Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4933702 times)

Jennifer in Ottawa

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3150 on: July 02, 2014, 06:43:44 PM »
He compounded his poor choice by selecting a bad University which was more generally known for it's agricultural program.

Guelph's not that bad a University . . .

I phrased it incorrectly.  I meant bad for his choice of study, not overall.

Scotch & CPA

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3151 on: July 02, 2014, 09:02:36 PM »
The "financial adviser," who looked to be in his 50s, answered "oh you should just pretty much put everything you can in the house fund, after all you're young, you have plenty of time to save fo
Thank God he added "Look at me, I'm a financial planner, and I just started saving for retirement now that my kids are done with college! My son is always making fun of me for it!" That pretty much convinced me not to listen to anything he had to say...

Sweet Jesus. How are we supposed to function as a society when people who are qualified to give financial advice dispense absolute shit like the above quote. I mean really. Fuck. Really?

I've noticed a recent trend around here suggesting that CPAs have no financial planning savvy.  It's probably just all the bad examples, but they're certainly living up to their "bean counter" reputation in these parts.

To be fair, you don't have to be a CPA to be a financial advisor. Actually, you need to pass only basic exams and be a motivated seller of mutual funds, or whatever else, to be a financial advisor. Most CPA's deal more with corporate finance, auditing, or taxes. That being said, I know a lot of very financially responsible and irresponsible CPAs. I would say on average for the profession, they tend to be more conservative.  The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.

HoneyBadger

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3152 on: July 02, 2014, 09:19:59 PM »
The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.

Not this one.  I bailed the minute I could.

Scotch & CPA

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3153 on: July 02, 2014, 09:38:50 PM »
The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.

Not this one.  I bailed the minute I could.

That's my plan too!

grantmeaname

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3154 on: July 03, 2014, 12:01:25 AM »
Hanging out on page 32?
I've noticed a recent trend around here suggesting that CPAs have no financial planning savvy.  It's probably just all the bad examples, but they're certainly living up to their "bean counter" reputation in these parts.
To be fair, you don't have to be a CPA to be a financial advisor. Actually, you need to pass only basic exams and be a motivated seller of mutual funds, or whatever else, to be a financial advisor. Most CPA's deal more with corporate finance, auditing, or taxes. That being said, I know a lot of very financially responsible and irresponsible CPAs. I would say on average for the profession, they tend to be more conservative.  The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.

I've noticed a recent trend around here suggesting that CPAs have no financial planning savvy
Yeah, and physicists make terrible doctors. Musicians can't write poetry for shit, either.

The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.
Not this one.  I bailed the minute I could.
That's my plan too!
From public accounting or from working at all?

dude

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3155 on: July 03, 2014, 07:42:58 AM »
I am sure 'making it' in Hollywood is like way totally hard but with daddy subsidizing life they can afford to stand at the plate swinging at pitches as long as they like.

hahaha!  Love this analogy!  Good companion to the one about "being born on third base and thinking he hit a triple."

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3156 on: July 03, 2014, 09:07:50 AM »
The older CPA's that I know tend to have the 1 more year or just a little more syndrome, even though their houses and cars are paid for, and they have a very large savings for retirement.

Not this one.  I bailed the minute I could.

That's my plan too!

Well I'm with you fellers! CPA, Partner, and hoping to leave it all behind at around 45 when the stache is full.
Indecision may or may not be my problem.

theknitcycle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3157 on: July 03, 2014, 10:20:58 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks. 

hernandz

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3158 on: July 03, 2014, 05:55:35 PM »
Quote
okay, I had to google this Dishes place... is this it?

http://www.dishestogo.com/admin/imageuploads/Files/TodaySpecial.pdf

because if so, I... don't get it. who the fuck wants a "hot" entree served at room temperature? especially moroccan stewed salmon?!? it's not like you can heat that shit up at work! plus also there's a typo in "pluots." judging so hard right now. LOL

Actually, I did like the food there, but I'll tell you why I stopped.  Much of the food is presented steam-table or salad bar style, and it's sold by weight. So they had this nice spanikopita (greek spinach & phyllo dough) which they had cut up. But the piece was too much, so before putting in my container, I grabbed the serving utensil and I chopped the piece in half on the steam table, and the employee said "No, we don't allow that. Don't ever do that again"  SO I PUT DOWN MY ENTIRE ORDER AND WALKED OUT, and my only regret is that I didn't have more in the order so that they lost more money on food that they now could not resell.

Primm

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3159 on: July 03, 2014, 07:51:32 PM »
A work colleague is unwell (cancer, so a long slow period of chemo), and standard practice in our unit is for staff to donate time which work convert to dollars so she doesn't have to worry about taking time off. The sign-up sheet to donate came around last week. Now we have about 300 staff and usually about half of them donate to causes like this. Most of us give at least a day, because, well, what goes around and all that. You just never know what's round the corner.

A person I was working with the other night when we were signing up was in tears, because she wanted to donate but if she put down more than an hour (which she thought was not enough) of time she wouldn't be able to pay all her bills next payday. I'm talking about someone who is making about $85K a year with penalties, and is in her mid-60s. So reasonably close to retirement. An hours pay takes about $30 out of our wage.

MooseOutFront

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3160 on: July 04, 2014, 08:05:44 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.
Ha!  That's bad.

Travis

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3161 on: July 04, 2014, 03:33:40 PM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

theknitcycle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3162 on: July 04, 2014, 03:57:01 PM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Still too hot to drink, in the summer.  In the winter it cools off more so I ask the barista to make it extra hot and it balances out just fine.  I've never noticed mine being cold or heard anyone else mention it, at least.

Rollin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3163 on: July 04, 2014, 08:09:35 PM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Factor in that the driving employees have to get in, buckle up, and all that.  Then when they get to the office, park the car, and reverse all that.  Walking is likely faster.

We were about 6 blocks from the courthouse where we worked often and most people drove.  I walked and was there before them since they had to search for parking.
I love being outside.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3164 on: July 04, 2014, 08:33:42 PM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Factor in that the driving employees have to get in, buckle up, and all that.  Then when they get to the office, park the car, and reverse all that.  Walking is likely faster.

We were about 6 blocks from the courthouse where we worked often and most people drove.  I walked and was there before them since they had to search for parking.

All that?

bikebum

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3165 on: July 04, 2014, 10:32:54 PM »
A coworker surprised me a while back. We were going to a lunch meeting about a mile away. If it was on my own time I would walk, but I figured my department would view that as a bad use of time and I was new, so I asked if I should check out a car. He said something like, "I appreciate you thinking like an engineer [we are engineers], but it's not that far away. Let's walk." Cool dude.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 11:12:50 AM by bikebum »

T-Rex

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3166 on: July 05, 2014, 05:17:22 AM »
While discussing healthy diet and getting out of debt, someone told me that he spends $1000 a month on food and detailed all the restaurants he visited in the last month. When cooking at home he likes to fry beef and cheese in bacon grease and put it on bread with bacon. He also gave "ribs and pork chops" as an example of a healthy meal he would eat at home.

I think for $1000 a month you could have a pretty good drug habit going.
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Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3167 on: July 05, 2014, 07:40:52 AM »
While discussing healthy diet and getting out of debt, someone told me that he spends $1000 a month on food and detailed all the restaurants he visited in the last month. When cooking at home he likes to fry beef and cheese in bacon grease and put it on bread with bacon. He also gave "ribs and pork chops" as an example of a healthy meal he would eat at home.

I think for $1000 a month you could have a pretty good drug habit going.
Sounds Like he does have an addiction to crappy food. Is he the size of a refrigerator or small car??! I don't know how people can eat out all the time and not feel like crap.  I know when we are on vacation and eat out a few days in a row my digestive tract is screwed up for atleast a week afterwards.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who think they can and those who think they can't. They are both right. - Henry ford

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3168 on: July 05, 2014, 08:47:11 AM »
Sounds Like he does have an addiction to crappy food. Is he the size of a refrigerator or small car??! I don't know how people can eat out all the time and not feel like crap.  I know when we are on vacation and eat out a few days in a row my digestive tract is screwed up for atleast a week afterwards.

Depends what you eat… I travel a lot so also end up eating outside fairly often. It does get old after some time, but not because of food. It's more about time and constant socialising. The latter is particularly tiring if you are on a business trip.

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3169 on: July 05, 2014, 09:24:09 AM »
Maybe thats my problem, we eat pretty healthy at the house. We dont go out much so treat every restaurant Visit as a special treat/cheat meal. I'll admit I normally don't order off the low calorie menu lol. I also don't really go on business trips but the few I have been on I could definitely see your second point. Socializing every meal with people you might just tolerate and have a working relationship with.
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BZB

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3170 on: July 05, 2014, 09:31:41 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

galliver

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3171 on: July 05, 2014, 11:28:45 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

chesebert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3172 on: July 05, 2014, 12:06:58 PM »
Being a BigLaw associate myself, I don't understand how it is NOT obvious to try to achieve FI before you are up for partnership given the poor prospects of partnership for most associates. I believe being FI will give you more leverage when it comes to partnership. The other partners likely will not drag you through more years of being an associate/counsel if they know you will just walk if passed for partnership.

Even when I was picking firms in law school, I used a spreadsheet to model my investment, expense and debt levels for my time as an associate. Once you have laid out all the numbers (including taking into account a healthy percentage of seamlessweb meals) it is clear that going from 0 to FI in less than 9 years is not only possible, it is downright easy to achieve with average market return.

I plan to be an associate for 4 more years at the most and I expect to reach FI well before that (due to in part the above average market return). I eat $3-4 lunches and bring my own fruit/snack to work. I don't own a car and ride bus/subway/taxi or walk to work. I try not to wear a suit if I don't have to so I only own 3 and I am still on the same two pairs of dress shoes since when I was a summer intern.

I'm at a work function with a young BigLaw associate; we work in Midtown Manhattan on Park Ave.  He makes 160k or more.   Because partnership prospects are terrible, I make an off-hand comment that you just have to save as much as you can while you still have a job.  He mentions that he doesn't understand how people save money.  I'm confused (I save 60-70% of my salary) and it turns out that for Manhattan, his rent is dirt cheap.  So I get really confused.

Me: Okay. . . . .  So what do you spend it on?
Him: Man, we work on Park Avenue, everything is hella expensive.
Me: Right; I agree. So what do you spend it on?
Him: Man, I must spend $50-60 a day just on food, minimum.   Have you ever been to Dishes??[a local to-go lunch place that is hella expensive].  I mean, you get lunch and it is $26.
Me: Yeah.  Dishes is hella expensive.  But you know what isn't hella expensive?  The food cart right next to Dishes.
Him: Come on man, we make 6-figures.  I'm not eating at a freaking food cart.
Me (to myself): [If you live like you make 6-figures, and you make 6-figures, of course you are never going to save any money.  Simple, simple math.]


I can't imagine $26 on a to-go lunch.  As a former biglaw associate, I found that ironically, when you worked crazy long hours, you spent little (no time, and firm offered cafe dinner if you worked past 8) and billed lots (making you more apt to keep your job in a down ecomony).  When you weren't busy working, you had more time to spend money and were more apt to lose your job in a down economy.

I also mentioned to him later the thing about if you were there after 8pm you could order Seamlessweb on the firm.... he didn't seem to think this substantially affected his budget.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 12:16:23 PM by chesebert »

The Hamster

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3173 on: July 05, 2014, 03:52:45 PM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

A lot of my colleagues get their take-away coffees in travel cups - keeps them hot for much longer.  Plus environmentally sustainable too I suppose. 

I succumbed to the take-away cappucino/latte crowd for a short while but found that in all honesty I can make a nicer tasting coffee using the  Nescafe in the tea-room.  Plus the big kitchen has a coffee machine if you can be bothered to walk all the way across the building.
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Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3174 on: July 05, 2014, 08:01:05 PM »
Quote
A lot of my colleagues get their take-away coffees in travel cups - keeps them hot for much longer.  Plus environmentally sustainable too I suppose.
it's funny/sad to see the new trend of disposable coffee cups that you buy from walmart take off at my work place. It started with one guy bringing them from home and has spread to the point where I am the minority caring around my coffee mug ( think its the same thing you are calling a travel cup) that has been faithfully keeping my coffee hot for the past 10 years now. For the record Im not a fancy coffee person. I always fill up at the shop for free and if I'm caught out and about and need a warm up I get the stuff from the quick mart for $0.89 for a refill.
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greenmimama

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3175 on: July 07, 2014, 07:48:19 AM »
Quote
A lot of my colleagues get their take-away coffees in travel cups - keeps them hot for much longer.  Plus environmentally sustainable too I suppose.
it's funny/sad to see the new trend of disposable coffee cups that you buy from walmart take off at my work place. It started with one guy bringing them from home and has spread to the point where I am the minority caring around my coffee mug ( think its the same thing you are calling a travel cup) that has been faithfully keeping my coffee hot for the past 10 years now. For the record Im not a fancy coffee person. I always fill up at the shop for free and if I'm caught out and about and need a warm up I get the stuff from the quick mart for $0.89 for a refill.

That is sad, especially with all the great travel mugs they have available, why do we need to use disposable. Those people probably even have a good ravel mug at home already

GuitarStv

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3176 on: July 07, 2014, 08:04:40 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Factor in that the driving employees have to get in, buckle up, and all that.  Then when they get to the office, park the car, and reverse all that.  Walking is likely faster.

We were about 6 blocks from the courthouse where we worked often and most people drove.  I walked and was there before them since they had to search for parking.

All that?



Average size of a city block (http://www.land4ever.com/block.htm) = 311 ft = (in less retarded units) 94.8 m

Since the distance is 1.5 blocks, that works out to 142 m.

Average speed of a person walking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking) = 5 km/h

So the dude walking should be able to traverse the distance in 1.7 minutes . . .



The test data on paper coffee cup cooling (http://www.shaunzhang.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Super-Cup-Technical-Report.pdf/41164041-B44C-4019-9CA5-E319E2CE27D3-) indicates that less than five degrees of cooling will occur after five minutes exposing a coffee cup (initial temperature of 90 C and ambient temperature of 1 C) to a temperature gradient.



I think that the conclusions we are able to draw from this data point to the likelihood that the walked coffee will still be drink-ably warm upon arrival.


Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3177 on: July 07, 2014, 08:07:40 AM »

I'm at a work function with a young BigLaw associate; we work in Midtown Manhattan on Park Ave.  He makes 160k or more.   Because partnership prospects are terrible, I make an off-hand comment that you just have to save as much as you can while you still have a job.  He mentions that he doesn't understand how people save money.  I'm confused (I save 60-70% of my salary) and it turns out that for Manhattan, his rent is dirt cheap.  So I get really confused.

Me: Okay. . . . .  So what do you spend it on?
Him: Man, we work on Park Avenue, everything is hella expensive.
Me: Right; I agree. So what do you spend it on?
Him: Man, I must spend $50-60 a day just on food, minimum.   Have you ever been to Dishes??[a local to-go lunch place that is hella expensive].  I mean, you get lunch and it is $26.
Me: Yeah.  Dishes is hella expensive.  But you know what isn't hella expensive?  The food cart right next to Dishes.
Him: Come on man, we make 6-figures.  I'm not eating at a freaking food cart.
Me (to myself): [If you live like you make 6-figures, and you make 6-figures, of course you are never going to save any money.  Simple, simple math.]

If this is the dishes I know, I can tell you the owner is comfortably making 7 figures, off of the 6 figure chumps who should be spending like they make 5, in their 4 figure shoes, 3 figure shirts, eating 2 figure lunches. Go figure.

Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Ashyukun

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3178 on: July 07, 2014, 12:36:03 PM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3179 on: July 07, 2014, 03:38:01 PM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

Do you have a full kitchen at work?  We only have a microwave.  I would also be amazed at someone cooking eggs in a microwave when they have a stove at home, which is a better method for cooking eggs (in my opinion).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3180 on: July 07, 2014, 03:47:59 PM »
Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3181 on: July 07, 2014, 03:48:52 PM »

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

Do you have a full kitchen at work?  We only have a microwave.  I would also be amazed at someone cooking eggs in a microwave when they have a stove at home, which is a better method for cooking eggs (in my opinion).

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3182 on: July 07, 2014, 03:57:03 PM »

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

Do you have a full kitchen at work?  We only have a microwave.  I would also be amazed at someone cooking eggs in a microwave when they have a stove at home, which is a better method for cooking eggs (in my opinion).

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.
I do love a good poached egg, but I've never seen the microwavable 'doohickey' before. 

I'm a fan of over medium or scrambled eggs.  Neither option is microwave friendly. 

Most people bring lunch where I work, but the car situation is insane.  There have been a few people that make about $60k/year purchasing luxury automobiles new this summer (BMW/Lexus).  The senior staff that make $200-250k have a wide range of cars, but nothing new (old Mercedes, Subarus, etc.). 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3183 on: July 07, 2014, 04:01:04 PM »

Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

True. I believe the 1997 NYC equivalent of hella is 'mad', as in 'mad props' or 'mad stache'.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3184 on: July 08, 2014, 02:25:01 AM »
Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

Everyone I know in California.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3185 on: July 08, 2014, 06:24:21 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Factor in that the driving employees have to get in, buckle up, and all that.  Then when they get to the office, park the car, and reverse all that.  Walking is likely faster.

We were about 6 blocks from the courthouse where we worked often and most people drove.  I walked and was there before them since they had to search for parking.

All that?



Average size of a city block (http://www.land4ever.com/block.htm) = 311 ft = (in less retarded units) 94.8 m

Since the distance is 1.5 blocks, that works out to 142 m.

Average speed of a person walking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking) = 5 km/h

So the dude walking should be able to traverse the distance in 1.7 minutes . . .



The test data on paper coffee cup cooling (http://www.shaunzhang.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Super-Cup-Technical-Report.pdf/41164041-B44C-4019-9CA5-E319E2CE27D3-) indicates that less than five degrees of cooling will occur after five minutes exposing a coffee cup (initial temperature of 90 C and ambient temperature of 1 C) to a temperature gradient.



I think that the conclusions we are able to draw from this data point to the likelihood that the walked coffee will still be drink-ably warm upon arrival.

Always good to back up with data!

Could always throw it in the microwave for 20 seconds too.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3186 on: July 08, 2014, 06:44:57 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3187 on: July 08, 2014, 06:56:42 AM »
Google maps has definitely made it much easier to sort out how to take a bus where you want to go. Once I'm at the bus stop, I also use a smartphone app called Rider that tells me when different bus lines are scheduled to arrive, taking the guess work out of waiting (caveat: Rider doesn't work everywhere). Also, if you are new to the bus route, telling the driver the intersection you want to get off at usually means he/she will stop and call it out for you so you don't miss it.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3188 on: July 08, 2014, 07:52:45 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.
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randymarsh

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3189 on: July 08, 2014, 08:03:37 AM »
I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Grew up/currently live in a mostly rural area. We have a couple of housing developments, but a lot of corn fields overall. Here, public transportation = poor. Me and most of of friends got cars at 16 or 17 and have been driving everywhere ever since. It's not just a "public transportation is gross/scary/etc" thing though. I'd have to drive 10 miles to get to the closet bus stop anyway.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3190 on: July 08, 2014, 08:06:56 AM »

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.

Cool story. Fits pretty well with the latest MMM post if you didn't read it already. Hopefully you are a stronger person for it. Badass indeed.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3191 on: July 08, 2014, 08:23:35 AM »

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.

Cool story. Fits pretty well with the latest MMM post if you didn't read it already. Hopefully you are a stronger person for it. Badass indeed.
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2014/07/07/necessity-is-the-mother-of-badassity/

And the reactions you get when everyone thinks you are on drugs are usually pretty fun.
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Ashyukun

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3192 on: July 08, 2014, 08:30:44 AM »

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

Do you have a full kitchen at work?  We only have a microwave.  I would also be amazed at someone cooking eggs in a microwave when they have a stove at home, which is a better method for cooking eggs (in my opinion).

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.
I do love a good poached egg, but I've never seen the microwavable 'doohickey' before. 

I'm a fan of over medium or scrambled eggs.  Neither option is microwave friendly. 

Most people bring lunch where I work, but the car situation is insane.  There have been a few people that make about $60k/year purchasing luxury automobiles new this summer (BMW/Lexus).  The senior staff that make $200-250k have a wide range of cars, but nothing new (old Mercedes, Subarus, etc.).

Nope, just two microwaves. The stove obviously works better, but I don't like eating before I ride in to work on my bike so that's not really an option. I worked out long ago the time and method for cooking the eggs. 2 eggs go into my tupperware bowl, scramble them with a fork until mixed, stir in diced ham (most days, occasionally use other meat if we have leftovers that will work), veggies, and cheese, and then toss in the microwave for about 2 minutes.


seanc0x0

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3193 on: July 08, 2014, 08:47:03 AM »

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.
I do love a good poached egg, but I've never seen the microwavable 'doohickey' before. 

I'm a fan of over medium or scrambled eggs.  Neither option is microwave friendly. 

Most people bring lunch where I work, but the car situation is insane.  There have been a few people that make about $60k/year purchasing luxury automobiles new this summer (BMW/Lexus).  The senior staff that make $200-250k have a wide range of cars, but nothing new (old Mercedes, Subarus, etc.).

This is the thing they have: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yZOJW8ph8U  It took some time to get the exact time sorted out so the yolk was right where I like it (just barely runny), but now that it's dialed in it's just a matter of putting it in the microwave for 56 seconds. We don't pierce the yolk like they do in the video though.

As far as cars at work, I work at a large university and we have everything from '90s Toyotas to the prof who parks his Porsche 911 behind the building where I work. Mostly, though, the cars are not too old, but not too new. There's not a lot of showoffs around my area (I'm in IT, but my office is in the Physics building), though if you head over to the admin or law buildings, that changes quickly!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3194 on: July 08, 2014, 09:45:14 AM »
Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

Everyone I know in California.

Hella Californians.  I still gotta give them mad props for their wicked cool weather.

Gin1984

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3195 on: July 08, 2014, 10:52:00 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.
Sorry MM, this probably was very scary but I am giggling like mad over here.  :D

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3196 on: July 08, 2014, 11:05:40 AM »
No worries, Gin. It was scary at the time, but after I made it through unscathed, it simply became a good story to laugh about in retrospect. As Cheddar Stacker noted, it made me slightly more badass than I was before because I didn't view getting lost in say, Atlanta, with nearly as much trepidation as I would have before the incident. There are some bad parts in Atlanta, but nothing like what I saw in Rio that night :)
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3197 on: July 08, 2014, 11:36:08 AM »
Not at work, but I was having lunch with a former coworker so it's close.  I was telling him about MMM, my goal to FIRE, not carrying debt, saving massive amounts of money, etc.  At one point I mentioned that I use credit cards for almost all purchases for the rewards, but I never carry a balance.  In fact, I have no debt other than my mortgage.

Him: I'm the same way.  I don't have any debt.
Me: (a little surprised) Really?  That's awesome.
Him: Well, except my student loans. 
Me: Oh.
Him: And of course my car.
Me: ....

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3198 on: July 08, 2014, 11:48:43 AM »
No worries, Gin. It was scary at the time, but after I made it through unscathed, it simply became a good story to laugh about in retrospect. As Cheddar Stacker noted, it made me slightly more badass than I was before because I didn't view getting lost in say, Atlanta, with nearly as much trepidation as I would have before the incident. There are some bad parts in Atlanta, but nothing like what I saw in Rio that night :)

Some of my best travel stories involve public transportation mishaps.

Like the time I was in a small town in Italy. We decided to take an early morning hike into the mountains on the day we were leaving. After the hike, we got on the bus to take us back to our hotel where our packed bags were. It was a beautifully crafted plan where the bus would take us to the hotel, we'd go back into the center of town to take a ferry to the neighboring town with a train station, where we would then get to Rome and take a fast train to Venice. Didn't happen quite that way...

Apparently the bus routes in this town don't go in circles as the bus dropped us off in the middle of town and we had to get off. We had to run through town about 5 miles (I may be exaggerating) back to the hotel. On the run back, we saw our hotel manager in town and told him we had to check out. So he also went back to the hotel to help us. Before he got there, we got to our villa, had to McGyver our way into the room to get our luggage, he finally came to help, we ran back into town (5 miles?Probably more like 2...) again with our luggage, but we missed the ferry. So we had to run back out back to where our hotel was to catch the out of town bus to take us to the other town with the train station. Did I mention this town was on a cliff? We missed that train. We ended up taking an overnight slow train from Rome to Venice, in which we were awoken at about midnight that our train was going to split in two at the next stop and the part of the train we were on wasn't going to Venice. So we had to move all of our stuff again. Also, a friend lost their passport during all of this turmoil.

We did end up in Venice early the next morning - totally exhausted. But it's one of my favorite stories. My nieces tell me I have the craziest stories...
« Last Edit: July 08, 2014, 11:53:14 AM by Daisy »

galliver

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3199 on: July 08, 2014, 12:10:15 PM »
Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

That is a reasonable fear. But you can combat it by educating yourself about the transit system--what the routes are, when they are active, etc. Then by keeping track once you get on the bus and making sure you know where it is and where it's going (it's easier than ever with a smartphone but you can also do it with a map). Finally, by having cab fare in your pocket and a charged cell phone (previously: change for a pay phone). I think what I was really getting at is that people are afraid of using the system because they have never been introduced to it, and that's a shame/I don't understand never encountering this in your life.

Grew up/currently live in a mostly rural area. We have a couple of housing developments, but a lot of corn fields overall. Here, public transportation = poor. Me and most of of friends got cars at 16 or 17 and have been driving everywhere ever since. It's not just a "public transportation is gross/scary/etc" thing though. I'd have to drive 10 miles to get to the closet bus stop anyway.

...and that's different. If it's not available is not the same thing as if it's there and you think it's gross/scary/etc so you don't use it, even though it's $72/year and takes you everywhere (<-- my town) and has super-nice drivers and is generally very clean. Also you should visit a city and ride some buses, for the experience. :)