Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5660433 times)

stevedoug

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 95
    • Photon Chasing
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8200 on: May 05, 2015, 04:02:01 PM »
Nice watch. Very cool. I'll pass, though! I'll enjoy looking from afar. I am (unlike some here) glad that some people have the money to fund ... well, functional art.

on the topic of Frugality, many of these super high end watches, if purchased correctly will not lose value, and may even gain value over a period of 10+ years. That makes the operating cost (and unrealized losses) lower than other watches.

I know some (wealthy) who have watches insured and part of their investment portfolio (that you can wear)
Maybe we should start making VFINX watches that show current value at all times to wear around and show off our stache's?

That being said I daily wear a cloth band SEIKO.

RWD

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1441
  • Location: Mississippi
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8201 on: May 05, 2015, 04:18:54 PM »
Nice watch. Very cool. I'll pass, though! I'll enjoy looking from afar. I am (unlike some here) glad that some people have the money to fund ... well, functional art.

on the topic of Frugality, many of these super high end watches, if purchased correctly will not lose value, and may even gain value over a period of 10+ years. That makes the operating cost (and unrealized losses) lower than other watches.

I know some (wealthy) who have watches insured and part of their investment portfolio (that you can wear)
Maybe we should start making VFINX watches that show current value at all times to wear around and show off our stache's?

That being said I daily wear a cloth band SEIKO.

A $10k watch that does not lose value (let's say it tracks with inflation) is still going to be significantly more expensive than buying a new $50 watch every year. You could invest the $10k instead and beat inflation. In addition, if you're planning on wearing it you'll have to insure it against possible theft or damage or risk losing your "investment". I imagine it would cost some money to keep it maintained as well.

I'd venture to guess that picking a watch that will appreciate in value enough to make it a good investment is sort of like being able to pick an individual successful stock. Though I'm certainly no expert on watches, as I haven't worn one since I was in high school.

gimp

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2355
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8202 on: May 05, 2015, 04:30:26 PM »
Doesn't help that probably every luxury watchmaker has multiple "limited edition" releases every year, all of which "might" appreciate in value because of their "rarity."

I probably would not consider as an investment anything that has no real value and no real use, whose only value comes from money other people might be willing to pay, because of the perceived value or rarity. Also one of the reasons I don't like gold as a form of / alternative to currency: it has no value beyond tradition, and its uses as decoration or in industrial / electronic / scientific applications. When times are tough, people trade gold family heirlooms for a day's worth of food or sturdy shoes.

And I mean, same goes for any art. Once bought, it's bought. Keep it. If you rely on its value as an investment... meh. As long as society prospers, you will probably do okay, but I admit to a little bit of schadenfreude watching people firesell art during economic downturns.

/offtopic

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7169
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8203 on: May 05, 2015, 04:37:24 PM »
I'm curious on the credit check charge. I'd have a slight problem paying it--it is in your interest as the landlord to make sure that I will pay. I know I will pay, I have always paid (albiet a few times a few days late, but that has been due to me and my landlord not meeting up--we live next door). You don't know that. YOU should pay for this, not me.

I would be ok with a "We'll knock it off the first months rent if you sign after a clean check". It probably wouldn't stop me if it was by far the best or only option, but it would still honk me off.

As in, you think the landlord should pay for it? Well, if you have no skin in the game, then it doesn't hurt you to apply to multiple places you have no intentions of renting. You're just hurting the landlord. How is that fair? You're the one who wants to live on their property.

My parents split it the cost of the (legally required) background check.

No skin in the game?  I'm sitting there ready to sign the lease.  Happy to put down a deposit.  Hold up is on your end, bro.  U Mad?

Seriously, I don't pay it either.  No application fee.  Because there's absolutely nothing stopping a sleezy landlord from just collecting application fees all day and not renting the apartment to anyone.

Tallgirl1204

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 104
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8204 on: May 05, 2015, 05:03:52 PM »
I'm curious on the credit check charge. I'd have a slight problem paying it--it is in your interest as the landlord to make sure that I will pay. I know I will pay, I have always paid (albiet a few times a few days late, but that has been due to me and my landlord not meeting up--we live next door). You don't know that. YOU should pay for this, not me.

I would be ok with a "We'll knock it off the first months rent if you sign after a clean check". It probably wouldn't stop me if it was by far the best or only option, but it would still honk me off.

As in, you think the landlord should pay for it? Well, if you have no skin in the game, then it doesn't hurt you to apply to multiple places you have no intentions of renting. You're just hurting the landlord. How is that fair? You're the one who wants to live on their property.

My parents split it the cost of the (legally required) background check.

No skin in the game?  I'm sitting there ready to sign the lease.  Happy to put down a deposit.  Hold up is on your end, bro.  U Mad?

Seriously, I don't pay it either.  No application fee.  Because there's absolutely nothing stopping a sleezy landlord from just collecting application fees all day and not renting the apartment to anyone.

We rent out two units-- one is a house, one a small studio apartment.  We run credit checks on each, and ask the applicant to pay for it-- we don't take more than one application at a time, so there's no way we're racking up any kind of profit on the effort, especially since it costs us $25 to have the credit check run.  Our best renters have shown up with pay stubs, references and even resumes in hand.   

We rent at about 10% below market so that we can be choosy (and $25 is way less than 10% of even one month's rent)-- so far we have ended up with excellent tenants, and our tenants know they're getting a great deal-- everyone is happy.  But if someone balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a break on the deposit, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, we politely move on to other applicants. 

It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you. 

tofuchampion

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 373
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • MadeByMarilynM
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8205 on: May 05, 2015, 08:06:51 PM »
I bought a protein shake at the employee fitness center the other day, using my ID badge to pay for it, so it comes out of my paycheck. The guy behind the counter tried to tell me that those deductions are pre-tax, and didn't understand when I explained that they aren't. Someone else overheard and agreed with the first guy...
There are no impossible obstacles, there are only stronger and weaker wills. (Jules Verne)

LennStar

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 839
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8206 on: May 06, 2015, 02:48:36 AM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants. 

Tallgirl1204

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 104
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8207 on: May 06, 2015, 07:13:43 AM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

Sounds like we agree: we would not be a good match.  Moving on to someone who is...

phillyvalue

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 88
  • Age: 25
  • Location: New York, NY
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8208 on: May 06, 2015, 07:46:09 AM »
Prospective tenant paying for credit check is just one of those societal norms that you deal with, and given its a small amount of money isn't worth worrying about. In the NYC market tenants also pay broker's fees, which is even more insane and a hell of a lot more money. But you just have to incorporate it into the effective cost of the apartment, as a cost of doing business in this market.

If you try to think philosophically about either, it makes little sense that the tenant should pay, but it's the way the market works. If you treat it as anything more than the $25 or whatever cost it is, then you are skewing your own cost-benefit analysis and potentially losing out.

Mississippi Mudstache

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1504
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Danielsville, GA
    • A Riving Home - Ramblings of a Recusant Woodworker
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8209 on: May 06, 2015, 08:20:19 AM »
If you treat it as anything more than the $25 or whatever cost it is, then you are skewing your own cost-benefit analysis and potentially losing out.

I agree. When my wife and I applied for our current rental, we had to pay a $120 application fee - $60 for each adult. Yeah, it sucked, but the market here is tight, and the place was a great value compared to everything else that was available. I don't mind dropping $120 up front for a place that rents $100/month below comparable homes. If we had balked at the application fee, it would have just been rented to the next guy that showed up, and we would have ended up with something less desirable or more expensive.
Never. Give up.

My Woodworking Blog

Tallgirl1204

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 104
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8210 on: May 06, 2015, 09:00:19 AM »
Nudging us back to the topic...  sorta...  my coworker had an intern come in for a 3-month stint.  The intern could NOT understand why he couldn't find anyone to rent a studio apartment to him for three months for $300/month (what he wanted to pay).  He couldn't understand why even a bedroom in a shared house was well over his budget.  Our town isn't super-expensive compared to the coasts, but it is a college town with a tight rental market, and bedrooms start at $500. 

"It's not like this where I'm from." 

My coworker, bless him, ended up letting the kid stay in his house for most of the time.  And the intern was otherwise a good kid, just new to the ways of the tight rental market.  Hopefully he will do his research another time-- or maybe he's just good at "working" coworkers. 


MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3368
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8211 on: May 06, 2015, 09:11:33 AM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

Sounds like we agree: we would not be a good match.  Moving on to someone who is...

As someone that is looking for a rental property, I can tell you that if is someone says something along the lines of, "YOU want a tenant. You want a credit check," my first thought is, 'thank you for your time, I hope you have a great day.'

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 394
  • Location: Central TX
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8212 on: May 06, 2015, 09:17:01 AM »
I have up-front policies and pricing for the application fee.  There are no surprises.  If you don't want to pay the fee, no one is forcing you to, just don't apply and then complain about the fee!  It's more than just a credit report, as I do background checks and have to spend time to check your references and contact your employer to confirm what you said in your application.  You'd be surprised how many people flat out lie, so it's a waste of my time.

However, I did have ONE person show up w/a copy of their credit report, copies of pay stubs, and several reference letters.  In that case, I did waive the fee, since she did all the work for me.  I still made a few calls to confirm, but when someone shows up that prepared, it's usually a foregone conclusion that they are what they appear to be.

Sibley

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1983
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8213 on: May 06, 2015, 09:30:01 AM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

So, should my parents break the law? Because where they are, it is legally required that all applicants for a rental submit to a criminal and credit check. The law also includes that the applicant must bear at least 50% of the cost. So my parents pay for 50% of the cost and the applicant pays 50%. My understanding is that most landlords in the area require the applicant to pay 100%.

The local regulation was put into place for a reason. City council was trying to ensure that the people moving into the area wouldn't immediately turn around and cause trouble (double digit increase in crime among other things), because that's what had been happening for several years and they were trying to address it.  A decent number (at least half based on my parents experience) of the applicants fall into at least one of the following categories: have outstanding arrest warrants, have other criminal background (but no current warrants), are unemployed, are drug addicts, or have multiple delinquencies on their credit.

This is in the Detroit area. Sometimes it's not so simple.

Tallgirl1204

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 104
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8214 on: May 06, 2015, 09:42:01 AM »
However, I did have ONE person show up w/a copy of their credit report, copies of pay stubs, and several reference letters.  In that case, I did waive the fee, since she did all the work for me.  I still made a few calls to confirm, but when someone shows up that prepared, it's usually a foregone conclusion that they are what they appear to be.

Yep, I've done this too.  Another example of luck favoring the prepared. 

mm1970

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4486
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8215 on: May 06, 2015, 10:31:58 AM »


Well, a 3BR is at least $3000/month, generally more.  There are many people willing to pay that. So landlords can require a credit check (that you pay for), can say "no pets", can limit the # of people living there (there are 650 sf studio apartments for rent that landlords say "1 person only", because they can).  Also: no Section 8, no smoking, etc. etc.

What do these places cost to buy?

You could build a nice 3BR out here for $150k including the lot. I'm wondering if these landlords are even making money, what's the capital involved here? Are renovations more expensive there as well?
3 BR houses are running about $900k-ish+.  The super low-end is about $800k.  A 2BR low-end would be $700k.  Renting is still WAY cheaper. 

A lot of folks complain about the slumlords gouging people.  But honestly, if you are a family that bought your house 10 years ago and have to leave town due to job loss and are renting it out?  $3000 will pay the mortgage and property taxes on a 2 BR house.  You'd probably be losing a couple hundred dollars a month.  That's not the case for long time landlords.  Many of them bought decades ago for $200k or less, and their property taxes are $1k to $2k per year (Thank you prop 13!)  Renovations are also pretty expensive, gotta love Coastal So Cal.

I have a friend who has a rental condo (he kept it when he traded up to a house), and he's losing a few hundred a month on it by renting it out.  However, long term he will probably be fine.  I expect it may be 5-10 years before rents catch up to where he will break even.  But he's only in his early 40's.  One might assume, that when he's retired at 65 or 70 and his kids have graduated from HS, that it will be a good part of his retirement plan.

And that's kind of what it is in this town.  To buy a house you need to have high incomes, or inherit money, or if you grew up here - inherit a house.  If you happen to time the market well, then you can maybe even get a rental unit.  I do not begrudge any of the landlords their income, "gouging" or not.  It's a business. Some of them have been raking it in for years, some had years of losing money.  Some of them have to deal with renters trashing their places.  I feel terribly bad for the lower income people who cannot find a place to live - it's awful, and it sucks to think about spending 50% of your income on rent, or commuting an hour, or leaving a town you grew up in.  But I don't have a solution to it.  If we ever left (no plans to), I would rent out my house, and you'd better believe it would be at market rate (~$2800+), which would still be a couple hundred dollars loss a month.

skunkfunk

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1059
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Oklahoma City
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8216 on: May 06, 2015, 01:14:00 PM »

3 BR houses are running about $900k-ish+.  The super low-end is about $800k.  A 2BR low-end would be $700k.  Renting is still WAY cheaper. 


That looks like a terrible investment. Even with a reasonable amount of leverage it's just a garbage return.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3368
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8217 on: May 06, 2015, 01:39:37 PM »

3 BR houses are running about $900k-ish+.  The super low-end is about $800k.  A 2BR low-end would be $700k.  Renting is still WAY cheaper. 


That looks like a terrible investment. Even with a reasonable amount of leverage it's just a garbage return.

Is this in Silicon Valley? I've read about how insane prices are rising, but with all the jobs and high valuations, it is a seller's market there.

myhotrs

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8218 on: May 06, 2015, 01:57:19 PM »
SoCal, so maybe Hermosa Beach or something in the OC. I think a lot of LA (including where I live) buying to rent doesnt make sense. I'm paying $2k on a place that would cost 450k to buy (plus a 450/mo HOA). Most rentals were bought years ago and the owners think its better to rent out than sell and make nothing in the bank. My landlord paid something like $150k back in the mid-90's.
I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7169
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8219 on: May 06, 2015, 02:31:34 PM »
SoCal, so maybe Hermosa Beach or something in the OC. I think a lot of LA (including where I live) buying to rent doesnt make sense. I'm paying $2k on a place that would cost 450k to buy (plus a 450/mo HOA). Most rentals were bought years ago and the owners think its better to rent out than sell and make nothing in the bank. My landlord paid something like $150k back in the mid-90's.

This is true in much of california as long as you're fine with deferred maintenance.  La lla don't care to install insulation or double paned windows in drafty CA-style homes

mm1970

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4486
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8220 on: May 06, 2015, 03:46:56 PM »

3 BR houses are running about $900k-ish+.  The super low-end is about $800k.  A 2BR low-end would be $700k.  Renting is still WAY cheaper. 


That looks like a terrible investment. Even with a reasonable amount of leverage it's just a garbage return.

Is this in Silicon Valley? I've read about how insane prices are rising, but with all the jobs and high valuations, it is a seller's market there.
Santa Barbara.  Prices aren't as high as SV, but neither are incomes, and the job market isn't that awesome either.

It is a terrible investment.  It's much better to rent.  I did the math once (a few months ago) on how much more we've spent by buying our house vs. renting, and it's not a pretty sight.  But hey, I bought my home to live in, not as an investment.

And I think that's why people rent out their homes. Once you leave and sell, it's terribly hard to come back.  So they hold on.  As far as my friend goes - he's not earning money on his condo, but he is earning money on a 2nd won he bought as a foreclosure.  And he could probably sell them for $400k (the foreclosure) to $600k if necessary.

Zamboni

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1769
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8221 on: May 06, 2015, 08:06:41 PM »
I'll offer another perspective on the potential tenant background checks:

As a fellow tenant in the property (assuming a multi-unit dwelling or complex), those checks are also to protect ME!  I don't want a criminal of any sort living next door to me and my family, thank you very much. When I rented I paid the background check fee without batting an eye because I understand that the other existing tenants in that building are being protected by this, not just the landlord.  Any good tenant should appreciate that their landlord does not rent to known criminals or deadbeats who will trash the place and then be evicted, because the costs associated with crappy tenants ultimately end up being indirectly passed along to other renters.

Quote
Thing that amazes me is people who pay for the credit check even though they have horrible credit. I tell people up front what the requirements are: no bankruptcies, no delinquencies, etc, and if you fail it I'm not refunding the fee. Yet I've had people go ahead with the check even though they have debts in collections, they're 6 months behind on tens of thousands of payments, even have debt payments totaling more than their monthly income. It just blows my mind - total waste of their money and my time.

The same happens with criminal background checks in job applications.  Someone I know runs a home visit healthcare company, and he is not going to hire someone with multiple counts of theft to go to homes of his elderly and/or infirm clients. He has an obligation to protect the clients. Yet an alarming number of applicants pay for the background check only to have this kind of history revealed.  Do they think it just won't show up?

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8222 on: May 07, 2015, 10:31:16 AM »
Yet an alarming number of applicants pay for the background check only to have this kind of history revealed.  Do they think it just won't show up?

Sometimes yes.  I have a drug possession charge from 10 years ago that was dropped (no conviction), that's not supposed to show up, last time I filled out a rental application/background check form, it showed up for the first time ever (or at least no landlords or employers have mentioned it).  I was able to explain it and still got the apartment, but threw me off when they asked me about it.

BlueHouse

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2464
  • Location: WDC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8223 on: May 07, 2015, 10:48:36 AM »
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

I felt the same way when I was the prospective tenant and rented from large apartment complexes.  I would not pay it and always have had it waived.  Now as a landlord (I've only ever rented to one person), my agent gave me boilerplate info that I followed.  The application said they would pay and no one balked at it.  It only took 2 before I accepted one of them.  If anyone had balked, I'm sure I would have waived it, but then I would have learned my lesson. 
This will be my last renter (first and last).  As soon as he's ready to move out, I'll put it up for sale.  I just don't have the stomach to be a part-time landlord and my condo is a loser investment property.   
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

cavewoman

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 448
  • Age: 31
  • I'm a woman who likes caves
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8224 on: May 07, 2015, 02:19:50 PM »
I just paid for our credit check fee this week.  I didn't even think of printing off our reports and trying to come in prepared to get it waived!  Next time.  Up until now I just figured it as a cost of seeking a rental.

jinga nation

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 614
  • Location: 'Murica's Wang
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8225 on: May 07, 2015, 02:47:15 PM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

It depends on the market. Tampa Bay is a landlord's market, so renters pay. In 2000, I remember my parents and I (having moved to FL) had our rental application fees waived, there were lots of apartment complexes advertising "No Application Fee, First Month Free, Security Deposit 1/2 Off". I haven't seen that in the last few years. That was a good renter's market with deals.
If I genuinely enjoy my profession and workplace, is there a reason to FIRE? Keep Calm and Carry On Milking.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7169
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8226 on: May 07, 2015, 03:26:40 PM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

It depends on the market. Tampa Bay is a landlord's market, so renters pay. In 2000, I remember my parents and I (having moved to FL) had our rental application fees waived, there were lots of apartment complexes advertising "No Application Fee, First Month Free, Security Deposit 1/2 Off". I haven't seen that in the last few years. That was a good renter's market with deals.

It obviously depends on the market.  McDonalds could try to charge a $10 application fee to buy a burger, and require all diners to pay $25 for a background check.  But as consumers, we typically expect businesses to handle their own costs of doing business and incorporate it into the final price.  We get mad that Ticketmaster wants to charge us a $5 convenience fee to print our tickets at home, and likewise we get mad when landlords want to charge us $25 to run a credit check that benefits them alone.

mm1970

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4486
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8227 on: May 07, 2015, 03:35:09 PM »
It may be mustachian to save $25, but there are times when demonstrating your ability to spend $25 without a fuss is a huge selling point.  If I don't know you, I don't know if you're frugal or maybe you can't afford $25 on short notice, and if you can't afford that, I can't afford to rent to you.
YOU want a tenant. YOU want a credit check. Why shoudl anybody else then YOU pay for things YOU want?

If a landlord balks at paying $25 for a credit check, wants a up-front payment, argues about the deal or is otherwise rude or unpleasant, I would politely move on to other applicants.

It depends on the market. Tampa Bay is a landlord's market, so renters pay. In 2000, I remember my parents and I (having moved to FL) had our rental application fees waived, there were lots of apartment complexes advertising "No Application Fee, First Month Free, Security Deposit 1/2 Off". I haven't seen that in the last few years. That was a good renter's market with deals.

It obviously depends on the market.  McDonalds could try to charge a $10 application fee to buy a burger, and require all diners to pay $25 for a background check.  But as consumers, we typically expect businesses to handle their own costs of doing business and incorporate it into the final price.  We get mad that Ticketmaster wants to charge us a $5 convenience fee to print our tickets at home, and likewise we get mad when landlords want to charge us $25 to run a credit check that benefits them alone.
It doesn't just benefit them alone though.

One house goes up for rent for $2500 a month.
40 families apply for it.
How do you choose the right family?  Through applications.  How do you ensure they are solvent?  You run a credit check.  You going to pay to run 40 credit checks?  Or 20?  No.

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8228 on: May 07, 2015, 04:07:56 PM »
We get mad that Ticketmaster wants to charge us a $5 convenience fee to print our tickets at home

Which is why I refuse to buy from ticketmaster.  I'll drive out of my way to go to the box office, or if I can't/don't want to, I'll forgo the show.  The full ticketmaster fee was $2, which included real tickets in the mail, when I started going to concerts.  That wasn't that long ago (I'm only 35).  I hate ticketmaster with a passion.

jordanread

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5876
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Colorado Springs
  • Live Long, Live Free, Drop Dead
    • Frugal FIRE Show
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8229 on: May 07, 2015, 04:21:59 PM »
I'll offer another perspective on the potential tenant background checks:

As a fellow tenant in the property (assuming a multi-unit dwelling or complex), those checks are also to protect ME!  I don't want a criminal of any sort living next door to me and my family, thank you very much. When I rented I paid the background check fee without batting an eye because I understand that the other existing tenants in that building are being protected by this, not just the landlord.  Any good tenant should appreciate that their landlord does not rent to known criminals or deadbeats who will trash the place and then be evicted, because the costs associated with crappy tenants ultimately end up being indirectly passed along to other renters.

Quote
Thing that amazes me is people who pay for the credit check even though they have horrible credit. I tell people up front what the requirements are: no bankruptcies, no delinquencies, etc, and if you fail it I'm not refunding the fee. Yet I've had people go ahead with the check even though they have debts in collections, they're 6 months behind on tens of thousands of payments, even have debt payments totaling more than their monthly income. It just blows my mind - total waste of their money and my time.

The same happens with criminal background checks in job applications.  Someone I know runs a home visit healthcare company, and he is not going to hire someone with multiple counts of theft to go to homes of his elderly and/or infirm clients. He has an obligation to protect the clients. Yet an alarming number of applicants pay for the background check only to have this kind of history revealed.  Do they think it just won't show up?

We get mad that Ticketmaster wants to charge us a $5 convenience fee to print our tickets at home

Which is why I refuse to buy from ticketmaster.  I'll drive out of my way to go to the box office, or if I can't/don't want to, I'll forgo the show.  The full ticketmaster fee was $2, which included real tickets in the mail, when I started going to concerts.  That wasn't that long ago (I'm only 35).  I hate ticketmaster with a passion.

I probably quoted the wrong stuff here, but as an actual criminal, I view the requirement as a way of stating that they won't accept me, regardless of my money/income/rental history. I wouldn't rent to me...I'm a bit of an asshole :)
Join the cycling challenge!
Get in shape in 2017!
Frugal FIRE - Episode 2

"Mustachians rarely sit back and let things happen to them. Mustachians go out and happen to things."

Camp Mustache Canada - Sold Out Already!!

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7169
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8230 on: May 07, 2015, 05:37:43 PM »

It doesn't just benefit them alone though.

One house goes up for rent for $2500 a month.
40 families apply for it.
How do you choose the right family?  Through applications.  How do you ensure they are solvent?  You run a credit check.  You going to pay to run 40 credit checks?  Or 20?  No.

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.

Indexer

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 907
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8231 on: May 07, 2015, 05:57:54 PM »
Where I live the background check fee was considered the deposit.  You fail, you are out, the LL keeps the fee.  You pass, it counts towards the security deposit. 

If your score is really good and no criminal history(me) then they completely waive the security deposit all together and the BC fee counts towards first month's rent.

I figure that is fair.

_____

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8232 on: May 07, 2015, 11:10:18 PM »
never had a credit check as part of renting

myhotrs

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8233 on: May 07, 2015, 11:55:19 PM »
Girl at work just bought am Audi q5 with the "black optics" package. Her husband drives a M3 and it's OK cuz he got 0%. Wouldn't be surprised if their car payments (including insurance and gas) are around $2k/month. They make good money, but not THAT good.
I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

TheLazyMan

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 55
  • Location: New Mexico
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8234 on: May 07, 2015, 11:58:46 PM »
No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.

Still I'd rather live in a neighborhood where all the landlords do checks than one where none of the landlords do.

Tallgirl1204

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 104
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8235 on: May 08, 2015, 12:09:31 AM »
[quote author=mm1970 link=topic=2540.msg654334#msg654334 date=143103450

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.
[/quote]

Everyone makes their deals.  I suppose if we lived in a tenant's market, we might pay for the credit check, or even not run one at all.  But we don't. 

Not willing to pay for the credit check?  No worries, and you can keep looking elsewhere for an apartment.  I dunno, the apartment seems like a benefit that the tenant is seeking,  but that's just my point of view.

And in a meta sort of way, I was telling people at work today about this argument, and they were laughing at work about the overheard at work thread... 



LennStar

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 839
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8236 on: May 08, 2015, 07:30:16 AM »
No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.

Still I'd rather live in a neighborhood where all the landlords do checks than one where none of the landlords do.
So if I read that right on the last pages, then landlords only rent to people with no criminal record?
So you get only neighborhoods without people who were in jail? Capital!
Now, I know that it is not the hobby of landlords to do the most important part of the criminal system - to reintegrate criminals - but I think that leaves a bit of a problem.
I mean, if nobody gices ex-criminals a job and noone gives them somewhere to live, it wont help them to reintegrate. Quite contrary it will increase the criminality rate, and I wont even mention that the US already has by far the highest inmate rate in the world. And an increased criminality rate will increase taxes, robberies, murders (of or from police it seems in the US) and not the last lower rental income as a product of this.


zolotiyeruki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8237 on: May 08, 2015, 08:07:57 AM »
So if I read that right on the last pages, then landlords only rent to people with no criminal record?
So you get only neighborhoods without people who were in jail? Capital!
Now, I know that it is not the hobby of landlords to do the most important part of the criminal system - to reintegrate criminals - but I think that leaves a bit of a problem.
I mean, if nobody gices ex-criminals a job and noone gives them somewhere to live, it wont help them to reintegrate. Quite contrary it will increase the criminality rate, and I wont even mention that the US already has by far the highest inmate rate in the world. And an increased criminality rate will increase taxes, robberies, murders (of or from police it seems in the US) and not the last lower rental income as a product of this.
Some landlords are willing to do it.  You just gotta price the risk into the rent.  And for some/many/most landlords, the risks from renting to a ex-convict are too great to justify.

While we're foamy, I'll just add the following opinion:  the criminal has to be willing to reintegrate/reform first.  Otherwise you'll end up wasting a lot of resources.

midweststache

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 456
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8238 on: May 08, 2015, 08:14:27 AM »
Girl at work just bought am Audi q5 with the "black optics" package. Her husband drives a M3 and it's OK cuz he got 0%. Wouldn't be surprised if their car payments (including insurance and gas) are around $2k/month. They make good money, but not THAT good.

Maybe she makes better money than you think 'cause SHE'S A SPY! "Black optics" makes me think she's a secret Sydney Bristow and her "international work trips" are all about wearing badass wigs and stealing data from Russians...

LennStar

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 839
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8239 on: May 08, 2015, 08:22:59 AM »
While we're foamy, I'll just add the following opinion:  the criminal has to be willing to reintegrate/reform first.  Otherwise you'll end up wasting a lot of resources.
Yes, of course, but that depends a lot on their surroundings and the help they get. The same as in the school. Both is education.
The "first" part is the core of the problem, though. What is first? Before he got fired, lost his wife and home and got on drugs?
Its not that easy. Same with depression. if you are depressive, you dont have the power to be willing to get better, thats part of the description ;) And even if you have it is no guarantee that you will get better. Same with criminals.

So, in this sense, I stand before teh antimustachian wall of shame and comedy every politicio who wants to save 1000$ on youth projects and then wonders why the youth prision wants 10000$ more.

Kris

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2381
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8240 on: May 08, 2015, 08:27:05 AM »
While we're foamy, I'll just add the following opinion:  the criminal has to be willing to reintegrate/reform first.  Otherwise you'll end up wasting a lot of resources.
Yes, of course, but that depends a lot on their surroundings and the help they get. The same as in the school. Both is education.
The "first" part is the core of the problem, though. What is first? Before he got fired, lost his wife and home and got on drugs?
Its not that easy. Same with depression. if you are depressive, you dont have the power to be willing to get better, thats part of the description ;) And even if you have it is no guarantee that you will get better. Same with criminals.

So, in this sense, I stand before teh antimustachian wall of shame and comedy every politicio who wants to save 1000$ on youth projects and then wonders why the youth prision wants 10000$ more.

Or, alternately, the system has to really WANT to reform the criminal

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-norways-prison-system-is-so-successful-2014-12
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

vitalmayhem

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8241 on: May 08, 2015, 08:30:45 AM »
A guy I work with was talking about how he's ready to win the lottery with our workplace pool ($50 million this week). He estimates that he would probably get $1 mil of the payout once it's been shared and he says he would be back to work in 1 month because the money is already spent and he's only 36 so he couldn't possibly retire on that.

He plans to pay off his $220k house, his $25k maxed credit line, his credit card(s), his ~$40k he owes his mom (on her credit line). He would then pay to build a custom house just outside the city and pay off his bro/sis (in-laws) consumer debts... but not their mortgages and take his siblings on a trip to Disney World.

A little back story on him. He has a wife and 2 daughters and currently lives in a 3 bed, 1 bath house that he borrowed money from his mom's credit for a down payment and to consolidate his consumer debts. They have lived there for about ~2.5 years, and has maxed out that $25k credit line, 2 cars (one purchased new last year) and has a smaller credit card debt of ~$1k. In order to afford his current lifestyle both him and his wife work full time and he works an additional 20-25hrs per week at a second minimum wage style job.
His wife is pushing him to upgrade their house and since "he's the numbers/money guy" he realized it would be a good idea. If they can sell their home for $250k they would profit ~$30k and can use that for a down payment and the rest can pay off the majority of his credit line. Though he says he definitely needs to keep the credit line open for at least $5k in case of emergencies (cause having a maxed out credit line is great help in emergencies???). He says the house MUST have at least 4 beds and 2 baths, cause they need spare rooms just in case.
While in the process of getting a pre-approval for the increase mortgage he was told they can't approve him because of a $27 delinquent debt from another bank. He says that he's never once been told by this bank that he owed that money and thought he paid off that credit card before he bought his house with his current bank. Even though he's paying off that $27 now, his current bank won't approve the mortgage for at least 90 days and he is so upset about it.

vivophoenix

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 409
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8242 on: May 08, 2015, 09:06:27 AM »
A guy I work with was talking about how he's ready to win the lottery with our workplace pool ($50 million this week). He estimates that he would probably get $1 mil of the payout once it's been shared and he says he would be back to work in 1 month because the money is already spent and he's only 36 so he couldn't possibly retire on that.

He plans to pay off his $220k house, his $25k maxed credit line, his credit card(s), his ~$40k he owes his mom (on her credit line). He would then pay to build a custom house just outside the city and pay off his bro/sis (in-laws) consumer debts... but not their mortgages and take his siblings on a trip to Disney World.

A little back story on him. He has a wife and 2 daughters and currently lives in a 3 bed, 1 bath house that he borrowed money from his mom's credit for a down payment and to consolidate his consumer debts. They have lived there for about ~2.5 years, and has maxed out that $25k credit line, 2 cars (one purchased new last year) and has a smaller credit card debt of ~$1k. In order to afford his current lifestyle both him and his wife work full time and he works an additional 20-25hrs per week at a second minimum wage style job.
His wife is pushing him to upgrade their house and since "he's the numbers/money guy" he realized it would be a good idea. If they can sell their home for $250k they would profit ~$30k and can use that for a down payment and the rest can pay off the majority of his credit line. Though he says he definitely needs to keep the credit line open for at least $5k in case of emergencies (cause having a maxed out credit line is great help in emergencies???). He says the house MUST have at least 4 beds and 2 baths, cause they need spare rooms just in case.
While in the process of getting a pre-approval for the increase mortgage he was told they can't approve him because of a $27 delinquent debt from another bank. He says that he's never once been told by this bank that he owed that money and thought he paid off that credit card before he bought his house with his current bank. Even though he's paying off that $27 now, his current bank won't approve the mortgage for at least 90 days and he is so upset about it.

i confused where the profit comes from. he gets ~$30k from the house sale( not really). then that is supposed to cover a $25k credit line, his moms $40k credit line and  a down payment. this guy owns nothing. between the cars, the house , and the debt for the down payment how does he get approved for anything?

vitalmayhem

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8243 on: May 08, 2015, 10:27:07 AM »
A guy I work with was talking about how he's ready to win the lottery with our workplace pool ($50 million this week). He estimates that he would probably get $1 mil of the payout once it's been shared and he says he would be back to work in 1 month because the money is already spent and he's only 36 so he couldn't possibly retire on that.

He plans to pay off his $220k house, his $25k maxed credit line, his credit card(s), his ~$40k he owes his mom (on her credit line). He would then pay to build a custom house just outside the city and pay off his bro/sis (in-laws) consumer debts... but not their mortgages and take his siblings on a trip to Disney World.

A little back story on him. He has a wife and 2 daughters and currently lives in a 3 bed, 1 bath house that he borrowed money from his mom's credit for a down payment and to consolidate his consumer debts. They have lived there for about ~2.5 years, and has maxed out that $25k credit line, 2 cars (one purchased new last year) and has a smaller credit card debt of ~$1k. In order to afford his current lifestyle both him and his wife work full time and he works an additional 20-25hrs per week at a second minimum wage style job.
His wife is pushing him to upgrade their house and since "he's the numbers/money guy" he realized it would be a good idea. If they can sell their home for $250k they would profit ~$30k and can use that for a down payment and the rest can pay off the majority of his credit line. Though he says he definitely needs to keep the credit line open for at least $5k in case of emergencies (cause having a maxed out credit line is great help in emergencies???). He says the house MUST have at least 4 beds and 2 baths, cause they need spare rooms just in case.
While in the process of getting a pre-approval for the increase mortgage he was told they can't approve him because of a $27 delinquent debt from another bank. He says that he's never once been told by this bank that he owed that money and thought he paid off that credit card before he bought his house with his current bank. Even though he's paying off that $27 now, his current bank won't approve the mortgage for at least 90 days and he is so upset about it.

i confused where the profit comes from. he gets ~$30k from the house sale( not really). then that is supposed to cover a $25k credit line, his moms $40k credit line and  a down payment. this guy owns nothing. between the cars, the house , and the debt for the down payment how does he get approved for anything?

Oh, I know that he doesn't get a profit and he's just ADDING to his debt but I was explaining the way he has been telling me and everyone else within earshot for the last 2 months. Most of us just smile and nod, because when he's got something in his mind like this there is no chance of changing it. Before he bought his house and his mom helped him out he says they were going to have to declare bankruptcy.

vivophoenix

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 409
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8244 on: May 08, 2015, 10:50:42 AM »
A guy I work with was talking about how he's ready to win the lottery with our workplace pool ($50 million this week). He estimates that he would probably get $1 mil of the payout once it's been shared and he says he would be back to work in 1 month because the money is already spent and he's only 36 so he couldn't possibly retire on that.

He plans to pay off his $220k house, his $25k maxed credit line, his credit card(s), his ~$40k he owes his mom (on her credit line). He would then pay to build a custom house just outside the city and pay off his bro/sis (in-laws) consumer debts... but not their mortgages and take his siblings on a trip to Disney World.

A little back story on him. He has a wife and 2 daughters and currently lives in a 3 bed, 1 bath house that he borrowed money from his mom's credit for a down payment and to consolidate his consumer debts. They have lived there for about ~2.5 years, and has maxed out that $25k credit line, 2 cars (one purchased new last year) and has a smaller credit card debt of ~$1k. In order to afford his current lifestyle both him and his wife work full time and he works an additional 20-25hrs per week at a second minimum wage style job.
His wife is pushing him to upgrade their house and since "he's the numbers/money guy" he realized it would be a good idea. If they can sell their home for $250k they would profit ~$30k and can use that for a down payment and the rest can pay off the majority of his credit line. Though he says he definitely needs to keep the credit line open for at least $5k in case of emergencies (cause having a maxed out credit line is great help in emergencies???). He says the house MUST have at least 4 beds and 2 baths, cause they need spare rooms just in case.
While in the process of getting a pre-approval for the increase mortgage he was told they can't approve him because of a $27 delinquent debt from another bank. He says that he's never once been told by this bank that he owed that money and thought he paid off that credit card before he bought his house with his current bank. Even though he's paying off that $27 now, his current bank won't approve the mortgage for at least 90 days and he is so upset about it.

i confused where the profit comes from. he gets ~$30k from the house sale( not really). then that is supposed to cover a $25k credit line, his moms $40k credit line and  a down payment. this guy owns nothing. between the cars, the house , and the debt for the down payment how does he get approved for anything?

Oh, I know that he doesn't get a profit and he's just ADDING to his debt but I was explaining the way he has been telling me and everyone else within earshot for the last 2 months. Most of us just smile and nod, because when he's got something in his mind like this there is no chance of changing it. Before he bought his house and his mom helped him out he says they were going to have to declare bankruptcy.

people like this confuse me. how do they keep getting allowed things?

fantabulous

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 264
    • My Crappy Little Blog
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8245 on: May 08, 2015, 12:27:06 PM »
It doesn't just benefit them alone though.

One house goes up for rent for $2500 a month.
40 families apply for it.
How do you choose the right family?  Through applications.  How do you ensure they are solvent?  You run a credit check.  You going to pay to run 40 credit checks?  Or 20?  No.

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

I imagine what's rubbing some people the wrong way about the application fee is that they live in areas where a landlord is likely to collect 40 application fees up front and not bother running credit/backgroun checks for 39-40 of the applicants.

seanc0x0

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
  • Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8246 on: May 08, 2015, 12:50:40 PM »

Oh, I know that he doesn't get a profit and he's just ADDING to his debt but I was explaining the way he has been telling me and everyone else within earshot for the last 2 months. Most of us just smile and nod, because when he's got something in his mind like this there is no chance of changing it. Before he bought his house and his mom helped him out he says they were going to have to declare bankruptcy.

people like this confuse me. how do they keep getting allowed things?

He's presumably making his payments (except the missed one, but it seems he'd be able to pay had he known about it), so he's a cash cow for lenders. He's their ideal client!

jinga nation

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 614
  • Location: 'Murica's Wang
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8247 on: May 08, 2015, 12:55:51 PM »

It doesn't just benefit them alone though.

One house goes up for rent for $2500 a month.
40 families apply for it.
How do you choose the right family?  Through applications.  How do you ensure they are solvent?  You run a credit check.  You going to pay to run 40 credit checks?  Or 20?  No.

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.

Of course it benefits you, the applicant. You need a place to stay. If you pass the credit check, then you get the place.
Of course he wants a solvent tenant. Why would he rent to someone who's going to stop paying rent in x<12 months and then go through courts for eviction.
Of course he wants the best for him to get the best return on his investments.

I've had applicants who want new flooring, countertops, walls in a certain paint color, etc. What for? The place is clean and with neutral colored walls. If you're so picky, go apply somewhere else. I've got a 5 person queue wanting to rent my condo in a gated community with nice amenities. And I won't waive application fees, security deposits, and won't pay for your utilities. You pay for water, power, cable, internet. You want, you pay. Or hit the highway!

Walk a mile in a landlord's shoes before you complain about his business practices.
 
And yes, there are PITA landlords just as there are a PITA tenants.
If I genuinely enjoy my profession and workplace, is there a reason to FIRE? Keep Calm and Carry On Milking.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3368
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8248 on: May 08, 2015, 01:05:46 PM »

It doesn't just benefit them alone though.

One house goes up for rent for $2500 a month.
40 families apply for it.
How do you choose the right family?  Through applications.  How do you ensure they are solvent?  You run a credit check.  You going to pay to run 40 credit checks?  Or 20?  No.

Around here, housing is so tight that if you want the house or apartment, you pay.  If you are going to be picky about it, you aren't going to have a place to live.

No, it's only benefiting the landlord.  I don't benefit from my LL running a credit check on me, the LL does.  He wants to "choose the right family."  He wants to make sure his tenant is solvent.  He wants he wants he wants.

Of course it benefits you, the applicant. You need a place to stay. If you pass the credit check, then you get the place.
Of course he wants a solvent tenant. Why would he rent to someone who's going to stop paying rent in x<12 months and then go through courts for eviction.
Of course he wants the best for him to get the best return on his investments.

I've had applicants who want new flooring, countertops, walls in a certain paint color, etc. What for? The place is clean and with neutral colored walls. If you're so picky, go apply somewhere else. I've got a 5 person queue wanting to rent my condo in a gated community with nice amenities. And I won't waive application fees, security deposits, and won't pay for your utilities. You pay for water, power, cable, internet. You want, you pay. Or hit the highway!

Walk a mile in a landlord's shoes before you complain about his business practices.
 
And yes, there are PITA landlords just as there are a PITA tenants.

I don't see any benefit in this conversation continuing, but this may be just me. Dragonstar has made his point and I doubt there is anything he can do to convince us that landlords should eat application fees, nor do I think that we can convince him as to why it is charged to applicants and why it should be continued to do so (with variations based on market conditions). I think it's best to agree to disagree.

Beaker

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #8249 on: May 08, 2015, 03:46:39 PM »
I don't see any benefit in this conversation continuing, but this may be just me. Dragonstar has made his point and I doubt there is anything he can do to convince us that landlords should eat application fees, nor do I think that we can convince him as to why it is charged to applicants and why it should be continued to do so (with variations based on market conditions). I think it's best to agree to disagree.

I agree with you, but can't resist leaving this here...

Quote
...renting [in Trump Tower] requires a $750 move-in fee, another $750 move-in security deposit, a $900 lease processing fee, and mandatory renterís insurance. There is also of course a $750 move-out fee...
Source

So, it could be worse!