Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8453954 times)

NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2750 on: May 31, 2014, 06:38:25 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving. 

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2751 on: May 31, 2014, 07:01:03 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

HOLY CRAP!!!! Good for you! Let them be all pissy lol. It's alway amazes me how some people can have such resentment for somebody who has achieved their goals.

ncornilsen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2752 on: May 31, 2014, 07:51:34 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

HOLY CRAP!!!! Good for you! Let them be all pissy lol. It's alway amazes me how some people can have such resentment for somebody who has achieved their goals.

You retiring is just holding up a big mirror that makes them see how little they've been doing... so they feel guilty, and transmit that back as the jealousy, etc... it's funny isn't it?

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2753 on: May 31, 2014, 07:56:18 AM »
Today a young coworker was complaining about retirement to an older coworker. The conversation went something like this
Young cw "I'll never be able to retire thanks to Obama and the nazis blah blah blah"
Old cw "if I was your age I would just try and save one dollar everyday and put that in a savings account you would be set by the time you retire"

That's almost as good as my mom telling my sister to save 1% of her income for retirement--as though it were good advice. For the record, my sister earned around $11,000 last year.

Unfortunately, I don't think she even saved 1%.

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2754 on: May 31, 2014, 08:23:56 AM »
yea I didn't bother to explain that $1x365x working careerX0.01% interest (he specifically said savings account) = not very much at all by the time you retire.

trailrated

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2755 on: May 31, 2014, 09:03:49 AM »
yea I didn't bother to explain that $1x365x working careerX0.01% interest (he specifically said savings account) = not very much at all by the time you retire.

Enough to fully fund a 401k for 1 year.... if the limit does not go up at all for 40 years...

Twenty4Me

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2756 on: May 31, 2014, 11:14:41 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

Congratulations!!!

Redgreen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2757 on: May 31, 2014, 11:22:39 AM »
My first post, hello all :)

Last year a woman I work with had been trying to save for a new motorcycle, she bought a used car for around $800.00 in great condition and very low milage (good move on her part).

She got the bike at the end of the summer and last week bought a used truck with the trade in on her paid off Bronco, another loan.

This conversation we had yesterday.
Me; So, how much did you pay for the bike?
CW; 11k
Me; Oh, so you paid up on it or about done?
CW; (After hearty laugh) No way.
Me; But you where saving for it, how much did you put down on it?
CW; $1.500.00, (laughing) I'm in so much debt, but you know, you can't take it with you. When you retire, you might be withered and old not able to enjoy it, so you might want to enjoy it while you can.
Me; True, but, what if you retire and are perfectly healthy and don't have anything left?

The subject then turned to my relatives and hers that are way past retirement and enjoying life. I think it made her think but not sure it sunk in all the way.

There are so many at work that I could start my own thread here.   
« Last Edit: May 31, 2014, 11:26:17 AM by Redgreen »

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2758 on: May 31, 2014, 03:15:32 PM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."
Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.
Retirement has a way of separating your friends from your co-workers...

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2759 on: May 31, 2014, 06:37:29 PM »
     I've been talking to the guys at work about finances lately and I've come to realize that out of the 40 or so regular people I work with there are exactly 2 that I know of that have even a clue about the subject of investing. So, recently at a Union meeting I brought up that I'd like to have a financial representative from our annuity plan come in and give a presentation on how the plan works and what you can invest in.
     Many people balked at the idea because no one really understands it. I said that I understood it and so should everyone else. I then asked for a show of hands as to who knew the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account....not one hand went up. Some of these guys have been contributing for over 20 years and have no clue where their money is invested! They were mortified to find out that investing is one of those things that you must self educate yourself about.

I would struggle to verbally answer the question as to the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account. I know somewhat, but not enough to try and articulate it. That said, all I care about is whether I'm getting a good return and whether my investments are diversified at the risk level I'm willing to accept at this point in my life. You don't actually need to know a whole lot about the specifics of investing to achieve that through your retirement account. Most retirement investing through employer-provided accounts allows you to pick funds by answering a few questions about what you want and where you want to be at retirement. You then choose the funds which are recommended, and ignore it until you need the money. While I'm sure educating yourself and picking investments for maximum return may be a challenge some people want to take on, you don't need to get into specifics to be able to achieve a decent return on your retirement accounts. The important thing is that you're contributing sufficiently.

Obviously, if you want to invest beyond what is provided by your employer, then you should work to educate yourself on more specifics of choosing funds, diversifying, managing risk, etc.

With all due respect to you...one of the cardinal rules of investing is "if you dont understand what you are investing in, dont invest in it". You are leaving too much in the hands of others. This info is not complicated and is all over the web. Good luck
Or, you pay someone else to do the work for you.
I know, I know, not exactly mustachian. I have a very good friend who makes a living as an investment advisor. 

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2760 on: May 31, 2014, 06:40:56 PM »
I find it interesting that most other social conventions get challenged on this site, but "working adults must live separately from their parents" seems to get assumed and defended a fair bit. There's still an undertone of shame or extreme circumstances when that choice is discussed.
Perhaps it's because the hot chicks are reluctant to spend the night at the bachelor pad of a guy who lives in his mother's basement...

I'm not saying that it's right or wrong, only that it's difficult to procreate those genes to future generations.
Ha!  You know, I *just* finished The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz (on your recommendation, I think?) and that was an interesting part of the book.  How we moved towards this "nuclear family" model and it doesn't always work out best.

I have, in the past, thought "you still live with your parents?"  But I have a younger coworker who is 27 and lives with his parents.  That kid is saving BANK.  He brings his lunch every day, and his "fun" is fishing and camping.  My step dad lived with his parents until he married my mom, at 43.

NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2761 on: June 01, 2014, 06:17:30 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."
Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.
Retirement has a way of separating your friends from your co-workers...

Thanks so much for all of the support, all!  My MIL can be a pain at times, but she summed it up:  "Fuck them!  We'll have cake and our own celebration!"  :-)

Zamboni

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2762 on: June 01, 2014, 07:00:48 AM »
They've only had 1 retirement celebration at my offices the whole time I've been working.  The one time was for a guy in his 80's.  They didn't do much (a cake and some balloons and a little gathering), but it was something.  Generally there were no parties at that place, but one of the admin assistants really liked him so she organized it.

Then a few months later another guy (in his 70's) retired.  Nada.  He made a comment to me about it later.  That was when I realized how sucky we were at that particular place about retirements and life transitions in general (like babies, graduations, etc.)

But two people made their retirements a celebration day in their own way:  both times by walking around and ceremoniously giving their "stuff" away to other individuals at work. 

The first guy I barely knew because I was just a co-op student at the time, but we did say "hi" when we passed in the hallway frequently and sometimes sat in the same meetings.  One day he was working on something and I heard him say "If this doesn't work right tomorrow morning, then that's it, I'm going to retire." The next afternoon he approached me in my lab holding his stapler in both hands and said "Zamboni, you've been really pleasant to work with this year, and I'm hoping you'll appreciate having my stapler since I won't be needing it anymore."  So I took the stapler, thanked him for being a nice co-worker, wished him well, and we shook hands.  Apparently he did the same thing with various people with his scissors, tape dispenser, cup full of pens, etc.  It sounds corny, but we all became possessive of those items.  "Hey, hey, don't touch that stapler!  It's the one Jim gave me!"

Another time (different place) a woman was retiring.  This was pre-MMM, and she seemed too young to retire to me and everyone else.  Her last day she also gave away a bunch of her stuff individually and ceremoniously, but this time she brought in stuff like "work clothes" from home as well.  For example, she gave me her briefcase, which I had complimented one day when we were on a business trip together.  Hilariously, she gave my colleague her work stash of pads and tampons (ceremoniously.)  I think she brought in a few things targeting people but then tried to give everybody something.

Anatidae V

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2763 on: June 01, 2014, 07:09:44 AM »
When an older lady retired recently, the bosses' PA organised for two baby orangutans to be adopted in her name and we had cake. We actually are a fairly celebratory group, though, and have "10 rules of cake" which dictate when you must bring in snacks to share, and have previously had Xmas decoration competitions while the other floors in our building (all the same company) just put up a single corporate decorated Xmas tree.

Joggernot

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2764 on: June 01, 2014, 07:24:06 AM »
So, I've retired twice from the same place.  The first time I got NADA.  Nothing.  No one took me to lunch, so I just left.  Later they called me back to work part time.  After three years of that I sent in my second retirement letter.  About a month later I got a nice plaque and a card signed by the people who were working there at the time.  Of course it came by mail...

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2765 on: June 01, 2014, 07:40:12 AM »
In my work place retirements are celebrated extensively. How extensively depends a bit from the final position in the department. When one of the project leaders retired (he was 62) we had a celebratory lecture by him followed by a small party with cakes, beer, wine and presents for the guy. We all collected some money for presents (cake and wine are brought by the guy leaving), head of the department gave a speech etc. When a lab technician retires he/she usually invites people they have worked with during the years and generally people they like to a small party in the coffee corner again providing food and drinks, but collecting presents in return. Not mandatory of course, but almost all people do. In fact almost everyone does it when they leave, doesn't necessarily have to be retirement. If it's someone really important then it would be organised officially with everyone invited.

Actually we are quite good at celebrating things here. For every major achievement (new product on the market, for example) or just a stage gate there would be a picnic organised on company grounds, the core team might be invited for a dinner to a fancy restaurant etc. Sometimes they would also distribute extra vouchers one could spend in local shops (non-food).

CarDude

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2766 on: June 01, 2014, 07:41:50 AM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

Congratulations! At the very least, the experience shows you (if you didn't already know) who the good ones were.

blackomen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2767 on: June 01, 2014, 12:19:59 PM »
My fiancee had this conversation with a coworker shortly after we got engaged -

Coworker: Congrats!  I hope he's financially secure.  What car does he drive?
Fiancee: A 1999 Honda Civic.
Coworker: What???  That doesn't look really good.  So what kind of work does he do?
Fiancee: He's a analyst for a Hedge Fund.

The coworker was speechless after that...

And no, contrary to what you might read in the media, I only make roughly the median US salary.

Nords

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2768 on: June 01, 2014, 03:27:51 PM »
In my work place retirements are celebrated extensively.
Military retirement ceremonies are such a big deal that my spouse and I actually found them to be too stressful.  When our turns came, we politely declined... and then disappeared early on our last day in the office.

Some of our chains of command were insistent about following the tradition, or that we'd change our minds and resent the bosses for not talking us into having a ceremony, or that we were missing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, or that we were somehow disrespecting their professional skill at executing a retirement ceremony.  We had several lectures about "closure" and "paying respects" and "saying goodbyes".  I saw the whole thing as a huge time-wasting hassle, and there was no way that I wanted to be up on a stage in dress whites spending hours of my valuable liberty following a script instead of having fun.

Besides, I'd seen one or two steely-eyed killers of the deep get just a little teary-eyed from the sound track and the emotional impact of the moment.  I wasn't going to take that risk, either...

You know, I *just* finished The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz (on your recommendation, I think?) and that was an interesting part of the book.  How we moved towards this "nuclear family" model and it doesn't always work out best.
Glad you enjoyed it!  That was a real eye-opener on our short-term appreciation for cultural history.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2769 on: June 01, 2014, 07:05:03 PM »
We have only had a few people leave (voluntarily) while I have been at my current employer, was always a good lunch out attended by everyone and a nice gift or two.  I imagine my perfect retirement day would be the group lunch then bumming a ride to the airport to start a round the world trip paid for with airline miles staying in hostels and only taking what I could carry on my back.  That feeling of freedom would have to be off the carts, then to have your first-post-career-morning be in Fiji....

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2770 on: June 01, 2014, 08:19:47 PM »
Thanks so much for all of the support, all!  My MIL can be a pain at times, but she summed it up:  "Fuck them!  We'll have cake and our own celebration!"  :-)

Congrats!!! Too bad for your (former!) coworkers that they can't be glad about it or at least take some inspiration to better their own situation. I'm slowly beginning to realize a big part of being happy in life is knowing how to have your own party and disregard the personal inability of others to participate in being happy with you. Enjoy the cake!!

Re: thread topic: I hear some pretty defeatist things at work about how much a person 'needs', i.e. about lifestyle inflation. My previous job at a fancy grocery paid quite a lot less, and my coworkers then still somehow scraped by. If I admit what I budget for food, people gape and assume I'm starving ($95 means not only do I not starve, I have an imported cheese affinity I still get to indulge.) The other day in line I heard a coworker telling another he 'needed' $300-500/mo. for groceries for himself alone and lamenting how expensive food has gotten - turns out he shops almost exclusively at my aforementioned former workplace.

The lack of perspective among the relatively high-income is what baffles me - do you think it's ever occurred to him or the masses like him that the people working where he shops, living in the same area, make maybe half as much and still, somehow, eat?

Travis

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2771 on: June 02, 2014, 02:01:23 AM »
Quote
Military retirement ceremonies...

One more mandatory formation...

trailrated

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2772 on: June 02, 2014, 09:49:59 AM »
Sorry for my rant if I just "don't get it" being young. But it seems like some posters are upset they did not get a retirement party or recognition at work before they left. I guess my POV is you finally achieved FI, and all they other people at work have not...therefore they are still working. So you expect people that do not have FI to spend money on you? I don't get it.

Although I would understand some nice words or a card after years of working with people.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2773 on: June 02, 2014, 10:23:22 AM »
     I've been talking to the guys at work about finances lately and I've come to realize that out of the 40 or so regular people I work with there are exactly 2 that I know of that have even a clue about the subject of investing. So, recently at a Union meeting I brought up that I'd like to have a financial representative from our annuity plan come in and give a presentation on how the plan works and what you can invest in.
     Many people balked at the idea because no one really understands it. I said that I understood it and so should everyone else. I then asked for a show of hands as to who knew the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account....not one hand went up. Some of these guys have been contributing for over 20 years and have no clue where their money is invested! They were mortified to find out that investing is one of those things that you must self educate yourself about.

I would struggle to verbally answer the question as to the difference between a mutual fund, an index fund and a money market account. I know somewhat, but not enough to try and articulate it. That said, all I care about is whether I'm getting a good return and whether my investments are diversified at the risk level I'm willing to accept at this point in my life. You don't actually need to know a whole lot about the specifics of investing to achieve that through your retirement account. Most retirement investing through employer-provided accounts allows you to pick funds by answering a few questions about what you want and where you want to be at retirement. You then choose the funds which are recommended, and ignore it until you need the money. While I'm sure educating yourself and picking investments for maximum return may be a challenge some people want to take on, you don't need to get into specifics to be able to achieve a decent return on your retirement accounts. The important thing is that you're contributing sufficiently.

Obviously, if you want to invest beyond what is provided by your employer, then you should work to educate yourself on more specifics of choosing funds, diversifying, managing risk, etc.

With all due respect to you...one of the cardinal rules of investing is "if you dont understand what you are investing in, dont invest in it". You are leaving too much in the hands of others. This info is not complicated and is all over the web. Good luck
Or, you pay someone else to do the work for you.
I know, I know, not exactly mustachian. I have a very good friend who makes a living as an investment advisor.

Hope his name isn't madoff...

randymarsh

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2774 on: June 02, 2014, 11:28:32 AM »
Sorry for my rant if I just "don't get it" being young. But it seems like some posters are upset they did not get a retirement party or recognition at work before they left.

I think it's less wanting a big party or lots of recognition and more expecting people not to be resentful/negative.

NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2775 on: June 02, 2014, 11:34:45 AM »
Sorry for my rant if I just "don't get it" being young. But it seems like some posters are upset they did not get a retirement party or recognition at work before they left. I guess my POV is you finally achieved FI, and all they other people at work have not...therefore they are still working. So you expect people that do not have FI to spend money on you? I don't get it.

Although I would understand some nice words or a card after years of working with people.

I'm 45 (is that oldish?) and I agree. I couldn't care less if I get a card or recognition when I finally quit at FI (in about 4 years, I hope). But then I don't socialize much with my coworkers. I guess it depends on the work environment. To me, retirement ceremonies make sense for something like the military (if you want one), because you are actually ending at a recognized date (20 years) and are receiving the official perks of "retiring." Plus, the military for all its flaws does have some nice traditions (being piped out when you retire, tough men crying and thanking their wives, I love it).

Nevertheless, I can't imagine the awkwardness of people celebrating my "retirement" when I leave work and others are struggling with past money issues or other issues that I don't have to deal with (medical, supporting older parents, etc.). So, I'll gently go, perhaps with a link to MMM stuck on my desk (if MMM is still active then!) or a list of books if someone asks me, but a party? No way.

Perhaps you're just one of the engineer types that just doesn't get involved with your coworkers.  ;-) 

In most workplaces it's traditional for coworkers to celebrate important milestones together:  baby showers, 10 and 20 year work anniversaries, weddings, retirement, etc.  It doesn't have to involve an outlay of cash.  Often the employer organizes a celebration if it's work-related, like work anniversaries and retirement, and sometimes co-workers organize it if it's more personal (weddings, baby showers, etc.). 

When you're part of a group that celebrates things together, it can be hurtful when one of your very important milestones is ignored, or, worse, when it incites jealousy, bitterness, etc.  This is one of the many occasions when I find it helpful not to take things personally.  :-)


I think it's less wanting a big party or lots of recognition and more expecting people not to be resentful/negative.

Yes. 

Albert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2776 on: June 02, 2014, 12:25:50 PM »
Sorry for my rant if I just "don't get it" being young. But it seems like some posters are upset they did not get a retirement party or recognition at work before they left. I guess my POV is you finally achieved FI, and all they other people at work have not...therefore they are still working. So you expect people that do not have FI to spend money on you? I don't get it.

Although I would understand some nice words or a card after years of working with people.

It's not about money or presents at all, it's about recognition from people with whom you have worked for years (sometimes decades). Some double as friends anyway… I believe it's good for general morale and positive working environment for those not leaving. I've never heard anyone expressing jealousy about it. Albeit I haven't seen anyone here retire early either. People are leaving either for a standard retirement (60+) or for other jobs.

Rollin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2777 on: June 02, 2014, 05:19:34 PM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."
Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.
Retirement has a way of separating your friends from your co-workers...

Thanks so much for all of the support, all!  My MIL can be a pain at times, but she summed it up:  "Fuck them!  We'll have cake and our own celebration!"  :-)

You should be proud of yourself breaking away from the herd like that.  I gave a retirement lunch for a CWr Friday and another recently retired CWr was there too.  She thanked me so much for encouraging her to check out retiring.  I told her what to look for and said "you can do it!"  She did and still can't get that grin off her face.  She says she is so very happy.

My problem though in encouraging them is that I have had 5 retirements in 4 years, from an office with only 6 left!  Pretty soon I won't have any left.  I'm next though!!!!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2778 on: June 02, 2014, 07:25:15 PM »
I am dreading whatever retirement event my work will feel obligated to provide.

I am utterly sick of the retirement events for others leaving and I would just like to leave without a party. But I also recognize that, generally speaking, a simple retirement event is part of work life. And what I mean by "simple " is a sheet cake, purchased by the company, and where a few people come to chat and say goodbye. I am pleased to see that at my work we are finally scaling these things down to a 2 hour party with cake. At one time it was a BIG GIANT event with a dinner at a restaurant that I had to pay for and attend on my own time. No, I don't think that's appropriate.

I had one employee who I liked well enough to honor his request for no party. That's the only person I've ever honored that way. Everyone else is required to have a small event, tiny though it may be. :) and of course there are the attention hogs who have to have a party. One jerk "retired" and had a big party with tons of presents, and then the following week went to his new full time job. I never understood that other than he was an attention hog.

I think it is great when people throw their own retirement party for freinds, family, and co-workers at their own expense, that seems very nice. But to put that burden on managers at work (I are one!) no no no no nope, don't do that to me.

No freaking presents, for god's sake. ugh.

greenmimama

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2779 on: June 02, 2014, 07:48:37 PM »
The company or boss should give a present as an appreciation for the employees hard work, not coworkers??

iris lily

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2780 on: June 02, 2014, 08:13:05 PM »
The company or boss should give a present as an appreciation for the employees hard work, not coworkers??

Yes, but you would be surprised at the number of coworkers who give presents to the retiree here. I think that is silly.

Insanity

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2781 on: June 02, 2014, 08:17:19 PM »
The company or boss should give a present as an appreciation for the employees hard work, not coworkers??

Yes, but you would be surprised at the number of coworkers who give presents to the retiree here. I think that is silly.

I don't think so, but then again, I'm not always for giving a gift because one has to.

Stacey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2782 on: June 02, 2014, 10:17:55 PM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

Gray Matter

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2783 on: June 03, 2014, 05:26:44 AM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

(emphasis above added)

I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

Of course, this is my last week before moving to the non-profit world, so goodbye bonuses!  It was fun while it lasted.

plainjane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2784 on: June 03, 2014, 06:22:31 AM »
I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

It would be great if that came automatically on the pay stub, much like the credit card statements now say "if you only paid the minimum, it would take you 5 years to pay this off".

(My bonuses lately have been in the mid 4 figures after tax, so they don't really impact my overall financial life, though they've probably cumulatively shortened the mortgage by about a year.)

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2785 on: June 03, 2014, 06:47:41 AM »
The company or boss should give a present as an appreciation for the employees hard work, not coworkers??

Yes, but you would be surprised at the number of coworkers who give presents to the retiree here. I think that is silly.

I work for the state. I don't even have standard things like an office kitchen. The state can't give retirement presents or it might be written up in the herald (and the public would object), plus there's no money for it.

Jags4186

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2786 on: June 03, 2014, 06:58:48 AM »
I was in the car with a new hire for a bit the other day. He is at the director level so he makes probably 20-40k a year more than me.

We started to talk briefly about finances and I made the comment that I try to save 1/2 of what I make. His eyes bugged out of his head and said that he and his wife (who also works) live paycheck to paycheck.  I asked what he spends so much money on and he said his rent is 5k a month for a 3 bedroom apartment overlooking the city.  He has no kids.


MooseOutFront

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2787 on: June 03, 2014, 09:41:01 AM »
he said his rent is 5k a month for a 3 bedroom apartment overlooking the city.
Ha!  That'll do it.

lisahi

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2788 on: June 03, 2014, 11:46:52 AM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

(emphasis above added)

I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

Of course, this is my last week before moving to the non-profit world, so goodbye bonuses!  It was fun while it lasted.

Just the idea of getting a 5-figure bonus makes me weak in the knees. I work for the Federal government as an attorney. At year-end, we do get "bonuses" but they're in the 3-figures, which is still better than a kick in the head. My aunt found out that we got a bonus and started complaining because that was her tax dollars, so why should a Federal employee get a bonus? God forbid we actually get rewarded individually for doing good work for the American people. I wanted to slap her. As an attorney, I'm not unionized, get zero overtime for doing work beyond 40 hours per week (which always happens), and am located in a city that was supposed to get locality pay last year because we make far less than the private sector, but didn't because the Office of Personnel Management failed to do the paperwork. So I'll take my $700, thank you.

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2789 on: June 03, 2014, 12:03:36 PM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

(emphasis above added)

I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

Of course, this is my last week before moving to the non-profit world, so goodbye bonuses!  It was fun while it lasted.

Just the idea of getting a 5-figure bonus makes me weak in the knees. I work for the Federal government as an attorney. At year-end, we do get "bonuses" but they're in the 3-figures, which is still better than a kick in the head.

I work for a state government.  Here the words "bonus" aren't even whispered.  Ahh, I remember the day of being annoyed I exceeded expectations for the law firm, and was told it was one of the best reviews of my 100+ yearmates, but bonuses were capped at half of the prior years (and w/o the additional $10k they got that year for exceeding hours).  My bonus was still $17k that year, but darned if I didn't find it frustrating it wasn't $45k...

MooseOutFront

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2790 on: June 03, 2014, 12:20:05 PM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

(emphasis above added)

I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

Of course, this is my last week before moving to the non-profit world, so goodbye bonuses!  It was fun while it lasted.

Just the idea of getting a 5-figure bonus makes me weak in the knees. I work for the Federal government as an attorney. At year-end, we do get "bonuses" but they're in the 3-figures, which is still better than a kick in the head.

I work for a state government.  Here the words "bonus" aren't even whispered.  Ahh, I remember the day of being annoyed I exceeded expectations for the law firm, and was told it was one of the best reviews of my 100+ yearmates, but bonuses were capped at half of the prior years (and w/o the additional $10k they got that year for exceeding hours).  My bonus was still $17k that year, but darned if I didn't find it frustrating it wasn't $45k...
It's such a strange dichotomy that government work.  My wife is an attorney for the state and she gets scrimped on the most random things that I take for granted in the private sector.  On one hand there's an unbelievable amount of waste in government, but in almost any individual employment situation, it's tight budgets and no bonuses and no pay raises, etc.  She actually had her pay decreased by $10k a few years back before getting it increased by $15k after that.  Just depends on what's in the budget for her little sub-corner of the .gov world.  Meanwhile there's almost no turnover at her job which is weird because it looks like a pretty shitty work environment from my perspective.

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2791 on: June 03, 2014, 12:34:34 PM »
I've been enjoying this thread for a while and thought I'd pipe in.  So many come to mind, but a classic one happened a few years ago.  I was an associate at a large law firm and a senior associate, making in the mid- to high- 200 thousands was complaining about the dismal bonuses.  Hers was probably in the range of $40-50k that year.  She didn't know how she was going to make all of her payments and decided to take out a loan to cover her living expenses.  Mind you, she was married to another working lawyer with no children.  I'm not sure where all of that cash was going- - but I almost had a heart attack when she was complaining about bonuses.  Perspective, people!

(emphasis above added)

I agree with you that people in certain high-paying industries and with big bonuses lose perspective.  For the past 12 years, I have worked in one of those industries and every year at bonus time, I calculate how long someone making minimum wage would have to work to earn my bonus.  It's sobering and helps me remain grateful, even in lean(er) bonus years.

Of course, this is my last week before moving to the non-profit world, so goodbye bonuses!  It was fun while it lasted.

Just the idea of getting a 5-figure bonus makes me weak in the knees. I work for the Federal government as an attorney. At year-end, we do get "bonuses" but they're in the 3-figures, which is still better than a kick in the head.

I work for a state government.  Here the words "bonus" aren't even whispered.  Ahh, I remember the day of being annoyed I exceeded expectations for the law firm, and was told it was one of the best reviews of my 100+ yearmates, but bonuses were capped at half of the prior years (and w/o the additional $10k they got that year for exceeding hours).  My bonus was still $17k that year, but darned if I didn't find it frustrating it wasn't $45k...
It's such a strange dichotomy that government work.  My wife is an attorney for the state and she gets scrimped on the most random things that I take for granted in the private sector.  On one hand there's an unbelievable amount of waste in government, but in almost any individual employment situation, it's tight budgets and no bonuses and no pay raises, etc.  She actually had her pay decreased by $10k a few years back before getting it increased by $15k after that.  Just depends on what's in the budget for her little sub-corner of the .gov world.  Meanwhile there's almost no turnover at her job which is weird because it looks like a pretty shitty work environment from my perspective.

Yeah.  I consider a kitchen actually a non-necessity - but a lack of a SINK is one in my eyes and makes being mustachian and bringing in food from home much harder w/o the chance to wash out plates/tupperware etc.  (Not keen at all on using the bathroom sink - and they have grates to prevent food from going down them.)  I, along with many coworkers, bring in my own supplies like pens in to work.  I have a computer with a non-supported system because it's so old now (yet we're required to save every email we ever get...on antiquated full servers).  We have a mice issue in the building, but no exterminators ever come by.  And yet - my dept, health care related, has a billion dollar budget.  That's right, B.  Now of course, right of the bat, know that it's actually really say $500 million, because we get federal financial participation with matching dollars), but still, sounds large and like we're wasting money...

Numbers Man

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2792 on: June 03, 2014, 02:30:54 PM »
I was in the car with a new hire for a bit the other day. He is at the director level so he makes probably 20-40k a year more than me.

We started to talk briefly about finances and I made the comment that I try to save 1/2 of what I make. His eyes bugged out of his head and said that he and his wife (who also works) live paycheck to paycheck.  I asked what he spends so much money on and he said his rent is 5k a month for a 3 bedroom apartment overlooking the city.  He has no kids.

I guess that puts an interesting spin on the term "location, location, location".

Jags4186

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2793 on: June 03, 2014, 02:39:08 PM »
Well today just adds to the cake. I found out he has a storage container.

So to recap. 3 bedroom apartment. 1 married couple. No children. Storage unit.


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NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2794 on: June 03, 2014, 08:05:05 PM »
Monday is my last day (hooray!) and I am officially retiring.  Yesterday one of my coworkers told me, "You'll be back in a month begging for your job back because you'll be so bored."  My (tightly restrained) response:  "I don't think so."

Really surprised by the jealousy, nastiness, gloom, and general pessimism my retirement has stirred up at my work place.  One person took me out to lunch.  Everyone else seems to be pretending it's not happening.  Makes me even happier to be leaving.

Congratulations! At the very least, the experience shows you (if you didn't already know) who the good ones were.

Just had to come back and post a follow-up.  This morning I was doing a celebratory dance with my nine-year-old to the song "Let Me Clear My Throat" and I heard and felt my hip snap followed by terrible pain and I thought, "Son of a bitch, I broke a hip on my first day of retirement!"  The thought was so funny I was yelling "Ow, Ow, that really hurts" and at
 the same time laughing hysterically and decided just to keep dancing. 

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2795 on: June 03, 2014, 08:36:20 PM »
Broken hip already lol!! I've heardone of people falling apart after retirement but damn that was quick!

jordanread

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2796 on: June 04, 2014, 10:00:45 AM »
Just had to come back and post a follow-up.  This morning I was doing a celebratory dance with my nine-year-old to the song "Let Me Clear My Throat" and I heard and felt my hip snap followed by terrible pain and I thought, "Son of a bitch, I broke a hip on my first day of retirement!"  The thought was so funny I was yelling "Ow, Ow, that really hurts" and at
 the same time laughing hysterically and decided just to keep dancing.

I damn near spit my coffee all over my monitor because of that mental image. Hope it's just a "freedom pang" and not something that would really suck.

p.s. I just made up freedom pang, but I decided it means that touch of soreness from using your retirement muscles instead of your career muscles. :-) You'll get used to it.

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2797 on: June 04, 2014, 11:32:31 AM »
A coworker sent me a link to an article about a thrift store in my town having a closeout sale and asked if I had ever been to the store.  Told her no, but I've been meaning to check it out, so I think we're both going to go tomorrow.  Other than her coming to my party the other weekend, we haven't done anything outside of work together, but I'd say this is a good start!  Oh, and she bikes to work most days (and I don't).  :)  Yep, I've got some MMM folks here.

Quark

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2798 on: June 04, 2014, 01:39:17 PM »
My company just built a new building in a nearby suburb and we are moving there in December, which means for an entire year I get to listen to my coworkers moan about their moving hassles. Many of them have to move to new homes because their current commute is already super long. I live in a major Texas city which will make my point to many of you.

Meanwhile I moved into a new one-bedroom apartment last month and it took me 4 whole carloads of moving stuff all by myself. I consider this to be ridiculous lifestyle inflation because 3 years ago I moved across the country and everything I owned fit into a single carload. I didn't have any furniture or pets back then. If I had a house I might actually consider renting a Uhaul!

Granted, I am single, no kids and no house. But I still shout, "Sukkas!" in my head whenever they moan and groan.

viper155

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2799 on: June 04, 2014, 06:32:42 PM »
It would make a lot more sense for everyone to be paid once a month. You know, just like virtually every other bill we pay once a month.

4 years ago I went to a monthly pay from a bi weekly. It took a little little used to but I prefer it.