Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5305046 times)

Scandium

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8400 on: May 20, 2015, 01:03:49 PM »
Different kind of crazy: I had a co-worker who inherited a condo in NYC, plus a bunch of money.  I mean millions of dollars.  She worked this miserable job and always working extra OT.  One day I went to borrow a pen from her and what did i see in her drawer?  Probably $40,000 worth of uncashed paychecks.  She said she was "saving them for a rainy day".  Far as I know, she died saving for a rainy day.  Good frugality IQ, terrible quality of life filter.

Uhm, Is that allowed? I was under the impression that checks went bad after a specific time, ("stale" I think is the word our payroll uses). Additionally, I know alot of companies set up specific accounts to do paychecks out of. Won't there be a delay when she tries to cash those all at once since the bank will probably want to double-check with the issuer due to their size and age?

Kind of defeats the point of a rainy-day fund if she has to wait for the checks to clear, doesn't it?

This is actually the most common form of saving for blue collar workers.  Can't spend what isn't in your bank account (or more accurately what you haven't already cashed in at the check cashing store).  Stick a few paychecks under the mattress and then bust them out at Christmas to pay for your shipping / vacation.
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well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8401 on: May 20, 2015, 01:22:58 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

Scandium

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8402 on: May 20, 2015, 01:29:08 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

solon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8403 on: May 20, 2015, 01:53:58 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I used to work for a company like this too. On payday, the paymaster would walk around the office and personally hand each employee a live check. Then, everyone would take a break and walk to the bank.

There were about 200 employees. Each person spent about half an hour of paid company time. So I estimate 100 person/hours each pay cycle was dedicated to depositing checks. I'm not sure what the company would have spent on DD, but surely it couldn't have been as much as it was spending on live checks.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8404 on: May 20, 2015, 01:58:52 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

Well they don't have to mail any out, it's all distributed by hand in our only office.  But yea, it's madness.  I think it's just the banks trying to capitalize on a service you want and are willing to pay for despite making it easier and cheaper for them.  Kind of like ticketmaster charging me a convenience fee to purchase tickets through their automated system and print them out myself.   You have an unmanned, automated system that exists on the internet...it's the cheapest and most efficient form of ticket sales possible, you require no infrastructure and minimal employees, and yet you are charging me extra for using this service that is obviously superior to any other way you could distribute tickets.  AND you have the balls to charge me an additional fee to print it out myself, even though it saves you the hassle and expense of doing it?! It's totally bonkers.  Straight greed.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8405 on: May 20, 2015, 02:03:26 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I used to work for a company like this too. On payday, the paymaster would walk around the office and personally hand each employee a live check. Then, everyone would take a break and walk to the bank.

There were about 200 employees. Each person spent about half an hour of paid company time. So I estimate 100 person/hours each pay cycle was dedicated to depositing checks. I'm not sure what the company would have spent on DD, but surely it couldn't have been as much as it was spending on live checks.

There would still need to be someone that gives each person a copy of their paystub. Even if they are on salary that pays them exactly the same amount, employees still need a copy (believe that this might be a requirement by law). If people are salary, there may be disputes about hours or vacation time or other things. We have half our employees with DD and they get copies of their paychecks.

solon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8406 on: May 20, 2015, 02:06:35 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I used to work for a company like this too. On payday, the paymaster would walk around the office and personally hand each employee a live check. Then, everyone would take a break and walk to the bank.

There were about 200 employees. Each person spent about half an hour of paid company time. So I estimate 100 person/hours each pay cycle was dedicated to depositing checks. I'm not sure what the company would have spent on DD, but surely it couldn't have been as much as it was spending on live checks.

There would still need to be someone that gives each person a copy of their paystub. Even if they are on salary that pays them exactly the same amount, employees still need a copy (believe that this might be a requirement by law). If people are salary, there may be disputes about hours or vacation time or other things. We have half our employees with DD and they get copies of their paychecks.

The other places I have worked gave us a website where we could download the paystubs ourselves. Which I do early in the morning on payday, before work, so it's on my own time.

Scandium

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8407 on: May 20, 2015, 02:11:08 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I used to work for a company like this too. On payday, the paymaster would walk around the office and personally hand each employee a live check. Then, everyone would take a break and walk to the bank.

There were about 200 employees. Each person spent about half an hour of paid company time. So I estimate 100 person/hours each pay cycle was dedicated to depositing checks. I'm not sure what the company would have spent on DD, but surely it couldn't have been as much as it was spending on live checks.

There would still need to be someone that gives each person a copy of their paystub. Even if they are on salary that pays them exactly the same amount, employees still need a copy (believe that this might be a requirement by law). If people are salary, there may be disputes about hours or vacation time or other things. We have half our employees with DD and they get copies of their paychecks.
Well then that's not the law here because I haven't seen a physical paystub in years. I can log into the ADP payroll system to look at a pdf of it though. Which is makes sense since we've not in the 1970s anymore..

fantabulous

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8408 on: May 20, 2015, 02:37:20 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

Well they don't have to mail any out, it's all distributed by hand in our only office.  But yea, it's madness.  I think it's just the banks trying to capitalize on a service you want and are willing to pay for despite making it easier and cheaper for them.  Kind of like ticketmaster charging me a convenience fee to purchase tickets through their automated system and print them out myself.   You have an unmanned, automated system that exists on the internet...it's the cheapest and most efficient form of ticket sales possible, you require no infrastructure and minimal employees, and yet you are charging me extra for using this service that is obviously superior to any other way you could distribute tickets.  AND you have the balls to charge me an additional fee to print it out myself, even though it saves you the hassle and expense of doing it?! It's totally bonkers.  Straight greed.

Kind of like Bank of America's "Disdain for customers" fee. Totally makes sense that improperly compared (costs of printing only vs costs of direct deposit) would work out to be I would estimate $42 cheaper per pay period.

Davids

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8409 on: May 20, 2015, 02:53:17 PM »
I look at it this way I don't care how I get paid as long as I get paid on the day I am supposed to get paid. Direct Deposit, physical check, cash, whatever. Hell with a physical check I would just pull my checking account's app on my smartphone and do the deposit right there instead of going to bank.

TrMama

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8410 on: May 20, 2015, 03:00:30 PM »
This wasn't overheard at work, so much as it was the topic of a mandatory HR meeting for all employees. The subject of the meeting was, "Why health insurance premiums are going up and health benefits are going down". Subtitle: Our HR people can't do math.

The intro contained 2 fascinating bits of info:

1) The average employee age has increased from 44 to 46 over the past 2 years. Since we haven't hired anyone in the past 2 years I thought that made sense. The HR people were mystified by the fact we all got 2 years older over the past 2 years.

2) Our utilization rate is higher than average (aka we claim more health expenses relative to our premiums than other companies). Since the company employs at lot of engineers (aka people who are good at math) I didn't find this shocking either. Apparently, my coworkers know how to milk the system. Again, the HR people were mystified.

The really scary part was when HR lady #1 told us she was shopping around to see if she could find us a better deal on our defined benefit retirement plan. However, she didn't seem to have any idea on what to look for. I suggested a plan that offers a greater range of funds (more than the 12 crappy ones we have now would be nice) and funds that don't have MERs greater that 3%.

I also suggested that forcing us to buy life insurance on our kids was pretty crappy and I'd love to opt out. I was admonished for not knowing how expensive a funeral was. "It's over $17K!" I was speachless. I was afraid if I admitted that a) my children are very unlikely to croak, b) my family doesn't do funerals anyway and c) I have cash on hand to pay for even the fancy funeral that their heads would just explode.




Kris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8411 on: May 20, 2015, 03:02:33 PM »
Today was the CTO's birthday. His executive assistant ordered a cake from Magnolia Bakery. I think it was probably a 12 or 14 inch round cake--not large at all. She said it cost $80!!!!! I know it was probably the company's money and not hers but holy shit who pays $80 for a fucking cake???

My sister made the wedding cakes for my other sister's wedding earlier this year.  I think she was over $80 in ingredients alone.

Then again, the same one "professionally" done would apparently have been ~$800.  O.O

It was probably the best cake I've ever eaten.

Who pays $80 when Costco sells delicious cake for $17!! Seriously their round chocolate layer cake is so good, it probably serves 30 people because it is so rich you can cut the pieces really small.


For real, Costco cake is the bomb.  I couldn't believe it the first time I tried one.
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Ghzbani

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8412 on: May 20, 2015, 04:21:07 PM »
I work in IT for a large insurance company with a wonderful boss. However, my boss said something today that really threw me for a loop:

Boss: There's no way I can retire on just $6 million.

Me: Whoa. That's way more than you need to retire on. Throw that in a Vanguard fund and you'll never work another day in your life.

Boss: Well you don't spend like I do.

Me: Not at all. I'll send you a link to a blog that you might find interesting. (This one if you haven't guessed.)

Boss: What is it about?

Me: It's all about frugality, minimalism and making the most of your money.

Boss: Pass. I want to live in the here and now.

:-\

I literally just did the calculation on 2 different calculators (my computer calc and my desk calc) just to make sure I wasn't off but...WOW. That comes out to like 240K per year. How can you not live off that?!?! That could support 8+ mustacian households! I know (admittedly young) attorneys that don't make that much.

mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8413 on: May 20, 2015, 05:31:46 PM »
Today was the CTO's birthday. His executive assistant ordered a cake from Magnolia Bakery. I think it was probably a 12 or 14 inch round cake--not large at all. She said it cost $80!!!!! I know it was probably the company's money and not hers but holy shit who pays $80 for a fucking cake???

My sister made the wedding cakes for my other sister's wedding earlier this year.  I think she was over $80 in ingredients alone.

Then again, the same one "professionally" done would apparently have been ~$800.  O.O

It was probably the best cake I've ever eaten.

Well sure but a. Your sister didn't have access to.wholesale ingredients and b. I'm sure it served more people than this thing.

Tjat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8414 on: May 20, 2015, 06:07:41 PM »
Coworker: I just really don't like eating leftovers. It just seems like a lot of work to cook extra.
Me: uh huh (I was in a bad mood)
Coworker: Yeah, plus the whole tupperware thing grosses me out. I heard they give you cancer if you use them in the microwave
Me: <as I dump my tupperwared lasagna onto a paper plate to heat up> really?

Coworker: Proceeds to heat up a lean cuisine

fb132

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8415 on: May 20, 2015, 06:15:28 PM »
Coworker asking me to void his transaction (I am the only one who has the keys to cancel any transactions):"Hey, can you cancel my bill, I wanted to buy Rockstar (energy drink) and some chocolate bars, but my credit card is maxed out."

When he told me that, I did my very best to keep my mouth shut. At least the credit card company did the right thing and stopped borrowing him more money.

« Last Edit: May 20, 2015, 06:18:56 PM by fb132 »

hdatontodo

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8416 on: May 20, 2015, 07:12:17 PM »
The other places I have worked gave us a website where we could download the paystubs ourselves. Which I do early in the morning on payday, before work, so it's on my own time.

I like that my company lets me see my paystub on Wednesday for what I'm going to get paid on Friday. The amount varies since I get paid OT now. My money's tight since I'm trying to knock off my mortgage by January, and I like to see how the OT helps out my cash budget months down the road.

Squashy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8417 on: May 20, 2015, 07:43:12 PM »
Sent over the office listserv today:

Beginning as early as June 1, the intersection at [location redacted] will be closed, for an unknown period of time, for utility relocation work.
This may interfere with your Starbucks runs (gasp!), but never fear, detours will be in place.

Starbucks is a 10-minute walk away...and we have fancy espresso machines with fancy coffee beans available for free at the office.

Indexer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8418 on: May 20, 2015, 08:09:23 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

Well they don't have to mail any out, it's all distributed by hand in our only office.  But yea, it's madness.  I think it's just the banks trying to capitalize on a service you want and are willing to pay for despite making it easier and cheaper for them.  Kind of like ticketmaster charging me a convenience fee to purchase tickets through their automated system and print them out myself.   You have an unmanned, automated system that exists on the internet...it's the cheapest and most efficient form of ticket sales possible, you require no infrastructure and minimal employees, and yet you are charging me extra for using this service that is obviously superior to any other way you could distribute tickets.  AND you have the balls to charge me an additional fee to print it out myself, even though it saves you the hassle and expense of doing it?! It's totally bonkers.  Straight greed.

I use to work in banking, and the banks WANT everyone on direct deposit... BADLY.  What do people with checks do?  They go bug tellers.... who get paid 25-35k a year.  Tellers are an expense.  Bankers bring in business, bankers pay for themselves... and the tellers.  Less checks means a lower teller/banker ratio required to keep the bank functioning which means more profits.

Its been forever, but I did help a few small companies set up direct deposit when I worked in banking.  It is normally a fixed cost for the service plus a very tiny cost per employee.  I want to say it was a monthly charge of $40+$1/employee(but it has been awhile).  So if you have 5 employees it is kind of a waste because the owner can just write 5 checks each week.  If you have 500 employees it is a no brainer because you are paying $1.08 per employee for a service that cuts other costs(checks, envelopes, labor to put the checks in the envelopes, etc.) and makes your employees happy.  $1 to make employees happy without raising their pay is huge to a business owner.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8419 on: May 21, 2015, 02:18:08 AM »
My husband keeps telling people at his work that they can contribute more to their pension than the 5% they do now, to little response.

One person said he might do that when he gets closer to retirement?! He is almost 50!

Coworker: I just really don't like eating leftovers. It just seems like a lot of work to cook extra.
Me: uh huh (I was in a bad mood)
Coworker: Yeah, plus the whole tupperware thing grosses me out. I heard they give you cancer if you use them in the microwave
Me: <as I dump my tupperwared lasagna onto a paper plate to heat up> really?

Coworker: Proceeds to heat up a lean cuisine

Lol.:)

iowajes

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8420 on: May 21, 2015, 07:01:20 AM »
I look at it this way I don't care how I get paid as long as I get paid on the day I am supposed to get paid. Direct Deposit, physical check, cash, whatever. Hell with a physical check I would just pull my checking account's app on my smartphone and do the deposit right there instead of going to bank.

I don't care when I get paid as long as I get my vacation accruals on time.  As long as they pay me everything I am owed by the end of the year, I'm good.

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8421 on: May 21, 2015, 07:18:03 AM »
My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

My city government is similar -- I can pay my property taxes, water bill, or other city services via a check for the price of postage, or I can pay them online via ACH for an additional "convenience fee". I like to think that spiteful cheapskates like me who keep paying by check are preserving the job of some civil service envelope opener in the bowels of City Hall.

tmac

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8422 on: May 21, 2015, 07:40:01 AM »
We pay $1.50 per paycheck to do a direct deposit. We email pay stubs to the employees. It's all done directly from the financial software and is much less effort for me than printing, stuffing in envelopes, and mailing (which we'd have to do because we're in a different location). And I only have 5 people on payroll. If I had a hundred, I'd absolutely insist on direct deposit.

Scandium

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8423 on: May 21, 2015, 08:20:41 AM »
My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

My city government is similar -- I can pay my property taxes, water bill, or other city services via a check for the price of postage, or I can pay them online via ACH for an additional "convenience fee". I like to think that spiteful cheapskates like me who keep paying by check are preserving the job of some civil service envelope opener in the bowels of City Hall.

I can pay my water bill online from my debit account for free, they only charge extra for credit card. Or you may be able to use your banks bill pay option. I do that for the mortgage. Mailing IOUs in the post is so antiquated the less I have to do it the better.

Elderwood17

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8424 on: May 21, 2015, 08:30:39 AM »
Coworker asking me to void his transaction (I am the only one who has the keys to cancel any transactions):"Hey, can you cancel my bill, I wanted to buy Rockstar (energy drink) and some chocolate bars, but my credit card is maxed out."

When he told me that, I did my very best to keep my mouth shut. At least the credit card company did the right thing and stopped borrowing him more money.

Sad.  Energy drinks and chocolate bars are worth making payments for?  I used to completely scorn people who maxed out their credit cards like this, but increasingly I have at least a little empathy (sometimes) because I don't think anyone has every shown a lot of these people the impact of their choices, proper use of credit, etc. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8425 on: May 21, 2015, 08:35:22 AM »
Coworker asking me to void his transaction (I am the only one who has the keys to cancel any transactions):"Hey, can you cancel my bill, I wanted to buy Rockstar (energy drink) and some chocolate bars, but my credit card is maxed out."

When he told me that, I did my very best to keep my mouth shut. At least the credit card company did the right thing and stopped borrowing him more money.

Sad.  Energy drinks and chocolate bars are worth making payments for?  I used to completely scorn people who maxed out their credit cards like this, but increasingly I have at least a little empathy (sometimes) because I don't think anyone has every shown a lot of these people the impact of their choices, proper use of credit, etc.
What is even more sad is that he makes twice as much as I make and lives with his parents and is almost 30.

WerKater

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8426 on: May 21, 2015, 09:50:50 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
This is one thing we do better in Europe. No checks.
I think I have held exactly one check in my hands in my whole life. It was given to me by my aunt as a gift when I was maybe 16 or so. I had heard about checks before, but I had to go to my parents and ask them what exactly I was supposed to do with the thing.
If I told my employer that I wanted a physical paycheck I would probably be fired for insanity.

Sam E

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8427 on: May 21, 2015, 10:41:10 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

There are still some companies that don't do direct deposit, and I know a few people who refuse to sign up for direct deposit because they prefer getting a check. I've never known a company that forced direct deposit, it's always optional to my knowledge.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8428 on: May 21, 2015, 11:06:14 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

Well they don't have to mail any out, it's all distributed by hand in our only office.  But yea, it's madness.  I think it's just the banks trying to capitalize on a service you want and are willing to pay for despite making it easier and cheaper for them.  Kind of like ticketmaster charging me a convenience fee to purchase tickets through their automated system and print them out myself.   You have an unmanned, automated system that exists on the internet...it's the cheapest and most efficient form of ticket sales possible, you require no infrastructure and minimal employees, and yet you are charging me extra for using this service that is obviously superior to any other way you could distribute tickets.  AND you have the balls to charge me an additional fee to print it out myself, even though it saves you the hassle and expense of doing it?! It's totally bonkers.  Straight greed.
So I don't run races anymore, but I feel the same way about race fees.  To sign up on line costs an extra few bucks - so I'd always print out the registration form and mail in a check that only costs 42 cents (or whatever a stamp was at the time).

Also: school lunches.  It costs about $3 to add money to my kid's account, so when we run low I have my husband just drop off a check to the cafeteria.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8429 on: May 21, 2015, 11:37:09 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

There are still some companies that don't do direct deposit, and I know a few people who refuse to sign up for direct deposit because they prefer getting a check. I've never known a company that forced direct deposit, it's always optional to my knowledge.

My company does. We're a bank though; if you don't have a checking account to direct deposit into they'll open one for you.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8430 on: May 21, 2015, 12:43:12 PM »
The thing that gets me is the 'grill your own steak' places.  I fail to see how that differentiates from grilling at home.  But I know people WHO love it.  It's like a steakhouse, but they let you cook your own steak.  um, What? 
I guess it saves you from having to make side dishes?  The idea baffles me.

Never heard of this concept, is it just a normal steak that they provide to you to grill?

I've never been, and probably will never go to such a place. I imagine the appeal to some people is somewhat nicer cuts of steak than a supermarket and not having to clean off the grill afterwards.


cleaning the grill?  My grill cleaning consists of rubbing it with a wire brush for like 10 seconds once it's hot.

Cleaning out the grease trap is the worst. Oh man the smell. Rotten crap. Ugh.
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frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8431 on: May 21, 2015, 01:58:32 PM »
The thing that gets me is the 'grill your own steak' places.  I fail to see how that differentiates from grilling at home.  But I know people WHO love it.  It's like a steakhouse, but they let you cook your own steak.  um, What? 
I guess it saves you from having to make side dishes?  The idea baffles me.

Never heard of this concept, is it just a normal steak that they provide to you to grill?

I've never been, and probably will never go to such a place. I imagine the appeal to some people is somewhat nicer cuts of steak than a supermarket and not having to clean off the grill afterwards.


cleaning the grill?  My grill cleaning consists of rubbing it with a wire brush for like 10 seconds once it's hot.

Cleaning out the grease trap is the worst. Oh man the smell. Rotten crap. Ugh.

Cleaning out the grease trap takes like 10 seconds too.  Take it out, dump it in glass jar, and put it back.  No big deal.

I recently got some teflon grill mats, so I have been cooking everything outside on the grill.  My new favorite thing is to cook up a full breakfast on the grill in the morning sun.  A pound of bacon, some tater rounds, some eggs.   MMMM.  Clean up is so easy too.  Just wash 2 teflon mats, and empty the grill's grease trap.  So much easier than making bacon inside the house.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8432 on: May 21, 2015, 02:18:49 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

Much like a convenience fee for ACH payments instead of sending a check, it is a profit center for many payroll processing companies, as it's free float.

Say payday is the first day of the week.  $250,000 of payroll for a generic company.  Checks are handed over at the end of the day on 6/1.  Payroll company pulls the month from the worker company on 5/29 to make sure the funds are available to pay the checks they issued.  Some people cash their paychecks same day, and it clears on 6/2.  Some of you are on vacation, out sick, etc. or just plain don't get around to doing it for a few days or even weeks.  Say on average checks clear on 6/4.

Payroll company just got to invest $250,000 for 6 days and keep the interest.  Invest it at around 1% APR and you just made $50.  Repeat 52 weeks a year, $2,600 in extra profit in that one example company.  ADP services over 600,000 companies.  You can do the math and see this is potentially millions of dollars of free money.  This is also why they love to mail checks -- if you can hold an average employee's $40k salary paid bi-weekly another 3 extra days as the USPS walks it to you every pay period and invest it at 1%, you just made an extra $85.  If you can mail out checks for less than $3.25 you're coming out ahead versus letting them hand them out at the office.

If you turn the money over to every employee same day via DD, you don't get this free float.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8433 on: May 21, 2015, 02:34:27 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

Much like a convenience fee for ACH payments instead of sending a check, it is a profit center for many payroll processing companies, as it's free float.

Say payday is the first day of the week.  $250,000 of payroll for a generic company.  Checks are handed over at the end of the day on 6/1.  Payroll company pulls the month from the worker company on 5/29 to make sure the funds are available to pay the checks they issued.  Some people cash their paychecks same day, and it clears on 6/2.  Some of you are on vacation, out sick, etc. or just plain don't get around to doing it for a few days or even weeks.  Say on average checks clear on 6/4.

Payroll company just got to invest $250,000 for 6 days and keep the interest.  Invest it at around 1% APR and you just made $50.  Repeat 52 weeks a year, $2,600 in extra profit in that one example company.  ADP services over 600,000 companies.  You can do the math and see this is potentially millions of dollars of free money.  This is also why they love to mail checks -- if you can hold an average employee's $40k salary paid bi-weekly another 3 extra days as the USPS walks it to you every pay period and invest it at 1%, you just made an extra $85.  If you can mail out checks for less than $3.25 you're coming out ahead versus letting them hand them out at the office.

If you turn the money over to every employee same day via DD, you don't get this free float.
This is nonsense. That's around 150-200 employees so that many checks. You're making $50 on the interest earned by printing and delivering that many checks. That's more expensive than it's worth. You grouped all the employees together to get a higher number without realizing that the interest earned per employee per check was negligible. Less than the cost of delivery.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8434 on: May 21, 2015, 02:46:42 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I used to work for a company like this too. On payday, the paymaster would walk around the office and personally hand each employee a live check. Then, everyone would take a break and walk to the bank.

There were about 200 employees. Each person spent about half an hour of paid company time. So I estimate 100 person/hours each pay cycle was dedicated to depositing checks. I'm not sure what the company would have spent on DD, but surely it couldn't have been as much as it was spending on live checks.

There would still need to be someone that gives each person a copy of their paystub. Even if they are on salary that pays them exactly the same amount, employees still need a copy (believe that this might be a requirement by law). If people are salary, there may be disputes about hours or vacation time or other things. We have half our employees with DD and they get copies of their paychecks.

Not doing DD means the company keeps its money in their accounts an extra few days. For DD money is transferred  into the accounts of the payroll company Mon/Tue/Wed to be transferred to the employees bank accounts Thurs or Friday. If employees receive a live check it doesn't clear until Monday or Tuesday.

AH013

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8435 on: May 21, 2015, 03:49:49 PM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

Much like a convenience fee for ACH payments instead of sending a check, it is a profit center for many payroll processing companies, as it's free float.

Say payday is the first day of the week.  $250,000 of payroll for a generic company.  Checks are handed over at the end of the day on 6/1.  Payroll company pulls the month from the worker company on 5/29 to make sure the funds are available to pay the checks they issued.  Some people cash their paychecks same day, and it clears on 6/2.  Some of you are on vacation, out sick, etc. or just plain don't get around to doing it for a few days or even weeks.  Say on average checks clear on 6/4.

Payroll company just got to invest $250,000 for 6 days and keep the interest.  Invest it at around 1% APR and you just made $50.  Repeat 52 weeks a year, $2,600 in extra profit in that one example company.  ADP services over 600,000 companies.  You can do the math and see this is potentially millions of dollars of free money.  This is also why they love to mail checks -- if you can hold an average employee's $40k salary paid bi-weekly another 3 extra days as the USPS walks it to you every pay period and invest it at 1%, you just made an extra $85.  If you can mail out checks for less than $3.25 you're coming out ahead versus letting them hand them out at the office.

If you turn the money over to every employee same day via DD, you don't get this free float.
This is nonsense. That's around 150-200 employees so that many checks. You're making $50 on the interest earned by printing and delivering that many checks. That's more expensive than it's worth. You grouped all the employees together to get a higher number without realizing that the interest earned per employee per check was negligible. Less than the cost of delivery.

The consolidated charge for performing payroll, either by DD or check, is already factored into my first example.  In reality most employees aren't paid weekly -- usually bi-weekly or monthly.  Frequency doesn't impact the payroll company's interest revenue, it just reduces the cost (frequency) of paper checks.  Change my example to monthly -- a $1M payroll per month for 200 employees.  $164/month in interest.  Yeah, maybe it costs close to $0.80 per check, but there will be people who lose their checks and then you're earning a decent amount of additional float, plus a lost check charge you hit the employer with.  It's not like switching to DD is completely free to the payroll company either, and it isn't just purely a float benefit -- they know as recipients you're willing to pay for DD so why not charge for it?

Keep in mind we're in an incredibly low interest environment.  No sense in converting everyone to DD just because right now it doesn't make a big revenue difference. 

Insanity

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8436 on: May 22, 2015, 06:24:00 AM »
I finally have one!

It's open enrollment time for benefits at my company now.  Today we went to the benefits meeting (Supposedly there are 2 new benefits, but I can't figure out what they are.  Anyway...).  CW, who I consider somewhat of an airhead, actually surprised me.  She is expounding on the benefits of the flex plan (money is taken out of your paycheck pre-tax & can be used to spend on a variety of things: health care, commuter costs & more).

Boss joins the conversation: "I only want to spend on a card.  No submitting receipts."
CW: "They give you a card!"
Boss: "Oh, that's cool"
CW: "You do have to keep some receipts though.  For example, the dentist could possibly do cosmetic work like whitening, and that's not eligible."
Boss: "Oh, forget the whole thing."

WHT?  The boss wears glasses, that's a pretty well-known expense.  Saving the cost of taxes on that expense seems like a no-brainer.  Especially since it's no longer a use-it-or-lose-it proposition...you can roll over $500 at the end of the year, too!


Am I the only one who finds it odd that the government allows for tax deductions for medical expenses rather than ensuring the costs are kept down?  Wouldn't that be cheaper over the long run? 

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8437 on: May 22, 2015, 07:01:58 AM »
Am I the only one who finds it odd that the government allows for tax deductions for medical expenses rather than ensuring the costs are kept down?  Wouldn't that be cheaper over the long run?
An ounce of prevention vs a pound of cure? It's so crazy it just might work!

When you see tax policy for what it is - a set of policy decisions driven by (and often directly written by) industry lobbyists to maximize profits - these things generally make a lot more sense.

Making medical expenses tax-deductible has one designed purpose and one actual function: increasing the available funds for purchase of medical goods and services. Prevention would increase the bang for the individual's buck, but it doesn't have comparable lobbying resources.
For example, what kind of things would reduce the need for medical expenses?
The fitness industry - it may have a substantial marketing budget but it's a tiny fraction of what pharm companies shell out in D.C.
Broccoli farmers? Ha! Good luck.
And "not eating disgusting processed shit" isn't even an industry, so it'll never have lobbyists.
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Insanity

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8438 on: May 22, 2015, 07:07:19 AM »
Am I the only one who finds it odd that the government allows for tax deductions for medical expenses rather than ensuring the costs are kept down?  Wouldn't that be cheaper over the long run?
An ounce of prevention vs a pound of cure? It's so crazy it just might work!

When you see tax policy for what it is - a set of policy decisions driven by (and often directly written by) industry lobbyists to maximize profits - these things generally make a lot more sense.

Making medical expenses tax-deductible has one designed purpose and one actual function: increasing the available funds for purchase of medical goods and services. Prevention would increase the bang for the individual's buck, but it doesn't have comparable lobbying resources.
For example, what kind of things would reduce the need for medical expenses?
The fitness industry - it may have a substantial marketing budget but it's a tiny fraction of what pharm companies shell out in D.C.
Broccoli farmers? Ha! Good luck.
And "not eating disgusting processed shit" isn't even an industry, so it'll never have lobbyists.

Yeah, I know. Follow the almighty dollar.  I'm too idealist.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8439 on: May 22, 2015, 08:09:09 AM »
Making medical expenses tax-deductible has one designed purpose and one actual function: increasing the available funds for purchase of medical goods and services
That doesn't make any sense. If that were the goal, why would it have the ridiculously high 10%/7.5% of AGI floor before expenses become deductible? The deduction functions as a risk sharing mechanism with the hope that it can prevent some of the medical bankruptcies that result from uninsured emergencies. I'll also note that the deduction dates from 1942 and the committee report read in part:
Quote
This allowance is recommended in consideration of the heavy tax burden that must be borne by individuals during the existing emergency and of the desirability of maintaining the present high level of public health and morale.

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Elderwood17

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8440 on: May 22, 2015, 08:14:45 AM »
"And "not eating disgusting processed shit" isn't even an industry, so it'll never have lobbyists."

You cracked me up with that one!  Too true. 


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8441 on: May 22, 2015, 09:51:48 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

There are still some companies that don't do direct deposit, and I know a few people who refuse to sign up for direct deposit because they prefer getting a check. I've never known a company that forced direct deposit, it's always optional to my knowledge.

Physical checks aren't available at my company in my area. Not sure if they are in other areas of the country. Those that don't have bank accounts have to get them direct deposited to some kind of payroll card--I think there are a few different options. And we're a huge corporation. I am sure this saves a lot for the company, but the employees who don't have bank accounts probably have to pay some "convenience fees". Boo.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8442 on: May 22, 2015, 10:36:17 AM »

But you are missing out on saving the bacon grease for cooking other tasty delights (like has browns)!
Yummy! But, I too love to grill and haven't heard of the Teflon mats (I use a charcoal grill, no grease traps, just flare ups if you are not careful)

I cooked the hashbrowns and eggs in the bacon grease right after I cooked the bacon. Once it drips through the grill to the trap it's all nasty, rusty, black and unusable though. 

These are the grill mats I bought: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KDNEM8K/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They were $6.99 when I purchased them a few weeks ago.

Tallgirl1204

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8443 on: May 22, 2015, 10:54:34 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

There are still some companies that don't do direct deposit, and I know a few people who refuse to sign up for direct deposit because they prefer getting a check. I've never known a company that forced direct deposit, it's always optional to my knowledge.

I had a boyfriend who insisted on getting a check at work, and went to check-cashing places with it, because somehow someone he owed money to (I can't remember if it was the Fed, the mortgage company or what) had his bank information and was taking money out of those accounts whenever he deposited anything in them.  At least, that's how he explained it to me.  He owed a lot of money a lot of places, and spent everything that came in-- I liked him a lot, but there was no long-term potential-- I am not super-frugal but geez, I hate debt and could have not tolerated living in that kind of stress and fear. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8444 on: May 22, 2015, 11:11:33 AM »
I wouldn't put Teflon anywhere near the high heat of a grill (even if I used Teflon at all, which I don't).
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frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8445 on: May 22, 2015, 11:39:25 AM »
I wouldn't put Teflon anywhere near the high heat of a grill (even if I used Teflon at all, which I don't).

Teflon is probably on all the pans you use.  If not then I think you are missing out. They also make bake ware out of teflon.  I wouldn't crank the grill on the highest setting and leave it closed, but even then I doubt it would get hot enough to damage it.  As long as you keep it under 500*F you should be fine. 

Apples

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8446 on: May 22, 2015, 11:47:35 AM »
well that won't work too well anymore. Who actually gets physical paychecks anymore? Isn't it all direct deposit at this point?

My company won't do direct deposit because it costs extra money.  I don't really understand why it costs more money to have dd though, it doesn't make any sense.  Some how issuing physical checks to everyone, and having everyone physically cash those checks is all totally free, but dd would cost an extra fee for each person on the payroll.  It's madness.

I just tried to set up direct deposit for our (25 employee, of which 10  might use DD) company.  Getting the add-on to our payroll was going to be a one time $400 fee.  In addition, our bank wanted to charge us $25/month to enable direct deposit capabilities, and in addition $0.25 per paycheck.  And if our employees use a different bank, there was a fee for that.  This is at our small, rural, local bank down the road.  And everyone goes and takes their checks to the bank either during lunch hour or after work, so company time isn't used.  So yes, using direct deposit would most definitely cost our company significantly more money than our current paper check system.
What? That is madness. So printing checks and putting them in envelopes, and mailing to any remote offices cost less than doing account transfers? How? Last I checked my bank charged zero to do a transfer..

If someone wanted to pay me with a piece of paper I have to cash every time I'd be pissed.

Well they don't have to mail any out, it's all distributed by hand in our only office.  But yea, it's madness.  I think it's just the banks trying to capitalize on a service you want and are willing to pay for despite making it easier and cheaper for them.  Kind of like ticketmaster charging me a convenience fee to purchase tickets through their automated system and print them out myself.   You have an unmanned, automated system that exists on the internet...it's the cheapest and most efficient form of ticket sales possible, you require no infrastructure and minimal employees, and yet you are charging me extra for using this service that is obviously superior to any other way you could distribute tickets.  AND you have the balls to charge me an additional fee to print it out myself, even though it saves you the hassle and expense of doing it?! It's totally bonkers.  Straight greed.

Edited to fix a quote fail.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8447 on: May 22, 2015, 11:57:43 AM »

TravelJunkyQC

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8448 on: May 22, 2015, 12:54:55 PM »
Sent out an e-mail to my coworkers who live in the same city sector as I do to carpool. Received numerous responses such as «my morning car ride is my time to wake up - I need to be alone», and «I need to be able to leave at whatever moment I want»...

Considering biking the 22 km (250 m incline uphill) to work (where we have no shower), and just stink the place up out of spite!

lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8449 on: May 22, 2015, 01:22:36 PM »
Sent out an e-mail to my coworkers who live in the same city sector as I do to carpool. Received numerous responses such as «my morning car ride is my time to wake up - I need to be alone», and «I need to be able to leave at whatever moment I want»...

Considering biking the 22 km (250 m incline uphill) to work (where we have no shower), and just stink the place up out of spite!

I know it's not Mustachian but I agree with your coworkers. I like leaving home at whatever time I want (within reason) and would hate to carpool. My work is relatively close to my home and I get free parking at work.