Author Topic: Overheard on Facebook  (Read 3210296 times)

I'm a red panda

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7900 on: November 30, 2018, 11:26:28 AM »
I am on the local Buy Nothing Group on Facebook, mainly so when I am decluttering I can give stuff away for free to others that might need it. I would say that roughly half the posts are "asks". Now we live on what us considered to be the nicer area of our city.

There are several posts a day about how they are out of diapers, milk, other household staple and  don't get paid for another week. Occassionally I will look at their profiles and invariably there are pictures of nice trips or their new toys. It is genuinely depressing to see so many people on the edge when they have means to be doing so much better.

I know it's considered rude, but really, making a comment that included links to all their wasteful spending posts, with the observation that maybe if they spent more on necessities they wouldn't have to beg from others, might actually help them out.   More likely, though, you would be kicked out of the FB group for "not getting it".

I moderate a BNP group, and we really aren't allowed to kick people out for almost anything, that comment would be immediately deleted.
We also don't allow sob stories though.  You can "Ask: size 2 diapers, today please" but not "Ask: Size 2 diapers, we don't get paid and my child will have to go without and it's below freezing, and poor me."

BNP is not a needs-based giving economy.  Wants and needs are of equal value within BNP.

rbuck

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7901 on: November 30, 2018, 02:54:12 PM »
I am on the local Buy Nothing Group on Facebook, mainly so when I am decluttering I can give stuff away for free to others that might need it. I would say that roughly half the posts are "asks". Now we live on what us considered to be the nicer area of our city.

There are several posts a day about how they are out of diapers, milk, other household staple and  don't get paid for another week. Occassionally I will look at their profiles and invariably there are pictures of nice trips or their new toys. It is genuinely depressing to see so many people on the edge when they have means to be doing so much better.

I know it's considered rude, but really, making a comment that included links to all their wasteful spending posts, with the observation that maybe if they spent more on necessities they wouldn't have to beg from others, might actually help them out.   More likely, though, you would be kicked out of the FB group for "not getting it".

I moderate a BNP group, and we really aren't allowed to kick people out for almost anything, that comment would be immediately deleted.
We also don't allow sob stories though.  You can "Ask: size 2 diapers, today please" but not "Ask: Size 2 diapers, we don't get paid and my child will have to go without and it's below freezing, and poor me."

BNP is not a needs-based giving economy.  Wants and needs are of equal value within BNP.

That is good to now. A lot of those posts seem to skirt the line as in, "I just used the last diaper on my 1 year old and don't get paid again for another week. I was just taken aback because the amount of asks was so high. I'm probably more senstive to this issue because of an issue my wife and I had with some friends.

We had some friends that were really great people. The mom didn't work and the father made decent money but they had 4 kids and  house in a HCOL area. The mom is out with my wife for a girl's night out at a local restaurant (WTF?) and starts crying that they don't have the basic household items and her husband doesn't get paid for a week. My wife feels bad so we go to Costco and buy some diapers, milk, bread, sandwich meat, hamburger meat, and toilet paper and dropped it off at her home without telling her who it was from. While I would freely give without resentment to someone in need this really irked me. The husband was just starting his "Crossfit Journey" so he was paying for his Crossfit gym membership, he was talking some course so he could become a trainer, and he was paying to attend various competitions as well. He had to be paying out at least $400 a month just to Crossfit activities while his family couldn't afford food.

Kyle Schuant

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7902 on: November 30, 2018, 06:02:37 PM »
They might have been able to afford food, but not the kind of food they are accustomed to eating. Someone paying $400 a month for Crossfit probably isn't checking out the bargain aisle at the greengrocer and supermarket. It'll be organic free range imported fair trade gluten-free palaeo something.

The average Australian household with a couple and youngest child under 5, like us, spends AUD282pw on food [source 1]. We spend 130, and we drink small amounts of alcohol, eat meat, fish and dairy, etc - we just don't eat out, really.

We don't really think about it, but essentially we're on a GST-free diet. Sales tax in Australia does not apply to fresh foods [source 2]. At shops when you get your receipt, stuff that had GST has an asterisk; if those are all missing then you probably have a diet which is both cheap and healthy, however you'd have to cook it. For example, dry or fresh pasta noodles, onions, garlic, cream, mushrooms, raw chicken, chicken stock and pepper do not attract GST, but "Hand-rolled penne with Gippsland mushrooms and chicken in a creamy sauce" for $22 at a restaurant does.

I would expect that people who have lifestyles of a lot of travel, Crossfit and so on, will also be contributing lots of GST to the tax office, and spending much more overall. After all, if the average is $282 and we're spending $130, then to keep the average up, someone is spending $424.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2018, 06:06:23 PM by Kyle Schuant »