Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8461277 times)

mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8800 on: June 23, 2015, 05:27:01 AM »
I know many people who will drive 3-4 hours and pay $60 one way to go to ikea. They will drive to this city only for ikea, and go with nothing in particular in mind that they want to buy. Consumerism at its finest.
Oh man... this takes me back to when I was an O-2 in the Air Force and we'd all drive an hour+ from Biloxi to Mobile just to walk around Best Buy, whether we needed anything or not. Good god, the dumb shit we brought home just because we could... and all the while wondering why I never seemed to get ahead. Haha...

Yeah, I noticed that my idle purchases went way down when I stopped going to Target and Barnes and Noble and other stores for no reason, but just to wander around. Go figure...
Haha!  We had a huge drop in our grocery budget when we started to get our groceries delivered.  I guess I can't resist pretty packaging and sugar right in front of me.

We don't have groceries delivered because the prices are a bit steep, but I have saved a lot by setting things up so I never have to set foot in Target. They have subscribe and save like Amazon and it's the same prices as in store. It's helped our budget so much to not have to go there for toothpaste, shampoo, etc.

wenchsenior

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8801 on: June 23, 2015, 07:57:52 AM »
If the hunting trip is in Texas, that's a pretty cheap figure. Unlike more normal parts of the United States, there is very little huntable land in TX. So the land owners can charge thousands to people even for hunting quail, turkeys, or deer. Then there are the big game ranches, where you pay sometimes in the tens of thousands to 'stalk' exotic African and Asian ungulates.

Texas is the 2nd biggest state with over a quarter million square miles.  Does it really have very little huntable land?  I find that mind boggling.

Don't they pay people to hunt feral pigs? I heard there were millions of them creating property damage around the state.

They, meaning landowners? Probably some do. The etiquette that is often practiced is that if you 'know someone' and get an in to hunt for free on their land, you shoot any feral hogs you see as a matter of courtesy. If you feel ambitious, you can butcher them for meat, but hog butchering is apparently a whole new level of gross (I've never tried, though I've helped butcher many deer and butchered various small game), so many hunters just leave the hogs and don't bother.

They meaning the government.  Many counties offer a tiny reward for each hog bagged.

How is butchering a hog a new level of gross above butchering a deer, or a domesticated hog?  Seems like it would be worth it for all that free pork.

I had to Google for info, but yes apparently some Texas counties pay between 2 and 5$ per hog.  But again, you need access to land first, so I'm not sure if that applies on private and public lands, or what. I haven't been around feral hog butchering, so can't speak from first hand experience. Several people who are experienced hunters said the fat is very greasy and stinky, which makes it more unpleasant than average.

I don't think butchering wild hog is any worse than any other meat. My husband and I do it all the time and I've never noticed it to be any more unpleasant than butchering deer. It's totally worth it for all the meat you get. Just this weekend we enjoyed some delicious BBQ ribs from a wild hog we got in Oklahoma last year. It was excellent.

Some fear Hep E so leave the hogs.  It was so rampant in GA when we lived there that hog hunting was primarily for population control.  I don't think it's worse then doing a deer, little stinkier then a deer, but not too bad.

This is good first-hand info, you guys. I love this forum!

shotgunwilly

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8802 on: June 23, 2015, 08:14:30 AM »
If the hunting trip is in Texas, that's a pretty cheap figure. Unlike more normal parts of the United States, there is very little huntable land in TX. So the land owners can charge thousands to people even for hunting quail, turkeys, or deer. Then there are the big game ranches, where you pay sometimes in the tens of thousands to 'stalk' exotic African and Asian ungulates.

Texas is the 2nd biggest state with over a quarter million square miles.  Does it really have very little huntable land?  I find that mind boggling.

Don't they pay people to hunt feral pigs? I heard there were millions of them creating property damage around the state.

They, meaning landowners? Probably some do. The etiquette that is often practiced is that if you 'know someone' and get an in to hunt for free on their land, you shoot any feral hogs you see as a matter of courtesy. If you feel ambitious, you can butcher them for meat, but hog butchering is apparently a whole new level of gross (I've never tried, though I've helped butcher many deer and butchered various small game), so many hunters just leave the hogs and don't bother.

They meaning the government.  Many counties offer a tiny reward for each hog bagged.

How is butchering a hog a new level of gross above butchering a deer, or a domesticated hog?  Seems like it would be worth it for all that free pork.

I had to Google for info, but yes apparently some Texas counties pay between 2 and 5$ per hog.  But again, you need access to land first, so I'm not sure if that applies on private and public lands, or what. I haven't been around feral hog butchering, so can't speak from first hand experience. Several people who are experienced hunters said the fat is very greasy and stinky, which makes it more unpleasant than average.

I don't think butchering wild hog is any worse than any other meat. My husband and I do it all the time and I've never noticed it to be any more unpleasant than butchering deer. It's totally worth it for all the meat you get. Just this weekend we enjoyed some delicious BBQ ribs from a wild hog we got in Oklahoma last year. It was excellent.

Some fear Hep E so leave the hogs.  It was so rampant in GA when we lived there that hog hunting was primarily for population control.  I don't think it's worse then doing a deer, little stinkier then a deer, but not too bad.

This is good first-hand info, you guys. I love this forum!

Hogs are being bought up in Texas by processors.  You have to trap them, they have to be a certain size, and right now people are getting 20-50 cents a pound.  So maybe anywhere from $30-$100 a hog.  They feed them corn in pens and then process them later. 

LoveStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8803 on: June 23, 2015, 03:22:33 PM »


Not sure if she has that many bras, but she buys lots of stuff; underwear, clothing, perfume, makeup...But yes, she wears matching bra and underwear everyday. And pays the minimum $25/month.
[/quote]

Let's get to what's important here...Is she hot?
[/quote]

....Unfortunately no.

LoveStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8804 on: June 23, 2015, 03:25:22 PM »
Not sure if she has that many bras, but she buys lots of stuff; underwear, clothing, perfume, makeup...But yes, she wears matching bra and underwear everyday. And pays the minimum $25/month.
[/quote]

Why is she telling her coworkers about her underwear? WTF?
[/quote]

My question exactly.  How would one know what one's coworkers were wearing underneath their clothes?  Shades of Mad Men...
[/quote]

We're friendly coworkers in that we go out, get drinks, talk about life...And she's told me all about her money problems which includes her VS charge card...Which is when she "justified" it by saying she has to have matching bra/panties everyday.

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8805 on: June 23, 2015, 03:37:54 PM »
What "industry" are you in exactly ??????

gimp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8806 on: June 23, 2015, 06:35:26 PM »
 come on man

[/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote]

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8807 on: June 23, 2015, 06:58:05 PM »
come on man

Thanks.  (It bothered me too.
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Migrator Soul

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8808 on: June 23, 2015, 07:49:38 PM »
A co-worker and I were talking about retirement. He was a regular complainy-pants telling me how he was never going to retire yada yada.

Another go-worker over heard us (he is usually a very quite guy never says much) and something I said must have struck him because he openly told me "yeah, my wife just told me last night we hit our goal 1.3M"

This guys makes between 40-50k and apparently for the last x-number of years his family has been living off just his income and completely banking his wife's. High fives ensued.

You never know who is a closet mustachian.

I will bet the other co-worker's jaw simply dropped.

iamlindoro

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8809 on: June 23, 2015, 10:05:44 PM »

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8810 on: June 24, 2015, 05:18:52 AM »

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8811 on: June 24, 2015, 05:21:31 AM »
Pro-tip yo you all serial misquoters out there (you know who you are):

Hit the preview button before hitting post. It's magical.

Pooplips

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8812 on: June 24, 2015, 05:40:30 AM »
A co-worker and I were talking about retirement. He was a regular complainy-pants telling me how he was never going to retire yada yada.

Another go-worker over heard us (he is usually a very quite guy never says much) and something I said must have struck him because he openly told me "yeah, my wife just told me last night we hit our goal 1.3M"

This guys makes between 40-50k and apparently for the last x-number of years his family has been living off just his income and completely banking his wife's. High fives ensued.

You never know who is a closet mustachian.

I will bet the other co-worker's jaw simply dropped.

Yes, yes it did. Then he kind of started making fun of the guy. "What are you doing here? I would retire right now if I had that money"

I wanted to say, "Thats the point. He can do whatever the f*ck he wants"

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8813 on: June 24, 2015, 07:42:17 AM »
come on man

Thanks.  (It bothered me too.

:)

Ahhhh....

You had a little typo there, forgot the colon before your smiley.  Don't worry, I fixed it for you! :)
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with two kids.
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We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8814 on: June 24, 2015, 07:49:05 AM »
[Russian-doll quote action on extended discussion of impressions]
This is good first-hand info, you guys. I love this forum!
Hi, native Texas hunter myself, here. I can see why you'd feel like there's not a lot of 'huntable' land in TX if you grew up in Wisconsin and were used to hunting public land, and that the heinous expense of "ranch" hunting (big programs with glossy pamphlets and guides) would be supported by that alone. But those hunts are definitely the premium experience and frankly isn't marketed so much at just Texans but just generally rich people who want an easy harvest on trophy gamebirds/deer/nilgai (though they're happy to take anyone's money.)

My experience of hunting growing up always took place on private land - ideally you can find a friend's or friend-of-a-friend's but we also had a relatively inexpensive year-round lease on a farmer's pasture, field, and woods split with three other people who all pitched in to maintain a couple of blinds and keep some feeders going and cut trail and make sure the owner's cattle weren't where they shouldn't be. In exchange we got access to a stocked tank with some largemouth bass and perch, tons of rabbit and squirrel year round, whitewing and mourning dove, hogs when they began invading, and plenty of whitetail deer and rio grande turkey. (There were also coyotes, bobcats, skunks, rattlesnakes, and a mountain lion, but we all left each other alone as best we could.) For the cost of one of my rent payments we had a year of entertainment and time in the woods and some of the best lessons on living I could have gotten, not to mention the need for a capacious additional freezer.

Butchering is fun, if you do it indoors with friends/family and AC.

Anyone who tells you feral hog, or any wild meat, isn't any good is usually butchering it wrong after letting it sit around in the heat rather than chilling it right away - it's DELICIOUS - or, less often, they shot some older male hogs in poorer health. Targeting sows is better for population control, eating, and your nose (I won't lie; male hogs do stink like a cesspit; I don't know how they have a good sense of smell when they smell so much themselves. But they do taste delicious, especially if you like carnitas, tamales and jerk barbeque.)

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8815 on: June 24, 2015, 08:48:59 AM »
Quote
Butchering is fun, if you do it indoors with friends/family
And there we have the reason for high house prices in SF relative to Houston ;-)

Quote
Anyone who tells you feral hog, or any wild meat, isn't any good ... especially if you like barbeque
Probably a good idea to make sure it is very well cooked. There is a good reason that those people that survived 1000s of years cooking over campfires have rules against eating wild pigs


GuitarStv

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8816 on: June 24, 2015, 08:57:39 AM »
Anyone who tells you feral hog, or any wild meat, isn't any good is usually butchering it wrong after letting it sit around in the heat rather than chilling it right away - it's DELICIOUS - or, less often, they shot some older male hogs in poorer health.

Meh.  I think it depends on the meat you get.  I've had deer many times.  It's always gamey, and too lean.  Hunting usually took place in November, so air temperature was typically cooler than a refrigerator.  Moose on the other hand, always tastes good.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8817 on: June 24, 2015, 09:30:11 AM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we heard of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers too much. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
« Last Edit: July 13, 2015, 12:05:39 PM by Joe Average »

RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8818 on: June 24, 2015, 11:40:38 AM »
OK, I'll bite, you have me hooked - St. Elmo?

Popular names  - you never know.  In elementary school I was the only one with my name, in High School there were 4 of us, and three of the four were in the same home room.
When we named our DD, it was uncommon but not weird, not in the birth notices, etc.  She hit school and shared her name with 2 other girls in her grade. 


Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8819 on: June 24, 2015, 11:47:34 AM »
In elementary school I was the only one with my name, in High School there were 4 of us

I guess more people were retired in high school than elementary
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 12:20:36 PM by nobodyspecial »

RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8820 on: June 24, 2015, 12:16:48 PM »
I am sure we all wished we could retire that early!  ;-)

In elementary school I was the only one with my name, in High School there were 4 of us
I guess more people were retired in high school than elementary
[/quote]

cripzychiken

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8821 on: June 24, 2015, 12:26:30 PM »

Popular names  - you never know.  In elementary school I was the only one with my name, in High School there were 4 of us, and three of the four were in the same home room.
When we named our DD, it was uncommon but not weird, not in the birth notices, etc.  She hit school and shared her name with 2 other girls in her grade. 


Our son's name was in the -75-100 range of top 100.  His 5 kid daycare has 2, one of the dad's of another kid has the same name, there were 2 more kids who were trying to find a spot with the same name.  I've known 1 person in my life (prior to this) with the name. 

You just never know with names outside of the annoying top 10.

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8822 on: June 24, 2015, 01:32:47 PM »
As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way. 

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8823 on: June 24, 2015, 01:54:42 PM »
As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way.

My name was in the top 10 the year I was born, but is not even represented in 2014's top 100. Interesting.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8824 on: June 24, 2015, 02:38:51 PM »
As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way.

My name was in the top 10 the year I was born, but is not even represented in 2014's top 100. Interesting.
I've met maybe two people in my life who share my first name.  Nobody pronounces it correctly the first time.  Last year (when I was 33), my mom told me that they gave me a common middle name so that I could use that if I wanted to.

Seriously?  You waited until I was 33 to tell me this!?

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8825 on: June 24, 2015, 02:47:18 PM »
I think I had to go back 2 years to find someone in MS/HS with my name (granted small school), but at my current company of 35 employees, 5 of us are Ryans.

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8826 on: June 24, 2015, 03:21:47 PM »
I have still never met anyone with my first name.  Zaga is not my name, but oddly enough I DO know someone by that name.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8827 on: June 24, 2015, 03:30:32 PM »
his coworker is an older guy (not sure how old... 40s or 50s?), some kind of quality engineer I think. he only recently started at this company. he moved here from St. Louis because he got laid off at his previous job and had been unemployed for a while. he STILL RENTS A HOUSE IN ST. LOUIS FOR HIS WIFE simply because she "doesn't want to move to Tulsa." not because she has an awesome job there... hell I don't even think she has a job. so he also rents a house here for himself. we actually found out about this a while ago, but it has escalated recently and my bf has heard the guy on the phone with his wife trying to negotiate a move.

I've got one similar. Fellow I've known for a long time in his late 60s. Works and lives in one high COL state with his wife and until recently their grown son who is in his late-30s.

Son never had a job, never went to school until recently. Parents paid for a new car, and provided everything since he still lived at home. Recently got a job in an intern level job now that he's had some training of some sort (associate degree maybe?). I don't think it is paid position... And it looks like (last I heard) he might lose that "job" b/c he is a lousy employee.

Father can't retire b/c of their lifestyle costs. Meanwhile they are maintaining their original residence in another state. The internship is local to the original residence and now the son is living there rent free. Son is not really doing any of the maintenance or chores around the place so father must drive hundreds of miles occasionally to do those chores. Meanwhile the maintenance on the formerly nice home is behind and the house has some problems (roof, siding, etc).

Wife has never worked and for years now has wandered around the country visiting relatives and checking on a modest piece of property (think starter house) in a third state which sits empty and also not receiving any maintenance. Until the internship - the son drove her all over.  At one time she had a weekly or bi-weekly commute to the place where they live now splitting her time between the original residence and the current residence. Burning gasoline and wearing out cars.

Last time I saw the father, he had just bought a $35K 4WD pickup. Well, he said he paid north of $35K but I see them priced about $5K to $7.5K below that so the dealer got their piece of his pie too. 

Great guy. I wish he could retire and enjoy himself. We share mutual friends and some of them have comfortably retired. Wonder if he looks at them and says "I wish I did spent my money differently". Can't be sure but I think the wife and the spoiled son made it impossible for him to do much differently. We I in his shoes I would have quit the wife just so I didn't have to work to my dying day. 

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8828 on: June 24, 2015, 03:34:36 PM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8829 on: June 24, 2015, 03:57:59 PM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

I've done it, too.  But EEs will generally be aware that automotive batteries are basically all 12v.

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8830 on: June 24, 2015, 04:16:04 PM »
I don't go to work, so I'm reporting third-hand neighborhood gossip.

A 40-year-old married his fourth spouse in December 2011.  None of his previous marriages lasted longer than four years, mostly due to his own misconduct. 

The divorce betting pool started shortly after the honeymoon, and I picked this coming December because it's the four-year point.  No money is changing hands-- we're only comparing our skills at judging human behavioral psychology.

I've just learned that this couple financed their wedding and they're still paying it off nearly four years later.  Let me be clear on the vocabulary:  they didn't just finance their honeymoon, but they also financed the wedding (and he financed the rings) and they're still paying off all of that.  This is in addition to the first mortgage, the second mortgage, the student loan, and the car payments.  She also has a habit of buying high-end clothing for their 18-month-old daughter... I've heard estimates as high as 50 outfits (which are soon outgrown and replaced).  But although they're dual-working parents, they still manage to eat out and bar-hop with friends and "have fun".  You know, just living a typical life with debt up to their eyeballs.

It was pointed out to me that not only do they not have enough money to pay a divorce lawyer, but they're so enabling of each other's dysfunctional behavior that they may feel trapped in their marriage out of fear that they'd never survive on their own.  Because, after all, it takes two full-time incomes to handle this much debt.  It's simply not possible for them to break up the payments.

I'm going to have to re-think my divorce pool entry.  This marriage might be "until debt death do you part". 

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8831 on: June 24, 2015, 04:44:24 PM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

I've done it, too.  But EEs will generally be aware that automotive batteries are basically all 12v.

Yea it's fine, 12v all around (unless you have a really old/weird bike w/ 6v, but never seen one).  What you don't want to do is have the car running.  Car alternators can put out a lot more than 12v, which the bike might not like.

Nudelkopf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8832 on: June 24, 2015, 11:32:18 PM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
Oooh! I'm a school teacher, I've taught some doozies!

My favourites:
  • Doobie (female)
  • Shoushan (female)
  • Dorsey ('door-see')(male)
  • Jacqualee ('ja-kah-lee') & Jamarlee (they're brothers)
  • Teniqua, Tanika, & Tamika (all in the same class)
  • Shonkiqua & Shaniqua (in the same class)
  • Tyreke and Tireek (again, in the same class)(and then I got a 'Tyreece' this year)
  • Phyia ('fire')(male)

There's lots more, but they get less funny.

Cookie

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8833 on: June 25, 2015, 01:18:04 AM »
My pastor met a lady who named her kid Fudgesicle! The lady saw it in the grocery store one day and thought it was the prettiest name she ever. Its pronouced foodge sciliy.

marty998

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8834 on: June 25, 2015, 01:44:25 AM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
Oooh! I'm a school teacher, I've taught some doozies!

My favourites:
  • Doobie (female)
  • Shoushan (female)
  • Dorsey ('door-see')(male)
  • Jacqualee ('ja-kah-lee') & Jamarlee (they're brothers)
  • Teniqua, Tanika, & Tamika (all in the same class)
  • Shonkiqua & Shaniqua (in the same class)
  • Tyreke and Tireek (again, in the same class)(and then I got a 'Tyreece' this year)
  • Phyia ('fire')(male)

There's lots more, but they get less funny.

Bloody Queenslanders. Can't even name their kids properly :)

I may have posted this before but friend of a friend knows a poor girl out there named "Abcde" (ab-see-de)

Didn't have the heart to ask if the surname was "Fghij"

theadvicist

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8835 on: June 25, 2015, 02:29:51 AM »
Can't be sure but I think the wife and the spoiled son made it impossible for him to do much differently.

I think you've got the chicken and the egg the wrong way round there.

Timmmy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8836 on: June 25, 2015, 07:02:20 AM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

I've done it, too.  But EEs will generally be aware that automotive batteries are basically all 12v.

Yea it's fine, 12v all around (unless you have a really old/weird bike w/ 6v, but never seen one).  What you don't want to do is have the car running.  Car alternators can put out a lot more than 12v, which the bike might not like.

Cars don't put out any more voltage than motorcycles.  Excepting if you have an old 6v bike that is actually still running at 6v.  Most I've seen have been converted to run as a 12v system. 


benjenn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8837 on: June 25, 2015, 07:04:04 AM »
I remember years ago when the daughter of a woman I worked with was a labor/delivery nurse at an inner city hospital.  She would always have tales of extremely young girls giving birth, which was always very sad.  She had to convince one of them one time that she couldn't possibly give her daughter the name she wanted to give her.... she wanted to name her VAGINA!  She thought it was a pretty name.  Wow.  Can you even imagine the grief that poor girl would have had her entire life?  I still laugh whenever I think of that.  :)

I take a group of high school kids to DC (about 70 of them each year) so I've had some unusual names over the years.  This year I had a girl named Shadow.  That was a first!  I asked her how her parents decided to name her that and she shrugged and said she could only guess that they wanted a dog but got a kid instead.  LOL.

wenchsenior

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8838 on: June 25, 2015, 07:51:43 AM »
[Russian-doll quote action on extended discussion of impressions]
This is good first-hand info, you guys. I love this forum!
Hi, native Texas hunter myself, here. I can see why you'd feel like there's not a lot of 'huntable' land in TX if you grew up in Wisconsin and were used to hunting public land, and that the heinous expense of "ranch" hunting (big programs with glossy pamphlets and guides) would be supported by that alone. But those hunts are definitely the premium experience and frankly isn't marketed so much at just Texans but just generally rich people who want an easy harvest on trophy gamebirds/deer/nilgai (though they're happy to take anyone's money.)
...

Butchering is fun, if you do it indoors with friends/family and AC.

Anyone who tells you feral hog, or any wild meat, isn't any good is usually butchering it wrong after letting it sit around in the heat rather than chilling it right away - it's DELICIOUS - or, less often, they shot some older male hogs in poorer health. Targeting sows is better for population control, eating, and your nose (I won't lie; male hogs do stink like a cesspit; I don't know how they have a good sense of smell when they smell so much themselves. But they do taste delicious, especially if you like carnitas, tamales and jerk barbeque.)

Yes, my husband has frequently gotten courtesy access to private land to do population control hunts for wt deer (doe kill only), and to hunt ducks and doves. If he felt ambitious and had more free time in the autumn (typically, a big chunk of time is spent working in another country in the autumn), I'm sure he could work the social network for cranes, turkeys, etc.

I have no doubt the hogs taste good...and no one has ever told us they don't...it's the fat and the stink we heard were not fun.

Re: your comment that butchering is fun...I've help butcher deer for years, and elk occasionally, and chicken and game birds back in the day, and I don't find it fun at all LOL. It messes up the entire kitchen for two or three days and (in the case of big game) makes my arms and shoulders hurt. I suppose it might be fun if a big group did it and you made a party out of it, but I've never done that and am not able to. Doesn't mean we don't go through the butchering process most years anyway, though, very happy to have the meat.

wenchsenior

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8839 on: June 25, 2015, 07:54:01 AM »
I don't go to work, so I'm reporting third-hand neighborhood gossip.

A 40-year-old married his fourth spouse in December 2011.  None of his previous marriages lasted longer than four years, mostly due to his own misconduct. 

The divorce betting pool started shortly after the honeymoon, and I picked this coming December because it's the four-year point.  No money is changing hands-- we're only comparing our skills at judging human behavioral psychology.

I've just learned that this couple financed their wedding and they're still paying it off nearly four years later.  Let me be clear on the vocabulary:  they didn't just finance their honeymoon, but they also financed the wedding (and he financed the rings) and they're still paying off all of that.  This is in addition to the first mortgage, the second mortgage, the student loan, and the car payments.  She also has a habit of buying high-end clothing for their 18-month-old daughter... I've heard estimates as high as 50 outfits (which are soon outgrown and replaced).  But although they're dual-working parents, they still manage to eat out and bar-hop with friends and "have fun".  You know, just living a typical life with debt up to their eyeballs.

It was pointed out to me that not only do they not have enough money to pay a divorce lawyer, but they're so enabling of each other's dysfunctional behavior that they may feel trapped in their marriage out of fear that they'd never survive on their own.  Because, after all, it takes two full-time incomes to handle this much debt.  It's simply not possible for them to break up the payments.

I'm going to have to re-think my divorce pool entry.  This marriage might be "until debt death do you part".

I just...I can't even. :boggles:

Camarillo Brillo

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8840 on: June 25, 2015, 08:15:28 AM »
As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way.

My name was in the top 10 the year I was born, but is not even represented in 2014's top 100. Interesting.
I've met maybe two people in my life who share my first name.  Nobody pronounces it correctly the first time.  Last year (when I was 33), my mom told me that they gave me a common middle name so that I could use that if I wanted to.

Seriously?  You waited until I was 33 to tell me this!?
How odd.  One would think that 'Pooperman' would have more staying power.  It has a certain je ne sais quoi.

Cookie78

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8841 on: June 25, 2015, 09:28:56 AM »
My pastor met a lady who named her kid Fudgesicle! The lady saw it in the grocery store one day and thought it was the prettiest name she ever. Its pronouced foodge sciliy.
I did taxes for a couple who's baby was named Quetzalcoatl....They pulled out his social security card so I could make sure I spelled it correctly.

I'm another one of those who was given a name that was not popular...until the year I was born. My parents didn't know anyone else with my name at the time but there were three of us in my class of 40.

DH on the other hand has a name that I feel should be well known but is often mispronounced or misspelled. Seriously, people have issues with Eli...

Is it Ehl-ee or Ee-lie? It's ambiguous.

Very ambiguous. I met someone a few years ago with the same spelling who pronounces it Ee-lee

klystomane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8842 on: June 25, 2015, 10:12:44 AM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
Oooh! I'm a school teacher, I've taught some doozies!

My favourites:
  • Doobie (female)
  • Shoushan (female)
  • Dorsey ('door-see')(male)
  • Jacqualee ('ja-kah-lee') & Jamarlee (they're brothers)
  • Teniqua, Tanika, & Tamika (all in the same class)
  • Shonkiqua & Shaniqua (in the same class)
  • Tyreke and Tireek (again, in the same class)(and then I got a 'Tyreece' this year)
  • Phyia ('fire')(male)

There's lots more, but they get less funny.

A friend of mine taught in Korea and had a female student named Rim So Young.


RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8843 on: June 25, 2015, 10:15:30 AM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

I've done it, too.  But EEs will generally be aware that automotive batteries are basically all 12v.

Yea it's fine, 12v all around (unless you have a really old/weird bike w/ 6v, but never seen one).  What you don't want to do is have the car running.  Car alternators can put out a lot more than 12v, which the bike might not like.

Cars don't put out any more voltage than motorcycles.  Excepting if you have an old 6v bike that is actually still running at 6v.  Most I've seen have been converted to run as a 12v system.

http://www.motorbikelicense.com/can-you-jump-start-a-motorcycle-with-a-car/

If this is wrong I'd be interested to hear why.  Alternator output varies a lot, up to 18v being common, as I understand it.

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8844 on: June 25, 2015, 10:25:28 AM »
Any page that says " more than 12v of power. " can be safely ignored.

A 12v alternator will typically put out 13.6V, it can supply a lot more current and hence power than a bike alternator but that is irrelevant. When I plug my phone charger into a house 110V outlet I don't care if it is supplied by a 300W gasoline generator or a  4Gw coal fired station.

The only danger with jump starting a bike is the same as jump starting a car, accidentally shorting the battery by touching cables - it's just a lot easier to do on a small bike.

Jump starting a bike can be entertaining as well. Run alongside, drop the clutch and have a 900cc sports bike engine start. My bike could do 0-60 in <3seconds and you are hanging onto it while running....


Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8845 on: June 25, 2015, 10:55:27 AM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
Oooh! I'm a school teacher, I've taught some doozies!

My favourites:
  • Doobie (female)
  • Shoushan (female)
  • Dorsey ('door-see')(male)
  • Jacqualee ('ja-kah-lee') & Jamarlee (they're brothers)
  • Teniqua, Tanika, & Tamika (all in the same class)
  • Shonkiqua & Shaniqua (in the same class)
  • Tyreke and Tireek (again, in the same class)(and then I got a 'Tyreece' this year)
  • Phyia ('fire')(male)

There's lots more, but they get less funny.

A friend of mine taught in Korea and had a female student named Rim So Young.

http://weknowawesome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/bus-driver-hung-e1339077580213.jpg

Timmmy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8846 on: June 25, 2015, 10:58:47 AM »
Funny story: my friend (EE/CE) sold his bike to a roommate (EE/CE) who didn't take care of it as instructed, and the battery ran flat. Jumped it with a car. Yep, jumped a bike battery with a car. No google, no research, just straight up connected the two. Hilarious.

Motorcycle battery? Sure you can do it. You can also jumpstart a lawn tractor this way. Have done both. My motorcycle was hard to start in wet weather (cracked coil). Rode it year 'round this way for a year or so. Eventually sold it. Learned to live with the hard start and how to get around that (how to tease the carbs so it would start and run on two cylinders until the other two dried out and fired).

I've done it, too.  But EEs will generally be aware that automotive batteries are basically all 12v.

Yea it's fine, 12v all around (unless you have a really old/weird bike w/ 6v, but never seen one).  What you don't want to do is have the car running.  Car alternators can put out a lot more than 12v, which the bike might not like.

Cars don't put out any more voltage than motorcycles.  Excepting if you have an old 6v bike that is actually still running at 6v.  Most I've seen have been converted to run as a 12v system.

http://www.motorbikelicense.com/can-you-jump-start-a-motorcycle-with-a-car/

If this is wrong I'd be interested to hear why.  Alternator output varies a lot, up to 18v being common, as I understand it.

If a car is producing 18v it is broken.  Specifically, the voltage regulator is broken.  Both my bike and my car produce about 14 volts while running as read by a multimeter at the battery terminals.  Both are also capable of producing substantially more if it weren't for the regulator.

I prefer to push start my bikes when the batteries die because of the pain that it is to get to the battery.  I have however jump started several bikes over the years, both mine and other peoples, and have never had a problem. 

Any page that says " more than 12v of power. " can be safely ignored.   <------  THIS A MILLION TIMES

Jump starting a bike can be entertaining as well. Run alongside, drop the clutch and have a 900cc sports bike engine start. My bike could do 0-60 in <3seconds and you are hanging onto it while running....


I prefer to be on the bike when I pop the clutch.  Seems less likely to get away from me.  Run, hop, pop.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8847 on: June 25, 2015, 11:27:58 AM »
As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way.
ha ha my husband is Michael.  #1 for decades, literally

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8848 on: June 25, 2015, 11:30:47 AM »
I have a top 10 name from the year I was born, but it was a "new" name. My parents thought it was unique. My grandparents had hardly heard of it. I used that when I gave my kids "weird" names.

As a person with a SUPER common first name (#1 or 2 the year I was born??) the small amount of annoyance of having 10 peers with the same name (guys think that's cool and use it as a reason to be friends) is vastly outweighed by the complete lack of chance that my name will be used to pull my resume out of a pile, keep me out of a job, or otherwise used against me in any way. 

This works if you're a man. Those of us with very common feminine names have the annoyance alongside the chance that my name will keep me out of a job. And, also, women's names seem more cyclical than men's, so they can also be used for age discrimination. As an example of what I'll be facing in 20 years, the equivalent name for girls 20 years before I was born was Linda. For boys, it was Jeffrey. I've known a much wider age-range of Lindas than Jeffs.
My name peaked in popularity in the 50's.  I've met 2 or 3 other women with the same name (born in the 50's or earlier!)

My neighbor has 3 daughters and mostly gave them gender neutral names.  The middle one is a bit more feminine but has a gender neutral middle name.

Funny because her husband's name is also gender neutral.  Or, is a male name that became gender neutral in the 70's.

MustardTiger

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8849 on: June 25, 2015, 11:58:16 AM »
OK, let's go back to stupid names for people's children.  Specifically Kaylee in all its variations.  The legitimate word is Ceilidh (Scots Gaelic) or sometimes Ceili (Irish Gaelic) and it means a party with alcohol and music and dancing and basically having a grand time.  Do the people using this as a girl's name have any clue as to the original meaning?

Okay - how about Stelmo for a little girl we know of? Our own children have old fashioned names so I can't laugh and point fingers. ;) Didn't want our kids to have any of the top 50 (especially the top 10) current names. I was one of those kids way back when. When they called my name about four or five of us all jumped to attention.  :)
Oooh! I'm a school teacher, I've taught some doozies!

My favourites:
  • Doobie (female)
  • Shoushan (female)
  • Dorsey ('door-see')(male)
  • Jacqualee ('ja-kah-lee') & Jamarlee (they're brothers)
  • Teniqua, Tanika, & Tamika (all in the same class)
  • Shonkiqua & Shaniqua (in the same class)
  • Tyreke and Tireek (again, in the same class)(and then I got a 'Tyreece' this year)
  • Phyia ('fire')(male)

There's lots more, but they get less funny.

I had a student named M'kaleah, and had an interesting discussion during a grammar assignment about whether she could have two apostrophes to be possessive, lol.