Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5882598 times)

limeandpepper

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2750 on: May 29, 2014, 11:23:01 PM »
Still cultural... in Slovakia 75% of young adults live with their parents.  I'm sure they are still having sex.

Haha, yep. In my parents' hometown, we have a bunch of relatives (several different families spanning a few generations) who all live together in a big house. And it seems like every year someone in that house is having a baby.

bikebum

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2751 on: May 29, 2014, 11:33:35 PM »
Someone at my work recently retired, and this guy said he's got another 25 years til he can retire. Then he said I have another 30. I guess he's just looking at our ages and assuming we will retire at 55 or 60. I just kept my mouth shut and smiled to myself. It's kinda fun when people make assumptions about you that are not true; it's like you have a cool secret. He's gonna be surprised one day.

galliver

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2752 on: May 30, 2014, 12:02:17 AM »
I find it interesting that most other social conventions get challenged on this site, but "working adults must live separately from their parents" seems to get assumed and defended a fair bit. There's still an undertone of shame or extreme circumstances when that choice is discussed.
Perhaps it's because the hot chicks are reluctant to spend the night at the bachelor pad of a guy who lives in his mother's basement...

I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, only that it's difficult to procreate those genes to future generations.

To the best of my understanding, the purpose of a guy (is he hot too? that wasn't specified for some reason) bringing "hot chicks" back to his "pad" to "spend the night" is not procreation.  In fact procreation is a pretty undesirable outcome in these situations ;)

johnintaiwan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2753 on: May 30, 2014, 01:20:13 AM »
Common in TW for people to live with parents until they get married. But that is why there are so many motels you can rent for 3 hrs at a time which include free porno, hot tubs and the like. .. I mean thats what I have heard anyway...

grantmeaname

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2754 on: May 30, 2014, 01:24:07 AM »
So if you're insinuating that *I* don't know what I'm doing, then that's bunk. If I buy or sell or change my investment strategy, of course I will research before I make a move. That doesn't mean I could sit down and write out with precision the dictionary definitions of certain terms.
I don't think they're insinuating it, I think you said it.

Quote
If we're talking about the average Jane or Joe investing in their retirement account, I think it would be NICE if they did some research, but no, it's not necessary. Retirement accounts are made for dummies now, and I think that's the way it should be.
I entirely disagree. If they don't know their VTSAX from their elbow, how are they going to avoid signing up for a variable annuity with 3%-a-year fees when they finally do decide to put money away? Investors may not need to know the differences between MSCI and CRSP indices, but they need to know what exactly they're investing in, how it works, and what it costs - especially if their intermediaries are trying to make fee disclosures as opaque as possible and HR knows fuck-all about the plan they're offering.

grantmeaname

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2755 on: May 30, 2014, 01:24:52 AM »
Do I sense a secondthird coming of the living with parents debate?

Adventine

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2756 on: May 30, 2014, 04:24:50 AM »
Common in TW for people to live with parents until they get married. But that is why there are so many motels you can rent for 3 hrs at a time which include free porno, hot tubs and the like. .. I mean thats what I have heard anyway...

Same where I live. Not that I've had any personal experience. Ahem.

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2757 on: May 30, 2014, 05:41:05 AM »
Common in TW for people to live with parents until they get married. But that is why there are so many motels you can rent for 3 hrs at a time which include free porno, hot tubs and the like. .. I mean thats what I have heard anyway...

Same where I live. Not that I've had any personal experience. Ahem.
This whole sharing economy is out of control!

There's at least one university in England where dorm rooms are not only single occupancy (no need to "reserve" room from roommate!), but they even provide queen size beds.

Beaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2758 on: May 30, 2014, 09:05:32 AM »
I also have people who come in all the time and want me to save their home.  I ask them "how much were you making a month when you bought the home" and the'll reply "$2,500 a month."  I then ask them "how much was your mortgage payment a month" and they'll say "$2,200."  And then they'll go into a rant as to how this is the bank's fault and that they are at no fault for failing to make their mortgage payments.

Aside from the shame on those people for borrowing to pay 2200 p/m when they earn 2500 p/m, I would also say shame on the lending institution...  Seriously we know that a lot of people don't understand money, but you would think that the people lending them money would know better, especially as in the US you have the ability to lock in interest rates...

Note: I live in Australia, interest rates are mostly variable, with the ability to lock in for 5 years.  There are also tighter lending restrictions which include loan servicability, I believe that currently, sensible lending institutions look at whether the people can service the loan at an 8% interest rate, current rates are around 5-6%.

I tend to agree - it takes two to make a stupid loan.

I got my first mortgage back in the pre-crash days. Having just switched jobs, I ended up with a "No Documentation" loan. They literally just asked me what I made, and accepted the answer I gave them without checking. The broker literally called it a "Liar's Loan" because most people got them so that they could buy a house that they couldn't actually afford. I probably could've told them I made a million billion trillion dollars per year and they would've just asked how many zeroes that was. Ridiculous for the bank to offer it, and equally ridiculous for all the people that took it as an opportunity to get into massive debt.

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2759 on: May 30, 2014, 09:13:42 AM »
Ahh you reminded me of another terrible coworker.

Strike one:
This guy has a 1 bedroom apartment with his cat. He's super close with his parents so I thought it was stupid that he was moving out bc he claims he claims he has practically no savings and is paying off his student loan. As soon as his one car loan was about to be paid off, this guy chooses to trade it in and buy a NEW car. I ask him why but a new car, you were about to have no car payment at all. His response, "it was priced right". A new car is neverrrrr priced right.

I fail to see why it's a strike for an adult to stand on their own and not sponge of mom & dad any longer.  (Now yes, better to have a place where he can also save and to not buy a new car, but still, not making mom & dad foot his lifestyle is good.)

I agree w/ it being good that he move out on his own to be an adult... but there are plenty of ways people can contribute to the household to limit the mooching. Also, the guy got along really really really well with his parents (if I got along w/ my parents as well as he does w/ his, I definitely would have stayed in their home much longer... but unfortunately my parents drive me insane).

And I guess I should have also noted that it felt like the guy was only moving out of his place b/c all of his co-workers were moving into new places and getting new cars.

I find it interesting that most other social conventions get challenged on this site, but "working adults must live separately from their parents" seems to get assumed and defended a fair bit. There's still an undertone of shame or extreme circumstances when that choice is discussed.

If you read above, you'll see my issue is with the "sponging" off mom & dad (or anyone really).  If his parents are ok with him living at home AND HE PAYS HIS FAIR SHARE OF THE BILLS (and by this, I don't just mean his cell bill but everything, including rent or money to the mortgage), then great but that wasn't the impression I got.

lisahi

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2760 on: May 30, 2014, 09:22:58 AM »
So if you're insinuating that *I* don't know what I'm doing, then that's bunk. If I buy or sell or change my investment strategy, of course I will research before I make a move. That doesn't mean I could sit down and write out with precision the dictionary definitions of certain terms.
I don't think they're insinuating it, I think you said it.

Quote
If we're talking about the average Jane or Joe investing in their retirement account, I think it would be NICE if they did some research, but no, it's not necessary. Retirement accounts are made for dummies now, and I think that's the way it should be.
I entirely disagree. If they don't know their VTSAX from their elbow, how are they going to avoid signing up for a variable annuity with 3%-a-year fees when they finally do decide to put money away? Investors may not need to know the differences between MSCI and CRSP indices, but they need to know what exactly they're investing in, how it works, and what it costs - especially if their intermediaries are trying to make fee disclosures as opaque as possible and HR knows fuck-all about the plan they're offering.

I can see you didn't get what I was trying to say, but that could be my fault and that's fine. This is an argument not worth having and I'm not invested in what you think I did or didn't mean or do or don't know. So let's get back to the purpose of this thread.

iris lily

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2761 on: May 30, 2014, 10:16:32 AM »
Our Mustachian friend moved into his parents home when he was in his 30's in order to save money--fast--for a house. It was fine with them and I doubt that he paid for anything because they had no debt (house and cars paid for--his father wanted to do all the yard work himself etc. being VERY Mustachian.)

DH lived with his parents, on their farm, into his 30's. He helped with farm work during the season. He saved up a nice 'stache doing so, and that initial 'stache propelled us into big 'stache territory 25 years later. And not surprisingly, DH's parents are very frugal and will die multi-Millionaires.

There's nothing wrong with responsible adult children living in the parental home, paying or not paying to stay there, when all parties agree it's a good thing.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 10:19:15 AM by iris lily »

PeteD01

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2762 on: May 30, 2014, 10:28:15 AM »
All of these examples show a real lack of effort on the part of the US gvt to educate its citizens about simple financial matters.

It is not the US govts job to "educate" its citizenry.

But they are doing it anyways:

http://investor.gov/


Not a bad resource at all.

Insanity

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2763 on: May 30, 2014, 10:30:58 AM »
Our Mustachian friend moved into his parents home when he was in his 30's in order to save money--fast--for a house. It was fine with them, I doubt that he paid for anything because they had no debt (house and cars paid for--his father wanted to do all the yard work himself etc. being VERY Mustachian themselves.)

DH lived with his parents, on their farm, into his 30's. He helped with farm work during the season. He saved up a nice 'stache doing so, and that initial 'stache propelled us into big 'stache territory 25 years later.

There's nothing wrong with responsible adult children living in the parental home, paying or not paying to stay there, when all parties agree it's a good thing.

Yep. It totally depends on the relationship. We have a loan with my parents where every payment they fight me on paying it back.  They wouldn't care if we lived with them and didn't pay any rent, food, or whatever. 


Le0

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2764 on: May 30, 2014, 02:24:40 PM »
I have to weigh in here. My brother is in his second year of university. My mother works at the university, which is about a 20 min bike from home. She bikes when ever the weather lets her.

Because she works at the university my brother and sister get free tuition (GRRR I missed out). So you would think that my brother would live at home, work in the summer and save money while attending school. Maybe even buy a house once he gets a 'real' job. Nope he chooses to rent a house in town, about 20 mins on the other side of the university. Everything he makes goes to paying for his lifestyle, and to top it off, he missed a rent payment recently, and is talking about dropping out of school to work. (I am not against not going to school, but when its free its hard to argue against it)

Nothing I say can turn him around, he does what feels good.

One case where he should be living at home.
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MamaStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2765 on: May 30, 2014, 02:32:22 PM »
Conversation on Tuesday:
Me:   What did you guys do this weekend?
Co-worker: Went to the casino with my friend.   We lost.

Conversation on Wednesday:
Co-worker: OK, tell me if you think I'm a bad mom.  Stacy and Chad* (children's names changed) want to join soccer this summer.  It's costs $100 each for them to join.  If I pay by the end of next week, I can save 10%. 
Me: Oh cool...
Co-worker:  Well, I already told them they could play.  But I am thinking about it now that it is really expensive and they both got a $50 bill from Christmas that they didn't spend yet.  I think I am going to tell them they have to pay $50 each towards sign up costs if they want to play.
Me: That would be a good lession in priorities and money for them, but you already told them they could play.
Co-worker:  yeah but I can talk them into using their own money.
Me: At least don't make them pay all of their Christmas money.   They will be paying over 1/2..... and you already told them they could play!

I just feel bad that she feels that trips to the casino are affordable but investing in activities she promised her children are not.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2766 on: May 30, 2014, 02:44:09 PM »
Conversation on Tuesday:
Me:   What did you guys do this weekend?
Co-worker: Went to the casino with my friend.   We lost.

Conversation on Wednesday:
Co-worker: OK, tell me if you think I'm a bad mom.  Stacy and Chad* (children's names changed) want to join soccer this summer.  It's costs $100 each for them to join.  If I pay by the end of next week, I can save 10%. 
Me: Oh cool...
Co-worker:  Well, I already told them they could play.  But I am thinking about it now that it is really expensive and they both got a $50 bill from Christmas that they didn't spend yet.  I think I am going to tell them they have to pay $50 each towards sign up costs if they want to play.
Me: That would be a good lession in priorities and money for them, but you already told them they could play.
Co-worker:  yeah but I can talk them into using their own money.
Me: At least don't make them pay all of their Christmas money.   They will be paying over 1/2..... and you already told them they could play!

I just feel bad that she feels that trips to the casino are affordable but investing in activities she promised her children are not.

dont have kids but that seems like a shit thing to do.  I will gamble a bit bit draw the line at 50$ a few times a year.  Just seems like changing the rules half way along, "O-you want to eat this week, well you remember that tooth fairy money...".
 
At some point would it be ok to tell your kids that they have say a 300$ per year (or some such) event/activity budget and that includes birthday parties and sports and holding them to that?
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Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2767 on: May 30, 2014, 03:27:10 PM »
Coworker on the phone with his son, talking about his daughter: "Get her inside. She doesn't need to be outside all day"

I'm not sure of the exact ages of his kids but I'm pretty sure they're preteen and up

grantmeaname

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2768 on: May 30, 2014, 03:31:06 PM »
Maybe she has work to get done? That's the most generous explanation.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2769 on: May 30, 2014, 04:12:22 PM »
Maybe she has work to get done? That's the most generous explanation.

Or maybe he's worried about UV exposure?

bikebum

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2770 on: May 30, 2014, 06:58:13 PM »
Our Mustachian friend moved into his parents home when he was in his 30's in order to save money--fast--for a house. It was fine with them, I doubt that he paid for anything because they had no debt (house and cars paid for--his father wanted to do all the yard work himself etc. being VERY Mustachian themselves.)

DH lived with his parents, on their farm, into his 30's. He helped with farm work during the season. He saved up a nice 'stache doing so, and that initial 'stache propelled us into big 'stache territory 25 years later.

There's nothing wrong with responsible adult children living in the parental home, paying or not paying to stay there, when all parties agree it's a good thing.

Yep. It totally depends on the relationship. We have a loan with my parents where every payment they fight me on paying it back.  They wouldn't care if we lived with them and didn't pay any rent, food, or whatever.

I lived with my parents as a working professional for a while. I paid rent, but when I decided to save and buy a house, they said to not pay rent anymore and put it towards the down payment. That allowed me to get my own house really fast. It was a good thing for me.

limeandpepper

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2771 on: May 30, 2014, 07:12:27 PM »
There's nothing wrong with responsible adult children living in the parental home, paying or not paying to stay there, when all parties agree it's a good thing.

+1

If the parents don't care about payment, not sure why a stranger should decide what's wrong for someone else's family matters.

shortly

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2772 on: May 30, 2014, 07:22:22 PM »
A coworker just traded in a three-year-old car (3,000 miles on it, still upside down on its loan) and bought a new car. Payments on the new car are over $700 per month for who knows how long.

Yes, 3,000 miles is correct.

The really bad part? The aforementioned coworker and spouse both work (at the same place) with me and ride together everyday - in the spouse's car that also has a giant payment.

greenmimama

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2773 on: May 30, 2014, 09:19:27 PM »
A coworker just traded in a three-year-old car (3,000 miles on it, still upside down on its loan) and bought a new car. Payments on the new car are over $700 per month for who knows how long.

Yes, 3,000 miles is correct.

The really bad part? The aforementioned coworker and spouse both work (at the same place) with me and ride together everyday - in the spouse's car that also has a giant payment.

Whoa, talk about overkill

Latwell

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2774 on: May 30, 2014, 10:23:45 PM »
Ahh you reminded me of another terrible coworker.

Strike one:
This guy has a 1 bedroom apartment with his cat. He's super close with his parents so I thought it was stupid that he was moving out bc he claims he claims he has practically no savings and is paying off his student loan. As soon as his one car loan was about to be paid off, this guy chooses to trade it in and buy a NEW car. I ask him why but a new car, you were about to have no car payment at all. His response, "it was priced right". A new car is neverrrrr priced right.

I fail to see why it's a strike for an adult to stand on their own and not sponge of mom & dad any longer.  (Now yes, better to have a place where he can also save and to not buy a new car, but still, not making mom & dad foot his lifestyle is good.)

By the way, strike one wasn't him moving out of his parents house. The moving out part background leading to strike #2. Strike 1 was him buying a NEW car bc it's "priced right". Strike 2 was him seriously considering to upgrade his apartment from a 1 bedroom to 2 bedroom so his cat has more room.

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2775 on: May 31, 2014, 05:13:18 AM »
Today a young coworker was complaining about retirement to an older coworker. The conversation went something like this
Young cw "I'll never be able to retire thanks to Obama and the nazis blah blah blah"
Old cw "if I was your age I would just try and save one dollar everyday and put that in a savings account you would be set by the time you retire"
There are two types of people in this world. Those who think they can and those who think they can't. They are both right. - Henry ford

NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2776 on: May 31, 2014, 06:38:25 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving. 
Blogging about mindset and making different choices at http://mommywontwork.blogspot.com/

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2777 on: May 31, 2014, 07:01:03 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

HOLY CRAP!!!! Good for you! Let them be all pissy lol. It's alway amazes me how some people can have such resentment for somebody who has achieved their goals.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who think they can and those who think they can't. They are both right. - Henry ford

ncornilsen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2778 on: May 31, 2014, 07:51:34 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

HOLY CRAP!!!! Good for you! Let them be all pissy lol. It's alway amazes me how some people can have such resentment for somebody who has achieved their goals.

You retiring is just holding up a big mirror that makes them see how little they've been doing... so they feel guilty, and transmit that back as the jealousy, etc... it's funny isn't it?

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2779 on: May 31, 2014, 07:56:18 AM »
Today a young coworker was complaining about retirement to an older coworker. The conversation went something like this
Young cw "I'll never be able to retire thanks to Obama and the nazis blah blah blah"
Old cw "if I was your age I would just try and save one dollar everyday and put that in a savings account you would be set by the time you retire"

That's almost as good as my mom telling my sister to save 1% of her income for retirement--as though it were good advice. For the record, my sister earned around $11,000 last year.

Unfortunately, I don't think she even saved 1%.

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2780 on: May 31, 2014, 08:23:56 AM »
yea I didn't bother to explain that $1x365x working careerX0.01% interest (he specifically said savings account) = not very much at all by the time you retire.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who think they can and those who think they can't. They are both right. - Henry ford

trailrated

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2781 on: May 31, 2014, 09:03:49 AM »
yea I didn't bother to explain that $1x365x working careerX0.01% interest (he specifically said savings account) = not very much at all by the time you retire.

Enough to fully fund a 401k for 1 year.... if the limit does not go up at all for 40 years...
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Twenty4Me

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2782 on: May 31, 2014, 11:14:41 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

Congratulations!!!

Redgreen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2783 on: May 31, 2014, 11:22:39 AM »
My first post, hello all :)

Last year a woman I work with had been trying to save for a new motorcycle, she bought a used car for around $800.00 in great condition and very low milage (good move on her part).

She got the bike at the end of the summer and last week bought a used truck with the trade in on her paid off Bronco, another loan.

This conversation we had yesterday.
Me; So, how much did you pay for the bike?
CW; 11k
Me; Oh, so you paid up on it or about done?
CW; (After hearty laugh) No way.
Me; But you where saving for it, how much did you put down on it?
CW; $1.500.00, (laughing) I'm in so much debt, but you know, you can't take it with you. When you retire, you might be withered and old not able to enjoy it, so you might want to enjoy it while you can.
Me; True, but, what if you retire and are perfectly healthy and don't have anything left?

The subject then turned to my relatives and hers that are way past retirement and enjoying life. I think it made her think but not sure it sunk in all the way.

There are so many at work that I could start my own thread here.   
« Last Edit: May 31, 2014, 11:26:17 AM by Redgreen »

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2784 on: May 31, 2014, 03:15:32 PM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."
Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.
Retirement has a way of separating your friends from your co-workers...
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mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2785 on: May 31, 2014, 06:37:29 PM »
     I've been talking to the guys at work about finances lately and I've come to realize that out of the 40 or so regular people I work with there are exactly 2 that I know of that have even a clue about the subject of investing. So, recently at a Union meeting I brought up that I'd like to have a financial representative from our annuity plan come in and give a presentation on how the plan works and what you can invest in.
     Many people balked at the idea because no one really understands it. I said that I understood it and so should everyone else. I then asked for a show of hands as to who knew the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account....not one hand went up. Some of these guys have been contributing for over 20 years and have no clue where their money is invested! They were mortified to find out that investing is one of those things that you must self educate yourself about.

I would struggle to verbally answer the question as to the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account. I know somewhat, but not enough to try and articulate it. That said, all I care about is whether I'm getting a good return and whether my investments are diversified at the risk level I'm willing to accept at this point in my life. You don't actually need to know a whole lot about the specifics of investing to achieve that through your retirement account. Most retirement investing through employer-provided accounts allows you to pick funds by answering a few questions about what you want and where you want to be at retirement. You then choose the funds which are recommended, and ignore it until you need the money. While I'm sure educating yourself and picking investments for maximum return may be a challenge some people want to take on, you don't need to get into specifics to be able to achieve a decent return on your retirement accounts. The important thing is that you're contributing sufficiently.

Obviously, if you want to invest beyond what is provided by your employer, then you should work to educate yourself on more specifics of choosing funds, diversifying, managing risk, etc.

With all due respect to you...one of the cardinal rules of investing is "if you dont understand what you are investing in, dont invest in it". You are leaving too much in the hands of others. This info is not complicated and is all over the web. Good luck
Or, you pay someone else to do the work for you.
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mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2786 on: May 31, 2014, 06:40:56 PM »
I find it interesting that most other social conventions get challenged on this site, but "working adults must live separately from their parents" seems to get assumed and defended a fair bit. There's still an undertone of shame or extreme circumstances when that choice is discussed.
Perhaps it's because the hot chicks are reluctant to spend the night at the bachelor pad of a guy who lives in his mother's basement...

I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, only that it's difficult to procreate those genes to future generations.
Ha!  You know, I *just* finished The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz (on your recommendation, I think?) and that was an interesting part of the book.  How we moved towards this "nuclear family" model and it doesn't always work out best.

I have, in the past, thought "you still live with your parents?"  But I have a younger coworker who is 27 and lives with his parents.  That kid is saving BANK.  He brings his lunch every day, and his "fun" is fishing and camping.  My step dad lived with his parents until he married my mom, at 43.

NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2787 on: June 01, 2014, 06:17:30 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."
Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.
Retirement has a way of separating your friends from your co-workers...

Thanks so much for all of the support, all!  My MIL can be a pain at times, but she summed it up:  "Fuck them!  We'll have cake and our own celebration!"  :-)
Blogging about mindset and making different choices at http://mommywontwork.blogspot.com/

Zamboni

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2788 on: June 01, 2014, 07:00:48 AM »
They've only had 1 retirement celebration at my offices the whole time I've been working.  The one time was for a guy in his 80's.  They didn't do much (a cake and some balloons and a little gathering), but it was something.  Generally there were no parties at that place, but one of the admin assistants really liked him so she organized it.

Then a few months later another guy (in his 70's) retired.  Nada.  He made a comment to me about it later.  That was when I realized how sucky we were at that particular place about retirements and life transitions in general (like babies, graduations, etc.)

But two people made their retirements a celebration day in their own way:  both times by walking around and ceremoniously giving their "stuff" away to other individuals at work. 

The first guy I barely knew because I was just a co-op student at the time, but we did say "hi" when we passed in the hallway frequently and sometimes sat in the same meetings.  One day he was working on something and I heard him say "If this doesn't work right tomorrow morning, then that's it, I'm going to retire." The next afternoon he approached me in my lab holding his stapler in both hands and said "Zamboni, you've been really pleasant to work with this year, and I'm hoping you'll appreciate having my stapler since I won't be needing it anymore."  So I took the stapler, thanked him for being a nice co-worker, wished him well, and we shook hands.  Apparently he did the same thing with various people with his scissors, tape dispenser, cup full of pens, etc.  It sounds corny, but we all became possessive of those items.  "Hey, hey, don't touch that stapler!  It's the one Jim gave me!"

Another time (different place) a woman was retiring.  This was pre-MMM, and she seemed too young to retire to me and everyone else.  Her last day she also gave away a bunch of her stuff individually and ceremoniously, but this time she brought in stuff like "work clothes" from home as well.  For example, she gave me her briefcase, which I had complimented one day when we were on a business trip together.  Hilariously, she gave my colleague her work stash of pads and tampons (ceremoniously.)  I think she brought in a few things targeting people but then tried to give everybody something.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2789 on: June 01, 2014, 07:09:44 AM »
When an older lady retired recently, the bosses' PA organised for two baby orangutans to be adopted in her name and we had cake. We actually are a fairly celebratory group, though, and have "10 rules of cake" which dictate when you must bring in snacks to share, and have previously had Xmas decoration competitions while the other floors in our building (all the same company) just put up a single corporate decorated Xmas tree.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2790 on: June 01, 2014, 07:24:06 AM »
So, I've retired twice from the same place.  The first time I got NADA.  Nothing.  No one took me to lunch, so I just left.  Later they called me back to work part time.  After three years of that I sent in my second retirement letter.  About a month later I got a nice plaque and a card signed by the people who were working there at the time.  Of course it came by mail...

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2791 on: June 01, 2014, 07:40:12 AM »
In my work place retirements are celebrated extensively. How extensively depends a bit from the final position in the department. When one of the project leaders retired (he was 62) we had a celebratory lecture by him followed by a small party with cakes, beer, wine and presents for the guy. We all collected some money for presents (cake and wine are brought by the guy leaving), head of the department gave a speech etc. When a lab technician retires he/she usually invites people they have worked with during the years and generally people they like to a small party in the coffee corner again providing food and drinks, but collecting presents in return. Not mandatory of course, but almost all people do. In fact almost everyone does it when they leave, doesn't necessarily have to be retirement. If it's someone really important then it would be organised officially with everyone invited.

Actually we are quite good at celebrating things here. For every major achievement (new product on the market, for example) or just a stage gate there would be a picnic organised on company grounds, the core team might be invited for a dinner to a fancy restaurant etc. Sometimes they would also distribute extra vouchers one could spend in local shops (non-food).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2792 on: June 01, 2014, 07:41:50 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

Congratulations! At the very least, the experience shows you (if you didn't already know) who the good ones were.
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blackomen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2793 on: June 01, 2014, 12:19:59 PM »
My fiancee had this conversation with a coworker shortly after we got engaged -

Coworker: Congrats!  I hope he's financially secure.  What car does he drive?
Fiancee: A 1999 Honda Civic.
Coworker: What???  That doesn't look really good.  So what kind of work does he do?
Fiancee: He's a analyst for a Hedge Fund.

The coworker was speechless after that...

And no, contrary to what you might read in the media, I only make roughly the median US salary.

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2794 on: June 01, 2014, 03:27:51 PM »
In my work place retirements are celebrated extensively.
Military retirement ceremonies are such a big deal that my spouse and I actually found them to be too stressful.  When our turns came, we politely declined... and then disappeared early on our last day in the office.

Some of our chains of command were insistent about following the tradition, or that we'd change our minds and resent the bosses for not talking us into having a ceremony, or that we were missing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, or that we were somehow disrespecting their professional skill at executing a retirement ceremony.  We had several lectures about "closure" and "paying respects" and "saying goodbyes".  I saw the whole thing as a huge time-wasting hassle, and there was no way that I wanted to be up on a stage in dress whites spending hours of my valuable liberty following a script instead of having fun.

Besides, I'd seen one or two steely-eyed killers of the deep get just a little teary-eyed from the sound track and the emotional impact of the moment.  I wasn't going to take that risk, either...

You know, I *just* finished The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz (on your recommendation, I think?) and that was an interesting part of the book.  How we moved towards this "nuclear family" model and it doesn't always work out best.
Glad you enjoyed it!  That was a real eye-opener on our short-term appreciation for cultural history.
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AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2795 on: June 01, 2014, 07:05:03 PM »
We have only had a few people leave (voluntarily) while I have been at my current employer, was always a good lunch out attended by everyone and a nice gift or two.  I imagine my perfect retirement day would be the group lunch then bumming a ride to the airport to start a round the world trip paid for with airline miles staying in hostels and only taking what I could carry on my back.  That feeling of freedom would have to be off the carts, then to have your first-post-career-morning be in Fiji....
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eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2796 on: June 01, 2014, 08:19:47 PM »
Thanks so much for all of the support, all!  My MIL can be a pain at times, but she summed it up:  "Fuck them!  We'll have cake and our own celebration!"  :-)

Congrats!!! Too bad for your (former!) coworkers that they can't be glad about it or at least take some inspiration to better their own situation. I'm slowly beginning to realize a big part of being happy in life is knowing how to have your own party and disregard the personal inability of others to participate in being happy with you. Enjoy the cake!!

Re: thread topic: I hear some pretty defeatist things at work about how much a person 'needs', i.e. about lifestyle inflation. My previous job at a fancy grocery paid quite a lot less, and my coworkers then still somehow scraped by. If I admit what I budget for food, people gape and assume I'm starving ($95 means not only do I not starve, I have an imported cheese affinity I still get to indulge.) The other day in line I heard a coworker telling another he 'needed' $300-500/mo. for groceries for himself alone and lamenting how expensive food has gotten - turns out he shops almost exclusively at my aforementioned former workplace.

The lack of perspective among the relatively high-income is what baffles me - do you think it's ever occurred to him or the masses like him that the people working where he shops, living in the same area, make maybe half as much and still, somehow, eat?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2797 on: June 02, 2014, 02:01:23 AM »
Quote
Military retirement ceremonies...

One more mandatory formation...

trailrated

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2798 on: June 02, 2014, 09:49:59 AM »
Sorry for my rant if I just "don't get it" being young. But it seems like some posters are upset they did not get a retirement party or recognition at work before they left. I guess my POV is you finally achieved FI, and all they other people at work have not...therefore they are still working. So you expect people that do not have FI to spend money on you? I don't get it.

Although I would understand some nice words or a card after years of working with people.
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dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2799 on: June 02, 2014, 10:23:22 AM »
     I've been talking to the guys at work about finances lately and I've come to realize that out of the 40 or so regular people I work with there are exactly 2 that I know of that have even a clue about the subject of investing. So, recently at a Union meeting I brought up that I'd like to have a financial representative from our annuity plan come in and give a presentation on how the plan works and what you can invest in.
     Many people balked at the idea because no one really understands it. I said that I understood it and so should everyone else. I then asked for a show of hands as to who knew the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account....not one hand went up. Some of these guys have been contributing for over 20 years and have no clue where their money is invested! They were mortified to find out that investing is one of those things that you must self educate yourself about.

I would struggle to verbally answer the question as to the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account. I know somewhat, but not enough to try and articulate it. That said, all I care about is whether I'm getting a good return and whether my investments are diversified at the risk level I'm willing to accept at this point in my life. You don't actually need to know a whole lot about the specifics of investing to achieve that through your retirement account. Most retirement investing through employer-provided accounts allows you to pick funds by answering a few questions about what you want and where you want to be at retirement. You then choose the funds which are recommended, and ignore it until you need the money. While I'm sure educating yourself and picking investments for maximum return may be a challenge some people want to take on, you don't need to get into specifics to be able to achieve a decent return on your retirement accounts. The important thing is that you're contributing sufficiently.

Obviously, if you want to invest beyond what is provided by your employer, then you should work to educate yourself on more specifics of choosing funds, diversifying, managing risk, etc.

With all due respect to you...one of the cardinal rules of investing is "if you dont understand what you are investing in, dont invest in it". You are leaving too much in the hands of others. This info is not complicated and is all over the web. Good luck
Or, you pay someone else to do the work for you.
I know, I know, not exactly mustachian. I have a very good friend who makes a living as an investment advisor.

Hope his name isn't madoff...