Author Topic: Educator: I can't manage to save  (Read 2506 times)

barbaz

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Educator: I can't manage to save
« on: October 09, 2017, 01:33:05 PM »
"I can't save for retirement. If I had more money, I would spend it on my car."

http://www.zeit.de/arbeit/2017-09/erzieherin-wohngruppe-jugendliche-gehaltsprotokoll

German article, Google translate below
Quote
Educator: "I can not manage to save"
What can an educator do? Florentine, 31, earned 1,590 euros net. She spends 230 euros a month for fuel and repairs on her bus

My job

Occupation: Educator in a residential group for young people in Berlin

Education: Educator at the Rudolf Steiner Institute for Social Pedagogy in Kassel

Weekly working hours: 30 hours. I have four night services and a weekend service a month. At night services, I usually sleep only briefly. Otherwise, I almost exclusively late service, which ends at 11pm.

My income

Gross income: 2,190 euros

Net income: 1,590 euros

My expenses

Rental price: 470 Euro. I live with three friends in Berlin-Neukölln. Our apartment has four large rooms. I can not imagine living alone, just because of the shifts and because I work when other people are free. When I get home, we often sit together on our balcony. I am very happy here.

Additional costs: 40 Euro

INSURANCE: I have neither private retirement nor insurance, which go beyond the compulsory insurance which is deducted from my salary.

Food: about 300 euros. We buy everything for our flat-sharing community in the organic shop. It is important to me to support agriculture, and it is self-evident to eat organic. I grew up with it. I do not eat out often, but rather cook at home, for example, thai soup, curries or even lasagna.

Mobile phone: 25 euros for a mobile phone contract

Travel expenses: For bus and train I give 30 euros. Most of the time I ride the bike.

Vacation expenses: about 230 euros. I travel almost exclusively with my vintage bus which I share with a friend. Unfortunately, we always have to buy spare parts such as brakes or new metal sheets. This is expensive and we try to repair as much as possible ourselves. In addition, the bus consumes a lot of fuel, in total we spend about 70 euros per month. Last summer we were on the bus six weeks in Portugal, this year we had unfortunately only time for weekend trips: We went to the Elbe Sandstone Mountains and the Mecklenburg Lake District.

Clothes: 60 euros. I buy my clothes secondhand.

Body care: 30 euros. Here, too, I mainly buy biological care products; alone the daily cream costs 15 euros.

Books and music: 70 euros. I love bookstores. Most of the time, I read novels, biographies or specialist literature. At the moment, I read rubble and trauma , a book by Bernd Ruf on pedagogical approaches, such as traumatized adolescents who come from a war zone, for example. For music, I spend around 40 euros, I often go to hip-hop concerts and sometimes buy a CD.

Hobbies and leisure: 210 euros. I spend 45 euros for a hip-hop dance course - which I visit about once a week, because of the shifts I can unfortunately not go there regularly. For movies, pubs, and festivals I spend about 120 euros. I also have a lot to do with my sewing machine: clothes and pants for my niece and my nephews or for myself. For fabrics, I spend about 35 euros. In addition, I donate five euros to a club: the bicycle repair wheels and gives them to people who can afford no. Sometimes I help myself repair.

So much remains in the end

About 100 euros. I can not make money on my side. If I could afford it, I would go on holiday with my bus more often.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 01:19:04 AM by barbaz »

Kimera757

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2017, 02:23:35 PM »
I think we need a little clarification, for those of us not familiar with German policies.

Additional costs: 40 Euro

INSURANCE: I have neither private retirement nor insurance, which go beyond the compulsory insurance which is deducted from my salary.

What sort of insurance? Renter's? Health? Pension?

Quote
Food: about 300 euros. We buy everything for our WG in the organic shop. It is important to me to support agriculture, and it is self-evident to eat organic. I grew up with it. I do not eat out often, but rather cook at home, for example, thai soup, curries or even lasagna.

That sounds expensive. A euro is more than an American dollar. Maybe food is really expensive in Germany?

Quote
Mobile phone: 25 euros for a mobile phone contract

Travel expenses: For bus and train I give 30 euros. Most of the time I ride the bike.

Alright to the first, very good for the second.

Quote
Vacation expenses: about 230 euros. I travel almost exclusively with my bus, a classic car, which I share with a friend. Unfortunately, we always have to buy spare parts such as brakes or new metal sheets. This is expensive and we try to repair as much as possible ourselves. In addition, the bus consumes a lot of fuel, in total we spend about 70 euros per month. Last summer we were on the bus six weeks in Portugal, this year we had unfortunately only time for weekend trips: We went to the Elbe Sandstone Mountains and the Mecklenburg Lake District.

"My bus, a classic car..." I'm thinking there might be a translation issue there.

In any event, 230 euros per month? How do you afford a six week vacation when you only work 30 hours per week?

The educator should consider selling their bus (if that's what is is) or their expensive car (if that's what it is) or both (if they have both!) and get a more fuel-efficient beater. I'm mystified why someone who buys organic food and organic skin care products wouldn't get something fuel-efficient. And if they take climate change is hot air... they'd still be saving money!

I would also try to avoid taking such an unreliable vehicle so far from home.

Quote
Clothes: 60 euros. I buy my clothes secondhand.

It's hard to say if this is rational or not. I don't think you normally need to spend 60 euros per month on clothing.

Quote
Body care: 30 euros. Here, too, I mainly buy biological care products; alone the daily cream costs 15 euros.

That might not be too crazy.

Quote
Books and music: 70 euros. I love bookstores. Most of the time, I read novels, biographies or specialist literature. At the moment, I read rubble and trauma , a book by Bernd Ruf on pedagogical approaches, such as traumatized adolescents who come from a war zone, for example. For music, I spend around 40 euros, I often go to hip-hop concerts and sometimes buy a CD.

The teacher should see if Germany has Overdrive or similar technologies to borrow books online from a library for free. There's also Openlibrary, etc. The amount spent on music seems pretty high for someone who is Just About Managing as well.

Quote
Hobbies and leisure: 210 euros. I spend 45 euros for a hip-hop dance course - which I visit about once a week, because of the shifts I can unfortunately not go there regularly. For movies, pubs, and festivals I spend about 120 euros.

That is way too much. The educator cannot afford this on their salary.

Quote
I also have a lot to do with my sewing machine: clothes and pants for my niece and my nephews or for myself. For fabrics, I spend about 35 euros. In addition, I donate five euros to a club: the bicycle repair wheels and gives them to people who can afford no. Sometimes I help myself repair.

This doesn't seem too crazy. Especially sewing clothing!

Quote
About 100 euros. I can not make money on my side.

They're working only 30 hours per week... yes they can make money on the side.

Hula Hoop

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2017, 02:35:31 PM »
I get the feeling that this is a bad Google translate.  I'm really confused. So many questions!  :)

barbaz

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Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2017, 12:57:02 AM »
I think we need a little clarification, for those of us not familiar with German policies.

INSURANCE: I have neither private retirement nor insurance, which go beyond the compulsory insurance which is deducted from my salary.

What sort of insurance? Renter's? Health? Pension?
Public insurance includes health, social security and pension, although she won't get much out of the last one. At her income level, public pension will cover living, health, and food, and that's it.

Quote
Quote
Food: about 300 euros. We buy everything for our WG in the organic shop. It is important to me to support agriculture, and it is self-evident to eat organic. I grew up with it. I do not eat out often, but rather cook at home, for example, thai soup, curries or even lasagna.

That sounds expensive. A euro is more than an American dollar. Maybe food is really expensive in Germany?
Food is generally cheaper here than in the US, 300 can feed a family of 3, even if you buy organic. "Organic Shops" sell luxury food to high-income people, you can get organic food for a fraction of the price at discounters like Aldi.

Quote
"My bus, a classic car..." I'm thinking there might be a translation issue there.

In any event, 230 euros per month? How do you afford a six week vacation when you only work 30 hours per week?

The educator should consider selling their bus (if that's what is is) or their expensive car (if that's what it is) or both (if they have both!) and get a more fuel-efficient beater. I'm mystified why someone who buys organic food and organic skin care products wouldn't get something fuel-efficient. And if they take climate change is hot air... they'd still be saving money!

I would also try to avoid taking such an unreliable vehicle so far from home.
Maybe "vintage bus" is the better translation. You can see it in the first picture. It's old, high maintenance, low MPG, and way too big unless you have 7 children.

Quote
Quote
Books and music: 70 euros. I love bookstores. Most of the time, I read novels, biographies or specialist literature. At the moment, I read rubble and trauma , a book by Bernd Ruf on pedagogical approaches, such as traumatized adolescents who come from a war zone, for example. For music, I spend around 40 euros, I often go to hip-hop concerts and sometimes buy a CD.

The teacher should see if Germany has Overdrive or similar technologies to borrow books online from a library for free. There's also Openlibrary, etc. The amount spent on music seems pretty high for someone who is Just About Managing as well.
Membership in a library is 10 per year. This also gives you access to movies, CDs and ebooks.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 04:08:26 AM by barbaz »

Linda_Norway

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2017, 03:04:54 AM »
"I cannot save because I drive a money-draining buss and make other expensive choices."

Was this an article in a new paper about how difficult it is for young people to make a living? It would have been nice with some redactional notes, summarizing how your choices influence your ability to save, and how working 30 hours a week is not very much. It would be a good idea of they would teach basic finance in schools at several levels, so that this kind of people would not have learned these habits.

barbaz

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2017, 05:02:14 AM »
A lot of comments in the article say she can't take a second job because of irregular work times and she probably can't work full time in her current job either. But even if she can't increase her income, she has enough money to save some.

"I cannot save because I drive a money-draining buss and make other expensive choices."

Was this an article in a new paper about how difficult it is for young people to make a living? It would have been nice with some redactional notes, summarizing how your choices influence your ability to save, and how working 30 hours a week is not very much. It would be a good idea if they would teach basic finance in schools at several levels, so that this kind of people would not have learned these habits.
The whole story is provided without comment, but the way it's presented it seems to be about how difficult things are. At least in the comments most people caught that her food, car and hobbies spendings are way too high.

Just Joe

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2017, 01:42:57 PM »
Maybe it is a VW Bus aka van?

Regardless I think they can't afford it. Buy a used scooter or some more modern grocery getter fuel sipper hatchback.

CU Tiger

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2017, 10:31:57 PM »
I have a lot of family in Germany, and this youngish teacher sounds fairly typical of Germans I know. As a rule most of them do things the way they have always done them, and changing does not seem easy.

For example, if you are used to taking four weeks of vacation a year, and going camping around Europe, that is what you think you need to do to relax. A stay-cation will not meet your beliefs about your vacation needs. We have seen this with a recently divorced cousin, her financial situation has changed, but she is not, so far, changing her spending habits.
There are two ways to get enough: one is to continue to accumulate more and more. The other is to desire less. - G.K. Chesterton

LennStar

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2017, 12:39:00 AM »
But the worst point is that this is a teacher for - I guess - problem children. Where should those problem-heavy children learn to live without problems if even the teacher with 50% more then basic wage (for 40 hours, not 30) has money problems?
50% of the problems someone can have start there after all!

MrsPete

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2017, 12:33:52 PM »
Vacation expenses: about 230 euros. I travel almost exclusively with my bus, a classic car, which I share with a friend. Unfortunately, we always have to buy spare parts such as brakes or new metal sheets. This is expensive and we try to repair as much as possible ourselves. In addition, the bus consumes a lot of fuel, in total we spend about 70 euros per month. Last summer we were on the bus six weeks in Portugal, this year we had unfortunately only time for weekend trips: We went to the Elbe Sandstone Mountains and the Mecklenburg Lake District ...

Hobbies and leisure: 210 euros. I spend 45 euros for a hip-hop dance course - which I visit about once a week, because of the shifts I can unfortunately not go there regularly. For movies, pubs, and festivals I spend about 120 euros.
I can't relate to euros or costs in other countries, but I understand that when you earn 2190 euros and spend 440 euros on vacation, hobbies, and leisure, you've spent 20% of your salary on fun non-essentials. 

They're working only 30 hours per week... yes they can make money on the side.
This was the second thing that came to mind right away.  I understand that working late into the evening (the above poster assumed "problem children"; I assumed handicapped children in a group home) will limit the second jobs available, but it's possible.  A number of my fellow teachers are teaching online classes in addition to their regular jobs; that's super flexible.  A job cooking/waiting tables at a breakfast place would work.  A seasonal job during the holidays would work.  With only 30 hours of work coupled with high leisure spending ... yeah, you can't expect to get ahead.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 12:36:56 PM by MrsPete »

Peony

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2017, 01:29:35 PM »
This person sounds like an ideal candidate to pick up babysitting gigs on the side, which might be quite lucrative as she is an "educator" who probably can do a lot of great enrichment.

Imma

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2017, 02:41:09 AM »
300 is insane to spend on food in Germany. Berlin is a bit more expensive than the rest of Germany, but it's still the cheapest capital in western Europe. I live close to the German border and we go food shopping in Germany because everything is so cheap there. Even organic produce often costs less than the regular counterpart over here. I paid 1,35 for 2,5 kg of organic potatoes at Aldi just this Saturday. From the article it sounds like they cook and eat together, which means she can buy in bulk and spend even less money.

The classic car is probably a old VW van. And this is on top of spending on public traffic and a bike ...  I have never understood why oldtimer vans are so popular among hippies. If you are so concerned about the environment, and most of them are, then the last thing you should do is drive a 40-year old fuel inefficient van instead of a small modern, efficient, possibly electric car. I guess they like the look and the fact that you can take all your friends and your music equipment. I saw two punks last week in the parking lot of the local supermarket. They had the engine running when I went in and it was still running when I came out of the store, probably so they could listen to music. Meanwhile they were probably eating their vegan lunch.

Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.

Just Joe

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2017, 12:12:08 PM »
The VW vans are as much a part of the hippie wannabe "style" as the giant pickup trucks are for the American guys. I doubt either group are giving much thought to the environment. This lady could probably get by just as well with a modern minivan or hatchback car if she wanted to.

I don't mind antique cars/vans/trucks b/c they generally don't rack up many miles in a year's time. I don't see much point to them either for folks who can't keep them in good repair all by themselves b/c any old car is maintenance intensive by design. It just took more work to keep these antiques reliable even when they were new. Adjust the carburetor, adjust the brakes, adjust the valves, grease and oil everything, adjust the timing and points, etc.

When I drove these kinds of cars as daily drivers years ago I could do all the maintenance and 99% of the repairs and they were affordable to operate if a person did the work at home. Every 1500 miles on the aircooled VWs though everything needed adjustment or at least a quick check.

barbaz

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2017, 02:51:08 PM »
The VW vans are as much a part of the hippie wannabe "style" as the giant pickup trucks are for the American guys. I doubt either group are giving much thought to the environment.
At least the American trucker is consistent in his world view (if he is a denialist), the hippie not so much.

300 is insane to spend on food in Germany. Berlin is a bit more expensive than the rest of Germany, but it's still the cheapest capital in western Europe. I live close to the German border and we go food shopping in Germany because everything is so cheap there. Even organic produce often costs less than the regular counterpart over here. I paid 1,35 for 2,5 kg of organic potatoes at Aldi just this Saturday. From the article it sounds like they cook and eat together, which means she can buy in bulk and spend even less money.
Now I'm tempted to go to the nearest Bio Company to see what they charge for potatoes.

Also interesting, according to this study (sorry, German again) a representative selection of food items that costs 21.01 in Germany would cost 31.54 or 37.21$ in the US. From where are you coming, Imma?

Quote
Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.
Berlin is paying shit wages to its public workers, lowest in Germany I think.

LennStar

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2017, 03:49:25 AM »
Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.
In 2013 average wage was 30K (before any taxes etc.) the median was 20K. 2017 average should be up to 37K but still you can see it is not a high paying country if you are not in the top 30%. And if you are in the lower 30%.... when minimum wage was introduced at 8,50 millions of people got a raise.

And surprise! The before propagated 2 million lost jobs ended up being about 20K. FUD...

Imma

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2017, 04:24:55 AM »


300 is insane to spend on food in Germany. Berlin is a bit more expensive than the rest of Germany, but it's still the cheapest capital in western Europe. I live close to the German border and we go food shopping in Germany because everything is so cheap there. Even organic produce often costs less than the regular counterpart over here. I paid 1,35 for 2,5 kg of organic potatoes at Aldi just this Saturday. From the article it sounds like they cook and eat together, which means she can buy in bulk and spend even less money.
Now I'm tempted to go to the nearest Bio Company to see what they charge for potatoes.

Also interesting, according to this study (sorry, German again) a representative selection of food items that costs 21.01 in Germany would cost 31.54 or 37.21$ in the US. From where are you coming, Imma?



NL. We go shopping in Kreis Kleve. We usually go to Aldi or Penny Market for groceries and to DM for personal care products. I still have my receipt, some comparison:

400 gr can kidneybeans:  DE 0,49 - NL 0,95
690 gr bottle passata:      DE 0.79 - NL 1,99 ( currently on discount, 2nd one for free, DE is still cheaper....)
1,25 l Coca-cola:             DE 0.89  - NL 1,62 for 1 liter

I don't really drink but alcohol is also much, much cheaper. We bought one 700 ml bottle of cider for 0,90 cents. It's at least 1,00 for a 300 ml bottle over here. I don't think I have my DM receipt, but most stuff is 30-40% cheaper. A name brand Labello stick is like 1,50 and they are 2,50 over here. I buy organic care products in Germany for the same price or even less than I'd pay for regular in here. In many border areas, shopping centers are built at locations that are convenient for foreign shoppers. You barely see a German plate in the car park.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2017, 04:40:03 AM by Imma »

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2017, 12:36:49 PM »
I get the feeling that this is a bad Google translate.  I'm really confused. So many questions!  :)
Swap the term "bus" for "Mercedes Uni-Mog" -- a large all terrain but street legal vehicle used by many travel to remote rugged locations (month long or weekend travel)....   the translation will make a lot more sense.  (or think of an old Land Rover, if you must).   Often used to tour africa.

http://www.truckcampermagazine.com/off-road/extreme-rigs/building-a-unimog-truck-camper-rig/

StockBeard

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2017, 11:17:42 PM »
Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.

Having lived and worked in 3 countries (France, Japan, US), it's eye-opening how wages for similar jobs can vary depending on the political/social background and salary expectations for each country.

I'm not shocked at her salary. I was making similar income (maybe a bit more) as a junior engineer in France (granted, that was a bit more than 10 years ago, factor in inflation, and her salary is definitely not great). I have seen junior engineers in the US make 4 to 6 times that, for the exact same job.

Imma

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #18 on: Today at 02:47:37 AM »
Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.

Having lived and worked in 3 countries (France, Japan, US), it's eye-opening how wages for similar jobs can vary depending on the political/social background and salary expectations for each country.

I'm not shocked at her salary. I was making similar income (maybe a bit more) as a junior engineer in France (granted, that was a bit more than 10 years ago, factor in inflation, and her salary is definitely not great). I have seen junior engineers in the US make 4 to 6 times that, for the exact same job.

It's about 33000/gross/fulltime. I make more (about 36000) as a bookkeeper in NL, and I have only a few years experience in this field, gaps in my work experience due to illness and an unrelated degree. It's a super easy office job. I don't really know what anyone in her line of work would make in my country, but it seems like an intense job with night and weekend shifts too. I hope they earn more than 33000.

havregryn

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #19 on: Today at 04:20:49 AM »
She doesn't necessarily have a degree, this job she has can be anything from actually being a trained specialist working with troubled teens to just being a kind of a designated adult in a group of teens in care who can't for legal reasons ever be left unattended. I don't think she's a teacher, this is probably a google translate from https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%A4dagoge and at least in Sweden now you don't really need any kind of real university education to do this kind of a job...you really only need a criminal clearance and that's it.

havregryn

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #20 on: Today at 04:25:29 AM »
Her net wage is fairly low though. I'm not familiar with German wages, but for someone who probably has a degree, 1600/net for 30 hours including night shifts and weekend shifts, it doesn't sound like much. Normally for these types of jobs with many night shifts and weekend shifts, you get some sort of compensation for those bad shifts.

Having lived and worked in 3 countries (France, Japan, US), it's eye-opening how wages for similar jobs can vary depending on the political/social background and salary expectations for each country.

I'm not shocked at her salary. I was making similar income (maybe a bit more) as a junior engineer in France (granted, that was a bit more than 10 years ago, factor in inflation, and her salary is definitely not great). I have seen junior engineers in the US make 4 to 6 times that, for the exact same job.

Yes, this could be interesting reading for US doctors
http://www.zeit.de/arbeit/2017-09/arzt-gehalt-ausgaben-einnahmen-protokoll

This guy takes home 3300 (3900$) every month for working 50-60 hours as a doctor.
It's a different planet really...you really can't earn as much money in Europe as you can in the US, but you have the benefit of free healthcare and education. I wouldn't trade ever but I just feel it's important to really reflect on this as it has vastly different implications for Mustachianism. You really can't save millions working here but you need to budget a lot less for unforeseen events.

Just Joe

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #21 on: Today at 08:02:11 AM »
I get the feeling that this is a bad Google translate.  I'm really confused. So many questions!  :)
Swap the term "bus" for "Mercedes Uni-Mog" -- a large all terrain but street legal vehicle used by many travel to remote rugged locations (month long or weekend travel)....   the translation will make a lot more sense.  (or think of an old Land Rover, if you must).   Often used to tour africa.

http://www.truckcampermagazine.com/off-road/extreme-rigs/building-a-unimog-truck-camper-rig/

Yep - I know about Unimogs. I have seen one of the expedition camper conversions in a national park once. At least an old VW bus would get low-20s MPG compared to the Unimog that might get a fraction of that. I can't imagine what it costs to drive such a thing with German fuel prices. 

Goldielocks

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #22 on: Today at 11:48:02 AM »
I get the feeling that this is a bad Google translate.  I'm really confused. So many questions!  :)
Swap the term "bus" for "Mercedes Uni-Mog" -- a large all terrain but street legal vehicle used by many travel to remote rugged locations (month long or weekend travel)....   the translation will make a lot more sense.  (or think of an old Land Rover, if you must).   Often used to tour africa.

http://www.truckcampermagazine.com/off-road/extreme-rigs/building-a-unimog-truck-camper-rig/

Yep - I know about Unimogs. I have seen one of the expedition camper conversions in a national park once. At least an old VW bus would get low-20s MPG compared to the Unimog that might get a fraction of that. I can't imagine what it costs to drive such a thing with German fuel prices.

Well, 10-14 MPG and a top speed, typically, of 70 kmph that turns a 6 hour drive into a 10 hour drive.  (Source - friends are now on their second)

Imma

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Re: Educator: I can't manage to save
« Reply #23 on: Today at 02:20:09 PM »
She doesn't necessarily have a degree, this job she has can be anything from actually being a trained specialist working with troubled teens to just being a kind of a designated adult in a group of teens in care who can't for legal reasons ever be left unattended. I don't think she's a teacher, this is probably a google translate from https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%A4dagoge and at least in Sweden now you don't really need any kind of real university education to do this kind of a job...you really only need a criminal clearance and that's it.

I assumed that because in the NL I think you would need a degree in applied science for anything like that.

I too sometimes think 'wow, look at those American salaries' and it annoys me that in my country you're almost punished if you take care of yourself financially. It's very hard to FIRE because of wealth tax and a lot less possibilities for tax-deferred retirement savings.

But then I think what kind of life I would have had in the USA, being from a working class environment and diagnosed with a chronic ilness in my teens. All in all I pay about 3000/year for my medical care and that's about 20% of what it actually costs. If I can't work anymore, I will get disability payments of 950/net per month until I retire. When I reach retirement age, I will get a government pension of 750/net per month for the rest of my life. The only thing I need to do for that is live here, you don't even have to work to qualify. I'm not sure these benefits still exist in a couple of decades from now, but currently my government is looking after the average person quite well. The only thing that's hard to do is RE - but that was a conscious policy decision. We have a strong calvinistic heritage, not working is frowned upon and so is 'flaunting your wealth' by retiring early.