of a Town Square I think is a good one. We don't have enough of them in Australia - everything is designed around roads and cars.

JustGettingStarted1980

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #367 on: Today at 10:55:24 AM »
I live in a condo community and a group of us is pretty friendly.  I go to the board meetings.  One of the frequent topics of conversation is that no trucks are allowed to be parked in driveways.  So people buy a condo and then find out they can't park their giant truck in their driveway and it won't fit in their garage.  Nevermind it was in the paperwork before they actually bought the place.  During one of these discussions one of the ladies on the board said, "ugh, people should be ashamed of some of the cars they have around here."  I haven't seen a single car that I would consider embarrassing.  I kind of wish I had kept my rusty, multicolored 1990 Honda Accord so I could park it in the driveway.

I moved into my unit in November and the next June or July one of the people in the friendly group told me I needed to buy some furniture for my deck so it looked like someone lives there.  I told her I was waiting until there was something on sale after the summer (I had a chair that wasn't suitable to all weather, but I would take it out on my deck when I needed it and then bring it back in.)  She told me I was a money bags.  Lol, guess I'm not good at hiding my mustache?  I'm also not sure that the hammock stand I ended up with was what she had in mind, but I love it!

I thank God every day that there is no HOA where I own my home.  To have a bunch of idiots control how I paint, manage, landscape, decorate, or even where I park my car [and then have to pay extra for this!!!] is the most idiotic of idiotic concepts I can imagine.

The metaphor that first comes to mind is going to dinner with a bunch of coworkers who start drinking like fish and ordering Delmonico steaks, while having just a draft beer and a ceasar salad myself. Time for the check, everyone wants an even split. Ai-yai.

JGS

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #368 on: Today at 12:35:55 PM »
I live in a condo community and a group of us is pretty friendly.  I go to the board meetings.  One of the frequent topics of conversation is that no trucks are allowed to be parked in driveways.  So people buy a condo and then find out they can't park their giant truck in their driveway and it won't fit in their garage.  Nevermind it was in the paperwork before they actually bought the place.  During one of these discussions one of the ladies on the board said, "ugh, people should be ashamed of some of the cars they have around here."  I haven't seen a single car that I would consider embarrassing.  I kind of wish I had kept my rusty, multicolored 1990 Honda Accord so I could park it in the driveway.

I moved into my unit in November and the next June or July one of the people in the friendly group told me I needed to buy some furniture for my deck so it looked like someone lives there.  I told her I was waiting until there was something on sale after the summer (I had a chair that wasn't suitable to all weather, but I would take it out on my deck when I needed it and then bring it back in.)  She told me I was a money bags.  Lol, guess I'm not good at hiding my mustache?  I'm also not sure that the hammock stand I ended up with was what she had in mind, but I love it!

I thank God every day that there is no HOA where I own my home.  To have a bunch of idiots control how I paint, manage, landscape, decorate, or even where I park my car [and then have to pay extra for this!!!] is the most idiotic of idiotic concepts I can imagine.

The metaphor that first comes to mind is going to dinner with a bunch of coworkers who start drinking like fish and ordering Delmonico steaks, while having just a draft beer and a ceasar salad myself. Time for the check, everyone wants an even split. Ai-yai.

JGS
Tis a free country where folks buy a house and are mandated by an HOA which is the antithesis to principles of a free country.
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MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard over the fence (Antimustachian neighbours)
« Reply #369 on: Today at 03:17:39 PM »
I live in a condo community and a group of us is pretty friendly.  I go to the board meetings.  One of the frequent topics of conversation is that no trucks are allowed to be parked in driveways.  So people buy a condo and then find out they can't park their giant truck in their driveway and it won't fit in their garage.  Nevermind it was in the paperwork before they actually bought the place.  During one of these discussions one of the ladies on the board said, "ugh, people should be ashamed of some of the cars they have around here."  I haven't seen a single car that I would consider embarrassing.  I kind of wish I had kept my rusty, multicolored 1990 Honda Accord so I could park it in the driveway.

I moved into my unit in November and the next June or July one of the people in the friendly group told me I needed to buy some furniture for my deck so it looked like someone lives there.  I told her I was waiting until there was something on sale after the summer (I had a chair that wasn't suitable to all weather, but I would take it out on my deck when I needed it and then bring it back in.)  She told me I was a money bags.  Lol, guess I'm not good at hiding my mustache?  I'm also not sure that the hammock stand I ended up with was what she had in mind, but I love it!

I thank God every day that there is no HOA where I own my home.  To have a bunch of idiots control how I paint, manage, landscape, decorate, or even where I park my car [and then have to pay extra for this!!!] is the most idiotic of idiotic concepts I can imagine.

The metaphor that first comes to mind is going to dinner with a bunch of coworkers who start drinking like fish and ordering Delmonico steaks, while having just a draft beer and a ceasar salad myself. Time for the check, everyone wants an even split. Ai-yai.

JGS
Tis a free country where folks buy a house and are mandated by an HOA which is the antithesis to principles of a free country.
Ah, but it's free to create an HOA so you live with like minded people.  I would never live in one.