Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8245988 times)

alanB

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19700 on: February 08, 2018, 08:44:08 AM »
[...]the daughter got in an accident and totaled the car, so the daughter had to take out a car loan to buy another new car because the insurance payout on the first one wasn't enough.  This is your run of the mill story, except then my co-worker said, we didn't want her saddled with a new car loan but God had other plans. 

What??!
Unfortunately, it's easier to blame something external (even supernatural) than blame yourself or your family member and actually own your fuckups.
Hilarious, I am imagining the car buying experience must have gone like this:
"What kind of car are you looking for?"
"Oh it is not what we want, it is what God wants for us.  We are beholden to His plan and will sign whatever loan documents He has prepared for us as His humble servants."

I guess most people think "I had a new car, now I need a new-new car."  The same thing happened to a coworker of mine, new Audi totaled after like 6 months... so he bought the same car again. 

On the subject of cell phones, I have on numerous occasions heard people on conferences calls dial in while they are driving.  Risk your life to prove your dedication to your job!!  Who cares if it is illegal!!

Dave1442397

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19701 on: February 08, 2018, 10:30:19 AM »
God recommends the Honda Accord.


mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19702 on: February 08, 2018, 12:32:47 PM »
My company just had the windows cleaned on its executive floors but not the rest of the 14-storey building.

Noticed this yesterday when I had meetings on the exec floors to pitch two $350,000 projects.

I wanted to ask, if we bring in the $700,000, can we spring for the window washers?

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19703 on: February 08, 2018, 01:18:21 PM »
Distracted driving may be risky, but I don’t pay attention to conference calls anyways.  Really no more dangerous than the radio.  Hands free not ilegal

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19704 on: February 08, 2018, 02:14:53 PM »
On the subject of cell phones, I have on numerous occasions heard people on conferences calls dial in while they are driving.  Risk your life to prove your dedication to your job!!  Who cares if it is illegal!!

Its not illegal here but if we receive a call from an obviously moving car we won't talk to them until they call back from a parking spot.

Its one thing to ask - do we need milk and another to have someone call and want an extended conversation about extended family matters or etc. 

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19705 on: February 09, 2018, 01:00:40 AM »
I've always wondered if the danger from cell phones was purely the distraction or if it's also holding the phone to your face. If hands-free is just as dangerous (as the term distracted-driving suggests) I wonder if having passengers is equally distracting and dangerous.

No, there have been studies on this.  Talking to a passenger in the car isn't the same because it doesn't mentally remove you from your environment, which talking on a phone partially does, whether you're driving or walking or sitting on your couch.  Last I heard, hands-free is just as distracting as holding a phone to your face.  My suspicion is the only reason hands-free is legal and holding a phone isn't is because of the difficulty detecting and enforcing hands-free, and also pushback from the auto industry, as bluetooth was starting to become a popular selling point in cars right as these laws were going into effect.
Citation please.  I have not seen this, I have seen the research bias the results by asking the participants to do hard math problems to as equivalent to the phone, but not one comparing like you have posted.

I've seen this study too. One of the factors is that a passenger (unless they very rarely travel in cars) will naturally pause the conversation when driving gets more complicated and requires more thinking.

alanB

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19706 on: February 09, 2018, 09:41:15 AM »
Distracted driving may be risky, but I don’t pay attention to conference calls anyways.  Really no more dangerous than the radio.  Hands free not ilegal
Pretty sure that (while driving) these people look up the conference info in their email, dial in, then enter the conference ID to connect.  I do not think they are savvy enough to do it hands-free.  Yea I agree that once they are on the call the biggest risk is falling asleep or even dying of boredom.

RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19707 on: February 09, 2018, 10:57:03 AM »
I've always wondered if the danger from cell phones was purely the distraction or if it's also holding the phone to your face. If hands-free is just as dangerous (as the term distracted-driving suggests) I wonder if having passengers is equally distracting and dangerous.

No, there have been studies on this.  Talking to a passenger in the car isn't the same because it doesn't mentally remove you from your environment, which talking on a phone partially does, whether you're driving or walking or sitting on your couch.  Last I heard, hands-free is just as distracting as holding a phone to your face.  My suspicion is the only reason hands-free is legal and holding a phone isn't is because of the difficulty detecting and enforcing hands-free, and also pushback from the auto industry, as bluetooth was starting to become a popular selling point in cars right as these laws were going into effect.
Citation please.  I have not seen this, I have seen the research bias the results by asking the participants to do hard math problems to as equivalent to the phone, but not one comparing like you have posted.

I've seen this study too. One of the factors is that a passenger (unless they very rarely travel in cars) will naturally pause the conversation when driving gets more complicated and requires more thinking.

Good God I wish that were true. That is the number one fight me and my SO have. You think money drives people apart? Try talking while they're trying to drive a new route. I'd love to see this study because that does not tally with my experience at all - I'm probably an outlier since I don't multi-task at all. I feel more invested in a conversation with someone right next to me. A handsfree call can be tuned out like the radio (and apologies made later...)

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19708 on: February 09, 2018, 12:34:56 PM »
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16854702

From 2006...

Quote
Approximately 125 studies were reviewed with regard to the research questions, type and rigor of the methods, and findings.

Quote
Experimental studies have found that simulated or instrumented driving tasks, or driving while being observed, are compromised by tasks intended to replicate phone conversations, whether using hand-held or hands-free phones, and may be further compromised by the physical distraction of handling phones.

Quote
Two such studies found a fourfold increase in the risk of a property-damage-only crash and the risk of an injury crash associated with phone use; increased risk was similar for males and females, younger and older drivers, and hands-free and hand-held phones

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19709 on: February 09, 2018, 03:39:22 PM »
We Mustachians would love to have a 20 minute walking commute to work. That is about as good as you could get.

That would be the best commute ever.
I had that a couple of years in DC.  Glorious!

Hula Hoop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19710 on: February 09, 2018, 03:42:35 PM »
We Mustachians would love to have a 20 minute walking commute to work. That is about as good as you could get.

That would be the best commute ever.
I had that a couple of years in DC.  Glorious!

I have a 35 minute (brisk) walking commute currently and it's the best thing ever.  I walk every day no matter the weather and it really clears my head and gives me effortless exercise.

RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19711 on: February 09, 2018, 04:19:37 PM »
We Mustachians would love to have a 20 minute walking commute to work. That is about as good as you could get.

That would be the best commute ever.
I had that a couple of years in DC.  Glorious!

I have a 35 minute (brisk) walking commute currently and it's the best thing ever.  I walk every day no matter the weather and it really clears my head and gives me effortless exercise.

I had this commute for a while. It was 30 minutes along a scenic river. On the way home on Wednesdays, the farmers market would just be closing so if I hurried I could grab the end of day surplus. There is nothing better in life.

Of course, I could have taken a smelly bus for a 20 minute commute instead...

Roe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19712 on: February 10, 2018, 04:10:26 AM »

Good God I wish that were true. That is the number one fight me and my SO have. You think money drives people apart? Try talking while they're trying to drive a new route. I'd love to see this study because that does not tally with my experience at all - I'm probably an outlier since I don't multi-task at all. I feel more invested in a conversation with someone right next to me. A handsfree call can be tuned out like the radio (and apologies made later...)

As someone married to a chatterbox without a license, i can relate.

Gin1984

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19713 on: February 10, 2018, 07:02:46 PM »
I've always wondered if the danger from cell phones was purely the distraction or if it's also holding the phone to your face. If hands-free is just as dangerous (as the term distracted-driving suggests) I wonder if having passengers is equally distracting and dangerous.

No, there have been studies on this.  Talking to a passenger in the car isn't the same because it doesn't mentally remove you from your environment, which talking on a phone partially does, whether you're driving or walking or sitting on your couch.  Last I heard, hands-free is just as distracting as holding a phone to your face.  My suspicion is the only reason hands-free is legal and holding a phone isn't is because of the difficulty detecting and enforcing hands-free, and also pushback from the auto industry, as bluetooth was starting to become a popular selling point in cars right as these laws were going into effect.
Citation please.  I have not seen this, I have seen the research bias the results by asking the participants to do hard math problems to as equivalent to the phone, but not one comparing like you have posted.

I've seen this study too. One of the factors is that a passenger (unless they very rarely travel in cars) will naturally pause the conversation when driving gets more complicated and requires more thinking.
Do you have the citation?

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RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19714 on: February 10, 2018, 11:35:06 PM »
Do you have the citation?

MrMoogle provided one

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16854702

From 2006...

Quote
Approximately 125 studies were reviewed with regard to the research questions, type and rigor of the methods, and findings.

Quote
Experimental studies have found that simulated or instrumented driving tasks, or driving while being observed, are compromised by tasks intended to replicate phone conversations, whether using hand-held or hands-free phones, and may be further compromised by the physical distraction of handling phones.

Quote
Two such studies found a fourfold increase in the risk of a property-damage-only crash and the risk of an injury crash associated with phone use; increased risk was similar for males and females, younger and older drivers, and hands-free and hand-held phones

Phoenix_Fire

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19715 on: February 13, 2018, 01:09:25 PM »
Talking to a co-worker, he's a warehouse manager and I suspect is paid pretty well.  He brings up his house and how when he bought it he did a 15 year mortgage.

CW: I have less than $10k left on my mortgage.
Me:  That's awesome, must feel great knowing that you could pay it off at any point now.
CW:  Well, no, I don't have that kind of money.  Plus I have a second mortgage on it. And I have about $20k on credit cards.
Me:  ....

About 15 minutes later he is telling co-worker 2 that he is looking to buy some sort of streaming box that comes with all sorts of movies included.  It's $400, but they have a buy one get one thing going on, but they are almost out of the ones that have extra movies, so he needs to do it soon.  He wants to get three boxes...

It started to make sense once I heard that.  I need to keep in mind that many people have different priorities.  Though I don't think priorities is the right word.  I'm convinced that most people have never been told better, or had anyone sit down and teach them what we take for granted as "common sense".
 

Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19716 on: February 13, 2018, 01:36:32 PM »
Eating lunch in the breakroom, ended up chatting with a couple coworkers. One of them confessed that he turned down several offers last year because the pay wasn't good enough. He's hoping for a promotion this year to management. If he doesn't get it, he'll probably start interviewing. Why? He needs more money. Unless he's drastically underpaid for the position, he's making around 85-90k. As far I know, he's single with no kids. I do wonder what he's spending his money on.

RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19717 on: February 13, 2018, 03:36:38 PM »
Eating lunch in the breakroom, ended up chatting with a couple coworkers. One of them confessed that he turned down several offers last year because the pay wasn't good enough. He's hoping for a promotion this year to management. If he doesn't get it, he'll probably start interviewing. Why? He needs more money. Unless he's drastically underpaid for the position, he's making around 85-90k. As far I know, he's single with no kids. I do wonder what he's spending his money on.

I wouldn't be too harsh on him. Wanting to earn more and knowing what you're worth isn't a bad thing. And frankly, I say that I "need" more money when I really mean that I want to save more.

Gin1984

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19718 on: February 14, 2018, 03:50:28 AM »
Do you have the citation?

MrMoogle provided one

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16854702

From 2006...

Quote
Approximately 125 studies were reviewed with regard to the research questions, type and rigor of the methods, and findings.

Quote
Experimental studies have found that simulated or instrumented driving tasks, or driving while being observed, are compromised by tasks intended to replicate phone conversations, whether using hand-held or hands-free phones, and may be further compromised by the physical distraction of handling phones.

Quote
Two such studies found a fourfold increase in the risk of a property-damage-only crash and the risk of an injury crash associated with phone use; increased risk was similar for males and females, younger and older drivers, and hands-free and hand-held phones
That is a metanalysis or a lit review.  That does not actually let me read the method of the kind of study you referenced and is most definitely not the citation to the study referenced. 

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19719 on: February 14, 2018, 09:54:53 AM »
That is a metanalysis or a lit review.  That does not actually let me read the method of the kind of study you referenced and is most definitely not the citation to the study referenced.

Feel free to google for more studies.  It seems like you're just looking for justification to not accept that hands free phone use is still dangerous.

blinx7

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19720 on: February 14, 2018, 10:12:13 AM »
Eating lunch in the breakroom, ended up chatting with a couple coworkers. One of them confessed that he turned down several offers last year because the pay wasn't good enough. He's hoping for a promotion this year to management. If he doesn't get it, he'll probably start interviewing. Why? He needs more money. Unless he's drastically underpaid for the position, he's making around 85-90k. As far I know, he's single with no kids. I do wonder what he's spending his money on.

I wouldn't be too harsh on him. Wanting to earn more and knowing what you're worth isn't a bad thing. And frankly, I say that I "need" more money when I really mean that I want to save more.

I had the same thoughts.

I vacillate between searching for a more highly-paid intense but high profile position or chucking it all and starting my own little part time consulting business.  Very different goals, but the basic theme is "if I am going to be putting this much time and effort into this, I need to be compensated accordingly or it's not worth it."

I've also turned down lateral moves that paid more because they weren't enough of a change while still searching for something better. 

It's weird to say "I have lots of money I just want more" so people cry poverty -- it's more socially acceptable. 

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19721 on: February 14, 2018, 12:48:26 PM »
Eating lunch in the breakroom, ended up chatting with a couple coworkers. One of them confessed that he turned down several offers last year because the pay wasn't good enough. He's hoping for a promotion this year to management. If he doesn't get it, he'll probably start interviewing. Why? He needs more money. Unless he's drastically underpaid for the position, he's making around 85-90k. As far I know, he's single with no kids. I do wonder what he's spending his money on.

I wouldn't be too harsh on him. Wanting to earn more and knowing what you're worth isn't a bad thing. And frankly, I say that I "need" more money when I really mean that I want to save more.

I had the same thoughts.

It's weird to say "I have lots of money I just want more" so people cry poverty -- it's more socially acceptable.

Absolutely that is the case. I make more than enough to live off of but I'm going to try to earn more and grow.

Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19722 on: February 14, 2018, 02:24:59 PM »
Eating lunch in the breakroom, ended up chatting with a couple coworkers. One of them confessed that he turned down several offers last year because the pay wasn't good enough. He's hoping for a promotion this year to management. If he doesn't get it, he'll probably start interviewing. Why? He needs more money. Unless he's drastically underpaid for the position, he's making around 85-90k. As far I know, he's single with no kids. I do wonder what he's spending his money on.

I wouldn't be too harsh on him. Wanting to earn more and knowing what you're worth isn't a bad thing. And frankly, I say that I "need" more money when I really mean that I want to save more.

I had the same thoughts.

It's weird to say "I have lots of money I just want more" so people cry poverty -- it's more socially acceptable.

Absolutely that is the case. I make more than enough to live off of but I'm going to try to earn more and grow.

Well, in today's breakroom chatting, I found out said coworker lives in the one of the most expensive areas of the city. And wants to buy rather than rent. At least he doesn't have a car, he hates to drive. Overall, nice guy, rich tastes, medium means.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19723 on: February 15, 2018, 12:21:27 AM »
Well, in today's breakroom chatting, I found out said coworker lives in the one of the most expensive areas of the city. And wants to buy rather than rent. At least he doesn't have a car, he hates to drive. Overall, nice guy, rich tastes, medium means.

I have such a coworker as well. He is married with now 3 children. Lives in an apartment in the city center. Shops at the most expensive grocery stores. Fancies only good quality food (no cheap brands for him). Buys the latest iPhone for himself and his older children. He saves a little money for him and his wife in a pension fund. I knew he had some money in the stock market.

But at least, he doesn't own a car and he seldom travels on vacation. But he has traveled on vacation all the way to Asia.
But recently he told me that he is debt free (including paid down his mortgage). He asked others at the table if they were debt free. Luckily the question died out before it reached me (as I would be embarrassed about colleagues knowing that I have such an expensive house without a mortgage).

kanga1622

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19724 on: February 15, 2018, 05:16:22 AM »
We Mustachians would love to have a 20 minute walking commute to work. That is about as good as you could get.

That would be the best commute ever.
I had that a couple of years in DC.  Glorious!

I have a 5 minute walking commute. I do typically get a ride during the coldest months as my fingers lose feeling in negative temps very quickly (autoimmune disorder). I can say I lost over 20 pounds this fall just from being forced to walk to/from work and to/from lunch along with a small diet change. I loved the automatic exercise.

dandarc

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19725 on: February 15, 2018, 09:33:08 AM »
Word on wanting the walking commute.  Fuck it.  Walking the 4.1 miles home tonight.  Might jog the downhills - if steep enough, I've found that's a way to pick up time without getting all huffy and puffy.

M5

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19726 on: February 15, 2018, 01:04:56 PM »
Heard a painful ad on the radio this morning while sitting at work. A local car dealership is now offering "Use the Dealer's rebates as your down payment!"

And no doubt people will fall for it and get sucked in. Amazing.

penguintroopers

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19727 on: February 16, 2018, 11:34:48 AM »
Just moved to get my husband a 10 minute walking commute. He's been loving it.

couponvan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19728 on: February 16, 2018, 01:31:59 PM »
Just moved to get my husband a 10 minute walking commute. He's been loving it.
I think this belongs in the celebrations thread....no shame for that item.

Mesmoiselle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19729 on: February 17, 2018, 03:44:10 PM »
I recently interviewed for a Medical Imaging local job after being a Medical Imaging Contract Worker for two years. Contract working is ridiculously lucrative. A "cheap" job is netting $1700/week for 38 hours. I've gotten $2400/week for more like 44+ hours. I opted for three months of vacation the first year, and 5 months of vacation the second year, living off the excess from my contracts while doing and paying for my own house renovations during the time off. Also, omg, I hate full time work and I was mentally exhausted.

Anyway, back to the interview. The hospital has a Contract Worker in the department when we're doing our walk through. And we're doing the usual chit chat "are you social or a introverted mouth breather" back and forth thing when the contract worker asked where all I'd been.

I listed off Arkansas, Arizona, Michigan, Tennessee, and California.

"Where else?" he asks, expecting a far longer list for my two years of travel employment.

"Well, I went to the California place three times and I've had two assignments in Tennessee. But I guess my list is also short because I take at least a month off after every assignment."

This grey haired man, obviously in his 50s, makes a scoffing noise at me. Then asks, "What, got a rich husband?"

I blink at him in bewilderment for a split second, then get an edge of steel in my voice. "No. I'm the rich wife. I've always out earned every partner I've ever been with."

It strikes me later that this question didn't come just from a place of sexism. But from someone who didn' t know what the eff to be doing with the fire hose of cash that Travel Contract work provides. How is this gray haired man not rolling in it (or at least as wealthy as I am) if he's been doing it for LONGER @_@

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19730 on: February 17, 2018, 04:27:20 PM »
I recently interviewed for a Medical Imaging local job after being a Medical Imaging Contract Worker for two years. Contract working is ridiculously lucrative. A "cheap" job is netting $1700/week for 38 hours. I've gotten $2400/week for more like 44+ hours. I opted for three months of vacation the first year, and 5 months of vacation the second year, living off the excess from my contracts while doing and paying for my own house renovations during the time off. Also, omg, I hate full time work and I was mentally exhausted.

Anyway, back to the interview. The hospital has a Contract Worker in the department when we're doing our walk through. And we're doing the usual chit chat "are you social or a introverted mouth breather" back and forth thing when the contract worker asked where all I'd been.

I listed off Arkansas, Arizona, Michigan, Tennessee, and California.

"Where else?" he asks, expecting a far longer list for my two years of travel employment.

"Well, I went to the California place three times and I've had two assignments in Tennessee. But I guess my list is also short because I take at least a month off after every assignment."

This grey haired man, obviously in his 50s, makes a scoffing noise at me. Then asks, "What, got a rich husband?"

I blink at him in bewilderment for a split second, then get an edge of steel in my voice. "No. I'm the rich wife. I've always out earned every partner I've ever been with."

It strikes me later that this question didn't come just from a place of sexism. But from someone who didn' t know what the eff to be doing with the fire hose of cash that Travel Contract work provides. How is this gray haired man not rolling in it (or at least as wealthy as I am) if he's been doing it for LONGER @_@

What happens when you meet an "introverted mouthbreather?"  Just kill them out of disgust?

Mesmoiselle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19731 on: February 17, 2018, 07:11:49 PM »
Anyway, back to the interview. The hospital has a Contract Worker in the department when we're doing our walk through. And we're doing the usual chit chat "are you social or a introverted mouth breather" back and forth thing when the contract worker asked where all I'd been.

What happens when you meet an "introverted mouthbreather?"  Just kill them out of disgust?

This phrasing was chosen specifically because I have the impression that everyone loves an extrovert and that employers think only an extrovert can give good customer service.  Extroverts also seem to give the impression of being smarter, sharper, quick. I know this is all a lie because I'm very much an introvert but pretend to be an extrovert at work because that is what is expected. I know introverted /=/ stupid, or as I put it, a mouthbreather. Starting and maintaining a conversation about irrelevant stuff during an interview is also an IQ and social test.

*Thinks some more* Death by snu snu?

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19732 on: February 18, 2018, 01:30:20 AM »
Anyway, back to the interview. The hospital has a Contract Worker in the department when we're doing our walk through. And we're doing the usual chit chat "are you social or a introverted mouth breather" back and forth thing when the contract worker asked where all I'd been.

What happens when you meet an "introverted mouthbreather?"  Just kill them out of disgust?

This phrasing was chosen specifically because I have the impression that everyone loves an extrovert and that employers think only an extrovert can give good customer service.  Extroverts also seem to give the impression of being smarter, sharper, quick. I know this is all a lie because I'm very much an introvert but pretend to be an extrovert at work because that is what is expected. I know introverted /=/ stupid, or as I put it, a mouthbreather. Starting and maintaining a conversation about irrelevant stuff during an interview is also an IQ and social test.

*Thinks some more* Death by snu snu?

I strongly recommend reading Susan Cain's "Quiet" about the extrovert ideal.

Mesmoiselle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19733 on: February 18, 2018, 07:28:18 AM »
Anyway, back to the interview. The hospital has a Contract Worker in the department when we're doing our walk through. And we're doing the usual chit chat "are you social or a introverted mouth breather" back and forth thing when the contract worker asked where all I'd been.

What happens when you meet an "introverted mouthbreather?"  Just kill them out of disgust?

This phrasing was chosen specifically because I have the impression that everyone loves an extrovert and that employers think only an extrovert can give good customer service.  Extroverts also seem to give the impression of being smarter, sharper, quick. I know this is all a lie because I'm very much an introvert but pretend to be an extrovert at work because that is what is expected. I know introverted /=/ stupid, or as I put it, a mouthbreather......

I strongly recommend reading Susan Cain's "Quiet" about the extrovert ideal.

It's one of the few books I listened to as an audio book a few years back. I think I pretty much said what that book said in way fewer words and far less eloquently and with no studies to back me up. :) I just abhor chit chat, I'm fine with silence, then realize the world isn't fine with silence. So I speak, then feel like I'm just manipulating them into believing a lie about me. It's become habitual to the point people have started believing I'm not an introvert and obviously an extrovert. bleh.

merula

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19734 on: February 19, 2018, 08:33:46 AM »
Interestingly, from an extroverted perspective, I've had people assume that I cannot possibly have good attention to detail because I'm an extrovert, an assumption that is 100% wrong but that negatively impacted me at work. (I've had several jobs within the same field, most of which boil down to "understanding something incredibly nuanced in order to be able to explain it to people who have no background in it".)

I also hate "chit-chat". I like to talk to people because people are interesting. The weather cannot possibly be the most interesting thing anyone has to talk about; I'd rather have silence. But you're right, the working world abhors silence.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19735 on: February 19, 2018, 08:54:09 AM »
Coworker bought a new pickup truck for family car whose price is higher than coworker's annual income at said job. I just smiled. Congrats and all that.

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19736 on: February 19, 2018, 10:51:00 AM »
I just don’t get the truck thing. If you are going to screw your self over financially to buy a silly toy, why not at least buy a toy that is fun to drive, easy to park, handles well, doesn’t make you look like an idiot trying to compensate for a lack in personal endowments?

Roadrunner53

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19737 on: February 19, 2018, 11:06:12 AM »
Pick up trucks are very handy for homeowners. We have had pick up trucks for years but none that cost more than we made per year! Some were used and some were new. I don't think all people are trying to look like idiots but it is idiotic to buy any vehicle just to stand out in the crowd.

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19738 on: February 19, 2018, 11:17:53 AM »
That use case makes sense. I would need to be convinced though that such use cases represent even a majority of truck owners.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19739 on: February 19, 2018, 11:48:29 AM »
Pick up trucks are very handy for homeowners. We have had pick up trucks for years but none that cost more than we made per year! Some were used and some were new. I don't think all people are trying to look like idiots but it is idiotic to buy any vehicle just to stand out in the crowd.
FWIW, a mini van will perform just as well, if not better, than a pickup at most tasks.  The exceptions including bulk stuff (gravel, mulch, that sort of thing) and taller items like some furniture.  For hauling plywood or lumber in general, a minivan will *outperform* most pickups, since most pickup these days seem to have short beds.

JAYSLOL

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19740 on: February 19, 2018, 04:00:01 PM »
Pick up trucks are very handy for homeowners. We have had pick up trucks for years but none that cost more than we made per year! Some were used and some were new. I don't think all people are trying to look like idiots but it is idiotic to buy any vehicle just to stand out in the crowd.
FWIW, a mini van will perform just as well, if not better, than a pickup at most tasks.  The exceptions including bulk stuff (gravel, mulch, that sort of thing) and taller items like some furniture.  For hauling plywood or lumber in general, a minivan will *outperform* most pickups, since most pickup these days seem to have short beds.

And a good utility trailer behind that minivan will outperform any full size truck with a long bed for carry capacity. 

Roadrunner53

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19741 on: February 19, 2018, 04:30:35 PM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19742 on: February 19, 2018, 04:55:22 PM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.
?!

The only part of this that is remotely true is that rural properties, especially when you have animals and long, muddy private road (with crater potholes in the spring) calls for a pickup, with 4WD.  Construction industries (some) also make great use of a pickup.

All the other examples given by Roadrunner53 -- the minivan and trailer combo works just fine.   After all, no one wants to shovel more than 1000 lbs of bricks or rock over a weekend (the max for a minivan and trailer).

nick663

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19743 on: February 19, 2018, 08:16:33 PM »
I've owned a house for almost a decade now and still don't understand the hard on people have for trucks.  I used to own nothing but small cars and on the rare occasion I had something that wouldn't fit in those (twice a year max) I would rent a truck from the local Home Depot for $20/75 minutes.  I ended up money way ahead on that.

Finally decided that I needed a trailer to tow a project car around so I bought an SUV last year.  That SUV when combined with a trailer can do anything Roadrunner just listed (assuming the load is less than 7k pounds) but it has 3 rows of seats and cost 1/2 what a comparable truck costs.

Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19744 on: February 20, 2018, 02:01:01 AM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.

I grew up on a farm in a country where pick up trucks aren't a thing (seriously, I think I've never seen one irl, just on TV) and we use tractors for this kind of stuff. A fairly decent, used smaller tractor will cost you €5000-€10.000 and fuel and insurance are much cheaper than for a car. We also had an old station wagon that my dad used for hauling smaller things over longer distances, but it could pull a horse trailer as well. I'm sure a pickup truck could do all those things too, they seem to be really practical vehicles that you could use for a lot of things, but from what I've read around here it's a fairly expensive option.

Roe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19745 on: February 20, 2018, 08:00:57 AM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.

I grew up on a farm in a country where pick up trucks aren't a thing (seriously, I think I've never seen one irl, just on TV) and we use tractors for this kind of stuff. A fairly decent, used smaller tractor will cost you €5000-€10.000 and fuel and insurance are much cheaper than for a car. We also had an old station wagon that my dad used for hauling smaller things over longer distances, but it could pull a horse trailer as well. I'm sure a pickup truck could do all those things too, they seem to be really practical vehicles that you could use for a lot of things, but from what I've read around here it's a fairly expensive option.

Same here, in regards to only seeing them on TV. I have now seen one now, and it was a weird experience. It appeared in my rear view mirror while in heavy traffic, and I had some difficulty making out how close it was, and WHAT it was.

Kevin S.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19746 on: February 20, 2018, 08:35:32 AM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.

I grew up on a farm in a country where pick up trucks aren't a thing (seriously, I think I've never seen one irl, just on TV) and we use tractors for this kind of stuff. A fairly decent, used smaller tractor will cost you €5000-€10.000 and fuel and insurance are much cheaper than for a car. We also had an old station wagon that my dad used for hauling smaller things over longer distances, but it could pull a horse trailer as well. I'm sure a pickup truck could do all those things too, they seem to be really practical vehicles that you could use for a lot of things, but from what I've read around here it's a fairly expensive option.

Same here, in regards to only seeing them on TV. I have now seen one now, and it was a weird experience. It appeared in my rear view mirror while in heavy traffic, and I had some difficulty making out how close it was, and WHAT it was.

As an American I find this fascinating ! Come to any big city in America and marvel at the amount of full size v8 gas or diesel trucks you will see. When I visited family as a teenager in Czec Republic I couldn't believe how small the cars were and the "trucks" looked very utilitarian and functional ! Most trucks I saw in Europe were indeed in the country side - hauling hay , sheep or they were big boxy vans like the ford transit that we have here now.

My overheard at work story of the day - coworker was talking about not being able to afford a house on his salary - single father with a 10 yr old son. He makes roughly 50k / yr. I get not being able to afford a house - cost of living in Colorado and housing prices have gone up in the last couple years however he was talking to me about this situation and then showing me housing prices in his desired neighborhood (which is park hill - if you know Colorado you know that is a very expensive area). What really got me was that he was showing me prices on his brand new iPhone x. $ 1000 phone....dumb!
 

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19747 on: February 20, 2018, 08:42:41 AM »
I don't think a mini van with a trailer is going to haul stones, loose bark mulch, and things you need 4WD. Plus, if you have a heavy enough truck you can install a 5th wheel to pull a mobile trailer. If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.
?!

The only part of this that is remotely true is that rural properties, especially when you have animals and long, muddy private road (with crater potholes in the spring) calls for a pickup, with 4WD.  Construction industries (some) also make great use of a pickup.

All the other examples given by Roadrunner53 -- the minivan and trailer combo works just fine.   After all, no one wants to shovel more than 1000 lbs of bricks or rock over a weekend (the max for a minivan and trailer).

Actually the Toyota Sienna is rated at 3500 lbs towing capacity. Get into a crossover and that can be 5000 lbs. I'm a big fan of trailers as a solution.

alanB

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19748 on: February 20, 2018, 09:36:16 AM »

All the other examples given by Roadrunner53 -- the minivan and trailer combo works just fine.   After all, no one wants to shovel more than 1000 lbs of bricks or rock over a weekend (the max for a minivan and trailer).

I once shoveled 7 tons of gravel over a weekend, and I only have a little car.  Services exist to deliver big loads of materials to your job site at minimal cost!  I also do not want to shovel more than 1000 lbs of rock ever again...

If you live in the country and not in a condo in a skyscraper, pick up trucks can come in very handy to move furniture for friends and family, haul trees for landscaping, haul topsoil, attach a trailer to haul cattle, haul hay. There are tons of uses for pick up trucks. City people don't need trucks and don't see the need for them.

All of those things can be delivered.  In my experience, in the country it is even cheaper.  Unless you are profiting from those services (either monetarily or through good will toward your fellow man/woman) or have a very frequent need you are better off not owning a pickup truck.

barbaz

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #19749 on: February 20, 2018, 09:44:07 AM »
I think there was a blog post that explained this pretty well: choose a car for the average use case, not for some rare what-ifs