Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 6407667 times)

deedeezee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4100 on: September 06, 2014, 05:50:15 AM »
My first post!  My coworker was telling me how she was shopping for new makeup at Ulta and when the cashier was done totaling up her purchases it was around $800.  She was a little shocked at the price, but paid it anyways.  She told herself it was good makeup and she would use it all.  When she saw my shocked face she explained that it wasn't just makeup, but really good makeup brushes also.

I love makeup/skincare/haircare, and I love Ulta/Sephora, and even I would have said, deadpan, "you are kidding, right?"  $800 is ludicrous for an annual budget.  For a one-time visit, it is truly, spectacularly, insane.  Wow.


Elderwood17

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4101 on: September 06, 2014, 06:58:30 AM »
My first post!  My coworker was telling me how she was shopping for new makeup at Ulta and when the cashier was done totaling up her purchases it was around $800.  She was a little shocked at the price, but paid it anyways.  She told herself it was good makeup and she would use it all.  When she saw my shocked face she explained that it wasn't just makeup, but really good makeup brushes also.
Welcome to the boards!  As a guy I refrain from commenting on this topic but once a co-worker came in gushing about her weekend at a spa, the manicure, pedicure, whole works and then said how her facial was $xxx number of dollars but so worth it.  Another, older lady who is very refined looking in a classic, non glitzy way stopped, looked at her intently and said " you spent $xxx on a facial?  Honey, you need to ask for a refund" and walked away.  I had to leave before I busted a gut!

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4102 on: September 06, 2014, 07:07:43 AM »
So one of my coworkers bought a new f250 diesel truck. Drover it to work every day for a while. All of a sudden he starts hitching a ride with his girlfriend. I thought to my self maybe this is the first small step in the right direction. Nope he shows up yesterday all smiles and says "Thank god its payday now I can afford to tag my truck and I won't have to bum rides with cindy".
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CabinetGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4103 on: September 06, 2014, 09:57:49 AM »
Finally have one.  I'm a custom cabinet installer, so it can be a solitary existence on the job site.  I'm either alone most of the time, or working with ESL painters (English second language.) 

However, the other day I had the unfortunate privilege of working with another installer.  I've known this guy for years, and I'm not a fan of his.  But I digress...As a custom cabinet installer, I've learned the hard way over the years to buy quality tools that will last.  Higher up front cost (mitigated by using CL, but less likely to have to replace.). His near constant remarks of calling me "big money" and "I wish I could afford your nice Festools" are, somewhat ironically, followed up by telling me he "Just got his old boat back" (he had to sell it when the economy tanked).  And he followed that up by telling me he and his buddy are going halves on a new 24' center console boat.  "The payment is only 250.00! (Over ten years, mind you.) "That's only 125.00 a month since we're splitting the payments."

Oh, and this is so the same guy that's had to find work out of state because he had to chase money elsewhere because he didn't have the savings to weather the downturn...

I'm a new mustacian, but in this industry, you either save your money when the gettins good, or your toast when it eventually tanks.


This same guy was talking to me again (tough to avoid him), and he's telling me how much money he was making up in Boston last year.  We both live in the greater Charleston sc area.  He's burnt every bridge here so he had to seek work out of state. 

Anyway, he's telling me that "guys up there make over 50.00 an hour." (I'm thinking, "no, that's what they're paid hourly as subcontractors, they're not really making 50.00.  I personally charge more per hour, and indont have to travel to Boston, nor do I have to pay to stay in a hotel while I'm up there like he did). And he goes on to say that most of the guys up there have second homes, and when it's payday, most of them just tell their boss to mail them their check.  He could not wrap his head around this!  He kept saying it over and over, and telling me he would rush to pick up his check. 

Sounds like a few mustacian carpenters live up in Boston :)

Draggon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4104 on: September 06, 2014, 10:39:18 AM »
I promise I'm not being judgy; I'm just trying to understand. When you were in the middle of the gymnastic and dancing, what was the end goal? What was the hoped for result that would make the expense and effort worthwhile?

I can tell you I asked myself this question many times over the years as I saw expenses piling up.  In contrast, my son was a bargain.  There is no right answer.  We could certainly afford it, but I made it clear that I wasn't on board with going whole-hog either.  We compromised, and my wife did as much as she could to save money along the way - things like making costumes or buying basic costumes and dressing them up herself with all the necessary bling.

The rewards were many.  It kept her very busy resulting in a trouble-free life for the most part.  It kept her focused and taught her the meaning of hard work vs. reward.  She had little interest in dating and partying until recently.  My wife ate it up and got very involved in the dance studio while making a bunch of new friends.  She was the go-to person when someone needing something done with a sewing machine.  I think she's still dealing with the post-partum blues.

Anyway, we had no specific end goal.  There was certainly no illusion that she would go Pro and make bazillions of dollars or anything like that.  I say that, but one of our dance family friends just had their daughter take 2nd place on the national TV show, So You Think You Can Dance.  For Valerie, this was a dream come true.  I can't quite relate, but I guess dancing really gets into your blood and becomes a big part of who you are and how you express yourself.

The biggest caution I would put on all this is to know your own means and don't get carried away.  While expensive, we both worked and made sure we kept it relatively reasonable.

viper155

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4105 on: September 06, 2014, 01:37:50 PM »
I am resigning my position in the Army, and there is literally an Act of Congress mandating that everyone leaving the service go through a battery of classes such as resume writing workshops, briefs on your Department of Veterans Affairs benefits, and how to conduct a professional interview. There is also a mandatory five hour personal finance class. From the material covered and the side conversations in the class it is clear that this is something that should be mandatory to all people upon entrance into the service.

You shouldn't be able to get a high school diploma until you've done this!

EricL

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4106 on: September 06, 2014, 03:02:58 PM »
I am resigning my position in the Army, and there is literally an Act of Congress mandating that everyone leaving the service go through a battery of classes such as resume writing workshops, briefs on your Department of Veterans Affairs benefits, and how to conduct a professional interview. There is also a mandatory five hour personal finance class. From the material covered and the side conversations in the class it is clear that this is something that should be mandatory to all people upon entrance into the service.

You shouldn't be able to get a high school diploma until you've done this!

LoL.  My high schools (I attended 4) didn't teach ANY of that.  And certainly not veteran's benefits.  The closest thing they ever did was teach me how to write checks.
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Lindy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4107 on: September 06, 2014, 03:16:22 PM »
My first post!  My coworker was telling me how she was shopping for new makeup at Ulta and when the cashier was done totaling up her purchases it was around $800.  She was a little shocked at the price, but paid it anyways.  She told herself it was good makeup and she would use it all.  When she saw my shocked face she explained that it wasn't just makeup, but really good makeup brushes also.

I love makeup/skincare/haircare, and I love Ulta/Sephora, and even I would have said, deadpan, "you are kidding, right?"  $800 is ludicrous for an annual budget.  For a one-time visit, it is truly, spectacularly, insane.  Wow.

This CW isn't even what I would consider very feminine.  She never wears makeup to work.  I just don't get it.
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Lindy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4108 on: September 06, 2014, 03:48:07 PM »
My first post!  My coworker was telling me how she was shopping for new makeup at Ulta and when the cashier was done totaling up her purchases it was around $800.  She was a little shocked at the price, but paid it anyways.  She told herself it was good makeup and she would use it all.  When she saw my shocked face she explained that it wasn't just makeup, but really good makeup brushes also.
Welcome to the boards!  As a guy I refrain from commenting on this topic but once a co-worker came in gushing about her weekend at a spa, the manicure, pedicure, whole works and then said how her facial was $xxx number of dollars but so worth it.  Another, older lady who is very refined looking in a classic, non glitzy way stopped, looked at her intently and said " you spent $xxx on a facial?  Honey, you need to ask for a refund" and walked away.  I had to leave before I busted a gut!
Haha. That's awesome.
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eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4109 on: September 08, 2014, 08:16:33 AM »
Got a great service at work on our intranet today. They're going to be offering a seminar on "Early Strategies for Getting More Money" geared towards parents preparing for college. Their focus group: Parents of 9-12th graders. "want to get a head start on finding additional money to pay for college."

Um, probably should have started planning a little earlier than 3 years out for something that could cost >20k per year...
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johnny847

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4110 on: September 08, 2014, 08:24:20 AM »
Got a great service at work on our intranet today. They're going to be offering a seminar on "Early Strategies for Getting More Money" geared towards parents preparing for college. Their focus group: Parents of 9-12th graders. "want to get a head start on finding additional money to pay for college."

Um, probably should have started planning a little earlier than 3 years out for something that could cost >20k per year...

Well considering how many Americans live paycheck to paycheck, they'd probably argue that saving for an expense before it is incurred is a "head start." *sigh*

Chranstronaut

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4111 on: September 08, 2014, 09:26:48 AM »
The newly remarried mom was complaining that "these banks just expect you to have money lying around for a down payment!"  They spoke some more and I tuned out, then heard the single mom say "No one in this day and age should hold it against someone for having credit card debt; we all do!"

I love it when someone talks about "who has money lying around." As if people with savings just have piles of cash on the floor, where we stumble over them and exclaim, "Oh! I could make a down payment with this!" It makes me want to drape some dollar bills on the couch, on the bed, in the recliner, on a cushion, etc., so I can have money actually lying around (instead of working its butt off earning interest and dividends).


That is hilarious. I actually /do/ have small amounts of cash stashed around my house in places where I'll forget about it. I'll come across it randomly and be like "oh yeah, I left some money here encase I need it. Well, I don't need it now, I guess I'll just leave it there". Its a pretty awesome feeling tbh.

When I was a kid, I used to stash money around the house in case I unexpectedly traveled through time.  I figured that if I ended up in the recent past or future, I would still have access to my secret stashes.  I was also REALLY concerned when they started printing Sacagawea dollars because I didn't know if I'd have money that would be accepted in the past anymore.  I was old enough at that age to be PRETTY SURE time travel wasn't possible, but I've always been cautious about money.
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johnny847

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4112 on: September 08, 2014, 09:41:50 AM »
The newly remarried mom was complaining that "these banks just expect you to have money lying around for a down payment!"  They spoke some more and I tuned out, then heard the single mom say "No one in this day and age should hold it against someone for having credit card debt; we all do!"

I love it when someone talks about "who has money lying around." As if people with savings just have piles of cash on the floor, where we stumble over them and exclaim, "Oh! I could make a down payment with this!" It makes me want to drape some dollar bills on the couch, on the bed, in the recliner, on a cushion, etc., so I can have money actually lying around (instead of working its butt off earning interest and dividends).


That is hilarious. I actually /do/ have small amounts of cash stashed around my house in places where I'll forget about it. I'll come across it randomly and be like "oh yeah, I left some money here encase I need it. Well, I don't need it now, I guess I'll just leave it there". Its a pretty awesome feeling tbh.

When I was a kid, I used to stash money around the house in case I unexpectedly traveled through time.  I figured that if I ended up in the recent past or future, I would still have access to my secret stashes.  I was also REALLY concerned when they started printing Sacagawea dollars because I didn't know if I'd have money that would be accepted in the past anymore.  I was old enough at that age to be PRETTY SURE time travel wasn't possible, but I've always been cautious about money.

Hahaha I got a kick out of this one. Funny how children's minds work---one of my friends as a kid thought the condensation that forms on the outside of cups of cold drinks was because it was too hard for the cup to hold the water in.

Helvegen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4113 on: September 08, 2014, 10:21:34 AM »
I have a co-worker complaining to me about how far in debt he is, no job stability, how that reality causes him so much stress, etc. Where is the co-worker today? On a beach in USVI. Because he deserves it, ya know. I wish I was joking.

AllChoptUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4114 on: September 08, 2014, 11:30:28 AM »
I promise I'm not being judgy; I'm just trying to understand. When you were in the middle of the gymnastic and dancing, what was the end goal? What was the hoped for result that would make the expense and effort worthwhile?

I can tell you I asked myself this question many times over the years as I saw expenses piling up.  In contrast, my son was a bargain.  There is no right answer.  We could certainly afford it, but I made it clear that I wasn't on board with going whole-hog either.  We compromised, and my wife did as much as she could to save money along the way - things like making costumes or buying basic costumes and dressing them up herself with all the necessary bling.

The rewards were many.  It kept her very busy resulting in a trouble-free life for the most part.  It kept her focused and taught her the meaning of hard work vs. reward.  She had little interest in dating and partying until recently.  My wife ate it up and got very involved in the dance studio while making a bunch of new friends.  She was the go-to person when someone needing something done with a sewing machine.  I think she's still dealing with the post-partum blues.

Anyway, we had no specific end goal.  There was certainly no illusion that she would go Pro and make bazillions of dollars or anything like that.  I say that, but one of our dance family friends just had their daughter take 2nd place on the national TV show, So You Think You Can Dance.  For Valerie, this was a dream come true.  I can't quite relate, but I guess dancing really gets into your blood and becomes a big part of who you are and how you express yourself.

The biggest caution I would put on all this is to know your own means and don't get carried away.  While expensive, we both worked and made sure we kept it relatively reasonable.

Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4115 on: September 08, 2014, 01:30:02 PM »
Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

KBlynx

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4116 on: September 08, 2014, 02:28:31 PM »
Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

Here here. I for one needed a physical outlet in my early years. I was a very stressed out teenager and without my trail horse I think I may have just curled up and died. It was the best way for me to blow off my social anxieties and self-confidence issues in a productive way.  I don't have the land or extra resources for a large animal for my daughter but I think that a few dance classes a week may help her the same way that my outlet did for me. Or so I hope!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4117 on: September 08, 2014, 03:12:55 PM »
Conversation at a garage sale involved a fellow who had a computer, tv, and the latest/greatest gaming console in each bedroom, his own bedroom and the living room because he didn't like to share and couldn't make his kids share either.

As a bonus, my 15 yr old overheard this conversation and pulled me aside later to say "Mom, that guy is insane"

He is going to be all right.


vivophoenix

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4118 on: September 08, 2014, 03:17:40 PM »
Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

My husband was a musical prodigy and my in-laws spent a fortune on it, simply because serious training in the arts tends to be very expensive (at least pianists don't wear out instruments the way ballerinas do their shoes). It won him a scholarship to America (where he met and married a nice US citizen who gave him a green card) and it's now his career. For most kids, that kind of training isn't worth the money or effort. For a small handful it may be, but you're going to know by the time they're eight or so. My MIL was told when my husband was five that he was the best musical talent anyone in the country had seen in decades. If you have a kid that talented, you're going to know early on and can make decisions from there.

sounds like youre treating the kid as an investment vehicle, which you  are welcome to do.

but seems a little cold. if i could afford it. and it wasnt too crazy. id pay for private music/dance/hobbies lessons for my kid. because it is enjoyable and yes there are plenty of free activities, but that does not make them equally enjoyable.

doing something just cause its free isnt the same as doing something you enjoy and   pay for.

J'onn J'onzz

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4119 on: September 08, 2014, 03:26:17 PM »
Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

My husband was a musical prodigy and my in-laws spent a fortune on it, simply because serious training in the arts tends to be very expensive (at least pianists don't wear out instruments the way ballerinas do their shoes). It won him a scholarship to America (where he met and married a nice US citizen who gave him a green card) and it's now his career. For most kids, that kind of training isn't worth the money or effort. For a small handful it may be, but you're going to know by the time they're eight or so. My MIL was told when my husband was five that he was the best musical talent anyone in the country had seen in decades. If you have a kid that talented, you're going to know early on and can make decisions from there.

Just because a kid is not a prodigy or is involved with an activity that will most likely not become a career for them does not mean it is not worth it. My 12 year old has been in martial arts since he was 6, started with Taekwondo, then MMA, and now he is at a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu after our recent move. I don't expect him to grow up and be a professional fighter and that doesn't really interest him either but there are plenty of other benefits that don't involve making a career out of it, confidence, fitness, work ethic, competitiveness, friendships just to name a few. Well worth the money spent on it IMO.


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4120 on: September 08, 2014, 03:37:35 PM »
Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!


I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

My husband was a musical prodigy and my in-laws spent a fortune on it, simply because serious training in the arts tends to be very expensive (at least pianists don't wear out instruments the way ballerinas do their shoes). It won him a scholarship to America (where he met and married a nice US citizen who gave him a green card) and it's now his career. For most kids, that kind of training isn't worth the money or effort. For a small handful it may be, but you're going to know by the time they're eight or so. My MIL was told when my husband was five that he was the best musical talent anyone in the country had seen in decades. If you have a kid that talented, you're going to know early on and can make decisions from there.

Just because a kid is not a prodigy or is involved with an activity that will most likely not become a career for them does not mean it is not worth it. My 12 year old has been in martial arts since he was 6, started with Taekwondo, then MMA, and now he is at a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu after our recent move. I don't expect him to grow up and be a professional fighter and that doesn't really interest him either but there are plenty of other benefits that don't involve making a career out of it, confidence, fitness, work ethic, competitiveness, friendships just to name a few. Well worth the money spent on it IMO.

Oh, absolutely. My stance isn't that I won't pay for extracurriculars for kids that aren't professional caliber at the activity in question. But I'm not willing to spend the same kind of money on my child's piano hobby as I am on their piano training, if that distinction makes sense. I have a number of hobbies, and I spend reasonable amounts of money on them quite happily. But there's a limit to the caliber of tools, materials and facilities I'll buy, a limit that would be higher if this was something I'd do for a living.

That does make sense. Guess I misinterpreted the first post.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4121 on: September 08, 2014, 05:55:36 PM »
When I was a kid, I used to stash money around the house in case I unexpectedly traveled through time.  I figured that if I ended up in the recent past or future, I would still have access to my secret stashes.  I was also REALLY concerned when they started printing Sacagawea dollars because I didn't know if I'd have money that would be accepted in the past anymore.  I was old enough at that age to be PRETTY SURE time travel wasn't possible, but I've always been cautious about money.

Reminds me of this...

Bill and Ted.

BlueHouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4122 on: September 08, 2014, 08:10:10 PM »
DC has much higher property tax than Virginia (or at least Fairfax County).  A similar priced home in hundreds of dollars more a month in DC just because of the escrow. 

This is incorrect.  DC Property Tax Rate = 0.85 / $100;   FFX Country Property Tax rate = 1.090 / $100. 
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4123 on: September 09, 2014, 06:19:14 AM »
DC has much higher property tax than Virginia (or at least Fairfax County).  A similar priced home in hundreds of dollars more a month in DC just because of the escrow. 

This is incorrect.  DC Property Tax Rate = 0.85 / $100;   FFX Country Property Tax rate = 1.090 / $100.

Would the insurance be more in DC?
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4124 on: September 09, 2014, 06:55:56 AM »
Friend: "We're thinking of making the garage two-storey"
Me: "Oh, why?"
Friend: "For, you know extra space, storage"
Me: "Why do you need extra space, you've got a five bedroom house..."
Friend: "But it's full of stuff! We need somewhere to put it all"
Me: "What stuff?"
Friend: "Mostly gifts and stuff we didn't even want in the first place!"
Me: "The solution to having too much stuff you don't even want is not to build somewhere to house all the stuff. The solution is to get rid of the stuff you don't even want"
Friend: Look of utter amazement. I actually think she -understood-

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4125 on: September 09, 2014, 07:02:14 AM »
Friend: "We're thinking of making the garage two-storey"
Me: "Oh, why?"
Friend: "For, you know extra space, storage"
Me: "Why do you need extra space, you've got a five bedroom house..."
Friend: "But it's full of stuff! We need somewhere to put it all"
Me: "What stuff?"
Friend: "Mostly gifts and stuff we didn't even want in the first place!"
Me: "The solution to having too much stuff you don't even want is not to build somewhere to house all the stuff. The solution is to get rid of the stuff you don't even want"
Friend: Look of utter amazement. I actually think she -understood-

/face palm
It boggles my mind that the first solution some people have to having too much unwanted stuff is to build more space for said unwanted stuff.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4126 on: September 09, 2014, 07:11:29 AM »
I've got two in the past week.

1.  Can anyone lend me $600 for Yo Gabba Gabba tickets?  Child X really LOVES them but we can't afford to go.  Me "Holy CRAP a kids show is that expensive?!?!"  Her "Well, that's the first 15 rows and you get a back stage VIP pass, only the best for child X (who is all of maybe 3 and won't remember anything about this meeting"  Mind you I am pretty sure they are still paying off around 60k in credit card debt that she wracked up before getting married.

2.  Co Worker who gets in large boxes from fancy stores all the time and routinely spends hundreds a week on clothes.   "Ugh, our home health aid wants a raise, I TOLD her 4 years ago when we hired her there would be no raises because we can't afford it".  Me: "Well how much are you paying her"  Her "800 a month for both of my parents who are on dialysis and live in NYC"  Her and her husband pull in over 200k (probably closer to 250) a year combined, this aid takes care of her parents 24-7 365 because she doesn't want to have to deal with them and when I asked she swore poverty that she couldn't afford an extra 50 a month to pay this woman (under the table mind you)...aaaand she just spent 3k, on a couch that she was flashing pictures in the office of...  We continued to talk and I brought up early retirement and got the "I don't know how you can save on our crappy salaries, we can only save 300 a month"....she earns about 20-30k more a year than me, and I'm pushing 90 a year.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4127 on: September 09, 2014, 07:15:33 AM »
Friend: "We're thinking of making the garage two-storey"
Me: "Oh, why?"
Friend: "For, you know extra space, storage"
Me: "Why do you need extra space, you've got a five bedroom house..."
Friend: "But it's full of stuff! We need somewhere to put it all"
Me: "What stuff?"
Friend: "Mostly gifts and stuff we didn't even want in the first place!"
Me: "The solution to having too much stuff you don't even want is not to build somewhere to house all the stuff. The solution is to get rid of the stuff you don't even want"
Friend: Look of utter amazement. I actually think she -understood-

/face palm
It boggles my mind that the first solution some people have to having too much unwanted stuff is to build more space for said unwanted stuff.

My best friend had to short-sell her too-spendy-too-big house when she got transferred. They then rented a somewhat-spendier-even-bigger house at the new location, which they HAD TO HAVE so they'd have room for all their stuff. It took 2 semi-trucks and $10k to move them. But then they had extra empty bedrooms, which of course needed to be furnished "for guests", so out they went to buy more stuff. Makes me sick to think about it.

We moved a week before she did, and she was blown away that we were downsizing by 300 sq. ft., and that we had "just" 4 BR house with 5 people. We used a medium-sized UHaul, which cost $1500, including gas.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4128 on: September 09, 2014, 07:28:20 AM »
I can see this point.  When we bought our house in Fairfax County I was working from home 100%, so we purchased something close to Belvoir, where my husband works, it's a reverse commute when he is home.  Fast forward a year and my company moves it's HQ from Florida to Sterling VA...I now have the commute from hell every morning.  Thankfully as a "please don't quit" they let me work from home one to two days a week still.  Now, we can't move closer to my job because that would put his commute in the bad zone, and I'd rather only have one of us driving the ridiculousness.

I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**"

« Last Edit: September 09, 2014, 07:32:03 AM by Siobhan »

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4129 on: September 09, 2014, 08:39:36 AM »
When I was a kid, I used to stash money around the house in case I unexpectedly traveled through time.  I figured that if I ended up in the recent past or future, I would still have access to my secret stashes.  I was also REALLY concerned when they started printing Sacagawea dollars because I didn't know if I'd have money that would be accepted in the past anymore.  I was old enough at that age to be PRETTY SURE time travel wasn't possible, but I've always been cautious about money.

Reminds me of this...

Bill and Ted.

To keep derailing the thread in the interest of science, this is exactly how I thought it could work.  I blame Bill and Ted and the Time Traveler's Quartet book series, but I was also really into wilderness survival books like My Side of the Mountain.  I was like a mini doomsday prepper who still thought magic could be real.

I had it all figured out.  The key to remember, obviously, is that you must keep hiding more money at different time intervals to keep a certain flow going for your future/past self.  This went on for a year or two.  I don't think I ever told my parents why I did it, but my mom would find the money around the house when cleaning and try to give it back to me.  She stopped asking for explanations eventually.

I think I just figured out the real reason I am a natural saver...
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RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4130 on: September 09, 2014, 08:47:24 AM »
If you ever have the chance, go to see 2 Pianos 4 Hands.  Great musical play, follows 2 boys to young manhood as piano takes over their lives

Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

I'd imagine it's very specific to each family and each child. My wife for example- like many girls she got started young in dance, but unlike many both excelled at it and truly enjoyed it and determined that it was what she wanted to do with her life. She continued instruction in it, probably not cheaply given what she herself now gets paid to teach it, through High School- and tried out for several dance companies resulting in her having a job as a professional ballet dancer waiting for her when she graduated from High School. She has long retired from being a professional dancer herself, but still teaches it and has started her own non-profit dance company. Many kids never get to go on and live their childhood dream jobs, but I fully support giving them the chance to find something they love and put their all into it.

My husband was a musical prodigy and my in-laws spent a fortune on it, simply because serious training in the arts tends to be very expensive (at least pianists don't wear out instruments the way ballerinas do their shoes). It won him a scholarship to America (where he met and married a nice US citizen who gave him a green card) and it's now his career. For most kids, that kind of training isn't worth the money or effort. For a small handful it may be, but you're going to know by the time they're eight or so. My MIL was told when my husband was five that he was the best musical talent anyone in the country had seen in decades. If you have a kid that talented, you're going to know early on and can make decisions from there.

sounds like youre treating the kid as an investment vehicle, which you  are welcome to do.

but seems a little cold. if i could afford it. and it wasnt too crazy. id pay for private music/dance/hobbies lessons for my kid. because it is enjoyable and yes there are plenty of free activities, but that does not make them equally enjoyable.

doing something just cause its free isnt the same as doing something you enjoy and   pay for.

I didn't treat the child as anything. It was my in-laws. My current parenting philosophy is just to not resent the tiny fetus that's making me sick all the time.

My husband loves his chosen instrument, and turned his back on a far higher earning skill to pursue it full time as a career. But PERSONALLY I wouldn't pay for serious athletic/musical/dance/arts training for a child that lacked professional potential. A local soccer league with practice twice a week or the high school team? Sure. Paying to send my kids to top training clinics and sending them to see sports psychologists? Not unless we're looking at national team material. Piano lessons once every week or two with the lady up the street because they think it's fun? Sure. $12,000 for Julliard's pre-college program, or fees to enter piano competitions in other countries? Not unless we're talking about serious professional potential. There are very different levels of "paying for an extracurricular" here. Pre-professional training in these fields is wildly expensive (on a par with college) and not something I would fund for someone who doesn't have the potential to do this for a living.
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frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4131 on: September 09, 2014, 08:51:43 AM »
When I was a kid, I used to stash money around the house in case I unexpectedly traveled through time.  I figured that if I ended up in the recent past or future, I would still have access to my secret stashes.  I was also REALLY concerned when they started printing Sacagawea dollars because I didn't know if I'd have money that would be accepted in the past anymore.  I was old enough at that age to be PRETTY SURE time travel wasn't possible, but I've always been cautious about money.

Reminds me of this...

Bill and Ted.

To keep derailing the thread in the interest of science, this is exactly how I thought it could work.  I blame Bill and Ted and the Time Traveler's Quartet book series, but I was also really into wilderness survival books like My Side of the Mountain.  I was like a mini doomsday prepper who still thought magic could be real.

I had it all figured out.  The key to remember, obviously, is that you must keep hiding more money at different time intervals to keep a certain flow going for your future/past self.  This went on for a year or two.  I don't think I ever told my parents why I did it, but my mom would find the money around the house when cleaning and try to give it back to me.  She stopped asking for explanations eventually.

I think I just figured out the real reason I am a natural saver...

I know this was just a hair brained half baked idea...but I still don't understand why you have to hide it at different intervals or in different locations.  Wouldn't a single central location (that is still secret to everyone but you) and one large initial deposit as early as possible be the superior solution?  What exactly do multiple secret locations around the house accomplish that a tin in your sock drawer couldn't? And if you place a bunch of money there as early as possible, then why would need to keep hiding additional money at different intervals?  Where is that initial money going to go?  Your future self is going to rob you of it then skip away?  But wouldn't your future self know all of your secret hiding locations, and if he/she was so inclined to be an asshole and leave his/her past self broke, couldn't he/she just do that anyway?   

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4132 on: September 09, 2014, 08:56:33 AM »

To keep derailing the thread in the interest of science, this is exactly how I thought it could work.  I blame Bill and Ted and the Time Traveler's Quartet book series, but I was also really into wilderness survival books like My Side of the Mountain.  I was like a mini doomsday prepper who still thought magic could be real.


I absolutely loved My Side of the Mountain. Especially the end. A prepper who thought magic could be real...now that is something that would make life pretty freaking sweet. :-)
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viper155

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4133 on: September 09, 2014, 09:33:04 AM »
I promise I'm not being judgy; I'm just trying to understand. When you were in the middle of the gymnastic and dancing, what was the end goal? What was the hoped for result that would make the expense and effort worthwhile?

I can tell you I asked myself this question many times over the years as I saw expenses piling up.  In contrast, my son was a bargain.  There is no right answer.  We could certainly afford it, but I made it clear that I wasn't on board with going whole-hog either.  We compromised, and my wife did as much as she could to save money along the way - things like making costumes or buying basic costumes and dressing them up herself with all the necessary bling.

The rewards were many.  It kept her very busy resulting in a trouble-free life for the most part.  It kept her focused and taught her the meaning of hard work vs. reward.  She had little interest in dating and partying until recently.  My wife ate it up and got very involved in the dance studio while making a bunch of new friends.  She was the go-to person when someone needing something done with a sewing machine.  I think she's still dealing with the post-partum blues.

Anyway, we had no specific end goal.  There was certainly no illusion that she would go Pro and make bazillions of dollars or anything like that.  I say that, but one of our dance family friends just had their daughter take 2nd place on the national TV show, So You Think You Can Dance.  For Valerie, this was a dream come true.  I can't quite relate, but I guess dancing really gets into your blood and becomes a big part of who you are and how you express yourself.

The biggest caution I would put on all this is to know your own means and don't get carried away.  While expensive, we both worked and made sure we kept it relatively reasonable.

Not judging here - others' spending does not affect my family.  And I have a three year old so things may change, I guess. 

I can't see paying hundreds of dollars a month on a child's hobby.  I have to think there are other activities that provide focus and the promise of reward for hard work.  May be wrong, time will tell.  I would like to see discussion on this topic though!

Sometimes it pays off...In my case, I spent thousands over the years taking my son to lacrosse events up and down the east coast. He always had excellent equipment and some private lessons. Not only did he get a generous academic package to college he got 2k a year to play lacrosse. 8 grand that does not have to come out of my pocket. Money well spent considering all the time we spent together traveling and bonding. I would do it all over again. Now, in retirement, I get to watch him play his sport, his passion at just about the highest level.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4134 on: September 09, 2014, 09:48:25 AM »

Sometimes it pays off...In my case, I spent thousands over the years taking my son to lacrosse events up and down the east coast. He always had excellent equipment and some private lessons. Not only did he get a generous academic package to college he got 2k a year to play lacrosse. 8 grand that does not have to come out of my pocket. Money well spent considering all the time we spent together traveling and bonding. I would do it all over again. Now, in retirement, I get to watch him play his sport, his passion at just about the highest level.

Isn't this survivorship bias?  It would be like a lottery winner explaining how his $500/mo investment in lottery tickets was great because it all worked out and he hit the multi million dollar jackpot.   Sometimes it pays off.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4135 on: September 09, 2014, 10:02:49 AM »

Sometimes it pays off...In my case, I spent thousands over the years taking my son to lacrosse events up and down the east coast. He always had excellent equipment and some private lessons. Not only did he get a generous academic package to college he got 2k a year to play lacrosse. 8 grand that does not have to come out of my pocket. Money well spent considering all the time we spent together traveling and bonding. I would do it all over again. Now, in retirement, I get to watch him play his sport, his passion at just about the highest level.

Isn't this survivorship bias?  It would be like a lottery winner explaining how his $500/mo investment in lottery tickets was great because it all worked out and he hit the multi million dollar jackpot.   Sometimes it pays off.

I don't think it is. In the above scenario you are getting something for your money and it just happen to work out that the kid got a return on the investment. Buying lotto tickets you are getting nothing else except that chance to win.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4136 on: September 09, 2014, 01:56:54 PM »
I had it all figured out.  The key to remember, obviously, is that you must keep hiding more money at different time intervals to keep a certain flow going for your future/past self.  This went on for a year or two.  I don't think I ever told my parents why I did it, but my mom would find the money around the house when cleaning and try to give it back to me.  She stopped asking for explanations eventually.

I think I just figured out the real reason I am a natural saver...

Party on. Excellent. (I know that's actually Wayne's World).

I know this was just a hair brained half baked idea...but I still don't understand why you have to hide it at different intervals or in different locations.  Wouldn't a single central location (that is still secret to everyone but you) and one large initial deposit as early as possible be the superior solution?  What exactly do multiple secret locations around the house accomplish that a tin in your sock drawer couldn't? And if you place a bunch of money there as early as possible, then why would need to keep hiding additional money at different intervals?  Where is that initial money going to go?  Your future self is going to rob you of it then skip away?  But wouldn't your future self know all of your secret hiding locations, and if he/she was so inclined to be an asshole and leave his/her past self broke, couldn't he/she just do that anyway?   

Obviously you can't know if that one location is going to be found and raided by someone else or even still exist in the past/future. Best to keep stashing in multiple locations.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4137 on: September 09, 2014, 02:48:14 PM »
I know this was just a hair brained half baked idea...but I still don't understand why you have to hide it at different intervals or in different locations.  Wouldn't a single central location (that is still secret to everyone but you) and one large initial deposit as early as possible be the superior solution?  What exactly do multiple secret locations around the house accomplish that a tin in your sock drawer couldn't? And if you place a bunch of money there as early as possible, then why would need to keep hiding additional money at different intervals?  Where is that initial money going to go?  Your future self is going to rob you of it then skip away?  But wouldn't your future self know all of your secret hiding locations, and if he/she was so inclined to be an asshole and leave his/her past self broke, couldn't he/she just do that anyway?   

Obviously you can't know if that one location is going to be found and raided by someone else or even still exist in the past/future. Best to keep stashing in multiple locations.
[/quote]

Bingo.  Risk mitigation through diversification as interpreted by 8 year old me.  I only got $1 a week in allowance, so it wasn't possible for me to save much all at once anyway.  Plus my mom kept finding it and moving it, so I needed new locations to keep it secret.  Frugalnacho's perspective is sound as an adult, though.  As much money saved as early as possible would probably be the best strategy... good investment strategy, too :)

If time travel into the past ever IS possible, I will go back and hide extra money for my little self at one of these locations.  It's the only way to know that it's really me, again according to my 8 year old self.
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Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4138 on: September 09, 2014, 03:36:21 PM »
Went out to lunch with former coworker. Bill comes and we split it $30 each including tip. She temp me "I didn't know this place was so inexpensive!" I told her I bring my lunch every day and that it is expensive. She replies "I've dropped $100 on brunch sometimes. This isn't bad." I left it there. She makes 3x what I do (150k+). I kindof wish she'd point that firehose of waste in my direction. I'd FIRE in like 5 years with that amount of money!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4139 on: September 09, 2014, 04:42:57 PM »
I think this one counts.

So I recently got a new job with a new company, and joined the 401k plan. The way the 401k plan here works is that you can have up to 17% of your paycheck automatically deducted each month to be put towards the plan. On the site, it states that the maximum allowed per year is $17,500 (per IRS regulations). The employer match sucks, but I don't think is too relevant for this post (in case you're wondering, it's up to 5% each month, up to $1,750 annually).

Anyway, if you contribute 17% of your paycheck each month, you would need to make approx. $103,000 per year to automatically hit the $17,500 maximum. Since I make less than that, I can't reach the max through standard deductions alone. Nowhere on the 401k site could I find a way of allowing me to contribute the remaining amount (about $5k in my case).

So, I went to HR and asked them about this. After a bit of back and forth and me explaining what I understood the rules to be, their answer was: "17% is the max. or $17,500, whichever is lower."

Me: "So, if I make $100 a year, I can only contribute $17?"

HR: "Err...yes, it seems that way."

Me: "Weird...I'm guessing nobody has ever asked you this question before?" (company is 20+ years old).

HR: "Yeah, nobody's ever asked that before!"

Now granted, I might be the only person in the entire organization of 200+ people that makes less than $103,000 and thus be the only person that has had to think about this...but I highly doubt it.


*mind blown*

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4140 on: September 09, 2014, 04:54:48 PM »
I think this one counts.

So I recently got a new job with a new company, and joined the 401k plan. The way the 401k plan here works is that you can have up to 17% of your paycheck automatically deducted each month to be put towards the plan. On the site, it states that the maximum allowed per year is $17,500 (per IRS regulations). The employer match sucks, but I don't think is too relevant for this post (in case you're wondering, it's up to 5% each month, up to $1,750 annually).

Anyway, if you contribute 17% of your paycheck each month, you would need to make approx. $103,000 per year to automatically hit the $17,500 maximum. Since I make less than that, I can't reach the max through standard deductions alone. Nowhere on the 401k site could I find a way of allowing me to contribute the remaining amount (about $5k in my case).

So, I went to HR and asked them about this. After a bit of back and forth and me explaining what I understood the rules to be, their answer was: "17% is the max. or $17,500, whichever is lower."

Me: "So, if I make $100 a year, I can only contribute $17?"

HR: "Err...yes, it seems that way."

Me: "Weird...I'm guessing nobody has ever asked you this question before?" (company is 20+ years old).

HR: "Yeah, nobody's ever asked that before!"

Now granted, I might be the only person in the entire organization of 200+ people that makes less than $103,000 and thus be the only person that has had to think about this...but I highly doubt it.


*mind blown*

That's pretty mind blowing indeed.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4141 on: September 09, 2014, 05:56:00 PM »
I think this one counts.

So I recently got a new job with a new company, and joined the 401k plan. The way the 401k plan here works is that you can have up to 17% of your paycheck automatically deducted each month to be put towards the plan. On the site, it states that the maximum allowed per year is $17,500 (per IRS regulations). The employer match sucks, but I don't think is too relevant for this post (in case you're wondering, it's up to 5% each month, up to $1,750 annually).

Anyway, if you contribute 17% of your paycheck each month, you would need to make approx. $103,000 per year to automatically hit the $17,500 maximum. Since I make less than that, I can't reach the max through standard deductions alone. Nowhere on the 401k site could I find a way of allowing me to contribute the remaining amount (about $5k in my case).

So, I went to HR and asked them about this. After a bit of back and forth and me explaining what I understood the rules to be, their answer was: "17% is the max. or $17,500, whichever is lower."

Me: "So, if I make $100 a year, I can only contribute $17?"

HR: "Err...yes, it seems that way."

Me: "Weird...I'm guessing nobody has ever asked you this question before?" (company is 20+ years old).

HR: "Yeah, nobody's ever asked that before!"

Now granted, I might be the only person in the entire organization of 200+ people that makes less than $103,000 and thus be the only person that has had to think about this...but I highly doubt it.


*mind blown*

That's pretty mind blowing indeed.

That is pretty mind blowing.

It also didn't seem legal to me, and according to this: http://money.stackexchange.com/questions/18861/can-my-employer-limit-my-maximum-401k-contribution-amount-below-the-irs-limit it is not. I didn't see a direct link to IRS documentation on the matter, but I would look into it.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4142 on: September 09, 2014, 05:59:58 PM »
I think this one counts.

So I recently got a new job with a new company, and joined the 401k plan. The way the 401k plan here works is that you can have up to 17% of your paycheck automatically deducted each month to be put towards the plan. On the site, it states that the maximum allowed per year is $17,500 (per IRS regulations). The employer match sucks, but I don't think is too relevant for this post (in case you're wondering, it's up to 5% each month, up to $1,750 annually).

Anyway, if you contribute 17% of your paycheck each month, you would need to make approx. $103,000 per year to automatically hit the $17,500 maximum. Since I make less than that, I can't reach the max through standard deductions alone. Nowhere on the 401k site could I find a way of allowing me to contribute the remaining amount (about $5k in my case).

So, I went to HR and asked them about this. After a bit of back and forth and me explaining what I understood the rules to be, their answer was: "17% is the max. or $17,500, whichever is lower."

Me: "So, if I make $100 a year, I can only contribute $17?"

HR: "Err...yes, it seems that way."

Me: "Weird...I'm guessing nobody has ever asked you this question before?" (company is 20+ years old).

HR: "Yeah, nobody's ever asked that before!"

Now granted, I might be the only person in the entire organization of 200+ people that makes less than $103,000 and thus be the only person that has had to think about this...but I highly doubt it.


*mind blown*

That's pretty mind blowing indeed.

That is pretty mind blowing.

It also didn't seem legal to me, and according to this: http://money.stackexchange.com/questions/18861/can-my-employer-limit-my-maximum-401k-contribution-amount-below-the-irs-limit it is not. I didn't see a direct link to IRS documentation on the matter, but I would look into it.

My guess is that there's a way to contribute towards the maximum, but the administrator doesn't know how to. I'm still looking into it though.

Pat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4143 on: September 09, 2014, 08:03:10 PM »
I'm 1 of 3 people at my work who regularly packs a lunch; it's amazing to me how so many people at work show up with take-out breakfasts, and go out to buy lunch and coffee daily.
Also, the parking lot at work is full of $50k+ luxury cars/SUVs  ...I'm 6'3", nearly 200lbs, and usually commute by bicycle or my little Honda Rebel 250. People think I'm crazy for bicycle-commuting almost 10 miles each way, and laugh their asses off when they see me on that little Rebel with my backpack/lunchbox, but I'm laughing too ...all the way to 'early' retirement.

viper155

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4144 on: September 09, 2014, 08:09:21 PM »

Sometimes it pays off...In my case, I spent thousands over the years taking my son to lacrosse events up and down the east coast. He always had excellent equipment and some private lessons. Not only did he get a generous academic package to college he got 2k a year to play lacrosse. 8 grand that does not have to come out of my pocket. Money well spent considering all the time we spent together traveling and bonding. I would do it all over again. Now, in retirement, I get to watch him play his sport, his passion at just about the highest level.

Isn't this survivorship bias?  It would be like a lottery winner explaining how his $500/mo investment in lottery tickets was great because it all worked out and he hit the multi million dollar jackpot.   Sometimes it pays off.

There is something a little more profound to spending quality time with your son than throwing money away on lottery tickets. A terrible anology....so, no

sky_northern

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4145 on: September 09, 2014, 09:26:58 PM »
9 year old showing off her new designer purse. Found out it cost $160, on sale! Yikes! I said something about the cost, and mom pipes up, 'She worked hard this summer, she deserves it!.'

The kicker, did the 9 year old have some sort of job to pay for the purse this summer? No.  The hard work mom talks about is that the 9 year old was at skating camp in the city for 3 weeks - paid for by mother of course. So was working hard at figure skating...


horsepoor

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4146 on: September 09, 2014, 09:57:47 PM »
2.  Co Worker who gets in large boxes from fancy stores all the time and routinely spends hundreds a week on clothes.   "Ugh, our home health aid wants a raise, I TOLD her 4 years ago when we hired her there would be no raises because we can't afford it".  Me: "Well how much are you paying her"  Her "800 a month for both of my parents who are on dialysis and live in NYC"  Her and her husband pull in over 200k (probably closer to 250) a year combined, this aid takes care of her parents 24-7 365 because she doesn't want to have to deal with them and when I asked she swore poverty that she couldn't afford an extra 50 a month to pay this woman (under the table mind you)...aaaand she just spent 3k, on a couch that she was flashing pictures in the office of...  We continued to talk and I brought up early retirement and got the "I don't know how you can save on our crappy salaries, we can only save 300 a month"....she earns about 20-30k more a year than me, and I'm pushing 90 a year.

If there is a category past face punching, to perhaps facial stabbing, this woman should get it.  Basically illegally paying someone $800/month for round the clock care of two people in NYC - that is fucking awful. 

firelight

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4147 on: September 09, 2014, 10:07:04 PM »
Why isn't the aid just threatening to leave? $800 per month for a 24*7 work in NYC is a crappy deal and the aid would know it.

austin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4148 on: September 09, 2014, 11:10:23 PM »
Your coworker is cheating her household employee out of pay and social security. You need to report them.

http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/How-Do-You-Report-Suspected-Tax-Fraud-Activity%3F

Adventine

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4149 on: September 10, 2014, 05:37:07 AM »
Why isn't the aid just threatening to leave? $800 per month for a 24*7 work in NYC is a crappy deal and the aid would know it.

Without knowing anything else about this person, it's possible that this person is an undocumented worker... which would also explain why they are willing to accept that salary.