Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4746828 times)

Misstachian

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4000 on: August 29, 2014, 08:47:11 PM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

No those people are just idiots.  I have known people that have an aversion to left overs.  They don't apply any type of logic or food safety arguments to their aversion.  It's more like "you prepared that food for dinner yesterday? THEN IT'S OLD! I need (and deserve) fresh food, prepared today, specifically for the meal i'm going to eat!"  They can't be reasoned with.

Is this really a real thing?  I've never been confused so much in my life.  Like...what about apples?  Apples are (probably) trucked across the country and sit in the store a few days and then normal people eat them over the course of a week.  Do they not eat that because its old?  How is say, a day-old salad any different?  Who ARE these people?

I hate wasting food so I am absolutely horrified by this.

My mom (who is not a mustachian!) tells the thirty-five year old story with horror in her voice like it was yesterday: she put out cheese, crackers, and grapes for a visiting Relative, and at the end of the hour, Relative helped carry things into the kitchen - and slid the entire tray into the garbage because it had "been out." Mom dove into the garbage and rinsed off the grapes, and every year at Thanksgiving would loudly announce that relative didn't need to help clean up because day-after turkey-stuffing-cranberry sandwiches are the best thing ever and if she threw the leftovers in the trash there would be blood. They laughed about it every year and neither swayed the other - Relative was a good sport about the joke but thought we were crazy for eating food a second time.

Christof

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4001 on: August 29, 2014, 11:25:29 PM »
eating food a second time.

Well, it does sound kind of gross. ;)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4002 on: August 29, 2014, 11:41:38 PM »
Quote
Quote from: frugalnacho on August 28, 2014, 02:22:42 PM



Quote from: shotgunwilly on August 28, 2014, 12:27:54 PM



Quote from: deedeezee on August 28, 2014, 12:24:56 PM

Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.




Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.



Fucking right man.  Sometimes we even intentionally make stuff the night before so it will be at the peak of the cooked-then refrigerated over night-then reheated flavor.  I find it with more than just spaghetti.  Almost any type of dish that has multiple ingredients tossed together seem to soak up each other's flavoring and be at optimal taste the second day.



I do this as well. I love sauce soaked pasta leftovers. I often "accidentally" make too much and when my husband comments on avoiding waste, I sigh and promise that I will make up for my mistake the next day. All the while I'm laughing evilly inside thinking "It's mine! All mine! Bwa ha ha!

Yeah when I was a kid I thought that some dishes were meant to taste better the day after. My parents were sort of 'well, we'll eat some tonight, but it's not going to be really ready until tomorrow night', when we ate the rest of it. You have to give it time for the flavours/magic to work :)

I've been known in the past to make risotto or pasta dishes for the sole purpose of being able to bake the leftovers with grated cheese on top the next day. YUM YUM YUM

larmando

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4003 on: August 30, 2014, 12:40:06 AM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Yes. Or you can't cook spaghetti. :) :) (sorry, nothing personal, but I've seen spaghetti being maimed in many many ways over the course of my life). On the other hand luckily spaghetti (and any other pasta) takes about 10 minutes to make, and thus can be made fresh "to measure" easily every time one needs some. And of course big amount of pasta sauce can be prepared in one go and then frozen (at least for sauces taking more than 30min to prepare).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4004 on: August 30, 2014, 12:46:17 AM »
Quote
Quote from: frugalnacho on August 28, 2014, 02:22:42 PM



Quote from: shotgunwilly on August 28, 2014, 12:27:54 PM



Quote from: deedeezee on August 28, 2014, 12:24:56 PM

Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.




Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.



Fucking right man.  Sometimes we even intentionally make stuff the night before so it will be at the peak of the cooked-then refrigerated over night-then reheated flavor.  I find it with more than just spaghetti.  Almost any type of dish that has multiple ingredients tossed together seem to soak up each other's flavoring and be at optimal taste the second day.



I do this as well. I love sauce soaked pasta leftovers. I often "accidentally" make too much and when my husband comments on avoiding waste, I sigh and promise that I will make up for my mistake the next day. All the while I'm laughing evilly inside thinking "It's mine! All mine! Bwa ha ha!

Yeah when I was a kid I thought that some dishes were meant to taste better the day after. My parents were sort of 'well, we'll eat some tonight, but it's not going to be really ready until tomorrow night', when we ate the rest of it. You have to give it time for the flavours/magic to work :)

This is actually very true for some dishes. :) Tiramisu that hasn't been in the fridge for 24h -> not good enough! :)


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4005 on: August 30, 2014, 01:56:10 AM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Yes. Or you can't cook spaghetti. :) :) (sorry, nothing personal, but I've seen spaghetti being maimed in many many ways over the course of my life). On the other hand luckily spaghetti (and any other pasta) takes about 10 minutes to make, and thus can be made fresh "to measure" easily every time one needs some. And of course big amount of pasta sauce can be prepared in one go and then frozen (at least for sauces taking more than 30min to prepare).

+1

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4006 on: August 30, 2014, 02:16:36 AM »
My overheard at work is a teammate casually mentioning she is going to take out loan from credit union to finally pay down her credit card debt.

That's great trying to pay down high interest credit card debt but the reason why she mentioned it is b/c of the convenience that they will automatically garnish her paycheck to pay it back. She just tells that how much she wants to borrow and how much to take out of her weekly paycheck... . She and another coworker have done it more than once apparently to take out loans to cover bills from shopping.

I didn't know what to say to that so I kept quiet.

I'm only starting to grow my 'stache but still sounds like the same cycle of consumer debt to me.

agent_clone

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4007 on: August 30, 2014, 05:16:28 AM »
Yikes, I looked at that picture and my first thought was - flies and mosquitoes in the house!!.  Screens were invented for a reason.


The SO and I have been looking around for a new place. We currently live in something like 900ft2. It was an amazing realization that the actual size wasn't the issue, it was the layout. When we look at places now, I immediately look for load-bearing walls. Ideally, I'd love something like the big glass walls that fold out and make a seamless integration to the outdoor living space, but that might be overkill. Kind of something like this:




I thought this a cool setup.
It doesn't need be left open when there's heavy bug population.
I often daydream of putting a garage door in our house so that I could totally open a whole wall.  But I am the outdoorsy type  - YMMV.
The modification I would do would be to add a flyscreen set of bifolds (or whatever they do for the fly screens) on top of the glass bifolds.  That way you can have bug free open doors, although where I am the flies die off in winter and don't come back until the wind brings them down when it gets warmer, so for parts of spring it tends to be pretty bug free and warm enough to have the doors open.

CabinetGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4008 on: August 30, 2014, 06:44:48 AM »
Finally have one.  I'm a custom cabinet installer, so it can be a solitary existence on the job site.  I'm either alone most of the time, or working with ESL painters (English second language.) 

However, the other day I had the unfortunate privilege of working with another installer.  I've known this guy for years, and I'm not a fan of his.  But I digress...As a custom cabinet installer, I've learned the hard way over the years to buy quality tools that will last.  Higher up front cost (mitigated by using CL, but less likely to have to replace.). His near constant remarks of calling me "big money" and "I wish I could afford your nice Festools" are, somewhat ironically, followed up by telling me he "Just got his old boat back" (he had to sell it when the economy tanked).  And he followed that up by telling me he and his buddy are going halves on a new 24' center console boat.  "The payment is only 250.00! (Over ten years, mind you.) "That's only 125.00 a month since we're splitting the payments."

Oh, and this is so the same guy that's had to find work out of state because he had to chase money elsewhere because he didn't have the savings to weather the downturn...

I'm a new mustacian, but in this industry, you either save your money when the gettins good, or your toast when it eventually tanks. 
« Last Edit: August 30, 2014, 06:46:25 AM by Jon Hilgenberg »

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4009 on: August 30, 2014, 10:44:44 AM »
Yikes, I looked at that picture and my first thought was - flies and mosquitoes in the house!!.  Screens were invented for a reason.


The SO and I have been looking around for a new place. We currently live in something like 900ft2. It was an amazing realization that the actual size wasn't the issue, it was the layout. When we look at places now, I immediately look for load-bearing walls. Ideally, I'd love something like the big glass walls that fold out and make a seamless integration to the outdoor living space, but that might be overkill. Kind of something like this:




I thought this a cool setup.
It doesn't need be left open when there's heavy bug population.
I often daydream of putting a garage door in our house so that I could totally open a whole wall.  But I am the outdoorsy type  - YMMV.
The modification I would do would be to add a flyscreen set of bifolds (or whatever they do for the fly screens) on top of the glass bifolds.  That way you can have bug free open doors, although where I am the flies die off in winter and don't come back until the wind brings them down when it gets warmer, so for parts of spring it tends to be pretty bug free and warm enough to have the doors open.
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.
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RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4010 on: August 30, 2014, 11:37:25 AM »
That setup looks lovely, and then the dog could go in and out at will.

Around here the fly/black fly/mosquito season is from early spring to late fall.  If it is warm enough to have the doors open, it is warm enough for flies.  Mostly to go outside it is - openthedoorgetoutsideclosethedoorbeforethefliesgetin. Coming in is faster, because they will follow you in.  Of course wet summers are worse than dry ones.

However, I do leave my sliding door and screen door open for a few minutes in the late evening when I put the dog out for the last time - it lets cool air (say 15C) in the house and the flies have gone to bed.

Given my climate, do not ask me why I live here.  ;-)

Yikes, I looked at that picture and my first thought was - flies and mosquitoes in the house!!.  Screens were invented for a reason.


The SO and I have been looking around for a new place. We currently live in something like 900ft2. It was an amazing realization that the actual size wasn't the issue, it was the layout. When we look at places now, I immediately look for load-bearing walls. Ideally, I'd love something like the big glass walls that fold out and make a seamless integration to the outdoor living space, but that might be overkill. Kind of something like this:




I thought this a cool setup.
It doesn't need be left open when there's heavy bug population.
I often daydream of putting a garage door in our house so that I could totally open a whole wall.  But I am the outdoorsy type  - YMMV.
The modification I would do would be to add a flyscreen set of bifolds (or whatever they do for the fly screens) on top of the glass bifolds.  That way you can have bug free open doors, although where I am the flies die off in winter and don't come back until the wind brings them down when it gets warmer, so for parts of spring it tends to be pretty bug free and warm enough to have the doors open.
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4011 on: August 30, 2014, 03:10:13 PM »
That setup looks lovely, and then the dog could go in and out at will.

Around here the fly/black fly/mosquito season is from early spring to late fall.  If it is warm enough to have the doors open, it is warm enough for flies.  Mostly to go outside it is - openthedoorgetoutsideclosethedoorbeforethefliesgetin. Coming in is faster, because they will follow you in.  Of course wet summers are worse than dry ones.

However, I do leave my sliding door and screen door open for a few minutes in the late evening when I put the dog out for the last time - it lets cool air (say 15C) in the house and the flies have gone to bed.

Given my climate, do not ask me why I live here.  ;-)

Yikes, I looked at that picture and my first thought was - flies and mosquitoes in the house!!.  Screens were invented for a reason.


The SO and I have been looking around for a new place. We currently live in something like 900ft2. It was an amazing realization that the actual size wasn't the issue, it was the layout. When we look at places now, I immediately look for load-bearing walls. Ideally, I'd love something like the big glass walls that fold out and make a seamless integration to the outdoor living space, but that might be overkill. Kind of something like this:




I thought this a cool setup.
It doesn't need be left open when there's heavy bug population.
I often daydream of putting a garage door in our house so that I could totally open a whole wall.  But I am the outdoorsy type  - YMMV.
The modification I would do would be to add a flyscreen set of bifolds (or whatever they do for the fly screens) on top of the glass bifolds.  That way you can have bug free open doors, although where I am the flies die off in winter and don't come back until the wind brings them down when it gets warmer, so for parts of spring it tends to be pretty bug free and warm enough to have the doors open.
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.
You live there because, even though it is freezing in winter and summer lasts one month, it's one of the most beautiful places on earth!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4012 on: August 30, 2014, 09:07:43 PM »
You are perfectly right, how did you know?

You live there because, even though it is freezing in winter and summer lasts one month, it's one of the most beautiful places on earth!
Given my climate, do not ask me why I live here.  ;-)








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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4013 on: August 30, 2014, 10:49:28 PM »
So they'll sit on the sidelines with their smartphones displaying their banking app, hitting refresh until the deposit arrives and the balance updates.  Then they can feed their families!
Seriously?
Once I knew what to watch for, I started seeing it at our Schofield Barracks commissary.

A few months ago I got stuck behind a drama queen whose debit card was turned down.  After ranting & raving at the data terminal (and the cashier, who stared her down and offered to bring over the manager), she looked up her bank balance (on her iPhone, of course) and realized she was in the hole. 

No worries-- right there at the register, using her iPhone, she transferred cash from her home equity line of credit to her checking account.  Her two-thumb proficiency makes me suspect that she's done it a few times.  Under 90 seconds from capitulation to recapitalization.  Good to go!
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Bigote

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4014 on: August 31, 2014, 12:36:39 AM »
Wow, mortgaging your home to buy groceries.   

agent_clone

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4015 on: August 31, 2014, 02:59:16 AM »
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.
Hmm, I haven't seen the "fly doors" I think your talking about.  I was thinking something like this: http://www.freedomscreens.com.au/
I was kind of meaning that the fresh air could come through the screen with the bifolds open.

Around here the fly/black fly/mosquito season is from early spring to late fall.  If it is warm enough to have the doors open, it is warm enough for flies.  Mostly to go outside it is - openthedoorgetoutsideclosethedoorbeforethefliesgetin. Coming in is faster, because they will follow you in.  Of course wet summers are worse than dry ones.

However, I do leave my sliding door and screen door open for a few minutes in the late evening when I put the dog out for the last time - it lets cool air (say 15C) in the house and the flies have gone to bed.
If you want to keep the bugs out and have the solid doors open if you don't have them already I would put a security door with a fly screen on to the hole with the front door e.g. http://northshorealuminium.com.au/pages/securitydoors.htm (Note there are more attractive doors than these).  And one for the sliding door e.g. http://www.spec-net.com.au/press/1210/gja_151210.htm .  I believe fly screens for sliding doors are fairly standard issue here, and the security doors are a high probability.  I could also be misreading this and the screen door be one with a fly screen door!

The bugs don't dissapear after dark here.  Moths in particular and I think flies tend to be attracted to the lights.  For a source of amusement the Bogong Moth invasion of 2013 at Parliament House http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-11-05/bogong-moths-invade-parliament-house-canberra-storify/5071360 .  Invasions are fairly regular apparently.  Also, Bogong Moths are edibile if you wish to eat them.  I can't remember if thats raw or cooked or both though.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4016 on: August 31, 2014, 06:03:21 AM »
Wow, mortgaging your home to buy groceries.
Yep...somewhere reds light should be flashing and a siren blaring!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4017 on: August 31, 2014, 08:25:08 AM »
So they'll sit on the sidelines with their smartphones displaying their banking app, hitting refresh until the deposit arrives and the balance updates.  Then they can feed their families!
Seriously?
Once I knew what to watch for, I started seeing it at our Schofield Barracks commissary.

A few months ago I got stuck behind a drama queen whose debit card was turned down.  After ranting & raving at the data terminal (and the cashier, who stared her down and offered to bring over the manager), she looked up her bank balance (on her iPhone, of course) and realized she was in the hole. 

No worries-- right there at the register, using her iPhone, she transferred cash from her home equity line of credit to her checking account.  Her two-thumb proficiency makes me suspect that she's done it a few times.  Under 90 seconds from capitulation to recapitalization.  Good to go!

I have a hard time shaking my head at this woman, though. I pity her - in the same way I would pity a drug user who just miraculously found her next hit.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4018 on: August 31, 2014, 09:34:02 AM »
You are perfectly right, how did you know?

You live there because, even though it is freezing in winter and summer lasts one month, it's one of the most beautiful places on earth!
Given my climate, do not ask me why I live here.  ;-)


I live in upstate NY and travel north more than I travel south on vacation!







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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4019 on: August 31, 2014, 11:48:10 AM »
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.
Hmm, I haven't seen the "fly doors" I think your talking about.  I was thinking something like this: http://www.freedomscreens.com.au/
I was kind of meaning that the fresh air could come through the screen with the bifolds open.

Around here the fly/black fly/mosquito season is from early spring to late fall.  If it is warm enough to have the doors open, it is warm enough for flies.  Mostly to go outside it is - openthedoorgetoutsideclosethedoorbeforethefliesgetin. Coming in is faster, because they will follow you in.  Of course wet summers are worse than dry ones.

However, I do leave my sliding door and screen door open for a few minutes in the late evening when I put the dog out for the last time - it lets cool air (say 15C) in the house and the flies have gone to bed.
If you want to keep the bugs out and have the solid doors open if you don't have them already I would put a security door with a fly screen on to the hole with the front door e.g. http://northshorealuminium.com.au/pages/securitydoors.htm (Note there are more attractive doors than these).  And one for the sliding door e.g. http://www.spec-net.com.au/press/1210/gja_151210.htm .  I believe fly screens for sliding doors are fairly standard issue here, and the security doors are a high probability.  I could also be misreading this and the screen door be one with a fly screen door!

The bugs don't dissapear after dark here.  Moths in particular and I think flies tend to be attracted to the lights.  For a source of amusement the Bogong Moth invasion of 2013 at Parliament House http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-11-05/bogong-moths-invade-parliament-house-canberra-storify/5071360 .  Invasions are fairly regular apparently.  Also, Bogong Moths are edibile if you wish to eat them.  I can't remember if thats raw or cooked or both though.
I haven't checked those links yet, but I got my terminology wrong. The thing I'm thinking about is called air curtains. And I don't have this yet. If o do it will be in the next house, but I'll have to convince the SO. She thinks they are all inefficient.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4020 on: August 31, 2014, 12:19:37 PM »
We are definitely getting OT here, but so what?  It's a long weekend, we are all relaxing enjoying our Wild Vines, and our biggest worry is insects in the house, right?

We have moths at night, but I don't mind a moth or two in the house.  Once it is full dark the mosquitoes are mostly gone.  We have yellow lights outside the doors, and they do not attract insects the way white ones do.  If the indoor lights are off, very few insects come in.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4021 on: August 31, 2014, 12:32:13 PM »
Not at work, but family (rather stick it here in the long list of awesome fails).

My SOs brother is planning a trip to FL for a soccer tournament for his son. His daughter wants to go. He tells her he she can't go cause there's no money to pay for her ticket. She says "but daddy, you're supposed to make it rain!" She's 8, and will be a super soccer mom consumer like her mom. Before this, the dad was complaining that he had to get a renal car in FL despite there being free transport to and from the tournament from the all inclusive because he goes "where my feet wants."

Some background on them. He's a mechanic, owes his parents about 50k, and his parents pay for insurance and everything. He lives in  a McMansion. His wife is on disability for no good reason (she had cancer and now doesn't want to work). They have 2 SUVs (escalades I think). They are underwater on their mortgage and are screwed financially. Beyond hair in fire emergency debt.

They can't make much more than my SO and I do together (50k after taxes), and they support this upper middle class existence that would only be possible on a lawyer's salary. Feels entirely alien to me.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4022 on: August 31, 2014, 07:31:06 PM »
His daughter wants to go. He tells her he she can't go cause there's no money to pay for her ticket. She says "but daddy, you're supposed to make it rain!" She's 8, and will be a super soccer mom consumer like her mom.

HAHAHAHAH

Super soccer mom, that's pretty hilarious.
Though, that was a pretty funny thing for her to say.. "make it
Rain."
I couldn't say if she's gotten the right upbriniging,
Probably, she'll be ok, but they should
Prepare for the worst, that all this 'make it rain' may
Enable her love of dollar bills, which would
Require her to have a career where she would see a lot of them.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4023 on: September 01, 2014, 05:52:59 AM »
His daughter wants to go. He tells her he she can't go cause there's no money to pay for her ticket. She says "but daddy, you're supposed to make it rain!" She's 8, and will be a super soccer mom consumer like her mom.

HAHAHAHAH

Super soccer mom, that's pretty hilarious.
Though, that was a pretty funny thing for her to say.. "make it
Rain."
I couldn't say if she's gotten the right upbriniging,
Probably, she'll be ok, but they should
Prepare for the worst, that all this 'make it rain' may
Enable her love of dollar bills, which would
Require her to have a career where she would see a lot of them.

It gets better. This 8 year old is a super antimustachian. After this conversation, the family and my SO and her mother went to walmart. On the way, this 8 year old hits up her grandmother for $10 to buy something. Father says "who is asking for $10?" When he realizes it's the 8 year old, he starts to tell her how bad of an idea that is when his wife tell him to be quiet. It's ok to ask for money.

Full disclosure, this antimustachian asks for money almost every time she comes over. Her grandma is like a credit card she'll never pay back...

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4024 on: September 01, 2014, 07:29:22 AM »
You are perfectly right, how did you know?

You live there because, even though it is freezing in winter and summer lasts one month, it's one of the most beautiful places on earth!
Given my climate, do not ask me why I live here.  ;-)


I live in upstate NY and travel north more than I travel south on vacation!







Long as we are all cool going OT, an option might be to screen in the patio like they do all over Florida.  Not sure if there would be weather/HOA restrictions.  if you have not seen them google "florida screened in patio" basically a big aluminum frame over the patio with screens in place of walls and windows.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4025 on: September 01, 2014, 07:41:13 AM »
I've always wondered about the "fly doors" that I see in restaurants or bars. It's a fan that sits above the for and the flies won't go inside through the wind. Haven't looked into it too much, because gf isn't sold on the idea, plus, with my dogs and chickens, the Muscovy ducks keep flies to a minimum.
Hmm, I haven't seen the "fly doors" I think your talking about.  I was thinking something like this: http://www.freedomscreens.com.au/
I was kind of meaning that the fresh air could come through the screen with the bifolds open.

Around here the fly/black fly/mosquito season is from early spring to late fall.  If it is warm enough to have the doors open, it is warm enough for flies.  Mostly to go outside it is - openthedoorgetoutsideclosethedoorbeforethefliesgetin. Coming in is faster, because they will follow you in.  Of course wet summers are worse than dry ones.

However, I do leave my sliding door and screen door open for a few minutes in the late evening when I put the dog out for the last time - it lets cool air (say 15C) in the house and the flies have gone to bed.
If you want to keep the bugs out and have the solid doors open if you don't have them already I would put a security door with a fly screen on to the hole with the front door e.g. http://northshorealuminium.com.au/pages/securitydoors.htm (Note there are more attractive doors than these).  And one for the sliding door e.g. http://www.spec-net.com.au/press/1210/gja_151210.htm .  I believe fly screens for sliding doors are fairly standard issue here, and the security doors are a high probability.  I could also be misreading this and the screen door be one with a fly screen door!

The bugs don't dissapear after dark here.  Moths in particular and I think flies tend to be attracted to the lights.  For a source of amusement the Bogong Moth invasion of 2013 at Parliament House http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-11-05/bogong-moths-invade-parliament-house-canberra-storify/5071360 .  Invasions are fairly regular apparently.  Also, Bogong Moths are edibile if you wish to eat them.  I can't remember if thats raw or cooked or both though.
I haven't checked those links yet, but I got my terminology wrong. The thing I'm thinking about is called air curtains. And I don't have this yet. If o do it will be in the next house, but I'll have to convince the SO. She thinks they are all inefficient.

i tell ya what, a month in the jungle in costa rica and i am ready to sing the praises of fans to whoever will listen, to keep bugs away. it is the only thing that will do it. the house we rented in CR was largely open-air, but it had great overhead fans, and we kept them on all the time. we could see clouds of mosquitos hovering just beyond the reach of the fan, but they couldn't come in to get us. it was rad. my next home will have some sort of covered outside with overhead fans area, because it is the best thing to be able to sit outside in all kinds of weather, bug free, and just be in nature. it does drown out the sounds of the forest/jungle/whatever but to me it's worth it.
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lifeinhd

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4026 on: September 01, 2014, 12:32:39 PM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4027 on: September 01, 2014, 02:46:18 PM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.
I'll defend the woman on this one since she can't really control it. 30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute so I can understand why she would not be able to do it. Also since the husband already had the house perhaps financially getting a house in DC, which is very expensive is not a feasible option. I don't know housing costs in Woodbridge, VA but I imagine it is cheaper than right in DC.

johnny847

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4028 on: September 01, 2014, 02:55:26 PM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4029 on: September 02, 2014, 02:07:25 AM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4030 on: September 02, 2014, 04:49:55 AM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

Without there numbers we really cant say, they could be 100k under water or just blind to the true cost of commuting, or his elderly mother lives next door, no way to say.  Had a friend that almost liked her long commute, it was the only alone time she got - not that this made any sense but that was where her head was.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4031 on: September 02, 2014, 04:55:20 AM »

I've been known in the past to make risotto or pasta dishes for the sole purpose of being able to bake the leftovers with grated cheese on top the next day. YUM YUM YUM

This is why the 3rd time tastes even better, and so on.  Keep adding cheese and baking.  By the time you get to 10th leftovers, it's 99.9% baked cheese.


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4032 on: September 02, 2014, 05:13:48 AM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

Without there numbers we really cant say, they could be 100k under water or just blind to the true cost of commuting, or his elderly mother lives next door, no way to say.  Had a friend that almost liked her long commute, it was the only alone time she got - not that this made any sense but that was where her head was.

I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

Notice how I said if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year. I don't know what their actual numbers are, but they could save thousands a year if even one of them found an alternative way to get to work. And this wouldn't require moving closer to work.
I find it somewhat to believe (though I understand it's still possible) that an alternative method of getting to work does not exist for both of them. Can they carpool together to work? Can one of them take the train? Can one of them take the bus to the Metro? Or drive to the Metro station? Or carpool with coworkers from work? Or drive say halfway, and then bike the rest?
Though if one of them actually likes the long commute, I wouldn't quite comprehend that but I would probably drop the argument.

mattchuck2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4033 on: September 02, 2014, 05:37:34 AM »
Quote from: Kriegsspiel
Super soccer mom, that's pretty hilarious.
Though, that was a pretty funny thing for her to say.. "make it
Rain."
I couldn't say if she's gotten the right upbriniging,
Probably, she'll be ok, but they should
Prepare for the worst, that all this 'make it rain' may
Enable her love of dollar bills, which would
Require her to have a career where she would see a lot of them.

Don't know if anyone else caught that, but I did. Well played.

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4034 on: September 02, 2014, 09:57:07 AM »
My colleague told me of her friend who buys stuff from web stores and doesn't bother to return the wrong size ones "Because it's too much trouble". Apparently she has quite a big storage of unused shoes and clothes...
Sounds like a good opportunity- especially if they still have tags & such, offer to buy them for pennies on the dollar and resell them. ;)

Exactly what I was thinking... What area of the US are you? I would love to buy it all! :)
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4035 on: September 02, 2014, 10:52:15 AM »
My mom (who is not a mustachian!) tells the thirty-five year old story with horror in her voice like it was yesterday: she put out cheese, crackers, and grapes for a visiting Relative, and at the end of the hour, Relative helped carry things into the kitchen - and slid the entire tray into the garbage because it had "been out." Mom dove into the garbage and rinsed off the grapes, and every year at Thanksgiving would loudly announce that relative didn't need to help clean up because day-after turkey-stuffing-cranberry sandwiches are the best thing ever and if she threw the leftovers in the trash there would be blood. They laughed about it every year and neither swayed the other - Relative was a good sport about the joke but thought we were crazy for eating food a second time.

Thanksgiving is a fantastic meal the day of, but there is nothing like it the next day. My family is HUGE on Christmas, and the Friday after Thanksgiving is the day we set up Christmas decorations and everything, and lunch/dinner (it's always a meal at around 3) is always leftovers from Thanksgiving. I swear everything tastes better the next day. A friend of mine's mother actually puts everything (turkey, gravy, stuffing, cranberry sauce, etc) into a blender and makes "cold Thanksgiving stew." Not my cup of tea, but my friend loves it. I think it's all about what you grew up with and how excited your family made you about leftovers.

As for non-holiday leftovers, I cook usually once, maybe twice a week for myself. When I get home from work I'm tired and cranky and I usually don't want to cook. So I make a big batch of something on Sunday and eat that through Wednesday. Thurs-Sat I'm usually with my boyfriend and we alternate between cooking or splitting going out. I'm slowly trying to steer him towards cooking more often :)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4036 on: September 02, 2014, 11:04:50 AM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.
I'll defend the woman on this one since she can't really control it. 30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute so I can understand why she would not be able to do it. Also since the husband already had the house perhaps financially getting a house in DC, which is very expensive is not a feasible option. I don't know housing costs in Woodbridge, VA but I imagine it is cheaper than right in DC.

And, do they have kids? DC schools are generally awful . VA ones might be better so they save thousands on private school, for many, many years. And you're probably paying more in DC for a cramped townhouse than a single family in VA.

I agree it's stupid that they can't carpool though.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4037 on: September 02, 2014, 11:09:08 AM »
My mom (who is not a mustachian!) tells the thirty-five year old story with horror in her voice like it was yesterday: she put out cheese, crackers, and grapes for a visiting Relative, and at the end of the hour, Relative helped carry things into the kitchen - and slid the entire tray into the garbage because it had "been out." Mom dove into the garbage and rinsed off the grapes, and every year at Thanksgiving would loudly announce that relative didn't need to help clean up because day-after turkey-stuffing-cranberry sandwiches are the best thing ever and if she threw the leftovers in the trash there would be blood. They laughed about it every year and neither swayed the other - Relative was a good sport about the joke but thought we were crazy for eating food a second time.

Thanksgiving is a fantastic meal the day of, but there is nothing like it the next day. My family is HUGE on Christmas, and the Friday after Thanksgiving is the day we set up Christmas decorations and everything, and lunch/dinner (it's always a meal at around 3) is always leftovers from Thanksgiving. I swear everything tastes better the next day. A friend of mine's mother actually puts everything (turkey, gravy, stuffing, cranberry sauce, etc) into a blender and makes "cold Thanksgiving stew." Not my cup of tea, but my friend loves it. I think it's all about what you grew up with and how excited your family made you about leftovers.

As for non-holiday leftovers, I cook usually once, maybe twice a week for myself. When I get home from work I'm tired and cranky and I usually don't want to cook. So I make a big batch of something on Sunday and eat that through Wednesday. Thurs-Sat I'm usually with my boyfriend and we alternate between cooking or splitting going out. I'm slowly trying to steer him towards cooking more often :)
What did that relative think of grapes from the grocery store? Those sit out all the time too!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4038 on: September 02, 2014, 11:36:50 AM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

Without there numbers we really cant say, they could be 100k under water or just blind to the true cost of commuting, or his elderly mother lives next door, no way to say.  Had a friend that almost liked her long commute, it was the only alone time she got - not that this made any sense but that was where her head was.

I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.

I mean I can understand the inertia aspect - it's hard to uplift your family, particularly if they have kids, to move closer to work. when you already own your home. But the financial cost each of them commuting 60 miles round trip is nuts! If we believe the IRS reimbursal rate of .56 cents per mile reflects the average cost per mile of the average car on the road, then they're paying $16800 a year for their commute, and she's paying $3500 a year for parking. That's $20,300 a year!!! After tax!!
**head explodes**

Of course, they could have fuel efficient cars that make these numbers better. But I'm not sure how much of that .56 cents per mile is gasoline costs.

Man, if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year.
I have no idea how much housing costs in DC, but say closer to work it costs 800k in one location, but 600k in the other location.  It would still take around 10 years to break even (I am ignoring interest rates, taxes etc and just dividing 200k by 20k).

Notice how I said if they could just drive in one car together, they could save $8400 a year. I don't know what their actual numbers are, but they could save thousands a year if even one of them found an alternative way to get to work. And this wouldn't require moving closer to work.
I find it somewhat (EDIT: forgot the word difficult) to believe (though I understand it's still possible) that an alternative method of getting to work does not exist for both of them. Can they carpool together to work? Can one of them take the train? Can one of them take the bus to the Metro? Or drive to the Metro station? Or carpool with coworkers from work? Or drive say halfway, and then bike the rest?
Though if one of them actually likes the long commute, I wouldn't quite comprehend that but I would probably drop the argument.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4039 on: September 02, 2014, 12:14:55 PM »
My mom (who is not a mustachian!) tells the thirty-five year old story with horror in her voice like it was yesterday: she put out cheese, crackers, and grapes for a visiting Relative, and at the end of the hour, Relative helped carry things into the kitchen - and slid the entire tray into the garbage because it had "been out." Mom dove into the garbage and rinsed off the grapes, and every year at Thanksgiving would loudly announce that relative didn't need to help clean up because day-after turkey-stuffing-cranberry sandwiches are the best thing ever and if she threw the leftovers in the trash there would be blood. They laughed about it every year and neither swayed the other - Relative was a good sport about the joke but thought we were crazy for eating food a second time.

Thanksgiving is a fantastic meal the day of, but there is nothing like it the next day. My family is HUGE on Christmas, and the Friday after Thanksgiving is the day we set up Christmas decorations and everything, and lunch/dinner (it's always a meal at around 3) is always leftovers from Thanksgiving. I swear everything tastes better the next day. A friend of mine's mother actually puts everything (turkey, gravy, stuffing, cranberry sauce, etc) into a blender and makes "cold Thanksgiving stew." Not my cup of tea, but my friend loves it. I think it's all about what you grew up with and how excited your family made you about leftovers.

Wow, that original story is unbelievably bizarre!! I'm pretty sure leftover Thanksgiving turkey with mayo on good sliced bread is one of the best foods of all time.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4040 on: September 02, 2014, 12:34:56 PM »
Not at work, but family (rather stick it here in the long list of awesome fails).

My SOs brother is planning a trip to FL for a soccer tournament for his son. His daughter wants to go. He tells her he she can't go cause there's no money to pay for her ticket. She says "but daddy, you're supposed to make it rain!" She's 8, and will be a super soccer mom consumer like her mom. Before this, the dad was complaining that he had to get a renal car in FL despite there being free transport to and from the tournament from the all inclusive because he goes "where my feet wants."

Some background on them. He's a mechanic, owes his parents about 50k, and his parents pay for insurance and everything. He lives in  a McMansion. His wife is on disability for no good reason (she had cancer and now doesn't want to work). They have 2 SUVs (escalades I think). They are underwater on their mortgage and are screwed financially. Beyond hair in fire emergency debt.

They can't make much more than my SO and I do together (50k after taxes), and they support this upper middle class existence that would only be possible on a lawyer's salary. Feels entirely alien to me.

I think this is made funnier by the fact that FL is a state where it's quite cheap to rent a car. BF and I rented one in Tampa for about $16/day about a year ago. Apparently it's closer to $17/day now. Of course if you *need* a luxury SUV, that's probably like $100/day after gas. :P  Anyhow, it's nothing compared to $50+/day before fees that we experienced on different trip, to DC :(

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4041 on: September 02, 2014, 04:25:20 PM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.
I'll defend the woman on this one since she can't really control it. 30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute so I can understand why she would not be able to do it. Also since the husband already had the house perhaps financially getting a house in DC, which is very expensive is not a feasible option. I don't know housing costs in Woodbridge, VA but I imagine it is cheaper than right in DC.

And, do they have kids? DC schools are generally awful . VA ones might be better so they save thousands on private school, for many, many years. And you're probably paying more in DC for a cramped townhouse than a single family in VA.

I agree it's stupid that they can't carpool though.

Nope, no kids. Just her and her husband and a couple dogs. Of course they'll pay more for a cramped townhouse in DC-- but as another poster pointed out they'd be saving $20k/year in commuting costs alone. After just 5 years they could break even on an extra $100k of house. Even if they just moved to southern MD and took the train they'd be so much better off.

Quote
30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute

I wasn't suggesting she bike commute 30 miles; rather that 30 miles of commute in any form is ridiculous!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4042 on: September 02, 2014, 04:34:48 PM »
I live in NoVA, but up until last Friday I worked in DC. I'm starting my new job Wednesday, which will be 13 miles from my house, a fairly reasonable biking distance. I'm eating my last ever lunch at this company, sitting around with coworkers chatting. I mention I'm looking forward to this new job since I'll be able to bike to work, and immediately everyone starts ranting about how much they hate cyclists. Then one woman says "I can't bike to work, I live too far away." I ask where she lives, and she says "Woodbridge." She apparently drives every day from Woodbridge, VA to DC, about 30 miles, then pays for parking in a $14/day lot. Someone asks her "but you live there because your husband works around there, right?" and she says "no, he works at the Navy Yard." The Navy Yard is also in DC, and they both commute separately 30 miles each way every day. She said it takes her an hour on a good day. I asked why doesn't she just move closer, and she said "we can't afford housing any closer, and besides, my husband already had the house, so it's just easier." I badly wanted to deliver a facepunch but lucky for her she was on the other side of the table and I couldn't reach.
I'll defend the woman on this one since she can't really control it. 30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute so I can understand why she would not be able to do it. Also since the husband already had the house perhaps financially getting a house in DC, which is very expensive is not a feasible option. I don't know housing costs in Woodbridge, VA but I imagine it is cheaper than right in DC.

And, do they have kids? DC schools are generally awful . VA ones might be better so they save thousands on private school, for many, many years. And you're probably paying more in DC for a cramped townhouse than a single family in VA.

I agree it's stupid that they can't carpool though.

Nope, no kids. Just her and her husband and a couple dogs. Of course they'll pay more for a cramped townhouse in DC-- but as another poster pointed out they'd be saving $20k/year in commuting costs alone. After just 5 years they could break even on an extra $100k of house. Even if they just moved to southern MD and took the train they'd be so much better off.

Quote
30 miles each way is a heck of a bike commute

I wasn't suggesting she bike commute 30 miles; rather that 30 miles of commute in any form is ridiculous!
I did look up where they live, and holyshit that is far! Even moving a bit closer sounds like a good idea. DC Metro is pretty good.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4043 on: September 02, 2014, 04:37:57 PM »
I knew a guy at work who commuted from Los Banos to San Jose everyday.

That's 85 miles and 2 hours each way.  I just didn't get it.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4044 on: September 02, 2014, 05:12:44 PM »
The DC Metro Area is famous for how far people commute.  I have worked with people whom drive in from West Virginia, Richmond and Annapolis.  It is crazy.

DC has much higher property tax than Virginia (or at least Fairfax County).  A similar priced home in hundreds of dollars more a month in DC just because of the escrow.  There is a very very busy bike path that goes from the Franconia/Alexandria area of VA into DC.  There are many places in VA where a 15 mile bike commute can be done pretty easily at a leisurely pace on mostly bike paths.

Its two people and two dogs.  1,000 Sq/ft is luxury and you can easily afford to live close enough to bike at that point.  The area around the Huntington Metro that isn't part of Belle Haven Country Club comes to mind.  Lots of smaller older 2/3 bedroom places.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4045 on: September 02, 2014, 05:37:50 PM »
My dad used to commute to DC from our Annapolis suburb in the early eighties.  But... he carpooled with 3 other people. They all took turns and they became great friends.  One of his carpool buddies was Dorothea.  She was a lawyer.  She was one of 2 women in her graduating class from law school in the early forties.  She became a family fixture and had a profound effect on me and my siblings growing up.  Her favorite phrase was, "Don't give me that shit!"  I loved her. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4046 on: September 02, 2014, 05:45:24 PM »


There is a very very busy bike path
And that, my friends, is what it's all about.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4047 on: September 02, 2014, 05:56:25 PM »
I knew a guy at work who commuted from Los Banos to San Jose everyday.

That's 85 miles and 2 hours each way.  I just didn't get it.

A decent 3-bedroom house can be had for under 150k. A similar house in or near SJ costs, what, 700k? A cool million?

So he essentially picked up a part time job of commuting. In return, his house is 5x cheaper. The ~600k difference or so in price may well be worth the commute. According to fed rates of 56 cents a mile, that's about $25k a year plus sanity... you do the math, ~600k vs ~25k a year.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4048 on: September 02, 2014, 06:31:03 PM »
I knew a guy at work who commuted from Los Banos to San Jose everyday.

That's 85 miles and 2 hours each way.  I just didn't get it.

A decent 3-bedroom house can be had for under 150k. A similar house in or near SJ costs, what, 700k? A cool million?

So he essentially picked up a part time job of commuting. In return, his house is 5x cheaper. The ~600k difference or so in price may well be worth the commute. According to fed rates of 56 cents a mile, that's about $25k a year plus sanity... you do the math, ~600k vs ~25k a year.

But he has to sit in the car 4 hours a day.  I just couldn't do it.  Gilroy maybe - but no - I couldn't handle that either. 

I will grant you that the cost of housing in San Joser is crazy expensive.  I just think I'd cycle through other alternatives such as renting out a room in our house or downsizing in a major way to commuting 170 miles in a car everyday.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #4049 on: September 02, 2014, 06:39:37 PM »
I knew a guy at work who commuted from Los Banos to San Jose everyday.

That's 85 miles and 2 hours each way.  I just didn't get it.

A decent 3-bedroom house can be had for under 150k. A similar house in or near SJ costs, what, 700k? A cool million?

So he essentially picked up a part time job of commuting. In return, his house is 5x cheaper. The ~600k difference or so in price may well be worth the commute. According to fed rates of 56 cents a mile, that's about $25k a year plus sanity... you do the math, ~600k vs ~25k a year.

Assuming $600k more mortgage at 4% works out to $24k extra in interest for a year. So the commuting costs $1k more per year plus 1,000 hours spent in a car per year... I'll take the expensive, closer house, thank you.