Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5109669 times)

gooki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #600 on: August 06, 2013, 02:06:43 AM »
NZ has six monthly vehicle safety checks. And we still have one of the oldest vehicle fleets. But I suspect a lot of that is due to low wages, and a large portion of Japanese made vehicles.
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tuyop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #601 on: August 06, 2013, 06:40:53 AM »
It goes into a shpeil about living your life to the fullest while you can, not waiting to save up for the things you want, et cetera. I just let the conversation die at that point, to be honest.  What can you even say?

Or just learn to want what you have so that you don't living to the fullest doesn't mean spending to the fullest.

rosered9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #602 on: August 07, 2013, 08:10:22 AM »
The British and French ones are known to be very lax (four wheels - check, driver seat - check, anchor outside passenger window to stop car - check. you're good to go) whereas the Germans and, believe it or not, Italians are very anal about this.

Really? I am British and have never heard of MOTs (vehicle safety tests) considered being lax. They check a whole bunch of things including e.g. emissions as well as safety and most people I know have to fix at least something or are issued advisory notices each year if their car is more than a few years old (new cars are exempted from MOTs for an initial period). Maybe other European ones are stricter, but this point of view really surprises me.

martynthewolf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #603 on: August 07, 2013, 08:58:36 AM »
The British and French ones are known to be very lax (four wheels - check, driver seat - check, anchor outside passenger window to stop car - check. you're good to go) whereas the Germans and, believe it or not, Italians are very anal about this.

Really? I am British and have never heard of MOTs (vehicle safety tests) considered being lax. They check a whole bunch of things including e.g. emissions as well as safety and most people I know have to fix at least something or are issued advisory notices each year if their car is more than a few years old (new cars are exempted from MOTs for an initial period). Maybe other European ones are stricter, but this point of view really surprises me.

Yeah I can back this up, it really isn't all that lax. My first car was failed because I had a slightly loose bit of trim that could have cut someone if they happened to gyrate their body up against the front offside wheel arch....
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DougStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #604 on: August 09, 2013, 04:56:01 PM »
This week a coworker of mine hit something in the road on his way to work, and I learned many interesting things about his car.

- It is imported from Germany, because the Volkswagen's in the US don't have the features he likes.
- His tires cost $500.  Each.
- He cannot imagine life without a full size spare in the trunk at all times.
- His car has a mechanism that lifts the [full size] spare out of the trunk for him.  He also will never buy another car without that.
- His car holds the brake down for him while he is stopped, so he doesn't have to.  He hates his current rental (fully loaded Chrysler 300) because he has to hold down the brake at stop lights.

I smiled, nodded, and attempted to act impressed (at the amount of "needs" a 26 year old has).

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #605 on: August 09, 2013, 05:14:36 PM »
This week a coworker of mine hit something in the road on his way to work, and I learned many interesting things about his car.

- It is imported from Germany, because the Volkswagen's in the US don't have the features he likes.
- His tires cost $500.  Each.
- He cannot imagine life without a full size spare in the trunk at all times.
- His car has a mechanism that lifts the [full size] spare out of the trunk for him.  He also will never buy another car without that.
- His car holds the brake down for him while he is stopped, so he doesn't have to.  He hates his current rental (fully loaded Chrysler 300) because he has to hold down the brake at stop lights.

I smiled, nodded, and attempted to act impressed (at the amount of "needs" a 26 year old has).

You should act real smug and say "yeah well my car wipes my ass for me." Then just walk away.
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DougStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #606 on: August 09, 2013, 05:23:15 PM »
You should act real smug and say "yeah well my car wipes my ass for me." Then just walk away.
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AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #607 on: August 09, 2013, 05:25:30 PM »
You should act real smug and say "yeah well my car wipes my ass for me." Then just walk away.
Mine has a catheter AND a bed pan!

That is exactly what I had in mind.
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huadpe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #608 on: August 09, 2013, 05:53:40 PM »
This week a coworker of mine hit something in the road on his way to work, and I learned many interesting things about his car.

- It is imported from Germany, because the Volkswagen's in the US don't have the features he likes.
- His tires cost $500.  Each.
- He cannot imagine life without a full size spare in the trunk at all times.
- His car has a mechanism that lifts the [full size] spare out of the trunk for him.  He also will never buy another car without that.
- His car holds the brake down for him while he is stopped, so he doesn't have to.  He hates his current rental (fully loaded Chrysler 300) because he has to hold down the brake at stop lights.

I smiled, nodded, and attempted to act impressed (at the amount of "needs" a 26 year old has).

I have a somewhat similar situation at my office

So we have a summer intern who is an engineering student at my (very small) patent law firm.  He is working 2 jobs this summer, one at CVS (where he also works while at school, at a different store) and the internship (which is paid at $12/hr).   He is driving a 2102 Jeep Liberty, which is on a lease.  He saved up $4000 in high school which he used for the down payment on the lease, and uses his salary plus money from his mom to make the payments.  It just seems so crazy to me.  He's a smart kid too, but when he said he paid $4k for a lease downpayment I couldn't stop myself from saying "you could have just bought a car for that."

gooki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #609 on: August 09, 2013, 09:04:16 PM »
At least he got a car from the future.
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Adventine

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #610 on: August 10, 2013, 02:10:50 AM »
Had an appointment with the big boss on Friday to get a big work cheque signed off and we got to talking retirement. Both of us are finishing up from our organisation at year end, but he is two levels higher, $50k pa more salary, 5 years more service and 1 extra year's salary golden handshake better off than me.  I estimate his pension will be around $120K pa and COLA adjusted.

Me: So Boss, I guess you'll be kicking up your feet and living it large in retirement very soon?

Boss: Not likely Grasshopper, I'm about to become a homeowner and that means another five years at least of slavery in another job to pay for it. What about you Grasshopper?

Me: <nearly choking> Already have my own place and reckon I can live on the much smaller pension than yours I will soon get and investments I already have.  <see he is now the one choking, so decide to change topic> Hey Boss, are you happy to sign that big work cheque?

Boss: Not just yet. I'll read through your proposal this arvo and should have it signed by tomorrow morning. This is big money we are dealing with, so I have to make sure we are using in prudently and are achieving best value for money. We must be very smart in the way we spend our organisation's money to achieve the most effective outcomes. You do understand young Grasshopper?

Me: <dripping with irony> Yes, Boss. Indeed I do!

Heh.

lifejoy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #611 on: August 10, 2013, 05:27:28 PM »
My boyfriend has come a long way in his journey from anti-Mustachian to Mustachian. His family roots explain a lot. Let me explain:

I love his family! But they are financially crazy. They flew from Ottawa to Prague for a conference, then to BC to meet my family (of their own volition!), in five months they're flying to Florida. They love travelling and just bought a new deck. They spend money like water and really truly live in the moment, which would be ok if they weren't so in debt!!

I just can't get over how much they travel. I'd say 6-12 major trips a year. And they have four kids, and loooove family reunions. Eeps. My parents took us on major trips once every 5 years, if that. Different strokes for different folks!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #612 on: August 12, 2013, 01:20:01 AM »

- His car has a mechanism that lifts the [full size] spare out of the trunk for him.  He also will never buy another car without that.


Call me when it changes the tire for him.  Otherwise he still has to, like, lift it up at some point.

footenote

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #613 on: August 12, 2013, 05:46:27 AM »
libraryjoy - Wow, this sure explains the comment in the other thread about your SO's family's expectations that the wedding be big and expensive. Yikes.
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davisgang90

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #614 on: August 12, 2013, 07:25:59 AM »
Lady in my cube farm's husband is stationed in HI.  She visits regularly.  Forgot her sunglasses and bought another set of Coach brand sunglasses for $120 instead of a cheaper pair.  Now she can leave a pair in HI for next visit!!  Win!
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AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #615 on: August 12, 2013, 09:10:16 AM »
This morning I overheard a conversation between 2 co-workers. One (who makes roughly $135k/yr) is getting an award and has to go to Dallas (from San Francisco) to receive it. Due to budget constraints he has to pay for his wife and kids to go which will cost $1,000. He was all dismayed; "That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I was a little shocked that someone who makes $135k/year doesn't have $1,000 for some plane tickets.
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gdborton

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #616 on: August 12, 2013, 09:39:46 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.
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MsSindy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #617 on: August 12, 2013, 10:52:05 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #618 on: August 12, 2013, 11:07:06 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

I agree with the story sounding as if he can't afford it, not that he's just going to charge it and pay off the card later.
However, I'd argue it would be even less mustachian to say "sweet, I'll get reward points ..."  It's always better to not spend money when compared to spending money and getting a percentage back.

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #619 on: August 12, 2013, 11:23:16 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

I agree with the story sounding as if he can't afford it, not that he's just going to charge it and pay off the card later.
However, I'd argue it would be even less mustachian to say "sweet, I'll get reward points ..."  It's always better to not spend money when compared to spending money and getting a percentage back.

While he didn't speciffically say, I got the impression that the credit card was the payment method of choice because the money wasn't otherwise available.

No matter how many times things like this happen I am still a little bit surprised when people with perfectly adequate incomes make a passing comment about not having money.
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Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #620 on: August 12, 2013, 11:40:29 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

I agree with the story sounding as if he can't afford it, not that he's just going to charge it and pay off the card later.
However, I'd argue it would be even less mustachian to say "sweet, I'll get reward points ..."  It's always better to not spend money when compared to spending money and getting a percentage back.

While he didn't speciffically say, I got the impression that the credit card was the payment method of choice because the money wasn't otherwise available.

No matter how many times things like this happen I am still a little bit surprised when people with perfectly adequate incomes make a passing comment about not having money.
At first I was right there with you, but then I thought that while I have the money in savings to be able to cover that I would be more likely to put it on a credit card and pay it off quickly because I HATE touching my savings. Also as someone said maybe he budgets and hadn't planned for the expense that month but can pay off the charge easily by tweaking his budget next month.

mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #621 on: August 12, 2013, 11:58:21 AM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

I agree with the story sounding as if he can't afford it, not that he's just going to charge it and pay off the card later.
However, I'd argue it would be even less mustachian to say "sweet, I'll get reward points ..."  It's always better to not spend money when compared to spending money and getting a percentage back.

While he didn't speciffically say, I got the impression that the credit card was the payment method of choice because the money wasn't otherwise available.

No matter how many times things like this happen I am still a little bit surprised when people with perfectly adequate incomes make a passing comment about not having money.
At first I was right there with you, but then I thought that while I have the money in savings to be able to cover that I would be more likely to put it on a credit card and pay it off quickly because I HATE touching my savings. Also as someone said maybe he budgets and hadn't planned for the expense that month but can pay off the charge easily by tweaking his budget next month.

but I know I wouldn't make a comment about putting it on the credit card.  I would say, "well I guess I'll put it on the card so I can pay it off next month."  I think the way the story was told on here, it sounds like he can't afford it because he's just going to charge it on the card.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #622 on: August 12, 2013, 12:09:26 PM »
Quote
"That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I don't see anything inherently wrong with this.  Could be read that he is budgeting and his budget doesn't include "$1000 for whatever I might need this month".

I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

If the co-worker had just said "... $1000 that I wasn't planning on spending", that's one thing.  But to imply that I don't have any extra money in savings so that I have to put it on a credit card is kind of sad when you're making $135k.  Now, if he said something like, "sweet, I'll get reward points when I put this on my credit card instead of taking it directly out of savings (or pay it off next month)", then that wouldn't be too bad either.  However, the way the story is laid out, it sounds like he's making a good salary and doesn't have an extra pot to piss in.... (as the saying goes.)

I agree with the story sounding as if he can't afford it, not that he's just going to charge it and pay off the card later.
However, I'd argue it would be even less mustachian to say "sweet, I'll get reward points ..."  It's always better to not spend money when compared to spending money and getting a percentage back.

While he didn't speciffically say, I got the impression that the credit card was the payment method of choice because the money wasn't otherwise available.

No matter how many times things like this happen I am still a little bit surprised when people with perfectly adequate incomes make a passing comment about not having money.
At first I was right there with you, but then I thought that while I have the money in savings to be able to cover that I would be more likely to put it on a credit card and pay it off quickly because I HATE touching my savings. Also as someone said maybe he budgets and hadn't planned for the expense that month but can pay off the charge easily by tweaking his budget next month.

but I know I wouldn't make a comment about putting it on the credit card.  I would say, "well I guess I'll put it on the card so I can pay it off next month."  I think the way the story was told on here, it sounds like he can't afford it because he's just going to charge it on the card.

What's the alternative?  Pay cash?  Who buys airline tickets with cash/check anymore? 

I'd also be dismayed at an unexpected $1000 expense.  There are a few times when I wouldn't have $1000 available in cash, or even if I did, I'd rather get a free month float by putting it on credit than dip into my cash reserves (which I might need for an actual emergency), or trying to get the $1k out of a brokerage account (commissions, wire transfer fees, or a multiple-day rtf transfer wait).

Plus maybe he didn't want to give you the impression he was flush.  I personally don't like to divulge how much I can afford at work.

So what can we infer from the statement?  Probably not much.

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #623 on: August 12, 2013, 03:22:07 PM »
I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

I would be.

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #624 on: August 12, 2013, 03:47:34 PM »
I wouldn't be at all surprised if most of the people on this site wouldn't have $1000 readily available for a plane ticket.

I would be.

I would be too.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #625 on: August 12, 2013, 03:48:59 PM »
I wouldn't be.

Poll time! :P

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #626 on: August 12, 2013, 04:39:32 PM »
One (who makes roughly $135k/yr) is getting an award and has to go to Dallas (from San Francisco) to receive it. Due to budget constraints he has to pay for his wife and kids to go which will cost $1,000.

I think everyone has missed the really non-Mustachian part of this.  He's getting some sort of work-related award, so why the heck does he think it necessary to spend an extra $1k (which he apparently hasn't got) in order to fly wife & kids to Dallas?

gdborton

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #627 on: August 12, 2013, 05:03:37 PM »
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/forum/ask-a-mustachian/your-checking-account-balance/

^ quite a few people there use $1k as their 'zero balance'.  I wouldn't spend $1k from checking on anything unless I had more than $3k sitting around (roughly the amount I have now, but only because I'm maintaining a balance for an upcoming trip).
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #628 on: August 12, 2013, 05:05:11 PM »
One (who makes roughly $135k/yr) is getting an award and has to go to Dallas (from San Francisco) to receive it. Due to budget constraints he has to pay for his wife and kids to go which will cost $1,000.

I think everyone has missed the really non-Mustachian part of this.  He's getting some sort of work-related award, so why the heck does he think it necessary to spend an extra $1k (which he apparently hasn't got) in order to fly wife & kids to Dallas?

I'm right there with you. Why does he have to bring his family along with him? If you've got the extra $1k and you don't mind spending it it's one thing, but he clearly doesn't have/want to spend it, so why on earth is he?

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #629 on: August 12, 2013, 07:02:36 PM »
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/forum/ask-a-mustachian/your-checking-account-balance/

^ quite a few people there use $1k as their 'zero balance'.  I wouldn't spend $1k from checking on anything unless I had more than $3k sitting around (roughly the amount I have now, but only because I'm maintaining a balance for an upcoming trip).

More to the point, I may have a few thousand "available," but it is spoken for by rent, credit card payments, minimum balance requirements, etc.  it would be much riskier to use these funds for a purchase than to put it on a card.

NumberJohnny5

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #630 on: August 12, 2013, 08:46:58 PM »
I've made statements like "won't have the money for that until Friday" when talking about buying groceries. One could easily think that we were living paycheck to paycheck. The reality is, Friday is just when our weekly budget is replenished in EEBA (could just as easily be Monday, or perhaps Wednesday which is the actual payday). I definitely wouldn't say something like "We have $X in the bank and could easily afford Product Y. We're just budgeting like we're poor so we can, you know, not be."

As far as having thousands extra in our bank account; usually we keep a fairly healthy buffer (perhaps more than we should), but I've been known to dump more than I may be comfortable with into something that had a time limit (such as a Roth IRA before April 15, or into a FHSA before June 30). I wouldn't mind using a credit card as long as we could pay it off before interest accrued, though I wouldn't want to depend on it for necessities (so, using card for cheap plane ticket = ok, depending on the credit card to buy groceries = not ok).

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #631 on: August 12, 2013, 11:32:25 PM »
That's why I like those "0% interest for X months + cash back" cards.

Left Bank

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #632 on: August 13, 2013, 03:11:31 PM »
A guy I know was telling me about some great app to get hotel rooms in the city, the city we live in, that he uses to stay IN the city.  Not a far off suburb, in the city limits.  This way he says he can go out clubbing, eating and drinking all night and just go back to the room. 
At a loss for what to say I ask, " Are the rooms really cheap?" 
Him: I got XYZ hotel for $165! A killer deal!. 
Me: Uhhh, OK.
FIRE'd and loving it.

Oscar_C

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #633 on: August 13, 2013, 11:45:16 PM »
That's why I like those "0% interest for X months + cash back" cards.

Really lucky that my 1st financial mistake was on one of those cards, otherwise I'd be paying an insane amount of interest. While i had the money to pay it down, I still think I was an ass for using it so stupidly.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #634 on: August 15, 2013, 10:07:30 AM »
This morning I overheard a conversation between 2 co-workers. One (who makes roughly $135k/yr) is getting an award and has to go to Dallas (from San Francisco) to receive it. Due to budget constraints he has to pay for his wife and kids to go which will cost $1,000. He was all dismayed; "That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I was a little shocked that someone who makes $135k/year doesn't have $1,000 for some plane tickets.

There's no way my wife would let me spend $1,000 to fly her and our daughter to Dallas to watch me get an award.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 10:09:32 AM by mgreczyn »

Kira

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #635 on: August 16, 2013, 01:24:34 PM »
I have a coworker that spent her tax refund on a HUGE tv.. at least 60". It boggles me that this thing is about as tall as I am, if you stood it on end. And her children now play video games (on multiple expensive game systems) on the old one, which was still bigger than the very nice TV my husband bought a few years ago for about $500.  She also has a Kindle Fire (though she doesn't red books) and bought a Samsung tablet to use to control the huge new TV.

But she had to move into her mother's house and rent out her own because they never have any money. Yesterday she was grumbling and shouted "I hate being poor!"

I feel bad because I think she really just doesn't believe that not spending your money now means you will have it later.. it just leaks out somewhere, right?! I kind of want to try to help her, but I don't think she would be very receptive. And she doesn't live a lavish life.. just general financial illiteracy.


dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #636 on: August 16, 2013, 03:15:18 PM »
I have a coworker that spent her tax refund on a HUGE tv.. at least 60". It boggles me that this thing is about as tall as I am, if you stood it on end. And her children now play video games (on multiple expensive game systems) on the old one, which was still bigger than the very nice TV my husband bought a few years ago for about $500.  She also has a Kindle Fire (though she doesn't red books) and bought a Samsung tablet to use to control the huge new TV.

But she had to move into her mother's house and rent out her own because they never have any money. Yesterday she was grumbling and shouted "I hate being poor!"

I feel bad because I think she really just doesn't believe that not spending your money now means you will have it later.. it just leaks out somewhere, right?! I kind of want to try to help her, but I don't think she would be very receptive. And she doesn't live a lavish life.. just general financial illiteracy.

That's a travesty... They should really be playing video games in the bigger tv!

Undecided

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #637 on: August 16, 2013, 04:09:11 PM »
This morning I overheard a conversation between 2 co-workers. One (who makes roughly $135k/yr) is getting an award and has to go to Dallas (from San Francisco) to receive it. Due to budget constraints he has to pay for his wife and kids to go which will cost $1,000. He was all dismayed; "That's $1,000 I wasn't planning on spending. I guess I'll just put it on the credit card."

I was a little shocked that someone who makes $135k/year doesn't have $1,000 for some plane tickets.

There's no way my wife would let me spend $1,000 to fly her and our daughter to Dallas to watch me get an award.

There's no way my wife would let me fly her to Dallas.

ny.er

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #638 on: August 16, 2013, 04:17:41 PM »
I have a coworker that spent her tax refund on a HUGE tv.. at least 60". It boggles me that this thing is about as tall as I am, if you stood it on end. And her children now play video games (on multiple expensive game systems) on the old one, which was still bigger than the very nice TV my husband bought a few years ago for about $500.  She also has a Kindle Fire (though she doesn't red books) and bought a Samsung tablet to use to control the huge new TV.

But she had to move into her mother's house and rent out her own because they never have any money. Yesterday she was grumbling and shouted "I hate being poor!"

I feel bad because I think she really just doesn't believe that not spending your money now means you will have it later.. it just leaks out somewhere, right?! I kind of want to try to help her, but I don't think she would be very receptive. And she doesn't live a lavish life.. just general financial illiteracy.

This is really tragic. I'm wondering, is there one simple, not threatening sentence that would get through to someone like that?

FunkyStickman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #639 on: August 16, 2013, 04:52:24 PM »

This is really tragic. I'm wondering, is there one simple, not threatening sentence that would get through to someone like that?

"The TV you just bought could feed a family of 4 for six months."
"There is no dignity quite so impressive, and no one independence quite so important, as living within your means." -Calvin Coolidge

"Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities." - Mark Twain

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #640 on: August 16, 2013, 05:27:44 PM »
I have a coworker that spent her tax refund on a HUGE tv.. at least 60". It boggles me that this thing is about as tall as I am, if you stood it on end. And her children now play video games (on multiple expensive game systems) on the old one, which was still bigger than the very nice TV my husband bought a few years ago for about $500.  She also has a Kindle Fire (though she doesn't red books) and bought a Samsung tablet to use to control the huge new TV.

But she had to move into her mother's house and rent out her own because they never have any money. Yesterday she was grumbling and shouted "I hate being poor!"

I feel bad because I think she really just doesn't believe that not spending your money now means you will have it later.. it just leaks out somewhere, right?! I kind of want to try to help her, but I don't think she would be very receptive. And she doesn't live a lavish life.. just general financial illiteracy.


This is really tragic. I'm wondering, is there one simple, not threatening sentence that would get through to someone like that?

"The reason you are poor is because you buy tons of shit with your money every month."

Kira

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #641 on: August 16, 2013, 05:53:20 PM »

This is really tragic. I'm wondering, is there one simple, not threatening sentence that would get through to someone like that?

"The TV you just bought could feed a family of 4 for six months."

Part of the problem is that she genuinely does have other financial problems - I don't think her husband has been consistently employed, her kids are in daycare, and she doesn't make much. So anytime I ever talk about doing something differently, I think she just chalks it up to me being "rich" and thus it couldn't ever work for her. Plus I am sure you have all heard parents trumpeting that I just couldn't understand their lives and how hard it is because they have kids and I don't. So there is some of that.

But yeah, I do want to just shake her and say, "What would you give to now have that money that you spent on that TV!!"

QuietContrary

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #642 on: August 17, 2013, 12:34:21 AM »
I've got one that I think takes the cake..
I work with a woman who is 31 yrs old and is an engineer like me, so she makes very similar to my $50k.  She commutes 50 miles to a town-house an hour and a half from work.  She complains at least once a week about her financial situation and for YEARS now I've really been feeling bad for her.. Her husband has made $34,000/yr for the last 5 years, they can't afford to move, she desperately wants kids but there's no way for her and her husband to afford kids.  She 'needs' a new car but can't afford one, and they want to move into a single family home.  They had (2) car payments, big mortgage on the town home, etc.
After genuinely feeling sorry for her situation (that she put herself in with her crazy commute, among other things), I found out she inherited $80,000 with the death of her grandmother.  This could be LIFE CHANGING for her since they could pay off some debt (credit card AND both vehicles AND have plenty to invest still).......
Then 2 months later I found out what the actually did with the money.. They used it to put a driveway and 'entrance gate' on a very high-end fishing cabin for her husband.  This cabin wasn't even built yet - they used that $80,000 to continue a process that her father in law has been working on for almost 10 years building this cabin.   I said "oh did you decide not to start a family?" which was probably aggressive but she complained for over 5 years about debt and then she was given the golden ticket and squandered it.  Her response was "Well Nick (her husband) and his dad REALLY like fishing...".  Hmm..
Needless to say, this was 5 years ago and the cabin has not progressed after that $80,000 and she's back to complaining about debt and dreams that could have been.

I actually feel a little queasy after reading that. What on earth was she thinking of?

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #643 on: August 17, 2013, 03:47:56 AM »
It's not truly antimustachian, but some time ago I was chatting with one of my lab technicians and she mentioned that she isn't saving anything (no debts either) other than paying the highest allowed amount to the pension fund. I asked why and isn't she worried that something might happen in the future or isn't she worried that there won't be enough money when she is old (currently in her late 20-ties). She gave a somewhat reasonable answer that there is nothing to save for:

- pension will be 80-90% of her current salary (about average for the country) if she work till age 63-65
- education is free
- any imaginable health care cost is covered either by insurance which can't be dropped or by government
- old age long term care is covered by government if you don't have your own money
- unemployment is covered by insurance (18 months at 80% previous salary)
- if it becomes really bad rent and food assistance is also provided
- getting a new job for lab technicians is not difficult (current unemployment in Switzerland is only 3%)
- inheritance from grandparents and parents is expected
- not interested in retiring early unless as SAHM

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #644 on: August 17, 2013, 01:41:11 PM »
She gave a somewhat reasonable answer that there is nothing to save for:

Not totally unreasonable, but for me it's been just the opposite: I can pay for everything I really need or want on a fraction of my income, so - since I hate shopping - spending the rest would be almost like work :-)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #645 on: August 17, 2013, 02:00:03 PM »
- pension will be 80-90% of her current salary (about average for the country) if she work till age 63-65

This, right here, is the reason why. If she doesn't save, and doesn't want to do something that her employer wants for whatever reason, then she's fucked because she decided to spend it all and wait for that 80-90% in forty years rather than spend less now and have that option available forever.

Undecided

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #646 on: August 17, 2013, 04:46:20 PM »
- pension will be 80-90% of her current salary (about average for the country) if she work till age 63-65

This, right here, is the reason why. If she doesn't save, and doesn't want to do something that her employer wants for whatever reason, then she's fucked because she decided to spend it all and wait for that 80-90% in forty years rather than spend less now and have that option available forever.

But even that probably just argues for having a bit of buffer to find another job (since the post states she has no interest in retiring early); at least as I understand it, even the 2nd pillar of the Swiss system (the occupational portion) is portable from one job to the next..

Luigi

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #647 on: August 17, 2013, 05:45:36 PM »
"The reason you are poor is because you buy tons of shit with your money every month."
My parents are exactly like this.  They constantly spend more than they can afford, more than they make, and can't figure out where the money goes.  Their anti-mustachian actions are probably enough to create a forum here just for them.  They're so bad, they are using all my grandma's money to live on.  And they work a combined total of 45 hours a week on a good week.

Most recently, my mom was complaining because the auto insurance check bounced, and it was like 70 dollars.  This is my grandma's insurance.  My grandma sold her house for $140,000 5 years ago (and it was paid off), and apparently now has no money in cash (and to my knowledge, that's where all the sale proceeds went).  My mom is my grandma's bookkeeper, and was well aware when the auto insurance bill was due.  However, the day prior to this bill coming due, my mom took my brother and sister out to dinner at some expensive restaurant, using my grandma's money. 

This sort of thing happens a lot, and I feel really bad for my grandma.  She's not a bad person, and doesn't deserve this, but I don't know how to tell her my mom is stealing from her... all the time.  It's crazy.


Another story, it's almost funny to me.  Last year they had their neighbor (an HVAC tech) come over to see why the A/C wasn't working.  He said that the coils were dirty and icing up.  He found that the reason is the fact that when my dad replaced the dryer, he never replaced the old, ratty dryer hose, and it was spitting lint into the room, and since the covers weren't on the A/C unit, getting caught in the coils.  So, of course, my dad went right out to replace the dryer hose.  Except that that last sentence is a lie, he never even bought a new hose. 
Fast forward to last weekend, and the A/C quit working.  One would think that the logical choice would be that when no cool air is coming out of the vents that something is wrong and to shut the unit off.  Well, my parents got halfway there.  The thing broke late morning and sometime around 9PM (they were both off all day), they decided to take a look at it, and that is when they turned off the air conditioner.  Nearly 12 hours after it stopped blowing air.  Needless to say, it was way too iced up to do anything, and it took until the next afternoon to get it cleaned (since they had to sleep and all). 

I don't know, maybe it's just me, but if my air conditioner is not blowing air, I'm not going to run it, if not to save the electricity costs, to make sure nothing happens to the unit. 

kkbmustang

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #648 on: August 17, 2013, 08:15:22 PM »
"The reason you are poor is because you buy tons of shit with your money every month."
My parents are exactly like this.  They constantly spend more than they can afford, more than they make, and can't figure out where the money goes.  Their anti-mustachian actions are probably enough to create a forum here just for them.  They're so bad, they are using all my grandma's money to live on.  And they work a combined total of 45 hours a week on a good week.

Most recently, my mom was complaining because the auto insurance check bounced, and it was like 70 dollars.  This is my grandma's insurance.  My grandma sold her house for $140,000 5 years ago (and it was paid off), and apparently now has no money in cash (and to my knowledge, that's where all the sale proceeds went).  My mom is my grandma's bookkeeper, and was well aware when the auto insurance bill was due.  However, the day prior to this bill coming due, my mom took my brother and sister out to dinner at some expensive restaurant, using my grandma's money. 


This is so sad.

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #649 on: August 18, 2013, 01:32:52 AM »
Not only sad, but potentially illegal depending on the awareness of your grandmother. Financial exploitation laws don't disappear just because it's a family matter.

This sucks.