Author Topic: Overheard on Facebook  (Read 1767364 times)

MustardTiger

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 174
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4950 on: August 01, 2016, 08:21:01 PM »
Today we said goodbye to our Jeep and hello to our new Yukon!!
She carried our family safely over 40k miles in 2 years.
Thank you baby for my new car!!

Insert image of brand new 2014 Jeep Cherokee because it just wasn't big enough.

ender

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3697
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4951 on: August 01, 2016, 08:28:47 PM »
Today we said goodbye to our Jeep and hello to our new Yukon!!
She carried our family safely over 40k miles in 2 years.
Thank you baby for my new car!!

Insert image of brand new 2014 Jeep Cherokee because it just wasn't big enough.

Is the takeaway to have a baby, who will gift you a big car?

:P

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3221
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4952 on: August 01, 2016, 09:28:24 PM »
Today we said goodbye to our Jeep and hello to our new Yukon!!
She carried our family safely over 40k miles in 2 years.
Thank you baby for my new car!!

Insert image of brand new 2014 Jeep Cherokee because it just wasn't big enough.

Is the takeaway to have a baby, who will gift you a big car?

:P

Yeah, that just seems odd...., perhaps it's their justification for such a large purchase?

Playing with Fire UK

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1367
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4953 on: August 02, 2016, 12:27:41 AM »
I read it that 'baby' was a pet name for a partner. Please report back if infants are now purchasing cars. Although with the number of infant based YouTube videos out there maybe the infant is the primary earner?

Tjat

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 560
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4954 on: August 02, 2016, 03:58:53 AM »
I read it that 'baby' was a pet name for a partner. Please report back if infants are now purchasing cars. Although with the number of infant based YouTube videos out there maybe the infant is the primary earner?

You haven't heard? It's the new Gerber Life 30 year car loan!

frooglepoodle

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 673
  • Location: DC Surburbs
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4955 on: August 02, 2016, 06:01:09 AM »
An acquaintance posted a picture of a big new Ford Escape SUV. Lots and lots of congratulatory comments along the lines of "Welcome to the Escape family!" and "Oh they are the best, you will love it!"

I knew I had a small car both by military family and mom car standards, but I didn't realize so many people drove this particular model.

Chris22

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2661
  • Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4956 on: August 02, 2016, 06:34:57 AM »
An acquaintance posted a picture of a big new Ford Escape SUV. Lots and lots of congratulatory comments along the lines of "Welcome to the Escape family!" and "Oh they are the best, you will love it!"

I knew I had a small car both by military family and mom car standards, but I didn't realize so many people drove this particular model.

10th best selling car/vehicle in the US in June:



Also, LOL at a "big" new Escape.  It's 178" long.  A Honda Accord is 189" long.  A Civic is 176.9" long.  An Escape is taller and boxy, but not a "big" car by any stretch.
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

frooglepoodle

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 673
  • Location: DC Surburbs
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4957 on: August 02, 2016, 12:00:14 PM »
An acquaintance posted a picture of a big new Ford Escape SUV. Lots and lots of congratulatory comments along the lines of "Welcome to the Escape family!" and "Oh they are the best, you will love it!"

I knew I had a small car both by military family and mom car standards, but I didn't realize so many people drove this particular model.

10th best selling car/vehicle in the US in June:



Also, LOL at a "big" new Escape.  It's 178" long.  A Honda Accord is 189" long.  A Civic is 176.9" long.  An Escape is taller and boxy, but not a "big" car by any stretch.

Interesting! I'm not a car person, can you tell?

Edit: Went back and checked, as it had looked like a big car. It was an Explorer.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 12:05:07 PM by frooglepoodle »

Digital Dogma

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 387
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4958 on: August 02, 2016, 02:50:22 PM »
I dunno, I'm not even sure where to shop for a S&D water heater; last one I bought was off the shelf at Home Depot.

I use openboxdirect.com for any appliances for my rentals. Sometimes they come pretty dinged up, but if they're metal you can usually disassemble them and straighten them out and then reassemble.

Thanks for the tip, I'll pass this on to someone I know!

jandr

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 10
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4959 on: August 02, 2016, 04:28:43 PM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

LeRainDrop

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4960 on: August 02, 2016, 06:25:15 PM »
Posted by a very sweet former co-worker who got fired, had to sell her home, and is now running an MLM "business."

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5313
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4961 on: August 03, 2016, 05:19:52 AM »
there are people in this forum who have the math worked out to know how much they need to save to have 11 minutes of freedom, each year, forever.
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

MustacheMathTM

ender

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3697
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4962 on: August 03, 2016, 06:29:08 AM »
there are people in this forum who have the math worked out to know how much they need to save to have 11 minutes of freedom, each year, forever.

For someone spending 30k a year working 40 hours a week for 50 weeks a year:

  • $30000 * 11 / (40x60x50) * 25 = $68.75

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5313
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4963 on: August 03, 2016, 06:41:06 AM »
Thank you, Ender. :D
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

MustacheMathTM

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4964 on: August 03, 2016, 07:18:11 AM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

I've gotten pretty tired of people wrapping everything in God and while refusing to demonstrate some personal wisdom in life.

If you are going to be thoughtful about your spirituality, why not also be thoughtful about your health or your spending or your future?

Its like God isn't the creator, etc but God is a brand and an excuse. 

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1317
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4965 on: August 03, 2016, 08:01:49 AM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

I've gotten pretty tired of people wrapping everything in God and while refusing to demonstrate some personal wisdom in life.

If you are going to be thoughtful about your spirituality, why not also be thoughtful about your health or your spending or your future?

Its like God isn't the creator, etc but God is a brand and an excuse.

It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5313
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4966 on: August 03, 2016, 08:35:09 AM »
It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.

I don't know, some devote followers of certain religions stop whatever they are doing, including sleeping, to pray several times during the day, every single day. While it's not maybe the same as exercising or following a budget, it still takes dedication that many people don't possess.
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

MustacheMathTM

cheapass

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4967 on: August 03, 2016, 08:59:04 AM »
It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.

Post of the year right here

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1317
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4968 on: August 03, 2016, 09:01:22 AM »
It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.

I don't know, some devote followers of certain religions stop whatever they are doing, including sleeping, to pray several times during the day, every single day. While it's not maybe the same as exercising or following a budget, it still takes dedication that many people don't possess.

Every major world religion contains emphasis on personal responsibility and sometimes civic responsibility as well as different forms of outward expression. My beef is with the way it's become socially acceptable to ditch the personal responsibility part, overemphasize the outward expression part, and act as though we expect to get the same results.
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

BDWW

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 237
  • Location: MT
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4969 on: August 03, 2016, 12:42:03 PM »
It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.

I don't know, some devote followers of certain religions stop whatever they are doing, including sleeping, to pray several times during the day, every single day. While it's not maybe the same as exercising or following a budget, it still takes dedication that many people don't possess.

Every major world religion contains emphasis on personal responsibility and sometimes civic responsibility as well as different forms of outward expression. My beef is with the way it's become socially acceptable to ditch the personal responsibility part, overemphasize the outward expression part, and act as though we expect to get the same results.

I feel to a certain degree, that's a modern media narrative/stereotype. There are a lot of religious people in this(USA) country and a large swath of them do practice what they preach. But like any stereotype the ones who fit it, stand out and perpetuate it.


kayvent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Location: Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4970 on: August 03, 2016, 07:19:54 PM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

I've gotten pretty tired of people wrapping everything in God and while refusing to demonstrate some personal wisdom in life.

If you are going to be thoughtful about your spirituality, why not also be thoughtful about your health or your spending or your future?

Its like God isn't the creator, etc but God is a brand and an excuse.

What those people need is some good Bible'ing. Among many financial tidbits, the good book says to be an astute financial steward and it suggests to avoid debt, surety, and high leveraging. I don't believe I've met any "Spend all I want, the Lord will provide" people but if I did, I'd probably try to tell the brother or sister to rethink their position. Maybe I'd slip in a quote from Song of Solomon. Catch them off guard with that one.

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5313
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4971 on: August 04, 2016, 04:50:21 AM »
What those people need is some good Bible'ing. Among many financial tidbits, the good book says to be an astute financial steward and it suggests to avoid debt, surety, and high leveraging.

To be fair, that text was written in a different interest rate environment than we are in currently.
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

MustacheMathTM

Apples

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 690
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4972 on: August 04, 2016, 07:18:15 AM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

I've gotten pretty tired of people wrapping everything in God and while refusing to demonstrate some personal wisdom in life.

If you are going to be thoughtful about your spirituality, why not also be thoughtful about your health or your spending or your future?

Its like God isn't the creator, etc but God is a brand and an excuse.

What those people need is some good Bible'ing. Among many financial tidbits, the good book says to be an astute financial steward and it suggests to avoid debt, surety, and high leveraging. I don't believe I've met any "Spend all I want, the Lord will provide" people but if I did, I'd probably try to tell the brother or sister to rethink their position. Maybe I'd slip in a quote from Song of Solomon. Catch them off guard with that one.

Can I borrow you?  And can you time travel?  I really want you to talk to my cousin in fall of 2014.  She was divorcing her husband and leaving a part time job to get away from him, and moving in with us for the transition while job and apartment hunting.  She had $800 to her name, so I figured it would take a few months for her to find a job and get enough cash to get back on her feet.  Cue 4 months later and 2 job interviews where she either thought it was too boring or told them she wanted to be doing something completely unrelated in 5 years, so surprise they didn't hire her.  Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week.  Meanwhile, she quit attending church and gave up all other big tenants of personal responsibility.  Gahhhhh.  We kicked her out to go live with a different family member after 4 months, I just couldn't take it.  I REALLY WISHED that I knew Bible quotes to give her at the time.

WerKater

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 308
  • Location: Germany
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4973 on: August 04, 2016, 07:29:00 AM »

Cue 4 months later and 2 job interviews where she either thought it was too boring or told them she wanted to be doing something completely unrelated in 5 years, so surprise they didn't hire her.  Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week. 
Reminds me of an old joke.
[Disclaimer: I have no clue what that website is. But it was my first hit when I googled for that joke.]

onlykelsey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1903
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4974 on: August 04, 2016, 07:33:28 AM »

Cue 4 months later and 2 job interviews where she either thought it was too boring or told them she wanted to be doing something completely unrelated in 5 years, so surprise they didn't hire her.  Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week. 
Reminds me of an old joke.
[Disclaimer: I have no clue what that website is. But it was my first hit when I googled for that joke.]

Haha, I love that joke.

Some people truly do seem to get the short end of the stick in life, but most of us have been given all sorts of options and ways out of our situation.

Inaya

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 913
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4975 on: August 04, 2016, 07:54:12 AM »
Saw this posted on my fb today.

"God never gives you a dream that matches your budget. He's not checking your bank account, he's checking your faith. ✨"

Because everyone knows we should spend all that we want since the good Lord will provide.

I've gotten pretty tired of people wrapping everything in God and while refusing to demonstrate some personal wisdom in life.

If you are going to be thoughtful about your spirituality, why not also be thoughtful about your health or your spending or your future?

Its like God isn't the creator, etc but God is a brand and an excuse.

What those people need is some good Bible'ing. Among many financial tidbits, the good book says to be an astute financial steward and it suggests to avoid debt, surety, and high leveraging. I don't believe I've met any "Spend all I want, the Lord will provide" people but if I did, I'd probably try to tell the brother or sister to rethink their position. Maybe I'd slip in a quote from Song of Solomon. Catch them off guard with that one.


 Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week. 


"Well, Dad, it looks like we're God now..."
My Cleverly Titled Journal: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/cleverly-titled-journal/
My Cat's Facebook Page (yes, really, and I'm not above begging for likes): www.facebook.com/chicagotau
Tau now has an Instagram: www.instagram.com/chicagotau or #chicagotau
Ting referral ($25 credit!): https://zds8505smfe.ting.com/

Drifterrider

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 998
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4976 on: August 04, 2016, 07:55:22 AM »
  I REALLY WISHED that I knew Bible quotes to give her at the time.[/quote]

I think "Physician heal thyself" would have been a good one.

MrsDinero

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
    • Mrs. Dinero's Journal
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4977 on: August 04, 2016, 07:56:29 AM »

Cue 4 months later and 2 job interviews where she either thought it was too boring or told them she wanted to be doing something completely unrelated in 5 years, so surprise they didn't hire her.  Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week. 
Reminds me of an old joke.
[Disclaimer: I have no clue what that website is. But it was my first hit when I googled for that joke.]

Reminds me of a friend who had to take a test for a county job.  They took the practice test and scored under the minimum acceptable score. 

They had the study guide for a month and could take the practice test as many times as they wanted.  They didn't study and never took the practice test again. 

When the actual test date arrived, guess what....they failed!  with the exact same score as when they took the first practice test.  On their facebook page, they lamented how upset because they were still unemployed but clearly god didn't want them to have this job and they trusted in his path for them. 

Chris22

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2661
  • Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4978 on: August 04, 2016, 08:23:10 AM »

Cue 4 months later and 2 job interviews where she either thought it was too boring or told them she wanted to be doing something completely unrelated in 5 years, so surprise they didn't hire her.  Lawyer fees ate up her money, she bought cheap new dresses and went to wine festivals while my dad watched her son, and she refused to take just any old job all because she "deserved" it.  "God didn't put me here to do minimum wage work and never see my son."  Which fine, yes, that sucks, but it will get money in the door. I think she said "God will provide" at least 4 times a week. 
Reminds me of an old joke.
[Disclaimer: I have no clue what that website is. But it was my first hit when I googled for that joke.]

Reminds me too of this:

"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

kayvent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Location: Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4979 on: August 04, 2016, 08:37:57 AM »
  I REALLY WISHED that I knew Bible quotes to give her at the time.

I think "Physician heal thyself" would have been a good one.
[/quote]

That is a bit too atomized. Verses or chapters are better examples. If I may make this anti-semitic joke: Jesus was a Jew. The bible is filled with sections about money as a result.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2016, 08:40:26 AM by kayvent »

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1317
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4980 on: August 04, 2016, 10:56:51 AM »
  I REALLY WISHED that I knew Bible quotes to give her at the time.
Quote
I think "Physician heal thyself" would have been a good one.

That is a bit too atomized. Verses or chapters are better examples. If I may make this anti-semitic joke: Jesus was a Jew. The bible is filled with sections about money as a result.

It's not anti-Semitic to note that the Old Testament is basically the Torah, which is a set of vital scriptures identified by the earliest Jews as containing all of their most important knowledge. That knowledge did include maxims about business and money management because those activities were vital to the survival of the community and the people in it.

A lot of factors combined to create the association between Judaism and finance.

First, the earliest Hebrew people emphasized literacy to the point of obsession. The bar mitzvah tradition, by which a boy is recognized as a man by the rest of the community, includes public demonstration of his reading skills. This tradition goes back thousands of years, and it produced a community of people who knew how to read in a world where the vast majority of others were illiterate and often innumerate. Work that required record keeping (and the accounting and banking professions definitely do) also required literacy. So there was an automatic skill overlap.

Second, the Jewish tribes didn't integrate well with other cultures. There was never a lot of voluntary intermarriage, and the community was always visibly separate even during times where there was no overt conflict and Jewish people lived harmoniously for generations with people from different communities (which was actually the norm). However the lack of intermarriage made it almost impossible for Jewish families to form ties with, say, the Roman patrician families during the Republic era or with landowning aristocrats during the medieval era. So ownership or control of land, the primary means of production prior to the Industrial Revolution, simply wasn't an option for Jewish families in Western Europe. The skilled trades also weren't much of an option for people who were ineligible for guild membership or who were otherwise unable to get their sons apprenticed. Even knowledge based professions that required admission to a university were sometimes inaccessible. Commerce, however, had no such barrier to entry.

Third, at some point in history every single group of people in the world has been dominated, defeated, enslaved, driven out, or otherwise on the losing end of a conflict with some other group. Being a very visible group that obviously does not integrate with other cultures has, at times, resulted in attack. A lot of Jewish people have had to flee their homes over the last several thousand years. Having a profession where it's possible to stash resources elsewhere, or pick up and move on short notice, has literally saved people's lives.

Now, let's suppose I was in charge of writing down what was important. Suppose I was writing only the most important things: something that would be studied, memorized, copied out, and the first thing grabbed and rescued in case of emergency. Along with the important family lineages and the information about divinity, should I also include the maxims and skills that allow me to provide for my family, and that would allow my children or grandchildren to start over from scratch in a new country, if they had to? I'd like to think that I'd be smart enough to do that, and to provide them with the tools to save themselves.

So, yes, the Torah talks about money and business.
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

Chris22

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2661
  • Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4981 on: August 04, 2016, 11:15:34 AM »
  I REALLY WISHED that I knew Bible quotes to give her at the time.
Quote
I think "Physician heal thyself" would have been a good one.

That is a bit too atomized. Verses or chapters are better examples. If I may make this anti-semitic joke: Jesus was a Jew. The bible is filled with sections about money as a result.

It's not anti-Semitic to note that the Old Testament is basically the Torah, which is a set of vital scriptures identified by the earliest Jews as containing all of their most important knowledge. That knowledge did include maxims about business and money management because those activities were vital to the survival of the community and the people in it.

A lot of factors combined to create the association between Judaism and finance.

First, the earliest Hebrew people emphasized literacy to the point of obsession. The bar mitzvah tradition, by which a boy is recognized as a man by the rest of the community, includes public demonstration of his reading skills. This tradition goes back thousands of years, and it produced a community of people who knew how to read in a world where the vast majority of others were illiterate and often innumerate. Work that required record keeping (and the accounting and banking professions definitely do) also required literacy. So there was an automatic skill overlap.

Second, the Jewish tribes didn't integrate well with other cultures. There was never a lot of voluntary intermarriage, and the community was always visibly separate even during times where there was no overt conflict and Jewish people lived harmoniously for generations with people from different communities (which was actually the norm). However the lack of intermarriage made it almost impossible for Jewish families to form ties with, say, the Roman patrician families during the Republic era or with landowning aristocrats during the medieval era. So ownership or control of land, the primary means of production prior to the Industrial Revolution, simply wasn't an option for Jewish families in Western Europe. The skilled trades also weren't much of an option for people who were ineligible for guild membership or who were otherwise unable to get their sons apprenticed. Even knowledge based professions that required admission to a university were sometimes inaccessible. Commerce, however, had no such barrier to entry.

Third, at some point in history every single group of people in the world has been dominated, defeated, enslaved, driven out, or otherwise on the losing end of a conflict with some other group. Being a very visible group that obviously does not integrate with other cultures has, at times, resulted in attack. A lot of Jewish people have had to flee their homes over the last several thousand years. Having a profession where it's possible to stash resources elsewhere, or pick up and move on short notice, has literally saved people's lives.

Now, let's suppose I was in charge of writing down what was important. Suppose I was writing only the most important things: something that would be studied, memorized, copied out, and the first thing grabbed and rescued in case of emergency. Along with the important family lineages and the information about divinity, should I also include the maxims and skills that allow me to provide for my family, and that would allow my children or grandchildren to start over from scratch in a new country, if they had to? I'd like to think that I'd be smart enough to do that, and to provide them with the tools to save themselves.

So, yes, the Torah talks about money and business.

Nice post.  Bravo.
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4982 on: August 04, 2016, 12:05:17 PM »
It's culturally acceptable to treat religion as a legitimate off-switch for the brain. Praying, praising, acts of blind and ill-advised faith, and other kinds of holy rolling are treated as legitimate substitutes for self-examination, discipline, and personal responsibility. It's not a mentality that makes even a fragment of sense to people for whom religion supplements personal accountability. But it's still popular. Maybe it feels good to the people who do it? After all, making mouth noises is probably easier than, say, exercising or following a budget.

I don't know, some devote followers of certain religions stop whatever they are doing, including sleeping, to pray several times during the day, every single day. While it's not maybe the same as exercising or following a budget, it still takes dedication that many people don't possess.

Every major world religion contains emphasis on personal responsibility and sometimes civic responsibility as well as different forms of outward expression. My beef is with the way it's become socially acceptable to ditch the personal responsibility part, overemphasize the outward expression part, and act as though we expect to get the same results.

THAT!

Aimza

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 14
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4983 on: August 04, 2016, 03:19:40 PM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

frugalnacho

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2687
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Madison Heights, Michigan
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4984 on: August 05, 2016, 07:45:11 AM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

Did he put flames on it though?

Drifterrider

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 998
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4985 on: August 05, 2016, 08:30:11 AM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

Did he put flames on it though?

Nope.  Flames appeared when it died.

Actually, I have no idea but the thought was funny.

kayvent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Location: Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4986 on: August 05, 2016, 09:05:31 PM »
[The whole post]

All this on a thread about stuff people heard on Facebook. This is why I love these forums - smart, interesting people and great conversations!

Imagine how I feel. I make an immature joke about a member of the trinity being a Jew and get back an excellent, thought out response. I was ill-deserving.

kayvent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Location: Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4987 on: August 05, 2016, 09:07:39 PM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

I am honestly curious: is that why he is an ex?

Chaplin

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 547
  • Location: Le Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4988 on: August 06, 2016, 01:32:43 AM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

I am honestly curious: is that why he is an ex?

Well, he's dead, so that pretty much makes him an ex.

kayvent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Location: Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4989 on: August 06, 2016, 05:16:01 AM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

I am honestly curious: is that why he is an ex?

Well, he's dead, so that pretty much makes him an ex.

You may be right. I read that as the truck dying.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2016, 09:31:26 AM by kayvent »

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5474
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4990 on: August 06, 2016, 08:17:57 AM »
Getting super OT here, but if you are married to someone and he dies, that makes him your late husband, not your ex husband (or of course late wife, not ex wife, in reverse).  Of course if he is your ex husband when he dies, he is still your ex.

Aimza  So giving in to curiosity, was he your ex before he died?  Or did the truck die?   Sorry, English can be such an imprecise language.

Chaplin

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 547
  • Location: Le Canada
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4991 on: August 06, 2016, 10:02:13 AM »

Sorry, English can be such an imprecise language.

Which is what makes word games so much fun!

nnls

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 744
  • Location: Perth, AU
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4992 on: August 06, 2016, 03:58:23 PM »

Anyway, the guy is in trouble. But I am wondering, who buys used cars for 30K?!

My ex was going to buy a used pick up truck for over 30k just because it had flames on the side of it. I pointed out he could buy a cheaper truck and put flames on himself for way less than half the cost.  He only didn't get the truck because someone else bought it before he could.

He ended up buying a truck for 5k that he didn't get inspected and died one month after purchase.

I am honestly curious: is that why he is an ex?

Well, he's dead, so that pretty much makes him an ex.

You may be right. I read that as the truck dying.

I also read it as truck dying

frugalnacho

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2687
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Madison Heights, Michigan
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4993 on: August 07, 2016, 01:27:26 PM »
I had a good chuckle at the previous confusion. While a funny interpretation of that sentence, I don't believe anyone would have constructed the sentence that way to convey that he died and not the truck. I read it as:

He ended up buying a truck (for 5k) that:

1. he didn't get inspected, and
2. died one month after purchase.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2688
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4994 on: August 07, 2016, 06:53:28 PM »
I have some friends who posted an article that said ,in no uncertain terms, entitled "It is literally impossible to save money when you are poor."  Just to make sure they were clear about that, they repeated the statement in bold print and also called special attention to it.

"Literally impossible".

The article went on to explain that when one is poor, it's hard to save.  (Duh.  There's some news.)

An example it gave is because it would be cheaper to buy a big bag of rice or beans, but someone who is poor cannot afford to buy a big bag, so they are forced to buy more expensive per serving smaller bags.

That's a perfectly good example but it in no way supports the premise of the article that it is "literally impossible" to save money.

Some of my friends chimed in about the "capitalist conspiracy" that intentionally has store owners in poor areas stocking only small packages instead of the big ones, all to keep those poor people down.

I am now an evil, ill-mannered lout because I pointed out half a dozen ways someone could get past the sample problem.

The consensus was that only a truly extraordinary person could do something like:

a) Get a side gig to raise $150 and use that to jump-start purchasing the larger packages, or
b) Get a friend or three to share the cost of the larger packages, or
c) Stop smoking cigarettes and use the saved money for the cheaper groceries.

As for the "capitalist conspiracy", I asked if anyone had actually ever asked the store owner to order a larger bag for them?   I suppose that would require extraordinary talents to be able to do, too...

For example, in our community, there has been a big to-do about a "food desert" in one of our poorer areas.   I think they are wrong about that, but that's immaterial.   Someone in the community asked the local farmer's market to show up and now they come out once a week and sell fresh produce.   

Other examples of things considered too extraordinary for regular people to do include a Memphis kid who sold the local paper on weekends for 5 years, from 8th to 12th grade.   He wanted to go to college and his single, poor mom told him he would have to solve that problem for himself.   He raised $50,000 before his first day of college, which is enough to fund his degree from a local university.   I mean really!  How could selling papers by standing on a street corner be considered something that requires someone extraordinary to do it!   

Basenji

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 646
  • Location: Inside the Beltway
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4995 on: August 08, 2016, 07:30:42 AM »
Young person I know liked and shared this.

https://m.facebook.com/BuzzFeedBuyMeThat/photos/a.245363505796264.1073741828.224750834524198/320605311605416/?type=3&source=48&__tn__=E

"Me: I never have any money.
Also me: [photo of girl carrying numerous clothes-shopping bags]"

So sad...I had started talking to her about money issues. Ugh. Gonna go remedial now.

« Last Edit: August 08, 2016, 07:33:49 AM by Basenji »

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4996 on: August 08, 2016, 08:20:24 AM »
To be fair I have seen smaller shops (mostly convenience stores) sell things at a price higher than a real grocery store.

Maybe these poor people haven't figured out the most cost effective places to shop? They just go for the one nearest home? The difference between the 1lb bag of something and the 5lb bag of something is usually a few cents per pound. Nothing drastic. If it is something drastic then it's time to find another place to shop.

I would recommend that they group up with a friend with a car and drive to a WalMart or other brand grocery store occasionally just like the rest of us make pilgrimages to the warehouse stores.

That's what us poor college students would do. That's what us poor military guys would do too. That's what we do today occasionally. Leave the kids with a friend/family and get the shopping done. Share the ride.

I still think the reason SOME people are poor is that they aren't creative enough to get out of their rut.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1317
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4997 on: August 08, 2016, 10:00:59 AM »
The homeless family of 7 that has been living with me since the first of July, and that will be here through the end of August, never seems to have a problem feeding itself or driving around. There's one working adult and 6 kids (well, we're down to 5 so I suppose it's now a family of 6).

Here's how they do food.

1) Get fast food for the whole fam' damly at least once a day. Make sure to go driving around in the car for at least half an hour with no clear direction, because it is Something To Do. (Taking out the trash or cleaning up after the kids would also be Something To Do, but then there wouldn't be the highly artistic pile of dirty diapers from the kid who's about to turn 4 but who isn't potty trained). It's very important to have a hundred-dollar-a-week fast food habit because that's all you've trained your kids to eat.

2) Even though healthy, real food is being provided for you, make sure to get a bunch of prepackaged, highly processed stuff every time you go for groceries. Leave the half-eaten stuff and the seeping drink containers randomly around the house, especially on top of wooden tables right next to a coaster. Make sure to avoid stepping into the kitchen or dining room when eating, because if you eat in the places that are designed to have food in them you won't be able to get that characteristic stale-food stench in the bedroom.

3) Thou Shalt Not walk to the grocery store half a mile away. That's fine for your host or hostess, but you've got More Important Things To Do because working 20 hours a week is just so strenuous.

4) When you get packaged food, open it immediately even if you've already got a jar or package of something else open. Make sure to have at least six or seven bags of "chips" open at the same time. Leave these lying around wherever it's convenient because insects are gross but you're incapable of understanding the relationship between food and insects. Besides, if the entire bag or package is spoiled, it's an excuse to throw it out and wail to your host that you need to buy more. [Edited to add: this is why it's best to pay more per unit to buy small packages.]

5) Make sure to carry food through the house no matter how many times your host or hostess asks you not to, so that it spills. Don't clean up spills because grinding your chips or your McCrap into the carpet is a vital part of your unique cultural heritage. It contributes to that homey sty-like aroma your host's house lacks, and it also guarantees that you won't have leftovers.

6) Make sure each of your kids has at least two or three foods they refuse to eat, and cater to them constantly so that they never have to compromise by trying something new or having a vegetable or fruit that isn't exactly what they want, when they want it. This will ensure that you (or, more accurately, your host or hostess because you're Too Busy) must prepare two or three meals at every sitting because somebody goes into a snit and refuses to eat the same food they demanded a week before.

7) Have a giant laundry list of different foods you "need" immediately, but don't express an interest in any of them until after they've spoiled

8) Make mouth noises about wanting fresh fruit and vegetables, but make sure that only one or two servings get used and the rest is thrown away. When you eat an apple, take just one or two bites, throw the rest out, and in a few minutes when you're hungry again, take another one.

9) Leave food in the most inappropriate possible place so that it spoils. Dairy, meat, and perishables must be left out on the kitchen counter. "Grease", or what the rest of the world knows as cooking oil, must be left in multiple pans on the stove so that it spills and stinks. Leave bottles and bags of bread open so that the air can get in. Cram empty or nearly-empty containers into the fridge instead of using smaller containers or throwing out things that spoil. [Again, here is the benefit of small packages. You're going to do your best to let the food spoil instantly anyway, so since you're only going to use things that are freshly opened and throw the rest away, why get a large container?]

10) All older children and adults must cook for themselves. Never, ever prepare a meal for the whole household because it's a mortal sin for more than one or two people to eat at a time: you can clutter up the kitchen far better if there's constantly someone in it, because that provides an excuse to never sweep or wipe up. This also ensures that there's plenty of food to be thrown away because eating leftovers might be fine for your host or hostess, but it's beneath you because you're superior.

11) If by chance you use something and put it away because your host or hostess is on your case again, make sure the lid isn't on. Lids aren't good for anything anyway: every jar of mayonnaise or bag of rice ought to be single-serve, so when you put the rice in the cabinet or the condiments in the fridge, balance them precariously so that they tip over and spill the second the door is open. You need spills in the cabinet and the fridge to booby trap your host or hostess for lulz, because they just don't appreciate you or your unique culture enough. You're also trying to train them to not be so unreasonable as to ask you to put away what you use. It's far more culturally appropriate to pile your food up on the counter.

12) Never, ever, ever finish a bag, bottle, or box of anything. Use just a couple slices of bread and leave the rest to dry out in an open bag. Take a bottle or can of processed drink, open it, take a couple of sips, and then either spill it or leave it sitting around. A few minutes later, repeat with a fresh can or bottle. If you've got two cases of, say, crackaroni, make sure to open and use at least one box out of each, so that you've got two open cases cluttering the place up. It's important to pile the clutter high so that there are several layers of everything. That will maximize spills and wastage.

In closing, this is how homeless families with large numbers of children like to cook and eat. I'd suggest that it's unique to this family, except having been in several other apartments or homes of people in this social class I've got to say that the way these folks try to live while in my home is pretty much par for the course for them. Food is free (when I'm not providing, there are food stamps) and so there's no incentive to do anything but waste. They're moving out at the end of the month, which is when I expect to hear a bunch of bitching and wailing about how the mother hasn't been able to save anything at all. She's lucky I don't give her a bill for all the stuff her kids have broken or damaged.

Why have I tolerated this? My goal was to get my daughter to value life in an organized household and to appreciate how much work goes into taking care of kids or teens. She didn't, before. Despite having been raised as an enabler, she was too willing to sacrifice her own interests even when she was pulled out of an enabling environment. That sort of thing can't be allowed in a child, but when the child learns only through experience, it's best to let them have a small taste of the experience under controlled circumstances. It took a brief voyage into Pig-istan, a couple months of her working like Cinderella, and massive destruction of her clothing and belongings before her disgust and sense of being used hit critical mass. She's within inches of developing a sense of self-worth, because her house guests are starting to treat her the same way they treat me: good enough to use, but not good enough to invite to the party. So that's why I'm allowing my daughter's couch-surfing friend and associated munchkins to do this to my home: to permanently turn my daughter off of enabling behavior along with disorderliness, chaos, waste, and bad smells. It's working.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2016, 10:07:28 AM by TheGrimSqueaker »
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

merula

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 717
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4998 on: August 08, 2016, 10:12:49 AM »
TheGrimSqueaker, you are the best and most hilarious mother in the whole world.

LeRainDrop

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #4999 on: August 08, 2016, 10:15:29 AM »
Why have I tolerated this?

Holy bananas, GS!  Good luck making it through the end of August.  I would have an anxiety attack for sure.