Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8586961 times)

Dezrah

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3900 on: August 27, 2014, 12:55:51 PM »
At a meeting yesterday with seven middle-aged women (myself included) and one young dude. One of these BIOTCHES starts blasting him about an old scooter his grandpa gave him. He's been driving it to work with a milk crate attached to the back. I'm thinking this guy is alright (he also bikes everywhere).

Another snide Biotch says, "Scooters are for teenagers and old people." Table erupts with laughter.

Guy shrugs sheepishly - playing the good sport.  These women are just laying into the poor dude razzing him terribly.

Finally, I couldn't take it anymore and say, "Well, I guess he's got the last laugh considering he's got no car payment and probably saves $300 a month on gasoline."

That shut the table up pretty quickly. BIOTCHES.

P.S. Last spring we changed 403b providers at work and there were initially problems with the new company posting contributions in a timely manner.  Same group of us were around the table when I asked in general if anyone else was having the problem I was having w/contributions posting to their accounts. Everybody looked at me blankly because NONE OF THEM contribute to the 403b and therefore had no idea what I was talking about EXCEPT Scooter Dude. He also contributes and knew about the technical glitch. Ha!

I love this story, but my favorite part is that you, a 40-year-old self-proclaimed middle-aged woman, goes by the name FartFace and calls people BIOTCHES and Scooter Dude.  Cracks me up.

ScienceRules

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3901 on: August 27, 2014, 01:36:35 PM »
I finally have one, sadly.

One of my good friends at work, who knows about MMM and all that I do to try and save was commenting on how he has no money so he started cooking dinner instead of eating out every night. He also eats out every lunch, just bought a car (we make <$20K a year and he lives 3 miles from work), went on a last minute vacation (book 3 days ahead of time), and is going on a month long vacation in a few weeks. I know he knows what I do to save money because we talk about it all the time, but it's sad because I don't think he will be implementing any of it soon. Even cooking dinner, he commented that he can't wait for a few more paychecks because he is sick of cooking (it's been less than 2 weeks of cooking and for 5 days of that he was on his last minute trip).

wild wendella

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3902 on: August 27, 2014, 02:24:58 PM »
This thread is always so entertaining. I finally have some stories to add.

I've been occasionally biking to work, and I got into a conversation with a guy who lives less than a mile away, possibly half a mile.  He doesn't own a bike.  Claims he wouldn't have anywhere to keep it.  He doesn't even consider walking to work, because he might get sweaty.  Also, for the occasional night he works late, he feels safer driving his car.  It's just more convenient.

Yesterday I had a long car conversation with some chaps at work.  One of them, a large Russian guy, previously had a Honda Ridgeline and just upgraded to a Dodge Ram.  He commutes 35 miles each way.  Part of his rationale was, he's frustrated that he pays so much in property taxes that he doesn't benefit from because he has no school-aged children, so he might as well get *some* personal use out of his remaining money. (In other words, he deserves to drive the vehicle he wants).  Also, he always leases.  Asked me 'why would you want to buy, it makes no sense?'  He said he couldn't imagine keeping the same car for more than a few years.  I asked him if he felt the same way about women. 

Today a friend at work wanted to talk about retirement planning over lunch.  He offered to buy my lunch.  I said, 'that's ok, I brought mine'.  So I just brought my salad/yogurt down to the cafeteria and met him.  He spent $7.77 on lunch (which isn't really that bad).  Afterwards he stopped off for a $2.50-ish Honest Tea. I told him he could make tea for free - we have free tea bags in the pantry, and free hot water.  He can make hot tea and let it cool.  We also have free cups and ice which he can use to make the tea cold.  He wasn't buying it.  this last guy is actually in good shape financially, but it's interesting to realize the little needless things you waste money on. 
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 02:26:43 PM by wild wendella »

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3903 on: August 27, 2014, 04:26:51 PM »
Someone should invite scooter dude to MMM. :-p

and recommend his screen name be "scooter dude".

solon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3904 on: August 27, 2014, 04:45:56 PM »
Someone should invite scooter dude to MMM. :-p

fartface, that's you! Don't come back here without ScooterDude!

The Hamster

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3905 on: August 27, 2014, 06:04:27 PM »
The newly remarried mom was complaining that "these banks just expect you to have money lying around for a down payment!"  They spoke some more and I tuned out, then heard the single mom say "No one in this day and age should hold it against someone for having credit card debt; we all do!"

I love it when someone talks about "who has money lying around." As if people with savings just have piles of cash on the floor, where we stumble over them and exclaim, "Oh! I could make a down payment with this!" It makes me want to drape some dollar bills on the couch, on the bed, in the recliner, on a cushion, etc., so I can have money actually lying around (instead of working its butt off earning interest and dividends).


I've never mentally pictured "money lying around."  Now I will think of


Oh hahaha this is exactly what I thought of when I read that post.  Scrooge McDuck was my childhood comic book hero.  I loved the thought of swimming in his olympic sized moneypool until....

Elderwood17

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3906 on: August 27, 2014, 08:15:48 PM »
Someone should invite scooter dude to MMM. :-p

fartface, that's you! Don't come back here without ScooterDude!
Fartface and scooterdude......sounds like the dynamic duo of MMM!

agent_clone

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3907 on: August 28, 2014, 02:52:51 AM »
I finally have one, sadly.

One of my good friends at work, who knows about MMM and all that I do to try and save was commenting on how he has no money so he started cooking dinner instead of eating out every night. He also eats out every lunch, just bought a car (we make <$20K a year and he lives 3 miles from work), went on a last minute vacation (book 3 days ahead of time), and is going on a month long vacation in a few weeks. I know he knows what I do to save money because we talk about it all the time, but it's sad because I don't think he will be implementing any of it soon. Even cooking dinner, he commented that he can't wait for a few more paychecks because he is sick of cooking (it's been less than 2 weeks of cooking and for 5 days of that he was on his last minute trip).
I can understand being sick of cooking, especially if doing it every day.  Tell him if he's sick of it, to cook batches, freeze the leftovers then take them out when he doesn't feel like cooking.  If he wants variety then cook a few different things and pick what he wants depending on his mood.

Nubs

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3908 on: August 28, 2014, 08:42:19 AM »
Finally have one:

There are some roofers working on our building at the moment.  I hear portions of their conversations. 

"You can't have good credit unless you are in debt" 

I thought, well that's odd.  I have pretty damn good credit and I've never been in debt.

It amazes me that in a world where a few simple well worded google searches can answer almost any question with facts, simple misunderstandings like this continue to persist (and be perpetuated by those with the confidence to blurt them out).

ScienceRules

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3909 on: August 28, 2014, 09:02:19 AM »
I finally have one, sadly.

One of my good friends at work, who knows about MMM and all that I do to try and save was commenting on how he has no money so he started cooking dinner instead of eating out every night. He also eats out every lunch, just bought a car (we make <$20K a year and he lives 3 miles from work), went on a last minute vacation (book 3 days ahead of time), and is going on a month long vacation in a few weeks. I know he knows what I do to save money because we talk about it all the time, but it's sad because I don't think he will be implementing any of it soon. Even cooking dinner, he commented that he can't wait for a few more paychecks because he is sick of cooking (it's been less than 2 weeks of cooking and for 5 days of that he was on his last minute trip).
I can understand being sick of cooking, especially if doing it every day.  Tell him if he's sick of it, to cook batches, freeze the leftovers then take them out when he doesn't feel like cooking.  If he wants variety then cook a few different things and pick what he wants depending on his mood.

So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

J'onn J'onzz

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3910 on: August 28, 2014, 09:29:11 AM »
I finally have one, sadly.

One of my good friends at work, who knows about MMM and all that I do to try and save was commenting on how he has no money so he started cooking dinner instead of eating out every night. He also eats out every lunch, just bought a car (we make <$20K a year and he lives 3 miles from work), went on a last minute vacation (book 3 days ahead of time), and is going on a month long vacation in a few weeks. I know he knows what I do to save money because we talk about it all the time, but it's sad because I don't think he will be implementing any of it soon. Even cooking dinner, he commented that he can't wait for a few more paychecks because he is sick of cooking (it's been less than 2 weeks of cooking and for 5 days of that he was on his last minute trip).
I can understand being sick of cooking, especially if doing it every day.  Tell him if he's sick of it, to cook batches, freeze the leftovers then take them out when he doesn't feel like cooking.  If he wants variety then cook a few different things and pick what he wants depending on his mood.

So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3911 on: August 28, 2014, 09:51:10 AM »
I finally have one, sadly.

One of my good friends at work, who knows about MMM and all that I do to try and save was commenting on how he has no money so he started cooking dinner instead of eating out every night. He also eats out every lunch, just bought a car (we make <$20K a year and he lives 3 miles from work), went on a last minute vacation (book 3 days ahead of time), and is going on a month long vacation in a few weeks. I know he knows what I do to save money because we talk about it all the time, but it's sad because I don't think he will be implementing any of it soon. Even cooking dinner, he commented that he can't wait for a few more paychecks because he is sick of cooking (it's been less than 2 weeks of cooking and for 5 days of that he was on his last minute trip).
I can understand being sick of cooking, especially if doing it every day.  Tell him if he's sick of it, to cook batches, freeze the leftovers then take them out when he doesn't feel like cooking.  If he wants variety then cook a few different things and pick what he wants depending on his mood.

So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

Ybserp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3912 on: August 28, 2014, 09:59:28 AM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

notquitefrugal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3913 on: August 28, 2014, 10:07:59 AM »
I agree. I actually think chili, pasta salad, and a lot of other things taste better the second day!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3914 on: August 28, 2014, 10:18:51 AM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

Right, if leftovers means "substantially prepared a previous day and reheated" then frozen food and most fast food and some fast casual food is "leftovers".  Like, they never eat a hot pocket or frozen burrito?  Good for them, if so.

But I think they just get turned off by the terminology.  I can't stand the thought of " brown bagging it" but I don't ins brining own lunch.  Just not in one of those brown bags ... Yuck

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3915 on: August 28, 2014, 10:53:14 AM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

No those people are just idiots.  I have known people that have an aversion to left overs.  They don't apply any type of logic or food safety arguments to their aversion.  It's more like "you prepared that food for dinner yesterday? THEN IT'S OLD! I need (and deserve) fresh food, prepared today, specifically for the meal i'm going to eat!"  They can't be reasoned with.

DeepEllumStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3916 on: August 28, 2014, 10:57:33 AM »
Someone should invite scooter dude to MMM. :-p

and recommend his screen name be "scooter dude".

Yes please!

TrulyStashin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3917 on: August 28, 2014, 11:18:07 AM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Basenji

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3918 on: August 28, 2014, 11:26:22 AM »
Someone should invite scooter dude to MMM. :-p

fartface, that's you! Don't come back here without ScooterDude!
This is gorgeous. Like Shakespeare!
« Last Edit: August 28, 2014, 11:29:29 AM by Basenji »

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3919 on: August 28, 2014, 11:31:03 AM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Yeah, I don't think social security pays out $950K annually. I haven't checked in a while though, maybe with inflation? : )

I think this is just people who think they need $10M+ to retire. For any of us, that's too much, and we would've saved it by now anyway. But for most, this has been beat into people's brains all their lives. I don't get it.

Timmmy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3920 on: August 28, 2014, 11:52:35 AM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Ignoring taxes and using rough numbers...  So if they save about 15% or 150k per year and spend 800K.  Which normal people would see as being very responsible.  They'd need about 20M in the bank for a 4%SWR.  Takes a long time to get there saving 150k/yr.

Even if they spent a mere 40% or so. They'd save about 550k/yr but they'd need 10M for a 4%SWR if the wanted to maintain current lifestyle in retirement.  That still will take a while. 

If they spent 100k per year and saved the rest they could retire in less than 4 years. 

fallstoclimb

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3921 on: August 28, 2014, 11:59:53 AM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

No those people are just idiots.  I have known people that have an aversion to left overs.  They don't apply any type of logic or food safety arguments to their aversion.  It's more like "you prepared that food for dinner yesterday? THEN IT'S OLD! I need (and deserve) fresh food, prepared today, specifically for the meal i'm going to eat!"  They can't be reasoned with.

Is this really a real thing?  I've never been confused so much in my life.  Like...what about apples?  Apples are (probably) trucked across the country and sit in the store a few days and then normal people eat them over the course of a week.  Do they not eat that because its old?  How is say, a day-old salad any different?  Who ARE these people?

I hate wasting food so I am absolutely horrified by this.

deedeezee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3922 on: August 28, 2014, 12:24:56 PM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

No those people are just idiots.  I have known people that have an aversion to left overs.  They don't apply any type of logic or food safety arguments to their aversion.  It's more like "you prepared that food for dinner yesterday? THEN IT'S OLD! I need (and deserve) fresh food, prepared today, specifically for the meal i'm going to eat!"  They can't be reasoned with.

Is this really a real thing?  I've never been confused so much in my life.  Like...what about apples?  Apples are (probably) trucked across the country and sit in the store a few days and then normal people eat them over the course of a week.  Do they not eat that because its old?  How is say, a day-old salad any different?  Who ARE these people?

I hate wasting food so I am absolutely horrified by this.

It is most definitely a real thing.  I know several people who have an aversion to having the same meal more than once per week.  I have a relative (by marriage, not sure why I feel the need to distance myself...) who will eat a meal one time.  Meaning, if you make chicken soup, he will eat it the day you make it.  If you made a pot, and there are still 8 bowls left the next day, he would literally throw it out before he ate it for another meal.

Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face. 

shotgunwilly

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3923 on: August 28, 2014, 12:27:54 PM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

deedeezee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3924 on: August 28, 2014, 12:32:35 PM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Pasta sauce is better the second day.  Leftover pasta?  I prefer it on the day I make it.  If there is enough sauce for day three, I will either freeze or use it in a casserole or eggplant parmesan.

vivophoenix

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3925 on: August 28, 2014, 12:40:12 PM »
So I have suggested batch cooking in the past (when money was tight so he cooked dinner), but he says he won't eat leftovers. That is also his excuse for continuing to buy lunch everyday. I don't get. I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

I have been told that by numerous people I have known, I just don't it.

I didn't used to eat vegetables. Until after college. But hey, I eat them now. People learn.

When people say they refuse to eat leftovers, I wonder if they never learned how to store food or how to reuse food as an ingredient. Chili stored properly in the fridge overnight and then put in a tortilla shell with some cheese makes a good burrito. Or a bunch of those burritos lined up in a casserole dish and covered in salsa and cheese makes an excellent entirely new meal. But if the "won't eat leftovers" person just leaves the day old chili in the pot and tries to eat it as is for breakfast or even worse doesn't think to at least put the pot in the fridge... Well I can see how leftovers can quickly become disgusting for a person lacking in basic kitchen skills.

No those people are just idiots.  I have known people that have an aversion to left overs.  They don't apply any type of logic or food safety arguments to their aversion.  It's more like "you prepared that food for dinner yesterday? THEN IT'S OLD! I need (and deserve) fresh food, prepared today, specifically for the meal i'm going to eat!"  They can't be reasoned with.

Is this really a real thing?  I've never been confused so much in my life.  Like...what about apples?  Apples are (probably) trucked across the country and sit in the store a few days and then normal people eat them over the course of a week.  Do they not eat that because its old?  How is say, a day-old salad any different?  Who ARE these people?

I hate wasting food so I am absolutely horrified by this.

It is most definitely a real thing.  I know several people who have an aversion to having the same meal more than once per week.  I have a relative (by marriage, not sure why I feel the need to distance myself...) who will eat a meal one time.  Meaning, if you make chicken soup, he will eat it the day you make it.  If you made a pot, and there are still 8 bowls left the next day, he would literally throw it out before he ate it for another meal.

Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

this sounds similar to a study in which they found that the more options people were given the more likely they were to be picky.

if wonder if this is because we live in world in which i can have not only different proteins every night of the week but different type of cooking... Mexican, fast food, sushi, middle eastern etc.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3926 on: August 28, 2014, 02:19:04 PM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Ignoring taxes and using rough numbers...  So if they save about 15% or 150k per year and spend 800K.  Which normal people would see as being very responsible.  They'd need about 20M in the bank for a 4%SWR.  Takes a long time to get there saving 150k/yr.

Even if they spent a mere 40% or so. They'd save about 550k/yr but they'd need 10M for a 4%SWR if the wanted to maintain current lifestyle in retirement.  That still will take a while. 

If they spent 100k per year and saved the rest they could retire in less than 4 years.


Don't ignore taxes, in an all cash comp scenario they would approach 50%, depending on the state, but most big law is located in high tax states.   

Having been a partner at Big Strategy Consulting, that conversation doesn't surprise me at all.   Most of these guys save a pretty small amount of their take home, and spend the rest.   And if they are on wife #2, even worse. 

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3927 on: August 28, 2014, 02:22:42 PM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Fucking right man.  Sometimes we even intentionally make stuff the night before so it will be at the peak of the cooked-then refrigerated over night-then reheated flavor.  I find it with more than just spaghetti.  Almost any type of dish that has multiple ingredients tossed together seem to soak up each other's flavoring and be at optimal taste the second day.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3928 on: August 28, 2014, 02:31:57 PM »
The leftovers conversation reminds me of something one of my high school teachers said that even as a 17 year old confused the crap out of me. I can't remember why on earth she was discussing this with the class in the first place, but she said something like "taking food home in a doggie bag is so gross. What do you do, eat it on the way home? That's disgusting." To this day I have no idea why that teacher didn't understand the concept of leftovers.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3929 on: August 28, 2014, 02:42:45 PM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Ignoring taxes and using rough numbers...  So if they save about 15% or 150k per year and spend 800K.  Which normal people would see as being very responsible.  They'd need about 20M in the bank for a 4%SWR.  Takes a long time to get there saving 150k/yr.

Even if they spent a mere 40% or so. They'd save about 550k/yr but they'd need 10M for a 4%SWR if the wanted to maintain current lifestyle in retirement.  That still will take a while. 

If they spent 100k per year and saved the rest they could retire in less than 4 years.

You really can't ignore taxes on $1 million income.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3930 on: August 28, 2014, 03:04:18 PM »
Does anybody else toss the noodles into the sauce and cook it for about a minute before serving? Don't drain, just throw em in there and it'll soak up the sauce flavors.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3931 on: August 28, 2014, 03:07:13 PM »
Does anybody else toss the noodles into the sauce and cook it for about a minute before serving? Don't drain, just throw em in there and it'll soak up the sauce flavors.

I do.

Also while we're talking pasta, my neighbor makes a pasta meat sauce using bacon grease as the base. I've tried it, and it's well worth the price of admission.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3932 on: August 28, 2014, 03:22:21 PM »
There are too many nice things that call for mashed potato for anyone to not like leftovers. Because making mashed potatoes just especially to then turn around and start cooking the actually thing you wanted to make is a colossal waste of time. Those recipes are for the days after you've made and eaten mashed potatoes. Hmmm, must do a roast soon. Lots of mash and then potato cakes for dinner the next day. Yum.

Edited to add: While I'm the kind of person who can happily eat the same thing for days in a row, I do know lots of people who feel deprived if they have to eat the same thing even twice. And I used to have a colleague with pretty bad IBS who said that one of the important things they had to do was make sure to not eat the same things every day. But even if you don't actually want to eat leftovers immediately, you can still put them into the freezer and have them next week, or the week after, or the week after that!
« Last Edit: August 28, 2014, 03:26:31 PM by Moonwaves »

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3933 on: August 28, 2014, 03:42:16 PM »
Does anybody else toss the noodles into the sauce and cook it for about a minute before serving? Don't drain, just throw em in there and it'll soak up the sauce flavors.

I'll just leave this here: http://www.budgetbytes.com/2013/05/italian-wonderpot/

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3934 on: August 28, 2014, 03:56:29 PM »
I admit I do hate eating the same thing for dinner twice in a row. I'm happy to have lunch the next day be yesterday's dinner, but I don't want to go have that same thing a third time for dinner. I love to freeze things instead and have meal sized portions to pull out whenever I next want that thing.

Some weeks I go entirely without new cooking by eating from my freezer. When I can do this, it feels like the height of luxury to me. I feel sorry for people who don't make their own frozen food. Making my own is so much more choice than the frozen food isle, so much less expensive, and best of all, so much more delicious!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3935 on: August 28, 2014, 03:58:36 PM »
For some people, like my husband, "leftovers" were half-portions of something that got stuck in the fridge, not properly wrapped or covered, and forgotten about. When you pulled them out to eat them, they were dried out (or soggy, or slimy), cold, greasy, stale, or smelly. You held your nose and ate them anyway, but were still hungry. If they were really old or smelly, they could make you gag.

If that's your only experience of leftovers, it's hard to realize that properly prepared and stored food can be just as delicious as it was when freshly cooked. Happily, my husband has no problem eating frozen-and-reheated home-cooked meals and even does some batch cooking himself. I still can't get him to make extras of stuff to eat later in the week, though. Whatever is made for dinner, you eat it all or throw it out.

I don't like to eat the same main dish all week. If I make a big pot of lentils, the leftovers  get frozen for future dinners. Sides/salads/accompaniments are great, though, like roasted vegs, slaw, potatoes, and so on.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3936 on: August 28, 2014, 04:00:33 PM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Ignoring taxes and using rough numbers...  So if they save about 15% or 150k per year and spend 800K.  Which normal people would see as being very responsible.  They'd need about 20M in the bank for a 4%SWR.  Takes a long time to get there saving 150k/yr.

Even if they spent a mere 40% or so. They'd save about 550k/yr but they'd need 10M for a 4%SWR if the wanted to maintain current lifestyle in retirement.  That still will take a while. 

If they spent 100k per year and saved the rest they could retire in less than 4 years.

You really can't ignore taxes on $1 million income.

Granted.  But they've been equity partners since the early 1990's.  Even if profit-per-partner were lower then and even with taxes taking, say..., half of that amount that's still huge coin.  Every year.  For two decades.  On top of their salary. 

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3937 on: August 28, 2014, 04:27:37 PM »
Wow, I really don't get the leftovers-aversion thing either. This:

I love leftovers because then I don't have to cook and for a lot of food I cook the flavor gets better once it sits overnight.

is so right on! Leftovers are a godsend! I will say, fish are not my favorite leftovers and neither are salads that have already had the dressing put on (I know, operator error).

The teacher's doggie bag comment is also unbelievably bizarre. For starters, it sounds about a million times less gross if you call it a "to-go box" instead of a doggie bag. Plus, these are like the cream of the crop leftovers... not only do you not have to cook it when you eat the leftovers,  you didn't even have to cook it in the first place! What a luxury! (again, an exception for me would be sandwiches or burgers, these usually kind of suck as leftovers, but I eat them anyway)

former player

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3938 on: August 28, 2014, 04:29:58 PM »
In the hallway outside my office, two equity partners in my BigLaw firm (the top 100 largest law firms = BigLaw) were discussing retirement.  They're both in their mid- to late-fifties.  They've both been EQUITY partners for roughly twenty years now.  Note . . . profits per equity partner at my firm hover around $950,000 annually.  Yes, you read that correctly.

P1:  "I'd love to retire, but I don't have enough money."

P2:  "Me too.  And it's not like we can count on social security."

This happened about two weeks ago and I still don't understand.   Neither partner is a spendy guy.  They each drive a Prius.  They have middle class-type houses.  Nice, but not swanky.   Maybe it's fear talking?  SMH

Ignoring taxes and using rough numbers...  So if they save about 15% or 150k per year and spend 800K.  Which normal people would see as being very responsible.  They'd need about 20M in the bank for a 4%SWR.  Takes a long time to get there saving 150k/yr.

Even if they spent a mere 40% or so. They'd save about 550k/yr but they'd need 10M for a 4%SWR if the wanted to maintain current lifestyle in retirement.  That still will take a while. 

If they spent 100k per year and saved the rest they could retire in less than 4 years.

You really can't ignore taxes on $1 million income.

Granted.  But they've been equity partners since the early 1990's.  Even if profit-per-partner were lower then and even with taxes taking, say..., half of that amount that's still huge coin.  Every year.  For two decades.  On top of their salary.
Anyone who has made it to partner in Big Law has done it because they are the kind of person who is not going to want to retire early and so isn't going to care that much about saving for retirement.  And a partner who does have early retirement/FU money is certainly not going to admit it to another partner, because that might call into question their commitment to the firm.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3939 on: August 28, 2014, 04:41:00 PM »

Granted.  But they've been equity partners since the early 1990's.  Even if profit-per-partner were lower then and even with taxes taking, say..., half of that amount that's still huge coin.  Every year.  For two decades.  On top of their salary.

I'm pretty sure that's not how partner compensation works, but feel free to correct me if you know for sure.  Either way, high-earning partners definitely skew the average higher,

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3940 on: August 28, 2014, 05:27:29 PM »
At a meeting yesterday with seven middle-aged women (myself included) and one young dude. One of these BIOTCHES starts blasting him about an old scooter his grandpa gave him. He's been driving it to work with a milk crate attached to the back. I'm thinking this guy is alright (he also bikes everywhere).

Another snide Biotch says, "Scooters are for teenagers and old people." Table erupts with laughter.

Guy shrugs sheepishly - playing the good sport.  These women are just laying into the poor dude razzing him terribly.

Finally, I couldn't take it anymore and say, "Well, I guess he's got the last laugh considering he's got no car payment and probably saves $300 a month on gasoline."

That shut the table up pretty quickly. BIOTCHES.

P.S. Last spring we changed 403b providers at work and there were initially problems with the new company posting contributions in a timely manner.  Same group of us were around the table when I asked in general if anyone else was having the problem I was having w/contributions posting to their accounts. Everybody looked at me blankly because NONE OF THEM contribute to the 403b and therefore had no idea what I was talking about EXCEPT Scooter Dude. He also contributes and knew about the technical glitch. Ha!

I love this story, but my favorite part is that you, a 40-year-old self-proclaimed middle-aged woman, goes by the name FartFace and calls people BIOTCHES and Scooter Dude.  Cracks me up.

Ha! Thanks. I definitely DO NOT act my age and have very little in common with my "esteemed" colleagues. Thank goodness for this forum where I can let it all hang out!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3941 on: August 28, 2014, 05:29:27 PM »
Anyone who has made it to partner in Big Law has done it because they are the kind of person who is not going to want to retire early

This guy gets it. Not everyone's goal is to stop working. Some people want to work till they die, because they enjoy the work - and in this case, likely enjoy the power and status that comes with it. Not for any want of money.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3942 on: August 28, 2014, 05:37:30 PM »
At a meeting yesterday with seven middle-aged women (myself included) and one young dude. One of these BIOTCHES starts blasting him about an old scooter his grandpa gave him. He's been driving it to work with a milk crate attached to the back. I'm thinking this guy is alright (he also bikes everywhere).

Another snide Biotch says, "Scooters are for teenagers and old people." Table erupts with laughter.

Guy shrugs sheepishly - playing the good sport.  These women are just laying into the poor dude razzing him terribly.

Finally, I couldn't take it anymore and say, "Well, I guess he's got the last laugh considering he's got no car payment and probably saves $300 a month on gasoline."

That shut the table up pretty quickly. BIOTCHES.

P.S. Last spring we changed 403b providers at work and there were initially problems with the new company posting contributions in a timely manner.  Same group of us were around the table when I asked in general if anyone else was having the problem I was having w/contributions posting to their accounts. Everybody looked at me blankly because NONE OF THEM contribute to the 403b and therefore had no idea what I was talking about EXCEPT Scooter Dude. He also contributes and knew about the technical glitch. Ha!

I love this story, but my favorite part is that you, a 40-year-old self-proclaimed middle-aged woman, goes by the name FartFace and calls people BIOTCHES and Scooter Dude.  Cracks me up.

+1. :)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3943 on: August 28, 2014, 09:24:55 PM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Pasta sauce is better the second day.  Leftover pasta?  I prefer it on the day I make it.  If there is enough sauce for day three, I will either freeze or use it in a casserole or eggplant parmesan.

Mix it in with the pasta and let it sit overnight. I think the pasta absorbs some of the flavoring. It tastes better the second day.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3944 on: August 28, 2014, 09:26:38 PM »
Without becoming the poster child for insane behavior, I don't love leftovers after day 2 either.  Chili is great, leftover chili is delicious, but if I eat it more than 4 times in a week, I don't want to eat it again for months.  Luckily, batch cooking and reformulating leftovers (day 1, roast chicken, day 2, chicken soup, day 3, chicken enchiladas) solves my problem.  That, and sometimes I just put on my big girl pants and eat it even if I don't want to, because plenty of people go hungry in the world and "I'm sorry, I'm tired of having this specific totally edible and delicious meal" is just ridiculous on its face.

Am I the only one who thinks spaghetti taste BETTER as leftovers? Maybe I'm crazy.

Fucking right man.  Sometimes we even intentionally make stuff the night before so it will be at the peak of the cooked-then refrigerated over night-then reheated flavor.  I find it with more than just spaghetti.  Almost any type of dish that has multiple ingredients tossed together seem to soak up each other's flavoring and be at optimal taste the second day.

I do this as well. I love sauce soaked pasta leftovers. I often "accidentally" make too much and when my husband comments on avoiding waste, I sigh and promise that I will make up for my mistake the next day. All the while I'm laughing evilly inside thinking "It's mine! All mine! Bwa ha ha!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3945 on: August 28, 2014, 09:27:04 PM »
You really can't ignore taxes on $1 million income.

To be fair, some people do, and some of those people are in prison.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3946 on: August 29, 2014, 02:37:59 AM »
You really can't ignore taxes on $1 million income.

To be fair, some people do, and some of those people are in prison.
And some are still in congress! :D

Fi(re) on the Farm

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3947 on: August 29, 2014, 04:07:05 AM »
My boss, who will retire in 3 years at 55 after working in the same government office for 37 years, was complaining that her pension was only $45000 a year! She couldn't figure out how she was supposed to live on that small of a pension!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3948 on: August 29, 2014, 05:22:00 AM »
Dang one person 45k. My wife and I aren't full mustache but plan to live on 55k

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3949 on: August 29, 2014, 06:04:36 AM »
My boss, who will retire in 3 years at 55 after working in the same government office for 37 years, was complaining that her pension was only $45000 a year! She couldn't figure out how she was supposed to live on that small of a pension!
Wow, $45k would send me into retirement pronto, even with the 5 little kids at home!