Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5293373 times)

tuyop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #250 on: April 29, 2013, 01:06:46 PM »
Quote
Yeah 20% is my salary replacement figure.  Under 50% is pretty typical around here.

You must work with a bunch of closet mustachians!

Some light needs to be shed here... I read that as 20-40% of salary saved in retirement... so for 100k you'd have 40k to retire on, netting you $1,600 a year at 4% SWR.

I have a feeling that they mean that they plan to earn 40% of their net working income in retirement.

So, if I take home 35k now, I hope to have 14k annual income post-retirement. This would require 350k of savings.

sheepstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #251 on: April 29, 2013, 01:51:10 PM »
A very nice, smart guy I work with sometimes was talking about his plan to save up 'a bunch of money' to move out of town and start fresh somewhere else.  I love hearing about people's financial plans and being supportive of them.  "I'm gonna save, like, five thousand dollars."  But it's hard to put on the expected impressed facial expression when numbers like that get thrown around as though they're a big deal.  Then said guy ordered himself the lobster mac and cheese for lunch.

It's funny too in New York, which is a huge party town for some people, to hear folks calculate their budgets to the dollar every month.  Like, "Hey, can I have the Saturday night shift this week?  I'm gonna end up short on rent otherwise."  It doesn't really effect me in the way other anti-mustachian stuff does because these kids are doing it consciously or at least are not complainy pants about how other people or the world are preventing them from saving money.  They know that their priority is pleasure and they genuinely seem to enjoy what they spend their money on.  But the money in = money out philosophy freaks out my miserly soul!

Starstuff

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #252 on: April 30, 2013, 09:53:46 AM »
I work in a mortgage brokerage, so our job is analyzing finances. So you'd think these guys have it down...

The processor is a few years out of bankruptcy, with more credit cards with balances than she can remember (literally- she frequently pays the wrong bills on the wrong days and has to call and beg for help). She has so much stuff that her house is overflowing into a storage unit into her desk into the work basement.... She bought some olive oil bottles (the nifty Rachel Ray ones), then commented that she already has a set in a color she likes better. I asked if I could buy a set, and she refused to sell either. No reason. The second set is sitting in the basement at work. She spends half her work day shopping online, and at least another quarter showing off and justifying everything that arrived that day. Then she'll pick up take out food while complaining that she can't afford her $12 crab cakes. She has to have payroll deposited into multiple accounts automatically just to keep her from spending it all at once. She drives two used SUV's- a ForeRunner and a Jeep, then complains about gas prices. She makes $60K and has nothing but junk to show for it.

The secretary is in her mid-sixties with exactly zero dollars saved anywhere, supports her kids stupid lifestyles, and travels 5-6 times a year... while making $32K and complaining because she's always broke.

One of the loan officers lives so far above his means that the company has to loan him money if he makes less than $10K a month, and hold back pay if he makes more just so he doesn't spend it all.

Meanwhile, I'm working two jobs so I can pay down my debt ($1500 a month right now!) while saving enough to pay cash for some grad school pre-requisite classes, yet I still have a perfectly balanced budget. Makes me want to scream.

jpo

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #253 on: April 30, 2013, 09:58:12 AM »
One of the loan officers lives so far above his means that the company has to loan him money if he makes less than $10K a month, and hold back pay if he makes more just so he doesn't spend it all.
Amazed that any company would do this.

the fixer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #254 on: April 30, 2013, 10:11:41 AM »
I work in a mortgage brokerage, so our job is analyzing finances. So you'd think these guys have it down...

Actually, given the financial crisis we just had this doesn't surprise me as much as you'd think. The subprime market wouldn't seem so risky if you were living in it.

Starstuff

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #255 on: April 30, 2013, 10:20:30 AM »
One of the loan officers lives so far above his means that the company has to loan him money if he makes less than $10K a month, and hold back pay if he makes more just so he doesn't spend it all.
Amazed that any company would do this.

We're a very small family company.

I work in a mortgage brokerage, so our job is analyzing finances. So you'd think these guys have it down...

Actually, given the financial crisis we just had this doesn't surprise me as much as you'd think. The subprime market wouldn't seem so risky if you were living in it.

We only work on the high end. This brokerage has never processed a sub-prime loan, and did not have a single foreclosure through the entire recession. Only one in it's whole history, and it involved a client dying.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #256 on: April 30, 2013, 11:41:27 AM »
We only work on the high end. This brokerage has never processed a sub-prime loan,
While that's a record to be proud of, the idea that subprime mortgages are poor peoples' mortgages is incorrect - subprime mortgages were primarily given to the middle class with just a little more hunger for housing than they could afford, and through the subprime crisis the average income of subprime borrowers actually increased. (I would cite it but my goo-fu is failing me today, sorry).

StarryC

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #257 on: April 30, 2013, 01:31:57 PM »
Someone I work with was recently in a car accident.  Not her fault, but the body shop wants her $300 deductible up front and then she'll be reimbursed by the other party's insurance.  And, she doesn't have it.  I said, since you know you'll get it back you could put it on a credit card.  She said she doesn't have $300 available on a credit card.  So she's going to ask the company for a salary advance.  But here's the kicker: Today is pay day.  So, her budget is so tight that even on PAYDAY she can't find $300 to pay the deductible! 
She's glad it wasn't totaled because she is underwater on the new car (of course!).

This is a relatively professional job.  My guess is she is making between $30 and $40k a year. It mostly just makes me sad.  I am not financially independent, but I have never been in a situation where I didn't have at least $500 in the bank and at least another $1000 in available credit.

Dr.Vibrissae

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #258 on: April 30, 2013, 02:09:29 PM »
She has so much stuff that her house is overflowing into a storage unit into her desk into the work basement.... She bought some olive oil bottles (the nifty Rachel Ray ones), then commented that she already has a set in a color she likes better. I asked if I could buy a set, and she refused to sell either. No reason. The second set is sitting in the basement at work.

Does anyone else watch Hoarders?  It's my guilty pleasure, but seriously I think this woman sounds like she has a hoarding problem, in addition to serious financial issues.
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mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #259 on: April 30, 2013, 02:15:00 PM »
Last night, a coworker and I took our student workers out to dinner. Neither of us are important enough to have company cards, but I wasn't concerned about just putting it on my card & getting a reimbursement, which should only take a month or so. The bill won't even be due by the time I get the money back, more than likely.

My coworker offered to split the bill with me and looked really anxious and disbelieving when I insisted that putting the full $90 on my card to be reimbursed was no big deal. I wish I thought she was just being nice, but based on the amount of clothing she buys at Banana Republic & J Crew (it was "on sale!"), I'd say she really couldn't float $90 for a month.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #260 on: April 30, 2013, 07:40:15 PM »

She's glad it wasn't totaled because she is underwater on the new car (of course!).


Don't the lenders require gap insurance anymore?

sheepstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #261 on: April 30, 2013, 09:13:16 PM »
She has so much stuff that her house is overflowing into a storage unit into her desk into the work basement.... She bought some olive oil bottles (the nifty Rachel Ray ones), then commented that she already has a set in a color she likes better. I asked if I could buy a set, and she refused to sell either. No reason. The second set is sitting in the basement at work.

Does anyone else watch Hoarders?  It's my guilty pleasure, but seriously I think this woman sounds like she has a hoarding problem, in addition to serious financial issues.

Ditto on the guilty pleasure and on thinking that's exactly what it sounds like.

randymarsh

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #262 on: April 30, 2013, 09:55:47 PM »

She's glad it wasn't totaled because she is underwater on the new car (of course!).


Don't the lenders require gap insurance anymore?

I don't know about brand new cars, but it wasn't required on the used (but still very new) car I financed in December.
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marty998

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #263 on: May 01, 2013, 04:52:15 AM »
I think I'm getting through to a couple of people at work. One girl yelled out in frustration about an upcoming task that is pointless but must be done according to the powers that be. I've gotten into the habit of just saying "10 years" (or more recently 9 years), meaning 10 years to FI, and the reply from the co-worker was "I know I know, that bloody mustache thing"

Starstuff

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #264 on: May 01, 2013, 08:43:34 AM »
We only work on the high end. This brokerage has never processed a sub-prime loan,
While that's a record to be proud of, the idea that subprime mortgages are poor peoples' mortgages is incorrect - subprime mortgages were primarily given to the middle class with just a little more hunger for housing than they could afford, and through the subprime crisis the average income of subprime borrowers actually increased. (I would cite it but my goo-fu is failing me today, sorry).

Fun fact: the newly released Qualified Mortgage rules (the "it" mortgage- best deal out there) would have been considered a sub-prime mortgage just ten years ago. This is because the debt to income ratio (using pre-tax income) is a maximum of 43%. Makes your head hurt a little, doesn't it?

StarryC

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #265 on: May 01, 2013, 10:54:20 AM »

She's glad it wasn't totaled because she is underwater on the new car (of course!).


Don't the lenders require gap insurance anymore?

I don't know about brand new cars, but it wasn't required on the used (but still very new) car I financed in December.

Maybe she has it and doesn't know it.  We didn't get in to that.

Starstuff

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #266 on: May 02, 2013, 12:33:58 PM »
I know I just posted about my coworkers but.... One of them just financed SHOES. She's making payments on TENNIS SHOES. Not even high end running shoes or work boots or something half way necessary. ANIMAL PRINTED KEDS.

DEAR GOD.

NumberCruncher

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #267 on: May 02, 2013, 01:02:59 PM »
I know I just posted about my coworkers but.... One of them just financed SHOES. She's making payments on TENNIS SHOES. Not even high end running shoes or work boots or something half way necessary. ANIMAL PRINTED KEDS.

DEAR GOD.

How...how is that even possible? Is the financing through a store or something? Like the layaway type stuff? I just...can't compute O.o

Google tells me these shoes retail for $125...

mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #268 on: May 02, 2013, 03:45:33 PM »
Fiancé told me yesterday that his coworker rents a car (zipcar or the like) 2-3 times a week to get to baseball games he coaches in time at $10 a pop. Just leave work earlier!!!

spider1204

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #269 on: May 02, 2013, 03:54:03 PM »
Quote
Fiancé told me yesterday that his coworker rents a car (zipcar or the like) 2-3 times a week to get to baseball games he coaches in time at $10 a pop. Just leave work earlier!!!

That actually sounds like it could be cheaper than owning a car, and could be a pretty reasonable choice.

mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #270 on: May 02, 2013, 04:28:04 PM »
He owns one and we live in Chicago so he could definitely get there on public transit or a bike.

blondegirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #271 on: May 03, 2013, 10:59:35 AM »
I was eating breakfast in our kitchenette this morning when I overhear a coworker complain about her younger son who was incessantly pestering her about wanting an ipod touch when they were at the Apple Store getting her older son's apple device fixed. The thing is-- he already got a kindle fire for Christmas.  Another coworker sympathizes by saying that her 7 year old daughter wants a kindle fire when she already has her own ipad. I can't help but think to myself, maybe they shouldn't buy their kids these gadgets in the first place? They honestly seemed surprised at how spoiled and entitled their children were acting when I know for a fact that the second woman immediately upgraded her ipad to an ipad mini herself recently. Of course the kids are going to follow their parents' example...   
« Last Edit: May 03, 2013, 11:01:14 AM by blondegirl »

EMP

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #272 on: May 03, 2013, 11:56:18 AM »
I was eating breakfast in our kitchenette this morning when I overhear a coworker complain about her younger son who was incessantly pestering her about wanting an ipod touch when they were at the Apple Store getting her older son's apple device fixed. The thing is-- he already got a kindle fire for Christmas.  Another coworker sympathizes by saying that her 7 year old daughter wants a kindle fire when she already has her own ipad. I can't help but think to myself, maybe they shouldn't buy their kids these gadgets in the first place? They honestly seemed surprised at how spoiled and entitled their children were acting when I know for a fact that the second woman immediately upgraded her ipad to an ipad mini herself recently. Of course the kids are going to follow their parents' example...

No wonder kids are so expensive...

the fixer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #273 on: May 03, 2013, 11:57:43 AM »
Yes, the kids are expensive because the adults are. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree!

GoStumpy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #274 on: May 03, 2013, 05:24:46 PM »
Yes, the kids are expensive because the adults are. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree!

Good pun.
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happy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #275 on: May 06, 2013, 06:34:41 AM »
Yes a colleague of mine who is very particular about having the latest fashion clothes each season both for her and her children (goes shopping every season and buys her kids "this season's outfits"), complained to me in an astounded fashion that her 9 year old daughter refused to wear regular trackpants to sport "because they are soooooo daggy mum!"  I'm sure my mouth opened and closed a few times before I managed some sort of polite reply...all I could think was "well where could she possibly have gotten that idea from?"
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KatieSSS

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #276 on: May 06, 2013, 10:20:39 AM »
I was at TJ Maxx this weekend to get a few work shirts for summer (its that and thift stores for me!), and I overhead an ad on the PA system. The words "You might see something you didn't even know you need!" jumped out at me. I'm glad I know now that stores or society don't determine what I need. I came out with two work tops for summer for $12, and THAT is the end of my summer clothes shopping.
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mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #277 on: May 07, 2013, 08:50:28 AM »
Fiancé told me yesterday that his coworker rents a car (zipcar or the like) 2-3 times a week to get to baseball games he coaches in time at $10 a pop. Just leave work earlier!!!

Ok, same guy. Going to be a great source of stories, I can tell. Owns part of a barber shop out in the far NW suburbs (easily an hour away and the traffic to get there is horrendous. He went all the way to his barber shop this weekend to get a haircut because it's free there.

Barbaebigode

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #278 on: May 07, 2013, 05:27:24 PM »
Today an intern at work got promoted to a 8 hours/day post doing pretty much the same job she used to do, but earning more than twice what she was earning before (still a low pay, since she has not graduated yet). Her big plan for the extra money? Buying a car, new and financed, of course! I unsuccessfully tried to talk her out of it, mentioning all the costs of owning a car, including depreciation etc, but she still wants to buy it.
This is the same girl that less than one month ago was telling me that she was unhappy with the job and wanted to work somewhere else. :/
I guess it makes sense, since the few times I gave her rides home, she always found ways of mentioning the scratches and noises of my car, while asking why won't I buy a better car (I have a 1999 corolla), since my sallary its not bad (she didn't asked in an arrogant way, she was trully puzzled).

oldtoyota

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #279 on: May 08, 2013, 03:22:17 PM »
All of these examples show a real lack of effort on the part of the US gvt to educate its citizens about simple financial matters.


Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #280 on: May 08, 2013, 04:10:14 PM »
All of these examples show a real lack of effort on the part of the US gvt to educate its citizens about simple financial matters.

Why should it be the government's responsiblity to educate people?  Shouldn't they have some responsibility for educating themselves?

Besides, in a democracy the government has a positive incentive not to create an educated citizenry, since as soon as a majority of the people become educated, they will vote the government out of office.

martynthewolf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #281 on: May 09, 2013, 05:53:12 AM »
Had a conversation with a colleague that is wanting to buy a house. In the last year and a half or so he's moved in with his gf and had a baby (unplanned) and bought another car. They are being lent the £10000 deposit they will need.

However they have to save the solicitors fees and all other associated costs which they estimate to be £1500 tops, they've been looking for a house for the last year and keep complaining they can't save the money they need to for fees. I asked what they had planned for the weekend and he told me they were going to the beach, needed to buy the gf clothes, dropping £100 on them alone plus loads of presents for the babies birthday. Then for his lunches he has all pre-packaged food like daiylea dunkers and babybel cheeses, mostly just things that cost a shit load of money.

I really wanted to give him a face punch but I don't think it'd go down very well. He just got an eye-roll.

Thinking about it he's a bit of an Anti MMM goldmine.

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tuyop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #282 on: May 09, 2013, 05:59:41 AM »
All of these examples show a real lack of effort on the part of the US gvt to educate its citizens about simple financial matters.

Why should it be the government's responsiblity to educate people?  Shouldn't they have some responsibility for educating themselves?

Yeah, sure, there's a partnership at work there. Students are responsible for being receptive to learning and internalizing attitudes and habits.

The government is responsible, in our system, for prioritizing content and vetting educators. Many people, like oldtoyota perhaps, argue that financial literacy and life philosophy should have a place over, say, quadratic equations and organic chemistry in our schools. Since our schools are regulated, it falls on the government to make that change and us as consumers and voters to demand it.

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #283 on: May 09, 2013, 12:40:05 PM »
Many people, like oldtoyota perhaps, argue that financial literacy and life philosophy should have a place over, say, quadratic equations and organic chemistry in our schools.

Err...  And what percentage of high school graduates can do quadratic equations, and understand anything about organic chemistry?

tuyop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #284 on: May 09, 2013, 01:17:48 PM »
No idea! I left high school just seven years ago and took both precalculus and chemistry and knew a tiny bit about both of those subjects after two years of courses in each. I grew up in Nova Scotia, Canada if it matters.

As for the personal finances, I vaguely remember a class where I drew a profession out of an envelope ("chick sexer", seriously, the one thing I DIDN'T get paid to do in high school!), drew a related salary, and had to budget for hypothetical purchases. I also made a resume in that class, which was dumb because I'd been working for four  years at that point. It was tied into the class where they measured our flexibility and VO2 max.

As for life philosophy, there was no education in philosophy whatsoever and I don't think a class was offered, classical or otherwise.

My point is that people would argue that the priorities are skewed. In a mustachian education model, advanced math and chemistry should be fringe courses and personal finance and philosophy should be core.

unitsinc

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #285 on: May 09, 2013, 01:44:22 PM »
Many people, like oldtoyota perhaps, argue that financial literacy and life philosophy should have a place over, say, quadratic equations and organic chemistry in our schools.

Err...  And what percentage of high school graduates can do quadratic equations, and understand anything about organic chemistry?

I graduated ten years ago and you learn the quadratic equation in 8th grade and apply it in a few of the later years.
Chemisty is usually combined with one semester of organic and one semester of inorganic. Though you don't HAVE to take chemisty, you can get by(in Texas) with three sciences, which may or may not include Chem. The other options are biology, physics, physics 2, and some other assorted ones depending on school such as geology.

My dad(born in 1960) said he didn't have to take algebra at all. I have younger friends who say they are beginning algebra around 6th grade now. This leads me to believe at least for math, that things are becoming more challenging.

I'm not quite sure what your question was getting at though. Hope this helped.
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mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #286 on: May 09, 2013, 02:57:50 PM »
Not exactly wall of shame material, but I was talking to a anti-mustachian woman in the office who is going to Colorado tomorrow.
me - where are you going
her - near boulder
me - what town
her - longmont

my though - oh you could use a visit to MMM!

EMP

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #287 on: May 09, 2013, 03:45:27 PM »
Many people, like oldtoyota perhaps, argue that financial literacy and life philosophy should have a place over, say, quadratic equations and organic chemistry in our schools.

Err...  And what percentage of high school graduates can do quadratic equations, and understand anything about organic chemistry?

Based on the results of the high stakes testing I scored one summer, approximately 20% of high school grads. 

mlipps

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #288 on: May 09, 2013, 05:51:43 PM »
I taught myself how to live by a budget and understand interest. I couldn't have done the same with quadratic equations or chemistry.

tuyop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #289 on: May 09, 2013, 06:31:25 PM »
I taught myself how to live by a budget and understand interest. I couldn't have done the same with quadratic equations or chemistry.

I don't agree, you can teach yourself a surprising amount of things and organic chemistry is far from the most difficult, but that's not really the point.

The point is we should be shifting education away from teaching to stream a product for final assembly (a student to the end result of either vocations, academia, or professions) and instead to teach people life skills and how to foster creativity. How to cook, how to budget, how to save and invest and find happiness. It's not about what you can teach yourself, it's about what we think is important to teach our children and young adults.

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #290 on: May 09, 2013, 10:14:02 PM »
I don't agree, you can teach yourself a surprising amount of things and organic chemistry is far from the most difficult, but that's not really the point.

I agree: I learned a lot more chemistry (and other subjects) studying on my own than was ever taught in my high school.  Though I'd say chemistry is really one of the more difficult, unless you have money for lab stuff and understanding parents.

But that wasn't quite the point I was trying to make.  It's that most high school graduates don't seem to retain what they were taught, so adding a "personal finance" track might not do all that much to help.

Quote
...and instead to teach people life skills and how to foster creativity. How to cook, how to budget, how to save and invest and find happiness.

Granted, it's been a few decades since I was in high school, but if my memory hasn't failed me, most of that was covered in courses, like for instance home economics and shop.  Though back then few guys took home ec - I think my buddy (who'd gotten kicked out of just about everything else) & I were the first.

I'd disagree about fostering creativity, though.  It's an overrated buzzword these days, even though just about everyone has an excess of creativity.  What desperately needs to be fostered is the art of buckling down and doing the competent work that's necessary to turn that creativity into reality.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 11:42:57 AM by Jamesqf »

Hotstreak

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #291 on: May 09, 2013, 11:42:25 PM »
No idea! I left high school just seven years ago and took both precalculus and chemistry and knew a tiny bit about both of those subjects after two years of courses in each. I grew up in Nova Scotia, Canada if it matters.

As for the personal finances, I vaguely remember a class where I drew a profession out of an envelope ("chick sexer", seriously, the one thing I DIDN'T get paid to do in high school!), drew a related salary, and had to budget for hypothetical purchases. I also made a resume in that class, which was dumb because I'd been working for four  years at that point. It was tied into the class where they measured our flexibility and VO2 max.

As for life philosophy, there was no education in philosophy whatsoever and I don't think a class was offered, classical or otherwise.

My point is that people would argue that the priorities are skewed. In a mustachian education model, advanced math and chemistry should be fringe courses and personal finance and philosophy should be core.


Lots of the private schools in my area have a personal finance class.  They teach the basics of credit such as building it, smart use, and opportunity cost.  They teach about saving, compounding money, and ways to get capital for starting ventures.  I went to public school, where I learned calculus and the history of the civil war (both basically useless in my life).  There's no standardized test about succeeding at life and money though... so there you go.


Saw somebody today who was retiring at 58.  10% equity in her home, 24k debt on credit cards, 2 financed vehicles, and enough savings to pay for 15-20 days of expenses.  She had a stable job with a good pension and never got her finances in order.  The pension is basically her same wage and she will keep doing the same thing she has for the rest of her life.. will die in probably 15-25 years with a net worth around zero and nothing to pass to her kids.  It's depressing to see.  In contrast someone at the same employer recently retired with all of that payed off, took a half pension with the other half rolled to an IRA (really great retirement options there), and actually has more disposable income per month because no monthly payments.  Will pay tons less tax on pension income and have an estate to do with as he pleases.

So sad to see the first situation.

ace1224

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #292 on: May 10, 2013, 08:00:23 AM »
I don't agree, you can teach yourself a surprising amount of things and organic chemistry is far from the most difficult, but that's not really the point.

I agree: I learned a lot more chemistry (and other subjects) studying on my own than was ever taught in my high school.  Though I'd say chemistry is really one of the more difficult, unless you have money for lab stuff and understanding parents.

But that wasn't quite the point I was trying to make.  It's that most high school graduates don't seem to retain what they were taught, so adding a "personal finance" track might not do all that much to help.

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...and instead to teach people life skills and how to foster creativity. How to cook, how to budget, how to save and invest and find happiness.

Granted, it's been a few decades since I was in high school, but if my memory hasn't failed me, most of that was covered in courses, like for instance home economics and shop.  Though back then few guys took home ec - I think my buddy (who'd gotten kicked out of just about everything else) & I were the first.

I'd disagree about fostering creativity, thought.  It's an overrated buzzword these days, even though just about everyone has an excess of creativity.  What desperately needs be fostered is the art of buckling down and doing the competent work that's necessary to turn that creativity into reality.

i agree about the creativity thing.  i'm all for thinking outside the box if the situation warrants it, but other than that i'm over creative. 
on a random side note about chemistry i surprisingly had to take three years of it in high school, on top of biology and math and earth science.  it worked out okay since my job is being a chemist but i think most people have no use for it, i would have liked a personal finance class.  we had to take this thing called success 101, but it was really more about learning how to study

Jamesqf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #293 on: May 10, 2013, 11:49:20 AM »
on a random side note about chemistry i surprisingly had to take three years of it in high school, on top of biology and math and earth science.  it worked out okay since my job is being a chemist but i think most people have no use for it...

I have to disagree.  I think most people would have a use for basic chemistry (and physics, math, &c) in their daily lives, if only to avoid all the BS artistry & fomentation of mass hysteria out there.  The problem seems to be that even if they vaguely remember the stuff learned in science classes, they are absolutely unable to make the connection between it and the real world.

I suspect the same would be true of personal finance &c.

the fixer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #294 on: May 10, 2013, 12:05:49 PM »
I think the problem is it can be difficult to teach someone how to think before they're college-age. For instance I took plenty of advanced science classes in high school but didn't "get it" until I got into college and majored in Astronomy. That taught me how to think like a scientist. I also took several classes in economics and learned some of how to think like an economist; my HS econ class didn't teach me that.

On the one hand I feel personal finance should get taught in schools. On the other, I'm skeptical that would lead to the outcome I'd like to see of most people able to think like investors.

aclarridge

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #295 on: May 10, 2013, 02:37:40 PM »
My boss lives about 2km (1.25 miles) from the office, and takes a taxi every morning in to work. The antimustachianness is compounded by the fact that this road is completely jammed during rush hour, so sometimes the taxi ride takes him close to 20 mins. He usually just walks home when the weather is nice.

Also he goes out for lunch (and I don't mean at the food court, I mean to restaurants) every day. Apparently gets take out dinners usually as well.

In his defense though, I don't think he spends money on much other than cable TV (big sports fan), good scotch, and meals. He certainly enjoys himself!

Dibbels81

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #296 on: May 14, 2013, 12:44:07 AM »
My coworker recently took out a 3k loan to pay for a stem cell treatment for her 12 year old dog's arthritic knees.  I love dogs and all, but, come on now.

JanMN

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #297 on: May 14, 2013, 07:38:28 AM »
A co-worker was remarking how much her daughters are so particular about name brands, rolls her eyes, and then picks up her new Coach purse... :-)

mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #298 on: May 15, 2013, 11:48:07 AM »
Was talking to a co-worker about how I bought some clothes at a thrift store. 
She responded - You make a decent salary.  Why don't you just buy normal clothes?
I then made her really uncomfortable by saying - "Do my clothes not look normal?" (I'm actually one of the best dressed in the office usually because I buy really high quality clothes, just used).  I continued to ask why I would pay more for something if I can get the same thing for less. 

This kind of reminds me of the AT&T commercial with all the little kids saying they want more.

gdborton

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #299 on: May 15, 2013, 11:51:45 AM »
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This kind of reminds me of the AT&T commercial with all the little kids saying they want more.

I hate that commercial, "more is always better right?"
If you know me well enough to ask for money, you should know not to ask for money.

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