Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4939463 times)

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3000 on: June 20, 2014, 02:58:29 PM »
Where I live, Michelina's cost about $2 regular price. You can get a small thing of pasta for under a buck, and a can of sauce for 80 cents- $1. That would be enough to make quite a few "homemade Michelina's" (pasta with sauce).
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Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3001 on: June 20, 2014, 03:06:15 PM »
Where I live, Michelina's cost about $2 regular price. You can get a small thing of pasta for under a buck, and a can of sauce for 80 cents- $1. That would be enough to make quite a few "homemade Michelina's" (pasta with sauce).
Ouch. They're usually $1 here, sometimes $.80 and I can occasionally stack up a coupon with a sale and get them for $.70 :) I've never bought pasta sauce in a can...probably cheaper than the jars I get.
Either way though, pasta + sauce > Michelina's

....now I want to learn to make my own sauce....

Jennifer in Ottawa

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3002 on: June 20, 2014, 03:08:10 PM »
The problem with those frozen meal things is that people don't consider the price per unit which is what you ought to know when purchasing.

For example, my local supermarket sells a dozen eggs for $3.09, and a pack of 18 eggs for $4.49.  On the face of it, I am spending less money by buying the dozen eggs.  However, when you look at the unit cost, each egg in a dozen pack costs 25.75 cents, and each egg in the 18 pack costs 24.94 cents.  A small difference yes, but carry that across your entire shopping each and every week, year in and year out.

Obviously there is a limit as to what is prudent.  You want to buy ketchup, not invest in it.  But, if you are looking at the purchase of dry or long lived goods, you will always be further ahead by purchasing at the lowest unit cost.  Replicating those frozen meals would cost you less than half, perhaps one quarter of the price, and your body would thank you endlessly for putting less sodium, sugar and highly questionable additives in it.

jordanread

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3003 on: June 20, 2014, 03:09:27 PM »
....now I want to learn to make my own sauce....

I'm sure there is something in the Recipe SuperThread
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Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3004 on: June 20, 2014, 03:22:11 PM »
....now I want to learn to make my own sauce....

I'm sure there is something in the Recipe SuperThread
Probably but with as rarely as we have pasta now it's low on my list of priorities. Maybe once I get downsized/moved WAY THE HELL closer to work (really getting tired of my 35 mile each way commute)

4alpacas

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3005 on: June 20, 2014, 03:45:15 PM »
....now I want to learn to make my own sauce....

I'm sure there is something in the Recipe SuperThread
Probably but with as rarely as we have pasta now it's low on my list of priorities. Maybe once I get downsized/moved WAY THE HELL closer to work (really getting tired of my 35 mile each way commute)

I feel your pain on the long commute, so I'm pretty lazy in the kitchen.  I've used this slow cooker recipe (http://www.budgetbytes.com/2011/11/slow-cooker-marinara/), which is ridiculously easy.  I divided it up into ziploc bags and froze it.  Now I have to toss it in the fridge in the AM to have very tasty pasta sauce (with a lot less sugar) for dinner. 

I also fall victim to buying "convenience meals," so I can't be too judgmental.  I have lazy evening food (frozen pizzas and velveeta shells & cheese) to fill the void when I want to go out or order in. 

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3006 on: June 20, 2014, 04:17:53 PM »
@Christof, or anyone else:
Does anyone have any numbers on the relative cost of groceries/food in Europe vs Us?   When over there (Netherlands mostly) we go to the nearby nice grocery store and it seems they are very reasonable wrt prices for a nice shop in downtown.  Selection is a bit lower but there is also much less crap food, ie only five frozen pizza choices instead of a 65 foot of isle of pizza's.

We dont really do proper normal shopping so is hard to say but it seems like the reputation of Europe being so much more expensive than the states is not deserved at least in terms of food.  Ok I will admit to buying a 15$ light bulb that would have cost 3$ at home but my options were limited and being in the dark sucked.  Sorry for going off topic.
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Grid

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3007 on: June 20, 2014, 07:25:18 PM »
I was chatting with the janitor at school/work today, and she asked how I was dealing with the heat.   "Fine.", I say.  Then she asks if I've had the A/C on.  I tell her "Nope, it hasn't been hot enough yet.".  She then informs me of her $200 electric bill last month because it's been too dang hot here in Indiana.  O.o   It hasn't been above 83F in my house.  And there's still places where I can see sunlight through the walls.
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Jack

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3008 on: June 20, 2014, 08:52:01 PM »
My boss, after we walked into a cool Chik-Fil-A from his car (which the AC didn't have a chance to cool on the short ride over from the office): "this is how I want my entire life to be... air-conditioned."

(Spare the facepunches for me going out for lunch, please... I normally bring my lunch, didn't today only because I had a free birthday meal coupon for somewhere else, then decided to go with my coworkers because we had a contentious meeting and I figured some socializing would be helpful professionally.)

(It's also worth noting that Chik-Fil-A is an unusually cheap lunch for him... usually it's at a ~$10 sit-down restaurant.)

robotclown

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3009 on: June 20, 2014, 09:08:45 PM »
People talking about stocks at work:

"I bought 5000 shares of (some penny stock)"
"I bought (whatever), I plan to sell it if it goes up 20%"
"AAPL is a great deal now since it split"

I tried to explain that selling when something goes up 20% is a good way to get killed by taxes, and that stock splits don't change the value at all, but people don't care.  Although at least AAPL is decently valued right now, if buying tech stocks is your thing, so I mostly let that one go.

Ayanka

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3010 on: June 21, 2014, 12:54:01 AM »
@ Alanstache: I am Belgian, but I lived close to the Netherlands for most of my life. The Netherlands are a bit cheaper than Belgium for food. Although every since Albert Heijn has opened stores here, the prices are dropping. If you buy in season and basic stuff, it isn't too expensive. Part of this is because the lower tax on those items, part because convenience foo costs more. I have the idea that eating healthy, or at least somewhat healthy is also more important here. Plus if you watch the sales, you can get very low prices.

Winston

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3011 on: June 21, 2014, 07:05:41 AM »
You can get a pretty high-performance Mustang for well under $10k, it just won't be new. If he's going to get an unmustachian car with respect to fuel economy (I was once a guy that age... testosterone makes you do crazy things), at least he can buy one that's cheap. Suggest that he buy a built-up Fox body GT, an early SN95 Cobra, or a pre-'05 GT.


FrenchyMustache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3012 on: June 21, 2014, 07:43:48 AM »
Does anyone have any numbers on the relative cost of groceries/food in Europe vs Us? 

Basically you have Walmart & Cosco on the US, we got ALDI / LIDL & Metro in Europe.
All the crappy junk food is cheap as hell (with canned veggies :^p) I could feed a week of junk food at lidl for 3 for around 10€ max.
I tried to bough some almond milk last day, it's around 5€/l. The more you are concerned about health / where the food comes from, prices goes up. I wouldn't be surprised the same goes in the US.


About an overheard, not really a mustachian one but it'll fit.
I was working as the only IT guy in a small business, i had to form a new saleswoman to her computerstation, around 30 y old.
The day after she rushes in my cubcicle with a letter :
CW : "Hey i made a sale, i have to send them an email. Where do i put the zip-code on the letter ?"
I was speechless.
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pka222

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3013 on: June 21, 2014, 07:33:52 PM »
I've got a recurring one. My senior colleague asks twice a month- "Bro can I borrow 50$"? I always say yes and he has always paid me back the next payday.  The weird thing is - he makes 15,000$ a month and gets stuck the last week on 50$.  Now I hope it is because he invests it all or is paying off his rental house empire- but based on what we've talked about it seems he just cant make it last.

agent_clone

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3014 on: June 21, 2014, 09:31:40 PM »
I've got a recurring one. My senior colleague asks twice a month- "Bro can I borrow 50$"? I always say yes and he has always paid me back the next payday.  The weird thing is - he makes 15,000$ a month and gets stuck the last week on 50$.  Now I hope it is because he invests it all or is paying off his rental house empire- but based on what we've talked about it seems he just cant make it last.
Are you paid montly or fortnightly?  If montly if I were him I would put the money directly into a higher interest savings account then pay myself x each week.  That way you only have a couple of days until the next pay day until you run out.  Which should normally be fine.  Fortnightly no idea :S

horsepoor

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3015 on: June 21, 2014, 10:30:07 PM »
I've got a recurring one. My senior colleague asks twice a month- "Bro can I borrow 50$"? I always say yes and he has always paid me back the next payday.  The weird thing is - he makes 15,000$ a month and gets stuck the last week on 50$.  Now I hope it is because he invests it all or is paying off his rental house empire- but based on what we've talked about it seems he just cant make it last.

My grad school professor used to borrow money from me.  I think it's because she'd run out of cash and her husband was the money manager but still... something is off with a university professor borrowing cash from a grad student living on a stipend...

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3016 on: June 22, 2014, 08:54:22 AM »
I've got one! Two co-workers were discussing the latest frozen meal thing, some sort of Stouffers thing that you throw in a pan, pour a packet of sauce over, and call it a "skillet meal". Apparently they're $8 EACH, and make enough for one meal for one or two people. Obviously loaded with salt, etc. One was telling the other how awesome they are, how he bought a bunch for the freezer, and what a great money saver they are!

I asked, why not just make a skillet meal with chicken, vegetables, sauce, etc for a fraction of the price, in almost the same amount of time? "Well, it's convenient..." It makes no sense to me.

We have a guy who does the same.  His is a zatarans rice meal thing for about the same amount lol. Last time I checked rice was about as cheap of a food as you can get.

The Michelina's frozen meals are pretty popular at my workplace as well - from what I can see, it's about 3/4 cup cooked pasta in some sort of white sauce. That's it. For the same amount of money as a whole bag of pasta and jar of sauce.

My wife does the same thing.  And even worse, she doesn't work.  She always uses tired and fast as an excuse.  With the 1 year old at home, she doesn't have time to make a real lunch.  The main reason she does it - she doesn't like left overs.  The real annoying thing. She is  complaining about her weight.  I keep telling her to track what she eats. She gets enough exercise running around with the kids that I don't think it is that.  I bet her salt intake is so high from those frozen things that it is slowing her metabolism down.  She eats relatively healthy outside of that (loves veggies, doesn't eat a lot of dessert type of foods, no soda).
I've got two kids.  And I tell ya, with the youngest one being under-2, it's exhausting.  It really is hard to cook.  Often I can only eat when he is napping.  Stress and sleep make it really hard.

Took me two years to lose the weight with #1.  I'm at 23.5 months and counting with #2.

Mostly, until age 18 months they cannot keep themselves occupied at all. And even after that, they are content to play independently for a few minutes UNTIL they see you in the kitchen trying to DO something.

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3017 on: June 22, 2014, 03:07:27 PM »
Mostly, until age 18 months they cannot keep themselves occupied at all. And even after that, they are content to play independently for a few minutes UNTIL they see you in the kitchen trying to DO something.
Our daughter was content to play with the pots & pans on the floor while we started a crockpot or defrosted leftovers in the microwave.

As soon as she could stand on a counter stepstool we started her on mixing ingredients.  By the time she was six years old she could make her own meal, and by the time she was eight years old she could make the family dinner.  She was rarely interested in cooking dinner for us more than once or twice a month, but she really enjoyed taking charge of desserts and birthday cakes.  When she was home for college senior break with her friends, they cooked every dinner for us (from Pinterest recipes) and even ran the BBQ grill.

"Training" someone always takes longer than doing it yourself, but the time spent making a meal together during her small-kid years was less than the sum of the time spent trying to make a meal while she was tugging at our legs for attention. 
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CDP45

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3018 on: June 22, 2014, 03:30:39 PM »
I've got one! Two co-workers were discussing the latest frozen meal thing, some sort of Stouffers thing that you throw in a pan, pour a packet of sauce over, and call it a "skillet meal". Apparently they're $8 EACH, and make enough for one meal for one or two people. Obviously loaded with salt, etc. One was telling the other how awesome they are, how he bought a bunch for the freezer, and what a great money saver they are!

I asked, why not just make a skillet meal with chicken, vegetables, sauce, etc for a fraction of the price, in almost the same amount of time? "Well, it's convenient..." It makes no sense to me.

We have a guy who does the same.  His is a zatarans rice meal thing for about the same amount lol. Last time I checked rice was about as cheap of a food as you can get.

The Michelina's frozen meals are pretty popular at my workplace as well - from what I can see, it's about 3/4 cup cooked pasta in some sort of white sauce. That's it. For the same amount of money as a whole bag of pasta and jar of sauce.

My wife does the same thing.  And even worse, she doesn't work.  She always uses tired and fast as an excuse.  With the 1 year old at home, she doesn't have time to make a real lunch.  The main reason she does it - she doesn't like left overs.  The real annoying thing. She is  complaining about her weight.  I keep telling her to track what she eats. She gets enough exercise running around with the kids that I don't think it is that.  I bet her salt intake is so high from those frozen things that it is slowing her metabolism down.  She eats relatively healthy outside of that (loves veggies, doesn't eat a lot of dessert type of foods, no soda).
I've got two kids.  And I tell ya, with the youngest one being under-2, it's exhausting.  It really is hard to cook.  Often I can only eat when he is napping.  Stress and sleep make it really hard.

Took me two years to lose the weight with #1.  I'm at 23.5 months and counting with #2.

Mostly, until age 18 months they cannot keep themselves occupied at all. And even after that, they are content to play independently for a few minutes UNTIL they see you in the kitchen trying to DO something.

You don't have the baby cage?  I mean the pen? I mean the "playpen?"

Cassie

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3019 on: June 22, 2014, 04:28:44 PM »
When my 3 kids were little I was a SAHM & would also watch my friends kids as needed. I cooked everyday. Either put them in the kitchen with some toys or use a playpen if necessary.  Also the long afternoon nap they should be taking is a good time to prep for the evening meal. 

Daisy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3020 on: June 22, 2014, 05:50:32 PM »
"Training" someone always takes longer than doing it yourself, but the time spent making a meal together during her small-kid years was less than the sum of the time spent trying to make a meal while she was tugging at our legs for attention.

Great training! That's what my mom did. We all learned how to cook and helped her out. Now that my parents are older, we cook for them sometimes. A lady that takes care of my mom during the week and is from the "old country" remarked to my mom that she raised us like they did in the "older times". That she doesn't see many kids like us.

I'm constantly amazed by how many people don't know and are somewhat scared of cooking. Even people that grew up in lower middle class homes where (usually) the mother was always cooking and they never ordered takeout.

Latwell

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3021 on: June 22, 2014, 08:23:59 PM »
"Training" someone always takes longer than doing it yourself, but the time spent making a meal together during her small-kid years was less than the sum of the time spent trying to make a meal while she was tugging at our legs for attention.

Great training! That's what my mom did. We all learned how to cook and helped her out. Now that my parents are older, we cook for them sometimes. A lady that takes care of my mom during the week and is from the "old country" remarked to my mom that she raised us like they did in the "older times". That she doesn't see many kids like us.

I'm constantly amazed by how many people don't know and are somewhat scared of cooking. Even people that grew up in lower middle class homes where (usually) the mother was always cooking and they never ordered takeout.

My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.


Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3022 on: June 22, 2014, 09:20:42 PM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.
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Jack

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3023 on: June 22, 2014, 10:20:57 PM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3024 on: June 22, 2014, 11:16:31 PM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...


Rural

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3025 on: June 23, 2014, 07:21:58 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...







Both the worst congealed salad recipe and the worst radish roses I've ever seen, all in one. Congratulations, you win the Internet for today.

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3026 on: June 23, 2014, 07:38:00 AM »
Well, if that big blue "x" on the recipe means what I think it means, this recipe was a real loser even in its time.

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3027 on: June 23, 2014, 07:53:17 AM »
lol @ ring around the tuna

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3028 on: June 23, 2014, 08:46:34 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

I agree - I was talking to a friend the other day and mentioned that this seemed to be the case - my grandparents were excellent cooks, and my generation seems to be picking it up again through the modern foodie culture that's all the rage, but it somehow "skipped" the boomers. Interesting to know that that was right around the time when convenience foods exploded onto the scene.
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Jane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3029 on: June 23, 2014, 09:01:12 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

Ugh. Yes. I grew up on cream of crap soup casseroles and I know a lot of my friends did, too. We joke about it now because none of us will touch that stuff with our own cooking. My parents made other things that were pretty good (thank goodness) but they still rely a lot on those type of convenience foods.

Jane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3030 on: June 23, 2014, 09:08:42 AM »
A lady I work with was going on about how she tried this new service that's so great. They send you all of the ingredients all prepped and you just do the cooking.

All for only $12/plate! ($15 if you aren't a member)

https://www.plated.com/menu

In talking, she said she was complaining she just doesn't have time to go to the store, and she just really hates going. We have the same job. She's doing something wrong if she doesn't have time. We work from home and the workload is far from demanding.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3031 on: June 23, 2014, 09:34:09 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

I agree - I was talking to a friend the other day and mentioned that this seemed to be the case - my grandparents were excellent cooks, and my generation seems to be picking it up again through the modern foodie culture that's all the rage, but it somehow "skipped" the boomers. Interesting to know that that was right around the time when convenience foods exploded onto the scene.

I have the same experience. I ate a lot of fish sticks and Kraft mac and cheese growing up. It was more because of my mom than my dad. My dad grew up on a farm, so he loved fresh produce and quality meat. His mom is an awesome cook. But my mom did most of the cooking in our house, and her mom knew no dish that wasn't a cream-of-something-based casserole. When we all left for college, my dad started doing most of the cooking, and he really is an awesome cook. I wish I grew up eating the food he cooks now! But my wife and I saw the light when we were out on our own, and cook most all of our own meal at home, from whole foods.
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geekette

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3032 on: June 23, 2014, 10:02:35 AM »
Eh, I'm a boomer, and I cook, mostly from scratch.  My mom grew up in the 40's and HATES cooking. 

I learned pretty much on my own, in the era of microwaves (which really didn't come out until the 80's IIRC). 

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3033 on: June 23, 2014, 10:10:47 AM »
As an immigrant to America my thoughts/opinions on this food stuff.... I truly believe the average white American family eats mostly crap. Going to my friends houses as a kid I was served crap from a box. As an adult, these people are still eating boxed crap their parents fed them. They are now feeding that boxed garbage to their kids and babies.

I pay attention to people's shopping carts at the grocery store --- they hang out in the middle aisles and barely venture into the outer ring of the store.... stacks of frozen foods... bags of chips, popcorn... pre-made this and that... 

As an adult, I'm even more confused when my adult friends/peers go out to dinner at places like Chili's, Longhorns, etc... fuck, that food is disgusting even when it's good...

Anyways --- nothing overhead at work today. :-p

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3034 on: June 23, 2014, 10:31:12 AM »
Does frozen spinach count as 'convenience food'? Super convenient that a healthy side to any meal can basically be stored in the freezer forever. I think that's about as close as I come.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3035 on: June 23, 2014, 11:05:50 AM »
When my 3 kids were little I was a SAHM & would also watch my friends kids as needed. I cooked everyday. Either put them in the kitchen with some toys or use a playpen if necessary.  Also the long afternoon nap they should be taking is a good time to prep for the evening meal.

Yeah, I really can't buy kids as an excuse to not cook. My mom did at home daycare growing up, when I was little there were four of us under 3, plus assorted preteens, usually 8-10 of us total every day. She always cooked. Maybe not 100% from scratch, but there was a proper meal on the table that she cooked as everyone got picked up & had on the table when my dad got home.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3036 on: June 23, 2014, 11:11:34 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

I agree - I was talking to a friend the other day and mentioned that this seemed to be the case - my grandparents were excellent cooks, and my generation seems to be picking it up again through the modern foodie culture that's all the rage, but it somehow "skipped" the boomers. Interesting to know that that was right around the time when convenience foods exploded onto the scene.

I have the same experience. I ate a lot of fish sticks and Kraft mac and cheese growing up. It was more because of my mom than my dad. My dad grew up on a farm, so he loved fresh produce and quality meat. His mom is an awesome cook. But my mom did most of the cooking in our house, and her mom knew no dish that wasn't a cream-of-something-based casserole. When we all left for college, my dad started doing most of the cooking, and he really is an awesome cook. I wish I grew up eating the food he cooks now! But my wife and I saw the light when we were out on our own, and cook most all of our own meal at home, from whole foods.

My parents were at the very tail end of the baby boom, and I don't remember much of my grandparents' cooking. For us it was shake & bake/barely seasoned & grilled meat, plain mashed potatoes or plain white rice, and frozen microwaved vegetables. Ugh, no wonder I was a picky eater.

My wife's parents were the same way, but now we make Mexican something from scratch at least once a week, and if I haven't pulled at least five different spices out of the cabinet, I don't feel like I've been cooking.

My parents have branched out more recently, and they do some pretty good stuff now, but still with the friggin' frozen vegetables "steamed" in the microwave! Do they just think that's how green beans are supposed to taste?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3037 on: June 23, 2014, 02:31:13 PM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

I agree - I was talking to a friend the other day and mentioned that this seemed to be the case - my grandparents were excellent cooks, and my generation seems to be picking it up again through the modern foodie culture that's all the rage, but it somehow "skipped" the boomers. Interesting to know that that was right around the time when convenience foods exploded onto the scene.

I have the same experience. I ate a lot of fish sticks and Kraft mac and cheese growing up. It was more because of my mom than my dad. My dad grew up on a farm, so he loved fresh produce and quality meat. His mom is an awesome cook. But my mom did most of the cooking in our house, and her mom knew no dish that wasn't a cream-of-something-based casserole. When we all left for college, my dad started doing most of the cooking, and he really is an awesome cook. I wish I grew up eating the food he cooks now! But my wife and I saw the light when we were out on our own, and cook most all of our own meal at home, from whole foods.

My parents were at the very tail end of the baby boom, and I don't remember much of my grandparents' cooking. For us it was shake & bake/barely seasoned & grilled meat, plain mashed potatoes or plain white rice, and frozen microwaved vegetables. Ugh, no wonder I was a picky eater.

My wife's parents were the same way, but now we make Mexican something from scratch at least once a week, and if I haven't pulled at least five different spices out of the cabinet, I don't feel like I've been cooking.

My parents have branched out more recently, and they do some pretty good stuff now, but still with the friggin' frozen vegetables "steamed" in the microwave! Do they just think that's how green beans are supposed to taste?

My mother taught me how to overcook a roast.  Her pantry was the size of a closet, and the closest to 'scratch' she got was a pie crust mix you had to add water to.

My grandmother taught me how to really cook.  Her pantry was a cold cellar, and the only thing that came out of a box was salt.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3038 on: June 23, 2014, 02:31:37 PM »
My parents have branched out more recently, and they do some pretty good stuff now, but still with the friggin' frozen vegetables "steamed" in the microwave! Do they just think that's how green beans are supposed to taste?

I'm 26 and the other day cooked braised fresh green beans for the first time.  I was like "what is this shit in a can i've been eating all these years?!"

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3039 on: June 23, 2014, 04:03:32 PM »
My parents have branched out more recently, and they do some pretty good stuff now, but still with the friggin' frozen vegetables "steamed" in the microwave! Do they just think that's how green beans are supposed to taste?

I'm 26 and the other day cooked braised fresh green beans for the first time.  I was like "what is this shit in a can i've been eating all these years?!"

Switch can for bag and that was my reaction too first time. Who knew veggies could be tasty?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3040 on: June 23, 2014, 07:15:01 PM »


Google Frankenfood....

This is a possible winner.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3041 on: June 23, 2014, 08:22:41 PM »

Quote
My parents have branched out more recently, and they do some pretty good stuff now, but still with the friggin' frozen vegetables "steamed" in the microwave! Do they just think that's how green beans are supposed to taste?

I'm in the same boat as many of you folks.  I hated most veggies growing up because they all came from a can and were boiled to death.  To be honest, I would LOVE if my mom steamed frozen vegetables.  I'm actually always trying to get her to make the switch from canned to frozen, because let's be honest, making the switch to fresh is just not a reasonable goal.  I spent the early part of my adult life teaching myself how to like vegetables that used to make me gag.  The biggest success was brussel sprouts.  I HATED brussel sprouts growing up (the one veggie my mom bought fresh, but she tortured it to death in a long, slow boil).  Now, it is absolutely one of my favorite foods.  I could eat that stuff like candy.  Seriously amazing!
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3042 on: June 23, 2014, 08:36:47 PM »
Lol I now love Brussel sprouts and spinach both. We used to have spinach from a can and it always made me gag just smelling it. And the texture of it gross.
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Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3043 on: June 23, 2014, 10:21:10 PM »

This looks like something Oscar the Grouch would eat on Sesame Street.

Jello and... olives?  Seriously?!?

Lol I now love Brussel sprouts and spinach both. We used to have spinach from a can and it always made me gag just smelling it. And the texture of it gross.
Growing up, cooked spinach or asparagus in our house was always a confrontation of epic proportions.  We protested for years and eventually Mom gave up.

Then after college I discovered that the stuff grows in gardens, not cans, and can be eaten fresh.  Amazing.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2014, 10:23:52 PM by Nords »
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3044 on: June 23, 2014, 11:14:32 PM »
Since people loved the Jello salad so much, I'll just leave this here:

https://www.google.com/search?q="the+joys+of+jello"&source=lnms&tbm=isch

and one more for the road for you shrimp lovers:


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3045 on: June 23, 2014, 11:39:23 PM »
Since people loved the Jello salad so much, I'll just leave this here:

https://www.google.com/search?q="the+joys+of+jello"&source=lnms&tbm=isch

and one more for the road for you shrimp lovers:



Oh my...That meal would certainly be "memorable". Ugh.
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boyerbt

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3046 on: June 24, 2014, 06:26:02 AM »
A coworker is currently going through the process of selling a house and purchasing a new home. Due to a past foreclosure he has to sign for the lone himself and if they are lucky, they may break even on the current house.

Just the other day we received an update notice for our 401k program and he mentioned that he may have to wipe out the retirement and start over to buy the new home...my coworker is in his 40's. I asked what he would do and he said that he would just have to invest more money afterwards and more aggressively. I don't think he understands how compound interest works.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3047 on: June 24, 2014, 06:33:48 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

Ugh. Yes. I grew up on cream of crap soup casseroles and I know a lot of my friends did, too. We joke about it now because none of us will touch that stuff with our own cooking. My parents made other things that were pretty good (thank goodness) but they still rely a lot on those type of convenience foods.

I must be too young to understand this hate.  Cream of mushroom soup makes an awesome pasta sauce (add cream, chopped grilled chicken, lots of mushrooms sauteed in butter, and pepper) and great pork chops.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3048 on: June 24, 2014, 06:50:38 AM »
Eh, I'm a boomer, and I cook, mostly from scratch.  My mom grew up in the 40's and HATES cooking. 

I learned pretty much on my own, in the era of microwaves (which really didn't come out until the 80's IIRC).

I too am a boomer and I cook.  My mother grew up during the depression and was a awful cook.  She lived on fried egg sandwiches, pancakes (with basted eggs on top), potatoes, pudding, and cake.  Veggies were from a can and the only thing she made that we three children still make and eat is potato soup.

Even when it was necessary to cook to feed the family, my mother found fast, easy, bad-tasting, and unhealthy food to serve us.  One good thing was that she rarely, if ever, bought candy, ice cream, chips, and other processed junk food.  I grew up before "fast food" restaurants.  I saw my first McDonalds in my teens.

Note that we were all overweight

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3049 on: June 24, 2014, 07:12:09 AM »
Quote
My parents are/were the worst cooks in the world. My mom can hardly boil water and my dad over cooks everything. I use to jump for joy when we would have take out, not because I enjoyed eating junk for dinner, but because the food my parents made was awful. I'm actually grateful my parents didn't teach me to cook. Instead, I've had to learn from friends, friend's parents, and thank god for the Internet.

I feel exactly the same! I figured out cooking on my own and through other people - and starting cooking all my food in about my mid teens. I remember a whole lot of nasty, boiled-to-death vegetables from my childhood.

I think there may have been an era back in the 50s/60s/70s where all the baby boomers learned to cook really terrible food using processed "ingredients" (e.g. Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup) and that miracle of modern technology, the microwave. We know better now, but "convenience" was all the rage back then...

Ugh. Yes. I grew up on cream of crap soup casseroles and I know a lot of my friends did, too. We joke about it now because none of us will touch that stuff with our own cooking. My parents made other things that were pretty good (thank goodness) but they still rely a lot on those type of convenience foods.

I must be too young to understand this hate.  Cream of mushroom soup makes an awesome pasta sauce (add cream, chopped grilled chicken, lots of mushrooms sauteed in butter, and pepper) and great pork chops.

Minus the canned soup and it sounds like a great recipe!