Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8881018 times)

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2350 on: April 10, 2014, 09:49:33 PM »
I haven't received my electricity bill yet (I've lived in this new apartment 1.5 months now and should have seen one...),

I used to get bills every month in Taipei, but since moving south we only get them once every 2 months.

Hmm... I will wait a little longer and see if that's the case here. It's pretty awkward that not many people in the building know what goes on with their bills, though.

ThatsMyOtter

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2351 on: April 11, 2014, 05:12:04 AM »
CW1: Any plans for the weekend?
CW2: I have to pick up my dry cleaning.
CW1: Doesn't that take like five minutes?
CW2: Well, I usually have to make at least two trips.

Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

(Note: This is the same man I posted about a month or two ago who owns several laptops because he doesn't like carrying them from one room to another.)

ketchup

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2352 on: April 11, 2014, 05:15:34 AM »
Does he also drive ten different cars so that he only has to get the oil changed in all of them every two years?

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2353 on: April 11, 2014, 06:43:05 AM »
CW1: Any plans for the weekend?
CW2: I have to pick up my dry cleaning.
CW1: Doesn't that take like five minutes?
CW2: Well, I usually have to make at least two trips.

Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

(Note: This is the same man I posted about a month or two ago who owns several laptops because he doesn't like carrying them from one room to another.)

holy shit, how much does that cost?!? just for the dry cleaning, let alone the purchase price of all the clothes!!! and where does he keep them?!?!

Does he also drive ten different cars so that he only has to get the oil changed in all of them every two years?

ROFL

jba302

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2354 on: April 11, 2014, 07:04:05 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

ThatsMyOtter

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2355 on: April 11, 2014, 07:23:27 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

I'm not sure what a normal dry cleaning routine would be (the only thing I ever dry clean is my winter coat) but CW also has a desk job, so I'm sure he pays to have things dry cleaned way more often than he should.

No idea where he keeps it all. He lives by himself, I think in a 2 bedroom? So maybe all of his clothes live in the other bedroom.

GuitarStv

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2356 on: April 11, 2014, 10:00:12 AM »


(Note: This is the same man I posted about a month or two ago who owns several laptops because he doesn't like carrying them from one room to another.)

holy shit, how much does that cost?!? just for the dry cleaning, let alone the purchase price of all the clothes!!! and where does he keep them?!?!

Does he also drive ten different cars so that he only has to get the oil changed in all of them every two years?

ROFL
[/quote]

PLEASE suggest that to him the next time you see him!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2357 on: April 11, 2014, 10:21:40 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

To be honest, I dry-clean my slacks about once a year.  They are dark, and never get visibly dirty.  They air out a week between wearings, and so far that's been enough to keep them fresh. 

Dress shirts I launder after two wearings.  For now, for me, ironing is indeed a waste of time.  I spend about $15/mo on laundry.  They have big fancy machines that press the shirts much better than a home iron ever could (I've tried).

marblejane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2358 on: April 11, 2014, 10:25:19 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

Honestly, if you are talking about pants or suits, I only dry clean those once a season (every 3 months or so), or if I've spilled something on them. Suits should not be dry cleaned frequently, it wears the fabric. Hang them up right after wearing, and use a steamer or iron to remove wrinkles as needed.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2359 on: April 11, 2014, 11:51:24 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

To be honest, I dry-clean my slacks about once a year.  They are dark, and never get visibly dirty.  They air out a week between wearings, and so far that's been enough to keep them fresh. 

Dress shirts I launder after two wearings.  For now, for me, ironing is indeed a waste of time.  I spend about $15/mo on laundry.  They have big fancy machines that press the shirts much better than a home iron ever could (I've tried).

Another good option are Brooks Brothers non-iron dress shirts, which can be pretty consistently had on eBay. They even have that little crease down the sleeve. It's some kind of chemical magic.

That's good advice for someone just building their wardrobe.  Unfortunately, I don't think I would get my investment back factoring in alterations (necessary for me to look professional).

Stacheintraining

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2360 on: April 11, 2014, 06:07:04 PM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

To be honest, I dry-clean my slacks about once a year.  They are dark, and never get visibly dirty.  They air out a week between wearings, and so far that's been enough to keep them fresh. 

Dress shirts I launder after two wearings.  For now, for me, ironing is indeed a waste of time.  I spend about $15/mo on laundry.  They have big fancy machines that press the shirts much better than a home iron ever could (I've tried).

Another good option are Brooks Brothers non-iron dress shirts, which can be pretty consistently had on eBay. They even have that little crease down the sleeve. It's some kind of chemical magic.

That's good advice for someone just building their wardrobe.  Unfortunately, I don't think I would get my investment back factoring in alterations (necessary for me to look professional).

Yeah. We have to put $15 in tailoring into every shirt my husband wears, and I can't buy skirts OTR. It's such a pain, but I'm very popular with my tailor.

Check out Banana Republic slim fit non-iron. Great investment, great fit.

brewer12345

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2361 on: April 11, 2014, 07:54:11 PM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

To be honest, I dry-clean my slacks about once a year.  They are dark, and never get visibly dirty.  They air out a week between wearings, and so far that's been enough to keep them fresh. 

Dress shirts I launder after two wearings.  For now, for me, ironing is indeed a waste of time.  I spend about $15/mo on laundry.  They have big fancy machines that press the shirts much better than a home iron ever could (I've tried).

Another good option are Brooks Brothers non-iron dress shirts, which can be pretty consistently had on eBay. They even have that little crease down the sleeve. It's some kind of chemical magic.

That's good advice for someone just building their wardrobe.  Unfortunately, I don't think I would get my investment back factoring in alterations (necessary for me to look professional).

Yeah. We have to put $15 in tailoring into every shirt my husband wears, and I can't buy skirts OTR. It's such a pain, but I'm very popular with my tailor.

Heh, one of the many small dividends of FIRE:  Fuck you, dress code.  I shop at goodwill and don't bother with those haircut things.

Hedge_87

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2362 on: April 11, 2014, 08:08:21 PM »
Yep dress code is one thing I don't have to mess with being a blue collar guy. Which is good because I feel SO uncomfortable in the one suit I own anyways. I don't know how you all do it everyday lol.

grantmeaname

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2363 on: April 11, 2014, 08:24:40 PM »
I'm thrilled every time I get to throw a suit on...

Daleth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2364 on: April 12, 2014, 09:54:28 AM »
Turns out CW2 bought 60+ pairs of dress pants and 60+ dress shirts (all of which could be machine washed) so that he only has to go to the dry cleaner every two months. He won't wash and iron his clothes himself because ironing is "a waste of time."

What is a normal cleaning routine for dry-clean only? I figure I can get a minimum of 2 weeks of wear per pair between washes if I don't spill shit all over them. But I also have a desk job so it's not like I'm sweating or anything.

To be honest, I dry-clean my slacks about once a year.  They are dark, and never get visibly dirty.  They air out a week between wearings, and so far that's been enough to keep them fresh. 

Dress shirts I launder after two wearings.  For now, for me, ironing is indeed a waste of time.  I spend about $15/mo on laundry.  They have big fancy machines that press the shirts much better than a home iron ever could (I've tried).

Another good option are Brooks Brothers non-iron dress shirts, which can be pretty consistently had on eBay. They even have that little crease down the sleeve. It's some kind of chemical magic.

It's formaldehyde, actually. That's why I avoid them. :(

Daleth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2365 on: April 12, 2014, 11:43:50 AM »
Merely long-term mustachian thinking. I'm saving my heirs the cost of embalming. =P

Har! :)

zataks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2366 on: April 13, 2014, 07:37:58 AM »
Unfortunately my CW story is not funny like so many in this thread.  It makes me sad/embarrassed for CW.

CW bought a bubba truck over a year ago. (They have at least 2 other cars)(And immediately after purchase the truck was decked out with video screens, in front and back, sound system, special head lights, etcetc) It was used, at least, and he said he got a 'great deal' with 10k down but payments are $700-something/month.
At the time, he lived 80 miles from work. 
In the Fall he stopped paying on his mortgage and moved into a rental 40 miles from work.  One morning around that time he got a call and answered with "you're not getting your money," and promptly hung up!
Has a 13 y/o and a 2 or 3 y/o; wife does not work.
Now he's hustling to get as much OT as possible because he owes $13k to IRS.
Still driving the bubba truck more often than not.  Wife still not working.




horsepoor

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2367 on: April 13, 2014, 08:38:30 AM »
DH's coworker says he is going to retire in a year, but isn't going to crunch the numbers on what his retirement income will be.  He is self-described as living paycheck to paycheck, and has "no disposable income", but apparently has the biggest cable package (like over $200 a month) because his wife doesn't work and sits on her butt watching TV much of the day.  He is also helping to support his mother and his grown son + grandson, and every unexpected expense is a financial calamity.

But when overtime is offered, he says he hates work so much that he refuses to work the OT.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2368 on: April 13, 2014, 09:50:56 AM »
Light fixtures, decorative home goods, that kind of thing.

If it had been a car, I'd be sharing their badassity :P

I guess I should brag on my coworker! He buys, fixes up, and then sells early 90's ford festivas, all for under $1000. They get 40 mpg if you're normal, 60+ if you are him. He drives it to work. Unfortunately his commute is over 20 miles, but hey, at least he has the least expensive and most efficient car that I have ever heard of.

I used to have a Festiva, great little cars. I'd recommend one to almost anybody, you'd be surprised what you can haul in one.
My mom had one in the late 80's.  87?  I remember it was the first and only stick shift I ever tried to drive.  Swore me off of them for life.

mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2369 on: April 15, 2014, 06:47:15 PM »
I'm buying a house with cash on Thursday.  I told my manager I had to leave early to go to the closing.  He said something like, "Are you getting a thirty year note?"  I didn't want to tell him I was paying with cash, so I gave an awkward answer that was neither yes nor no.  Then he said something like, "welcome to the life of American debt."

Thought it was just a pretty funny interaction.

littleone

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2370 on: April 15, 2014, 06:53:06 PM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?

notquitefrugal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2371 on: April 15, 2014, 08:16:12 PM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?

Maybe they have gift cards for the restaurants? It's still pretty dumb, but makes slightly more sense.

wizlem

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2372 on: April 15, 2014, 09:05:02 PM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?

Wonder if she works with a friend of mine. He did the exact same thing a few years back. I know he didn't have any gift cards. Might explain why he's always having financial problems

lithy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2373 on: April 16, 2014, 05:26:07 AM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?

I think this sort of stuff usually falls under the "I can't possibly get together 100 bucks for groceries, but I can scrounge for 5-10 bucks for lunch each day" kind of logic that works for so many other 'expensive' needs. 

Target2018

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2374 on: April 16, 2014, 08:13:35 AM »
Wow - buying a house with cash!  Truly awesome.  Congratulations!
I'm buying a house with cash on Thursday.  I told my manager I had to leave early to go to the closing.  He said something like, "Are you getting a thirty year note?"  I didn't want to tell him I was paying with cash, so I gave an awkward answer that was neither yes nor no.  Then he said something like, "welcome to the life of American debt."

Thought it was just a pretty funny interaction.

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2375 on: April 16, 2014, 09:17:34 AM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?

I think this sort of stuff usually falls under the "I can't possibly get together 100 bucks for groceries, but I can scrounge for 5-10 bucks for lunch each day" kind of logic that works for so many other 'expensive' needs.

This! A few years ago I had a co-worker who was injured and off work for about a month, during which time he ran out of money (I think his insurance claim got delayed or something, he eventually got some money, but not as much as regular pay). In Vancouver you have three options for transit - monthly pass, book of 10 tickets, or individual tickets. Obviously individual tickets are the most expensive. He was buying individual tickets both ways every day, came in with Starbucks coffee and a pastry every day, and talking constantly about how he couldn't afford groceries, of even a book of 10 bus tickets. Got a co-worker to pick up some fancy cut of meat for him from a specialty store for $20 or something, but had to transfer money around from multiple accounts to be able to pay her for it. Obviously a smoker as well, etc etc.

My boyfriend used to look forward to Financial Trainwreck Storytime everyday when I got home.

FreeBy45

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2376 on: April 16, 2014, 09:31:44 AM »
My CW over the cube was telling my other coworkers that he just switched to Republic Wireless and was telling them about what a great deal it is. The other coworkers with their expensive Iphone plans dismissed it as a scam and said he better watch his credit card closely because he will probably start seeing fraudulent charges.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2377 on: April 16, 2014, 09:51:30 AM »
My CW over the cube was telling my other coworkers that he just switched to Republic Wireless and was telling them about what a great deal it is. The other coworkers with their expensive Iphone plans dismissed it as a scam and said he better watch his credit card closely because he will probably start seeing fraudulent charges.

I tried explaining Republic Wireless to someone on the train the other day and she just refused to believe it because her new ATT family plan cost $160/month and that was "the best deal ANYONE is offering right now." When I got to explaining that she could get unlimited talk and text to her kids for $10/month with Republic, she just sat there like a fish with her mouth open for a couple seconds. I thought I had broken her brain.

Gen Y Finance Journey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2378 on: April 16, 2014, 10:10:48 AM »
My CW over the cube was telling my other coworkers that he just switched to Republic Wireless and was telling them about what a great deal it is. The other coworkers with their expensive Iphone plans dismissed it as a scam and said he better watch his credit card closely because he will probably start seeing fraudulent charges.

I tried explaining Republic Wireless to someone on the train the other day and she just refused to believe it because her new ATT family plan cost $160/month and that was "the best deal ANYONE is offering right now." When I got to explaining that she could get unlimited talk and text to her kids for $10/month with Republic, she just sat there like a fish with her mouth open for a couple seconds. I thought I had broken her brain.

I think it's a case of "sounds-too-good-to-be-true". We're (rightfully) wary of things that are so far better than every other available option because we assume there has to be a catch.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2379 on: April 16, 2014, 10:19:58 AM »
My CW over the cube was telling my other coworkers that he just switched to Republic Wireless and was telling them about what a great deal it is. The other coworkers with their expensive Iphone plans dismissed it as a scam and said he better watch his credit card closely because he will probably start seeing fraudulent charges.

I tried explaining Republic Wireless to someone on the train the other day and she just refused to believe it because her new ATT family plan cost $160/month and that was "the best deal ANYONE is offering right now." When I got to explaining that she could get unlimited talk and text to her kids for $10/month with Republic, she just sat there like a fish with her mouth open for a couple seconds. I thought I had broken her brain.

I think it's a case of "sounds-too-good-to-be-true". We're (rightfully) wary of things that are so far better than every other available option because we assume there has to be a catch.

That and not wanting to admit you didn't get the best deal.  If I heard about republic from somewhere else, without the benefit of the countless endorsements on this forum, I would be wary too.  Probably not rude as above, but silently wary.  Iran I've never heard of the company outside this forum!

mpbaker22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2380 on: April 16, 2014, 10:32:45 AM »
My CW over the cube was telling my other coworkers that he just switched to Republic Wireless and was telling them about what a great deal it is. The other coworkers with their expensive Iphone plans dismissed it as a scam and said he better watch his credit card closely because he will probably start seeing fraudulent charges.

I tried explaining Republic Wireless to someone on the train the other day and she just refused to believe it because her new ATT family plan cost $160/month and that was "the best deal ANYONE is offering right now." When I got to explaining that she could get unlimited talk and text to her kids for $10/month with Republic, she just sat there like a fish with her mouth open for a couple seconds. I thought I had broken her brain.

I think it's a case of "sounds-too-good-to-be-true". We're (rightfully) wary of things that are so far better than every other available option because we assume there has to be a catch.

But it's not that much better than other deals.  For example, I have Virgin Mobile which is less than half the price of a comparable plan at a major carrier.  My service isn't as good, but it's more than half as good.

I haven't had time to look into Republic Wireless, but the point is that there are options all the way down the scale.  It's not a straight $160 vs $10.  It just happens to be that everyone does what they know and are comfortable with.  I'm the same way; I haven't had time to look into Republic Wireless.

the fixer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2381 on: April 16, 2014, 11:01:56 AM »
The people on the $160 AT&T plans would consider the cheaper plans to have plenty of catches. Republic Wireless: you can't get an iPhone. Airvoice: the $10 plan will cut off service if you run down your balance. None of these MVNOs have roaming agreements with other carriers (to my knowledge). Some of these companies' websites and phone support leave much to be desired.

To us these sorts of things aren't a big deal, but other people are used to the cushiness of the Big 4 and arguing purely based on price won't get you anywhere. You first have to convince people that the things that differentiate the Big 4 from the cheap players don't have much value, then the alternatives will seem appealing.

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2382 on: April 16, 2014, 11:29:51 AM »
I'm buying a house with cash on Thursday.  I told my manager I had to leave early to go to the closing.  He said something like, "Are you getting a thirty year note?"  I didn't want to tell him I was paying with cash, so I gave an awkward answer that was neither yes nor no.  Then he said something like, "welcome to the life of American debt."

Thought it was just a pretty funny interaction.

Yeah we sold a condo with no mortgage (bought w/o one).  Briefly had two places and a coworker was commiserating saying how we must be so happy to get rid of the mortgage bill.  I evaded, and said, yes, we'd be happy to not have two sets of bills, like utilities, etc.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2383 on: April 16, 2014, 12:08:45 PM »
The people on the $160 AT&T plans would consider the cheaper plans to have plenty of catches. Republic Wireless: you can't get an iPhone. Airvoice: the $10 plan will cut off service if you run down your balance. None of these MVNOs have roaming agreements with other carriers (to my knowledge). Some of these companies' websites and phone support leave much to be desired.

To us these sorts of things aren't a big deal, but other people are used to the cushiness of the Big 4 and arguing purely based on price won't get you anywhere. You first have to convince people that the things that differentiate the Big 4 from the cheap players don't have much value, then the alternatives will seem appealing.

Roaming, international agreements and data tethering can be compelling reasons to stick with the big 4 for some people.  It is all about seeing your options and knowing what choices can be made and what those choices cost.  But yes 160$/month should be reexamined.

Daley

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2384 on: April 16, 2014, 12:38:53 PM »
The people on the $160 AT&T plans would consider the cheaper plans to have plenty of catches. Republic Wireless: you can't get an iPhone. Airvoice: the $10 plan will cut off service if you run down your balance. None of these MVNOs have roaming agreements with other carriers (to my knowledge). Some of these companies' websites and phone support leave much to be desired.

To us these sorts of things aren't a big deal, but other people are used to the cushiness of the Big 4 and arguing purely based on price won't get you anywhere. You first have to convince people that the things that differentiate the Big 4 from the cheap players don't have much value, then the alternatives will seem appealing.

And this is exactly why I'm so picky about which MVNOs I namecheck in the guide. Roaming agreements aren't that big a deal if you know what sort of coverage is actually available, but customer support and reasonable terms of service go a long way towards end users.

I would also say that Republic has far more catches than most people here realize as well. There is such a thing as caring too much about getting the cheapest monthly deal that you start entering into contracts that you probably shouldn't and ignore the very real added cost of being able to do business at that price in the first place.

skunkfunk

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2385 on: April 16, 2014, 02:17:43 PM »
The people on the $160 AT&T plans would consider the cheaper plans to have plenty of catches. Republic Wireless: you can't get an iPhone. Airvoice: the $10 plan will cut off service if you run down your balance. None of these MVNOs have roaming agreements with other carriers (to my knowledge). Some of these companies' websites and phone support leave much to be desired.

To us these sorts of things aren't a big deal, but other people are used to the cushiness of the Big 4 and arguing purely based on price won't get you anywhere. You first have to convince people that the things that differentiate the Big 4 from the cheap players don't have much value, then the alternatives will seem appealing.

And this is exactly why I'm so picky about which MVNOs I namecheck in the guide. Roaming agreements aren't that big a deal if you know what sort of coverage is actually available, but customer support and reasonable terms of service go a long way towards end users.

I would also say that Republic has far more catches than most people here realize as well. There is such a thing as caring too much about getting the cheapest monthly deal that you start entering into contracts that you probably shouldn't and ignore the very real added cost of being able to do business at that price in the first place.

I've had great luck with Ting. You can have almost any phone you want, roam on Verizon's network, and customer support has a no waiting and no computer systems policy (they pick up the phone).

BlueHouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2386 on: April 16, 2014, 08:12:05 PM »
Girlfriend told me that someone at her work said they do not have money to buy food from the grocery store until payday. So instead they go out to eat at restaurants until payday.

What? How does this make sense to anyone?
Did she specify who was buying?  It's not uncommon to go out to ladies' nights and other happy hour events for free food when you know someone will buy drinks for you.  I've gone out to eat many times because I didn't have food at home.  Doesn't mean I paid.  I used to do this a lot when I was in college (a long time ago)  Not sure if the world still works this way.

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2387 on: April 16, 2014, 10:29:57 PM »
Co-worker said she was interested in saving money, too (it always comes up when I interact with new people--saying "no" to going out all the time usually requires a polite explanation). Cool. So why do you get coffee and cake out at least once a day? Why do you go out to eat at Western restaurants (more expensive) several times a week? Why do you pay someone else to clean up your 225ish sq. ft. apartment? Why do you pay someone else to walk your dog when you work less than 20 hours a week? Siiiigh...

We meet at a coffee shop every Friday in a reflective practices group. Even when I announce that I'm bringing muffins, cookies, whatever, she has a slice of ~$4 cake and a coffee when I show up. I know it's not an anti-home-baking thing because she eats my goodies, too. But seriously--why buy it if you know something to eat is on its way?

She also just got a scooter. It takes about 15 minutes to walk from one end of our campus to the other, but there are hills and stairs everywhere. I see it as a built-in workout!

I mentioned that I found a puppy pee pad when I moved in and offered to give it to her. She said her dog doesn't use them anymore. Well, he does, actually. Several a day. She lied because she didn't want to walk to my apartment (2 buildings away from hers) to pick it up, even though it would save her a bit of money. As soon as I had plans to visit others in her building, she asked if I'd bring it.

But she sure did walk over here to get a carrot cake cupcake Sunday night.

I just don't understand this woman.

Also: her dog sucks. Worst behaved dog I've ever met.

zataks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2388 on: April 16, 2014, 11:10:30 PM »
We meet at a coffee shop every Friday in a reflective practices group. Even when I announce that I'm bringing muffins, cookies, whatever, she has a slice of ~$4 cake and a coffee when I show up. I know it's not an anti-home-baking thing because she eats my goodies, too. But seriously--why buy it if you know something to eat is on its way?

But she sure did walk over here to get a carrot cake cupcake Sunday night.


I think some people are uncomfortable entering business places, using the space, and not buying anything.  I used to be this way. 


nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2389 on: April 16, 2014, 11:19:01 PM »
We meet at a coffee shop every Friday in a reflective practices group. Even when I announce that I'm bringing muffins, cookies, whatever, she has a slice of ~$4 cake and a coffee when I show up. I know it's not an anti-home-baking thing because she eats my goodies, too. But seriously--why buy it if you know something to eat is on its way?

But she sure did walk over here to get a carrot cake cupcake Sunday night.


I think some people are uncomfortable entering business places, using the space, and not buying anything.  I used to be this way.

Ya, I get the drink part. I personally don't order coffee when we meet, but I'm an ass and don't care. The part I don't get is adding the unnecessary $4 cake to the order.

mikecorayer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2390 on: April 16, 2014, 11:47:21 PM »
It's funny seeing so many similarities with expat teachers at my school as well. Constant meals out, maids for tiny one-bedroom apartments, $500 electric vespas that never go beyond the campus gate, and of course, predictable complaints regarding money by the end of every month.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2391 on: April 17, 2014, 02:04:24 AM »
Co-worker said she was interested in saving money, too (it always comes up when I interact with new people--saying "no" to going out all the time usually requires a polite explanation). Cool. So why do you get coffee and cake out at least once a day? Why do you go out to eat at Western restaurants (more expensive) several times a week? Why do you pay someone else to clean up your 225ish sq. ft. apartment? Why do you pay someone else to walk your dog when you work less than 20 hours a week? Siiiigh...

We meet at a coffee shop every Friday in a reflective practices group. Even when I announce that I'm bringing muffins, cookies, whatever, she has a slice of ~$4 cake and a coffee when I show up. I know it's not an anti-home-baking thing because she eats my goodies, too. But seriously--why buy it if you know something to eat is on its way?

She also just got a scooter. It takes about 15 minutes to walk from one end of our campus to the other, but there are hills and stairs everywhere. I see it as a built-in workout!

I mentioned that I found a puppy pee pad when I moved in and offered to give it to her. She said her dog doesn't use them anymore. Well, he does, actually. Several a day. She lied because she didn't want to walk to my apartment (2 buildings away from hers) to pick it up, even though it would save her a bit of money. As soon as I had plans to visit others in her building, she asked if I'd bring it.

But she sure did walk over here to get a carrot cake cupcake Sunday night.

I just don't understand this woman.

Also: her dog sucks. Worst behaved dog I've ever met.

Sounds more like laziness than anything else.  And yeah if I am going to meet in some commercial place I am going to buy something.  Some people dont like exercise.

Nudelkopf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2392 on: April 17, 2014, 05:12:11 AM »
I was commenting to a coworker that I have no idea when I'm going to get Easter dinner made, and she said I should cater it because, "it was just as cheap." In what universe? My mother is doing the lamb roast, I'm making whipped potatoes, asparagus and some kind of dessert. Oh, and a cheese board. The whole affair should set me back less than $40, with a lavish cheeseboard.
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out. Also.. Cheese platters are just about the best thing that's ever been invented!

paddedhat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2393 on: April 17, 2014, 06:19:53 AM »
It's only a facepalm if the said soon to be retired co-worker can't afford all those purchases.

I disagree.  A cottage is nearly always a tremendous financial drain for no good reason.  You want to vacation somewhere in the woods for a few weeks a year?  Rent a cottage.  You're not tied to the same tiny plot of land so you can experience different places, don't have to pay for the maintenance, taxes, and upkeep on a building that you're not living in for more than half the year, and can probably afford to rent for a short period a much fancier place than you could afford to buy.

I spent the last seven years building fairly modest vacation cottages in a local resort, and currently live in one as my primary, only, paid cash for, residence. One of life's unexpected lessons was starting this adventure with absolutely zero expectation that most of my buyers would be making extraordinarily bad financial decisions when they bought one of my homes. With little exception, these folks are middle age to early AARP, middle class, and insist on creating a massive drain on their financial future by satisfying a 100% "want" which they have zero need for.

My typical customer spent $140-180K for a new home. They are a mix of those that needed various levels of financing, to ones that drain their retirement savings to pay cash. On the financed side, I had two that borrowed 100%  to close the deal. One used FHA, needed sale price inflated seller's assist to cover the 3% down, and wrote less than $400 in checks at the table to cover small fees. Another got a 1st for 90%, and a co-signed super high rate second to cover the remainder, including all closing costs. On the cash down side, one guy emptied his small retirement account, (after losing half of it at the bottom of the market) and threw his $60K total savings at the deal, he then financed with BOA. Oven the next few years the home declined in value by 10-15% and, so far, there has been almost zero appreciation.

These homes typically have a $2800-$3000 yearly tax bill, an annual $400 HOA Fee, and at least $1500-1800 in utilities, minimum. A typical buyer drops $5-10K on interior furnishings and often an equal amount in landscaping.

The story got even more interesting when I developed a relationship with a Real Estate broker who had been doing business in the neighborhood for many decades. She told me that, absent the ongoing recession, a typical second home property in the area will turn over every five years, on average. Her personal record was selling the same home five times, since the 1980s. This is particularly horrifying once you factor in the fact that a five year old home will bring roughly 80% of the sale price. ( one of my customers recently sold a place that was $189K new, in 2004, he got $150K) When you add up all the closing costs X2, fees, taxes, expenses, improvements, interest, depreciation, etc... I could easily see one of my customers selling their home in five years at an out of pocket loss of $60-80K.  I'm sure there are dumber moves to be made, but WOW, when it comes to the stupid Olympics, buying a vacation home can earn you a gold medal.

kimmarg

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2394 on: April 17, 2014, 09:02:18 AM »
I was commenting to a coworker that I have no idea when I'm going to get Easter dinner made, and she said I should cater it because, "it was just as cheap." In what universe? My mother is doing the lamb roast, I'm making whipped potatoes, asparagus and some kind of dessert. Oh, and a cheese board. The whole affair should set me back less than $40, with a lavish cheeseboard.
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out. Also.. Cheese platters are just about the best thing that's ever been invented!

Hmmm didn't realize Easter dinner was NOT a thing some places! :) here in the Northeast US it's pretty common. Not as big a deal as Thanksgiving and Christmas, but all our stores will close Easter Sunday. Ham is the sterotypical choice. Sometimes it's Easter brunch rather than dinner with quiche, ham, pasteries etc. I'll be making a 2 hr drive to eat with my family, however when I lived a plane ride away I typically didn't go home.

notquitefrugal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2395 on: April 17, 2014, 09:09:45 AM »
One of life's unexpected lessons was starting this adventure with absolutely zero expectation that most of my buyers would be making extraordinarily bad financial decisions when they bought one of my homes.

You should see some of the seller financing agreements that I see. They are typically set up as "lease option" agreements with a 10-20% down payment, 15-30 year amortization, 8-10% interest, and a balloon payment due in about 5 years. Like a buy here, pay here car lot, I've seen the same property given back to the original owner and resold multiple times. It's expensive to be poor.

BlueHouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2396 on: April 17, 2014, 09:19:32 AM »
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out.
Please tell me that the Easter Bunny visits you.  This is not only a thing here in the US, it's huge.  And as much as I hate over-commercialization, I never turn my nose up at my Easter Basket. 

CommonCents

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2397 on: April 17, 2014, 10:11:25 AM »
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out.
Please tell me that the Easter Bunny visits you.  This is not only a thing here in the US, it's huge.  And as much as I hate over-commercialization, I never turn my nose up at my Easter Basket.

The best is the Easter bunny on the ski slopes, scattering chocolate as s/he skies!

Yes, it's not as widely celebrated (as um, not as many are Christian as are American celebrating Thanksgiving...or just like presents at Christmas and heck, even more Christians celebrate Christmas than Easter), but yes, a chunk still do Easter dinner.  I am not particularly religious although my family is, so we do it.  My old church pastor used to call folks who only showed up on Easter and Christmas the "Lily and Pointsetta crowd". 

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2398 on: April 17, 2014, 10:25:08 AM »
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out.
Please tell me that the Easter Bunny visits you.  This is not only a thing here in the US, it's huge.  And as much as I hate over-commercialization, I never turn my nose up at my Easter Basket.

Damn, you gotta get on it, Nudelkopf.  I'm agnostic, but I'll feast just about anything: Easter, Passover, Christmas, Thanksgiving, Canadian Thanksgivingm you name it!  Wine and cheese every day!

Nudelkopf

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #2399 on: April 17, 2014, 05:51:09 PM »
Easter dinner is a thing?? I'm clearly missing out.
Please tell me that the Easter Bunny visits you.  This is not only a thing here in the US, it's huge.  And as much as I hate over-commercialization, I never turn my nose up at my Easter Basket.
When I was a kid, we used to have chocolate eggs hidden around the yard & we'd have to find them. Buut.. Then it was a normal day. Actually, my bootcamp instructor gave me a chocolate rabbit yesterday at the end of training, which was pretty awesome. But I've never heard of people having an Easter dinner, similar to a Christmas or Thanksgiving dinner! That's cool!