Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8895845 times)

Freedomin5

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21100 on: November 04, 2018, 02:16:11 AM »
My work has an “employee bonding event” coming up. It’s a full day trip to a neighboring tourist city and on the itinerary is a scenic bus tour and all-you-can-eat seafood buffet including all-you-can-eat local seafood delicacy. Everyone is encouraged to participate. But...it’s SELF-PAY.

Oh, and it’s on a weekend so we are using our (uncompensated) personal time. They’re not even telling us how much we might expect to pay for the privilege of doing this work-related activity on our personal time.  Well, guess who just happens to not be available on that date?
Yeah, that's a bad joke.  Do it during a workday or at LEAST have the company pay for that shit.  Who the hell is going to attend that?

There are five people signed up so far. I’m guessing those are the people vying for good end of year reviews and promotions.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21101 on: November 05, 2018, 08:44:28 AM »
My work has an “employee bonding event” coming up. It’s a full day trip to a neighboring tourist city and on the itinerary is a scenic bus tour and all-you-can-eat seafood buffet including all-you-can-eat local seafood delicacy. Everyone is encouraged to participate. But...it’s SELF-PAY.

Oh, and it’s on a weekend so we are using our (uncompensated) personal time. They’re not even telling us how much we might expect to pay for the privilege of doing this work-related activity on our personal time.  Well, guess who just happens to not be available on that date?
Yeah, that's a bad joke.  Do it during a workday or at LEAST have the company pay for that shit.  Who the hell is going to attend that?

There are five people signed up so far. I’m guessing those are the people vying for good end of year reviews and promotions.

Could be.

Over the weekend I attended a gala and silent auction for a friend's PTA. (Yeah-- most of my social activities revolve around charitable ventures. It's a family thing.) Historically this PTA has funded most of the supplies for students' science projects, bought a bunch of equipment for classes ranging from the library to Phys Ed, provided computer support for all the students, and generated an annual $200 "mini-grant" for each classroom so that no teacher has to pay so much as a cent out of pocket for classroom supplies. This charter school, a type of public school, is ranked highly at a national level and produces outstanding students with a high scholarship and college acceptance rate. Students consistently outperform those at even the most selective private schools.

In most respects the event was very well run. The organizers kept their operating costs low but still put on a good party. They got a deal on the venue, the wine, and the finger food. There were dozens of silent auction items that were well presented, and the auctioneer who auctioned off the major items was an excellent professional who saw to it that the reserve price was met. Sadly, although it was standing room only in previous years, the ticket sales were lean this year. Only two teachers and faculty members showed up. Although the event made enough money to cover the expenses of putting it on, the event didn't generate the revenue it did in previous years. The attendance was the only reason why. If you have bodies in the room, you get bids. No bodies? No bids.

At a silent auction or charity auction, you need bids because the point is not for the people bidding to get a bargain. The goal is to get people into an ego competition so that the value of each item gets bid up well past its usual sale price, resulting in a sizable benefit to the organizing charity. Sometimes it turns into a game in which people who try to run the bid up as high as they can without actually buying the item-- a grown-up version of "hot potato" that is actually quite fun. Other times, people bid on items they need, want, and can use (such as vehicle care vouchers for an oil change or a tire rotation) and get them for approximately market value. They bid up to the market value, and then stop. If they win the auction, they have an item they already budgeted for and needed to buy anyway. If they don't win the auction, so what? They showed up, they enjoyed the wine and the finger food, and they got to chat with people they know or ought to know.

When you don't get attendance, you don't get bids. Most items went for well below their market value. All the reserve prices were met for the major items, but nothing got bid up.

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21102 on: November 05, 2018, 08:51:07 AM »

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

But why would teacher's attend? Like you said, auctions mean you pay way more than something is worth, so you can donate the money to a cause. (Um, I was just at an event where my table paid $3,000 for a homemade cake for our dessert...)   Teacher's are going to end up funding the classroom anyway. Why bother donating through this event?

It's parents who need to be attending these things.


(I used to work at a University who wanted 100% employee participation in the "philanthropy" event. Which was giving to the University.  Um, no thank you. The University should give to me- in form of a paycheck.  Thankfully, Children's Miracle Network for the hospital was included in University giving, so I didn't ruin it for my department by not donating. But I wasn't going to donate to the college that employeed me!)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21103 on: November 05, 2018, 09:00:29 AM »
My work has an “employee bonding event” coming up. It’s a full day trip to a neighboring tourist city and on the itinerary is a scenic bus tour and all-you-can-eat seafood buffet including all-you-can-eat local seafood delicacy. Everyone is encouraged to participate. But...it’s SELF-PAY.

Oh, and it’s on a weekend so we are using our (uncompensated) personal time. They’re not even telling us how much we might expect to pay for the privilege of doing this work-related activity on our personal time.  Well, guess who just happens to not be available on that date?
Yeah, that's a bad joke.  Do it during a workday or at LEAST have the company pay for that shit.  Who the hell is going to attend that?

There are five people signed up so far. I’m guessing those are the people vying for good end of year reviews and promotions.

Could be.

Over the weekend I attended a gala and silent auction for a friend's PTA. (Yeah-- most of my social activities revolve around charitable ventures. It's a family thing.) Historically this PTA has funded most of the supplies for students' science projects, bought a bunch of equipment for classes ranging from the library to Phys Ed, provided computer support for all the students, and generated an annual $200 "mini-grant" for each classroom so that no teacher has to pay so much as a cent out of pocket for classroom supplies. This charter school, a type of public school, is ranked highly at a national level and produces outstanding students with a high scholarship and college acceptance rate. Students consistently outperform those at even the most selective private schools.

In most respects the event was very well run. The organizers kept their operating costs low but still put on a good party. They got a deal on the venue, the wine, and the finger food. There were dozens of silent auction items that were well presented, and the auctioneer who auctioned off the major items was an excellent professional who saw to it that the reserve price was met. Sadly, although it was standing room only in previous years, the ticket sales were lean this year. Only two teachers and faculty members showed up. Although the event made enough money to cover the expenses of putting it on, the event didn't generate the revenue it did in previous years. The attendance was the only reason why. If you have bodies in the room, you get bids. No bodies? No bids.

At a silent auction or charity auction, you need bids because the point is not for the people bidding to get a bargain. The goal is to get people into an ego competition so that the value of each item gets bid up well past its usual sale price, resulting in a sizable benefit to the organizing charity. Sometimes it turns into a game in which people who try to run the bid up as high as they can without actually buying the item-- a grown-up version of "hot potato" that is actually quite fun. Other times, people bid on items they need, want, and can use (such as vehicle care vouchers for an oil change or a tire rotation) and get them for approximately market value. They bid up to the market value, and then stop. If they win the auction, they have an item they already budgeted for and needed to buy anyway. If they don't win the auction, so what? They showed up, they enjoyed the wine and the finger food, and they got to chat with people they know or ought to know.

When you don't get attendance, you don't get bids. Most items went for well below their market value. All the reserve prices were met for the major items, but nothing got bid up.

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

Teachers already pay for so much, why would you expect them to want to pay more to do their jobs??

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21104 on: November 05, 2018, 09:10:10 AM »
My work has an “employee bonding event” coming up. It’s a full day trip to a neighboring tourist city and on the itinerary is a scenic bus tour and all-you-can-eat seafood buffet including all-you-can-eat local seafood delicacy. Everyone is encouraged to participate. But...it’s SELF-PAY.

Oh, and it’s on a weekend so we are using our (uncompensated) personal time. They’re not even telling us how much we might expect to pay for the privilege of doing this work-related activity on our personal time.  Well, guess who just happens to not be available on that date?
Yeah, that's a bad joke.  Do it during a workday or at LEAST have the company pay for that shit.  Who the hell is going to attend that?

There are five people signed up so far. I’m guessing those are the people vying for good end of year reviews and promotions.

Could be.

Over the weekend I attended a gala and silent auction for a friend's PTA. (Yeah-- most of my social activities revolve around charitable ventures. It's a family thing.) Historically this PTA has funded most of the supplies for students' science projects, bought a bunch of equipment for classes ranging from the library to Phys Ed, provided computer support for all the students, and generated an annual $200 "mini-grant" for each classroom so that no teacher has to pay so much as a cent out of pocket for classroom supplies. This charter school, a type of public school, is ranked highly at a national level and produces outstanding students with a high scholarship and college acceptance rate. Students consistently outperform those at even the most selective private schools.

In most respects the event was very well run. The organizers kept their operating costs low but still put on a good party. They got a deal on the venue, the wine, and the finger food. There were dozens of silent auction items that were well presented, and the auctioneer who auctioned off the major items was an excellent professional who saw to it that the reserve price was met. Sadly, although it was standing room only in previous years, the ticket sales were lean this year. Only two teachers and faculty members showed up. Although the event made enough money to cover the expenses of putting it on, the event didn't generate the revenue it did in previous years. The attendance was the only reason why. If you have bodies in the room, you get bids. No bodies? No bids.

At a silent auction or charity auction, you need bids because the point is not for the people bidding to get a bargain. The goal is to get people into an ego competition so that the value of each item gets bid up well past its usual sale price, resulting in a sizable benefit to the organizing charity. Sometimes it turns into a game in which people who try to run the bid up as high as they can without actually buying the item-- a grown-up version of "hot potato" that is actually quite fun. Other times, people bid on items they need, want, and can use (such as vehicle care vouchers for an oil change or a tire rotation) and get them for approximately market value. They bid up to the market value, and then stop. If they win the auction, they have an item they already budgeted for and needed to buy anyway. If they don't win the auction, so what? They showed up, they enjoyed the wine and the finger food, and they got to chat with people they know or ought to know.

When you don't get attendance, you don't get bids. Most items went for well below their market value. All the reserve prices were met for the major items, but nothing got bid up.

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

Teachers already pay for so much, why would you expect them to want to pay more to do their jobs??

See sentence 3, paragraph 2. At this particular school, teachers pay for nothing. The PTA fundraising events are the reason why.

Extra information not in my original post: for staff and teachers, the tickets were free.

PloddingInsight

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21105 on: November 05, 2018, 10:46:21 AM »
Background: I make at least 3x the median income for my area.  Guy in the next cubicle has the same job description and has been at it at least ten years longer than I have. He's on the phone about replacing a broken faucet in his house

Quote
"I get paid Thursday, so....


magnet18

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21106 on: November 05, 2018, 11:21:50 AM »
Background: I make at least 3x the median income for my area.  Guy in the next cubicle has the same job description and has been at it at least ten years longer than I have. He's on the phone about replacing a broken faucet in his house

Quote
"I get paid Thursday, so....

My thoughts were
"Why was he on the phone about a broken.... Oh.. yea... Normal people"

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21107 on: November 05, 2018, 12:16:52 PM »
I've been lurking on the MMM forum for a few months, but then this gem occurred so I had to create an account just to share it.

It's open enrollment season, so my company has been announcing new benefits options. Most of it's been pretty standard stuff until they decided to announce a "Purchasing Power" benefit to "promote financial wellness". It turns out that this is a new program that allows employees to buy items and then pay for them over time via payroll deduction. It's essentially a zero-interest loan from the company to finance irresponsible spending. When one goes to the website to see what you can buy with this new "benefit", there are lists of vacation packages, jewelry, and other luxury items.

I guess it's better than going into credit card debt, but encouraging people to buy consumer crap they can't afford isn't exactly the best way to "promote financial wellness".

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21108 on: November 05, 2018, 12:27:16 PM »
I've been lurking on the MMM forum for a few months, but then this gem occurred so I had to create an account just to share it.

It's open enrollment season, so my company has been announcing new benefits options. Most of it's been pretty standard stuff until they decided to announce a "Purchasing Power" benefit to "promote financial wellness". It turns out that this is a new program that allows employees to buy items and then pay for them over time via payroll deduction. It's essentially a zero-interest loan from the company to finance irresponsible spending. When one goes to the website to see what you can buy with this new "benefit", there are lists of vacation packages, jewelry, and other luxury items.

I guess it's better than going into credit card debt, but encouraging people to buy consumer crap they can't afford isn't exactly the best way to "promote financial wellness".

I see that The Company Store is alive and well.

Still Being

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21109 on: November 05, 2018, 12:29:48 PM »
I've been lurking on the MMM forum for a few months, but then this gem occurred so I had to create an account just to share it.

It's open enrollment season, so my company has been announcing new benefits options. Most of it's been pretty standard stuff until they decided to announce a "Purchasing Power" benefit to "promote financial wellness". It turns out that this is a new program that allows employees to buy items and then pay for them over time via payroll deduction. It's essentially a zero-interest loan from the company to finance irresponsible spending. When one goes to the website to see what you can buy with this new "benefit", there are lists of vacation packages, jewelry, and other luxury items.

I guess it's better than going into credit card debt, but encouraging people to buy consumer crap they can't afford isn't exactly the best way to "promote financial wellness".

I see that The Company Store is alive and well.

Hard to believe this is legal!!

PloddingInsight

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21110 on: November 05, 2018, 12:37:00 PM »
My thoughts were
"Why was he on the phone about a broken.... Oh.. yea... Normal people"

I believe he was talking to a family member, not a repair person.  But still! Ha ha

Sugaree

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21111 on: November 05, 2018, 01:17:06 PM »
My thoughts were
"Why was he on the phone about a broken.... Oh.. yea... Normal people"

I believe he was talking to a family member, not a repair person.  But still! Ha ha

If I were talking to DH I might say the same thing about waiting until payday if it were only a few days away.  If at all possible, I like to try to juggle spending to accommodate something like that rather than automatically dip into the emergency fund every time something comes up.  Hell, I had trouble dipping into the emergency fund after an actual emergency. 

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21112 on: November 05, 2018, 01:56:29 PM »

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

But why would teacher's attend? Like you said, auctions mean you pay way more than something is worth, so you can donate the money to a cause. (Um, I was just at an event where my table paid $3,000 for a homemade cake for our dessert...)   Teacher's are going to end up funding the classroom anyway. Why bother donating through this event?

It's parents who need to be attending these things.


(I used to work at a University who wanted 100% employee participation in the "philanthropy" event. Which was giving to the University.  Um, no thank you. The University should give to me- in form of a paycheck.  Thankfully, Children's Miracle Network for the hospital was included in University giving, so I didn't ruin it for my department by not donating. But I wasn't going to donate to the college that employeed me!)
Good will, they can be fun, invite your friends.

I've thrown one or two of these and attended others.  We probably end up with about 25-30% of the teachers attending.  It's not everyone's thing.  Many teachers live far away and commute.  But mingling with parents is a way to get more donations, more help in the classroom, etc.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21113 on: November 05, 2018, 03:56:35 PM »

Given the extent to which the teachers benefit from this program, I truly expected more to attend. But then I got to thinking that this kind of event must be an awful bore and an extension of a classroom job that the teachers don't necessarily like. Interacting with parents and members of the community might not be a way they want to spend an evening. Of course, most of the parents didn't attend either.

I wonder how they'll deal with not having the funding the next year.

But why would teacher's attend? Like you said, auctions mean you pay way more than something is worth, so you can donate the money to a cause. (Um, I was just at an event where my table paid $3,000 for a homemade cake for our dessert...)   Teacher's are going to end up funding the classroom anyway. Why bother donating through this event?

It's parents who need to be attending these things.


(I used to work at a University who wanted 100% employee participation in the "philanthropy" event. Which was giving to the University.  Um, no thank you. The University should give to me- in form of a paycheck.  Thankfully, Children's Miracle Network for the hospital was included in University giving, so I didn't ruin it for my department by not donating. But I wasn't going to donate to the college that employeed me!)
Good will, they can be fun, invite your friends.

I've thrown one or two of these and attended others.  We probably end up with about 25-30% of the teachers attending.  It's not everyone's thing.  Many teachers live far away and commute.  But mingling with parents is a way to get more donations, more help in the classroom, etc.

@i'm a red panda: I responded to someone else's post first. These particular teachers, in this particular school, aren't "funding the classroom" and they never have been. The PTA has reimbursed them for all their classroom related expenses and also purchases extra supplies (based on teacher wish lists) that range from science lab chemicals to robot parts.

Also (and I acknowledge that I didn't put this information in the original post) the event was free to staff and faculty. (Tickets were sold to parents and outsiders like me). Tickets included two glasses of wine and a light buffet meal.

The only thing these school employees would have been contributing would have been an hour or two of time. It wasn't just the teachers who chose not to attend. The principal and administrators didn't show either. The parents likewise mostly gave the event a pass. I'm not sure why. It's possible that after the success of previous years it's possible the event was under-advertised. Either that or enough people thought "nah... enough other people will go and I'll still get the benefit from a successful fundraiser having occurred." I've seen that happen a couple of times when a community gets too confident and people start slacking off because they think someone else will carry the weight.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21114 on: November 05, 2018, 05:12:25 PM »
Honestly....We pass on fundraisers too.  But our PTA has the option of opting out.  AKA pay them for the privilege of not hocking wrapping paper and cookie dough to friends and family.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21115 on: November 05, 2018, 11:34:45 PM »
Coworker proudly told me they sold off all their investments right before the correction last month "great timing isn't it?" Ik asked if they made a nice profit but no, they didn't. They didn't lose any money though, and this money is their retirement pot so they can't afford to lose it to the market. It's safe in a 0,3% interest savings account now.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21116 on: November 06, 2018, 08:35:42 AM »
If I were talking to DH I might say the same thing about waiting until payday if it were only a few days away.  If at all possible, I like to try to juggle spending to accommodate something like that rather than automatically dip into the emergency fund every time something comes up.  Hell, I had trouble dipping into the emergency fund after an actual emergency.
If you don't have enough money for a new faucet in your everyday bank account, you run a very tight ship.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21117 on: November 06, 2018, 08:54:04 AM »
If I were talking to DH I might say the same thing about waiting until payday if it were only a few days away.  If at all possible, I like to try to juggle spending to accommodate something like that rather than automatically dip into the emergency fund every time something comes up.  Hell, I had trouble dipping into the emergency fund after an actual emergency.
If you don't have enough money for a new faucet in your everyday bank account, you run a very tight ship.

Meh.  I don't actually keep much more than I need in checking.  I get paid, bills get paid, anything extra goes into one kind of savings or another.  So a day or two after payday there might be very little in my checking account.  If it were only a couple of days I'd rather wait, research the best option, and make a decision.  I find that it stops impulse decisions.  In this case, I might want to order something rather than just have to pick from whatever the box stores have in stock. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21118 on: November 06, 2018, 01:57:54 PM »
If I were talking to DH I might say the same thing about waiting until payday if it were only a few days away.  If at all possible, I like to try to juggle spending to accommodate something like that rather than automatically dip into the emergency fund every time something comes up.  Hell, I had trouble dipping into the emergency fund after an actual emergency.
If you don't have enough money for a new faucet in your everyday bank account, you run a very tight ship.

Meh.  I don't actually keep much more than I need in checking.  I get paid, bills get paid, anything extra goes into one kind of savings or another.  So a day or two after payday there might be very little in my checking account.  If it were only a couple of days I'd rather wait, research the best option, and make a decision.  I find that it stops impulse decisions.  In this case, I might want to order something rather than just have to pick from whatever the box stores have in stock.

I put like 200 in checking at the beginning of the month. That's more than enough for me. In case of emergency I van transfer the money back from savings in real time through my online banking app, or use a credit card.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21119 on: November 06, 2018, 03:40:40 PM »
At my employer's headquarters, they're experimenting with having a barista at a mobile "coffee bar" during some hours of the day. Coffee is going to cost between 1.50 and 2 euros, depending on how fancy you want it to be. So that's okay-ish.

I do plan on trying it once when I visit the headquarters (normally I don't work there). But I think there will be plenty of folks who will go there every day or multiple times per day.

All the while there are also coffee machines that produce reasonable quality coffee, espresso, hot water and some other options, a rich choice of 12 different types of tea - all of these drinks are for free. Plus the break rooms have multiple fridges for any other drinks or food you might want to bring in with you. Two nice supermarkets within walking distance...

Update: yup, it's popular. I bought coffee there three times now over the last couple of months. It's okay-ish coffee, slightly better than the one you get from the coffee machine. There's a line most of the time. So the barista is probably going to stay.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21120 on: November 07, 2018, 01:36:09 AM »
At my employer's headquarters, they're experimenting with having a barista at a mobile "coffee bar" during some hours of the day. Coffee is going to cost between 1.50 and 2 euros, depending on how fancy you want it to be. So that's okay-ish.

I do plan on trying it once when I visit the headquarters (normally I don't work there). But I think there will be plenty of folks who will go there every day or multiple times per day.

All the while there are also coffee machines that produce reasonable quality coffee, espresso, hot water and some other options, a rich choice of 12 different types of tea - all of these drinks are for free. Plus the break rooms have multiple fridges for any other drinks or food you might want to bring in with you. Two nice supermarkets within walking distance...

Update: yup, it's popular. I bought coffee there three times now over the last couple of months. It's okay-ish coffee, slightly better than the one you get from the coffee machine. There's a line most of the time. So the barista is probably going to stay.

If even you (as a mustachian) buy there regularly, it has done the trick. Isn't it bad of a company to allow such a coffee bar to be established in their building? It is a much bigger challenge to withstand something that you pass every done then something you would actively have to go to. Why tempting all employees with this extra cost?

Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21121 on: November 07, 2018, 04:03:20 AM »
At my employer's headquarters, they're experimenting with having a barista at a mobile "coffee bar" during some hours of the day. Coffee is going to cost between 1.50 and 2 euros, depending on how fancy you want it to be. So that's okay-ish.

I do plan on trying it once when I visit the headquarters (normally I don't work there). But I think there will be plenty of folks who will go there every day or multiple times per day.

All the while there are also coffee machines that produce reasonable quality coffee, espresso, hot water and some other options, a rich choice of 12 different types of tea - all of these drinks are for free. Plus the break rooms have multiple fridges for any other drinks or food you might want to bring in with you. Two nice supermarkets within walking distance...

Update: yup, it's popular. I bought coffee there three times now over the last couple of months. It's okay-ish coffee, slightly better than the one you get from the coffee machine. There's a line most of the time. So the barista is probably going to stay.

If even you (as a mustachian) buy there regularly, it has done the trick. Isn't it bad of a company to allow such a coffee bar to be established in their building? It is a much bigger challenge to withstand something that you pass every done then something you would actively have to go to. Why tempting all employees with this extra cost?

They probably think they're good employers for offering nice coffee for a low-ish price so people don't have to go to Starbucks.

My old employer used to have a ground floor with only a large hall, reception area and bathrooms and they have turned that floor into a coffeeshop accessible to both employees and the public. Brilliant way of turning a wasted space into something that makes money for them.

My current employer offers terrible coffee so several coworkers have their own coffee machines on their desk.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21122 on: November 07, 2018, 06:15:02 AM »
At my employer's headquarters, they're experimenting with having a barista at a mobile "coffee bar" during some hours of the day. Coffee is going to cost between 1.50 and 2 euros, depending on how fancy you want it to be. So that's okay-ish.

I do plan on trying it once when I visit the headquarters (normally I don't work there). But I think there will be plenty of folks who will go there every day or multiple times per day.

All the while there are also coffee machines that produce reasonable quality coffee, espresso, hot water and some other options, a rich choice of 12 different types of tea - all of these drinks are for free. Plus the break rooms have multiple fridges for any other drinks or food you might want to bring in with you. Two nice supermarkets within walking distance...

Update: yup, it's popular. I bought coffee there three times now over the last couple of months. It's okay-ish coffee, slightly better than the one you get from the coffee machine. There's a line most of the time. So the barista is probably going to stay.

If even you (as a mustachian) buy there regularly, it has done the trick. Isn't it bad of a company to allow such a coffee bar to be established in their building? It is a much bigger challenge to withstand something that you pass every done then something you would actively have to go to. Why tempting all employees with this extra cost?

They probably think they're good employers for offering nice coffee for a low-ish price so people don't have to go to Starbucks.

My old employer used to have a ground floor with only a large hall, reception area and bathrooms and they have turned that floor into a coffeeshop accessible to both employees and the public. Brilliant way of turning a wasted space into something that makes money for them.

My current employer offers terrible coffee so several coworkers have their own coffee machines on their desk.

If people appreciate the fancy coffee, then the employer is making their employees content and likely improving morale and retention - good move. It's not their job to help people save money!

That said, my office offers for-money keurig coffee (50 cents per cup, which is JUST low enough that I'll occasionally get some), but the machine dispenses free hot water. I've switched to tea, for the most part.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21123 on: November 07, 2018, 06:52:21 AM »
Our snack bar at work used to have a ton of items, you put your cash in a steel box, honor system, no IOUs.
Now notices are up that there is a lot of theft and items will not be replenished, item variety will be reduced.
This is at a DOD site with civilians, military, and contractors.

Second time I've seen this. First time I was when I ran my team's snack fund in a different building.

fatcow240

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21124 on: November 07, 2018, 08:30:33 AM »
Our snack bar at work used to have a ton of items, you put your cash in a steel box, honor system, no IOUs.
Now notices are up that there is a lot of theft and items will not be replenished, item variety will be reduced.
This is at a DOD site with civilians, military, and contractors.

Second time I've seen this. First time I was when I ran my team's snack fund in a different building.
I have never seen an honor system snack bar work.  My current office has a self service area.  It has several cameras.  That is the only way I see it working.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21125 on: November 07, 2018, 10:30:23 AM »
My former employer was a DoD contractor and our honor system snack bars worked just fine. It is odd to think that people with security clearances who are entrusted with supposedly secrets of national security importance can’t be trusted not to steal a cup-o-noodle. Then again, we also got janitors and contractors and who knows who else going through the building.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21126 on: November 07, 2018, 11:20:31 AM »
My former employer was a DoD contractor and our honor system snack bars worked just fine. It is odd to think that people with security clearances who are entrusted with supposedly secrets of national security importance can’t be trusted not to steal a cup-o-noodle. Then again, we also got janitors and contractors and who knows who else going through the building.

There was a study (it was a person who sold bagels with an honesty box system, it was in a book called something like the truth about dishonesty), that suggested that the higher the status of people the more likely it was that they stole from the honesty system.

My friend runs the tuck shelf at a Police station and had to double the prices to break even, it was highly amusing.

It's pretty scary that people are willing to steal from an employer or from their colleagues. If you are too skint to pay for a snack you probably need to be keeping that job.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21127 on: November 07, 2018, 11:38:20 AM »
I was talking to my boss about an upcoming trip to Vietnam in two weeks (!!!) for a friend's wedding, and she asked if we were flying "freight" and I said, "Of course!  What, do you think I'm made of money?"

And she said, "Well, you never know.  People might have a secret stash.  No secret stash for you, I guess."

And the hilarious thing is we absolutely do have a secret stache. We have said stache because we don't spend money on shit like business class flights.

She's going to be really confused when I retire before she does.

i has a friend who asked if i wanted to fly to vietnam for the WEEKEND!
i live in the eastern USA, it takes a day and a half to fly to Vietnam ! ha ha
i would barely make it thru customs before we had to go back home

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21128 on: November 07, 2018, 11:41:38 AM »
i had a co-worker who screamed (she was very nice, not a screamer)
FUcKKK!! all of a sudden
i almost came running , thinking there was emergency

she says, did you hear our (professional) license costs 275$ to renew now?!!

i was like , no ,  what difference does $50 make (it used to be like $215)?

she was like. i'm not gonna be able to pay my mortgage now. 


jinga nation

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21129 on: November 07, 2018, 11:53:48 AM »
Our snack bar at work used to have a ton of items, you put your cash in a steel box, honor system, no IOUs.
Now notices are up that there is a lot of theft and items will not be replenished, item variety will be reduced.
This is at a DOD site with civilians, military, and contractors.

Second time I've seen this. First time I was when I ran my team's snack fund in a different building.
I have never seen an honor system snack bar work.  My current office has a self service area.  It has several cameras.  That is the only way I see it working.
The snack bar has 2 cameras, yet theft occurs. In the face of the signs that say "No borrowing, no IOUs" and "Cash only, no credit".
What happened to "if you don't have 2 quarters to rub, you ain't getting anything but free air"?
This isn't millennials, people here are from the 60s all the way down to early 20s. Theft don't age discriminate.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21130 on: November 07, 2018, 02:01:33 PM »

...The only thing these school employees would have been contributing would have been an hour or two of time. It wasn't just the teachers who chose not to attend. The principal and administrators didn't show either. The parents likewise mostly gave the event a pass. I'm not sure why. ...

You have two dominant charity genes; I one recessive.  When I get the least hint, the faintest waft, of entitlement - and in the case of these teachers and these administrators it's strong enough to be mephitic - my money and I retreat back under our rock. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21131 on: November 07, 2018, 02:44:41 PM »
I've been lurking on the MMM forum for a few months, but then this gem occurred so I had to create an account just to share it.

It's open enrollment season, so my company has been announcing new benefits options. Most of it's been pretty standard stuff until they decided to announce a "Purchasing Power" benefit to "promote financial wellness". It turns out that this is a new program that allows employees to buy items and then pay for them over time via payroll deduction. It's essentially a zero-interest loan from the company to finance irresponsible spending. When one goes to the website to see what you can buy with this new "benefit", there are lists of vacation packages, jewelry, and other luxury items.

I guess it's better than going into credit card debt, but encouraging people to buy consumer crap they can't afford isn't exactly the best way to "promote financial wellness".

Hmmm, either we work for the same company or it's a new thing making the rounds. I, too, looked at the website and at first was confused...

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21132 on: November 07, 2018, 04:29:59 PM »

...The only thing these school employees would have been contributing would have been an hour or two of time. It wasn't just the teachers who chose not to attend. The principal and administrators didn't show either. The parents likewise mostly gave the event a pass. I'm not sure why. ...

You have two dominant charity genes; I one recessive.  When I get the least hint, the faintest waft, of entitlement - and in the case of these teachers and these administrators it's strong enough to be mephitic - my money and I retreat back under our rock.

As do I, although my olfactory gifts are more puny so I require more like a facepunch's worth of entitlement before I lose interest.

Large-scale loss of interest from donors and supporters is definitely what I foresee for this particular school unless they make some big changes. For example, every group or individual that donated more than $50 worth of goods for the auction should have received a free pair of tickets to the event, so that they can schmooze with the ticket-buying parents. Faculty and staff should receive free tickets likewise, because that's how you attract the ticket-buying parents. You have to bait your hook to catch the fish.

Here is a slightly paraphrased excerpt from a conversation with my friend who is involved in running said PTA:

Friend: We're making some changes for next year. There's a new administrative team.

Grim: If you'd like some help--

Friend: (brightly) Any time or resources you're willing to commit would be more than welcome.

Grim: -- I wrote a book on the subject a couple years ago and there's an entire section on parent-teacher organizations. Whatever problems they have, there's most likely a solution in there. And if they buy it on SmashWords they will get the next edition for free when it comes out.

Friend: (less happily) Ah, I'd forgotten about that. I'll mention it to them.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21133 on: November 08, 2018, 06:40:38 AM »
At the lunch table at work, we discussed phones, as I am looking for a new smartphone. One colleague showed me his Samsung Note 9 that he paid $1300 for, and in addition to that came a fancy case that shows the time on the outside. It looked nice, though.
It was a new record for me to hear someone in my network spent that much money on a phone.

I myself have been looking into low segment and middle segment phones. But I have difficulties finding one that completely lives up to my requirements. I found one that does, that is an older flagship phone. Another of my colleagues thinks that I save so hard on everything else that I should give myself this high segment phone that does all the things that I need, rather than a cheaper that has compromises. But I have just decided that she is right. The older flagship phones do not cost so much more than the cheaper model that I had in mind and I would like one that does the all stuff I need.

Here is the thread:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/my-next-smartphone/

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21134 on: November 08, 2018, 10:31:17 AM »

...The only thing these school employees would have been contributing would have been an hour or two of time. It wasn't just the teachers who chose not to attend. The principal and administrators didn't show either. The parents likewise mostly gave the event a pass. I'm not sure why. ...

You have two dominant charity genes; I one recessive.  When I get the least hint, the faintest waft, of entitlement - and in the case of these teachers and these administrators it's strong enough to be mephitic - my money and I retreat back under our rock.

As do I, although my olfactory gifts are more puny so I require more like a facepunch's worth of entitlement before I lose interest.

Large-scale loss of interest from donors and supporters is definitely what I foresee for this particular school unless they make some big changes. For example, every group or individual that donated more than $50 worth of goods for the auction should have received a free pair of tickets to the event, so that they can schmooze with the ticket-buying parents. Faculty and staff should receive free tickets likewise, because that's how you attract the ticket-buying parents. You have to bait your hook to catch the fish.

Here is a slightly paraphrased excerpt from a conversation with my friend who is involved in running said PTA:

Friend: We're making some changes for next year. There's a new administrative team.

Grim: If you'd like some help--

Friend: (brightly) Any time or resources you're willing to commit would be more than welcome.

Grim: -- I wrote a book on the subject a couple years ago and there's an entire section on parent-teacher organizations. Whatever problems they have, there's most likely a solution in there. And if they buy it on SmashWords they will get the next edition for free when it comes out.

Friend: (less happily) Ah, I'd forgotten about that. I'll mention it to them.
I have found it's a delicate balance at our school, and probably many.

On one hand, you NEED new people, new blood, new excitement!  Because, well, kids and families come and go, right?  Not everyone is like me and spaces their kids 6 years apart, guaranteeing a straight 13 years at the same elementary school.

New ideas are great too - it's always good to try new things.  Except: some things don't work.  And: some things that didn't work last year might work next year.  And vice versa.  And some things will NEVER work with a particular demographic.  But demographics change.

We've had a few newer parents who are super excited to jump and do ALL THE THINGS.  And in some ways, they are trying to emulate the wealthier schools.  We've done that before, every few years in the 8 years that I've been at this school.  With varying success. 
- Jogathon.  Instead of low-budgeting and going with parent work, we hired a company with chips to set up, be the EMCEE, and do timing.  We also lured kids into getting donations by promising a free shaved ice if they raised money.  It was a lot more fun this last year!  And it was a bit easier.
(but it netted almost exactly the same amount of money.  In truth, a little less than normal considering the $1000 cost for the chip company.  Though it's really hard to make a comparison with declining enrollment).
- Party books - one or two couples offer up a party, or a sailing trip, or whatever and others pay to attend.  This was a dismal failure.
- Festival with donated food.  Our school is heavily Latino/ Hispanic.  This is the first year that the festival planners just opted to sell pizza, instead of getting food donated by families.  This might be because our powerhouse parent left (her daughter graduated).  I have no idea how well the festival went this year, as I was injured and wasn't able to go.

So many of the people come in with I HAVE SO MANY IDEAS, but "I'm not a doer".  Okay, come back with a doer!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21135 on: November 08, 2018, 11:09:30 AM »
I have found it's a delicate balance at our school, and probably many.

On one hand, you NEED new people, new blood, new excitement!  Because, well, kids and families come and go, right?  Not everyone is like me and spaces their kids 6 years apart, guaranteeing a straight 13 years at the same elementary school.

That's one of the reasons PTA organizations have higher levels of sustainable activity: there's a constant throughput of new people and by the time burnout sets in there's new blood available. Children's sport activities tend to be longer-term.

Quote
New ideas are great too - it's always good to try new things.  Except: some things don't work.  And: some things that didn't work last year might work next year.  And vice versa.  And some things will NEVER work with a particular demographic.  But demographics change.

Sometimes, slowly, over time. Mostly, for public schools and PTA activities, the conditions deteriorate consistently over time as the demographic skews toward a less and less community-minded class of people.

Quote
We've had a few newer parents who are super excited to jump and do ALL THE THINGS.  And in some ways, they are trying to emulate the wealthier schools.  We've done that before, every few years in the 8 years that I've been at this school.  With varying success. 
- Jogathon.  Instead of low-budgeting and going with parent work, we hired a company with chips to set up, be the EMCEE, and do timing.  We also lured kids into getting donations by promising a free shaved ice if they raised money.  It was a lot more fun this last year!  And it was a bit easier.
(but it netted almost exactly the same amount of money.  In truth, a little less than normal considering the $1000 cost for the chip company.  Though it's really hard to make a comparison with declining enrollment).

This methodology is worth keeping if it significantly reduced the wear and tear on your volunteer pool.

Quote
- Party books - one or two couples offer up a party, or a sailing trip, or whatever and others pay to attend.  This was a dismal failure.

It's the same in fundraising as it is in fishing. If the bait's not right, the fish won't bite.

A couples based party is attractive only to individuals who don't have a baby at home, who are able to make plans in advance and stick to them because plans aren't "subject to change", and who are from a culture where going off as couples and leaving the kids at home is common. In cultures where people prefer to celebrate with the extended family, it's quite rare that you'll find someone interested in paying to attend an event with people they didn't know and grow up with. They will, however, spend freely on family oriented activities. Likewise, if you have a group of single parents, the last thing they want is to either pay double to hang out with couples, get forcibly partnered up with someone with whom they have nothing in common, or spend a ton of money to treat someone who's not an actual-- or prospective-- life partner.

Later on in the post you mention a predominately Latino/Hispanic demographic. This is a demographic where people are statistically more likely to enjoy an all-ages activity where they can bring their kids and extended family for a not-too-expensive activity that creates a net gain for you. The event has to be the kind that's easily expandable so that if someone shows up he or she can be included at the last minute.

Quote
- Festival with donated food.  Our school is heavily Latino/ Hispanic.  This is the first year that the festival planners just opted to sell pizza, instead of getting food donated by families.  This might be because our powerhouse parent left (her daughter graduated).  I have no idea how well the festival went this year, as I was injured and wasn't able to go.

So many of the people come in with I HAVE SO MANY IDEAS, but "I'm not a doer".  Okay, come back with a doer!

There are ALWAYS tons of "idea people". Likewise there are plenty of people who want to lecture about how things "ought" to be done. I generally invite them to join the Board of Directors or put together an effective fundraiser using their theories (to show us peons just how superior their approach is, but I leave that part out).

dude

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21136 on: November 08, 2018, 12:02:07 PM »
Background: I make at least 3x the median income for my area.  Guy in the next cubicle has the same job description and has been at it at least ten years longer than I have. He's on the phone about replacing a broken faucet in his house

Quote
"I get paid Thursday, so....

Oh, I say this all the time! Or say, "Fuck, I'm broke this week." By which I mean, I already spent my discretionary income for the pay period, which is a fraction of what I make after committing to savings. I especially don't want tradespeople thinking I'm rich, because they can and will charge more if they think they can get it (though by virtue of the neighborhood I live in, that's a tougher sell).

In fact, I cried poverty just the other day, after I paid off a $1,400 charge for a vacation coming up in two weeks, $543 for our H06 policy, $525 for my wife's Christmas gift (a plane flight to Mexico for a yoga retreat), $330 worth of beer I purchased for a party I'm hosting in a couple weeks for @60 guests, and other sundry shit I spent money on the past week. Left me with $200 in my checking account until next payday (next Friday). Am I actually broke?  Fuck no, we've got $1.2 million dollars in our accounts! But by my definition, I'm broke!

Feivel2000

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21137 on: November 08, 2018, 02:07:16 PM »
*notsohumblebrag*

marcela

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21138 on: November 09, 2018, 08:44:48 AM »
Coworker has been looking for a house for the past 3 years. Husband had a ridiculous list of requirements which made their search hard: certain amount of acreage, pool, couldn't see neighbors from the house and, of course, excellent schools (despite planning to send their kid to private school). They finally found one for $150k over their budget and moved in last month.
Now they are buying furniture because their old house was 2,000 sq ft smaller than the new one. Today my coworker comes in complaining that she just had a $10k credit card bill and had a $12k one last month. Apparently just the sofa they bought was $6k!!! That's more than I spent on outfitting my entire house when we moved from a furnished apartment last year!

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21139 on: November 09, 2018, 02:48:35 PM »
$6k on a sofa?!?!? What does it do? Do they drive it around their giant house?

How terrible will it be when they spill red wine on it for the first time?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21140 on: November 09, 2018, 03:31:19 PM »

Also (and I acknowledge that I didn't put this information in the original post) the event was free to staff and faculty. (Tickets were sold to parents and outsiders like me). Tickets included two glasses of wine and a light buffet meal.

The only thing these school employees would have been contributing would have been an hour or two of time. It wasn't just the teachers who chose not to attend. The principal and administrators didn't show either. The parents likewise mostly gave the event a pass. I'm not sure why. It's possible that after the success of previous years it's possible the event was under-advertised. Either that or enough people thought "nah... enough other people will go and I'll still get the benefit from a successful fundraiser having occurred." I've seen that happen a couple of times when a community gets too confident and people start slacking off because they think someone else will carry the weight.

I recently attended one of these. It was fun. The employees of the school were not expected to be there but if they came and mingled they had to buy a ticket just like everyone else. $50 per head. Consequently nobody but the boss and a couple of the more senior staff attended. What a missed opportunity for the academic folks to meet and greet and thank the people helping to support their mission.

Overheard from university faculty friends: husband and wife both work on campus and carpool to avoid buying TWO $250 per year parking passes. They were warned by campus police that whichever spouse did not buy a parking pass could not drive nor park their shared car on campus - although the car has a paid parking pass for the year. The spouse whose name is on the parking pass must be the driver of the vehicle if it is on campus. Penalties could include revoking parking privileges. Must have two passes.

Spouse told us - let 'em try it. -eye roller-
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 03:39:54 PM by Just Joe »

marcela

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21141 on: November 09, 2018, 05:47:43 PM »
$6k on a sofa?!?!? What does it do? Do they drive it around their giant house?

How terrible will it be when they spill red wine on it for the first time?

Apparently it has both USB outlets at the seats AND lumbar support.  How much time are you spending on the couch to be concerned about lumbar support?!

OtherJen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21142 on: November 09, 2018, 06:07:47 PM »
$6k on a sofa?!?!? What does it do? Do they drive it around their giant house?

How terrible will it be when they spill red wine on it for the first time?

Yikes. We paid $750 for a sofabed to replace our sagging IKEA sofa, and I'm super careful not to spill on it.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21143 on: November 09, 2018, 06:51:01 PM »
Our snack bar at work used to have a ton of items, you put your cash in a steel box, honor system, no IOUs.
Now notices are up that there is a lot of theft and items will not be replenished, item variety will be reduced.
This is at a DOD site with civilians, military, and contractors.

Second time I've seen this. First time I was when I ran my team's snack fund in a different building.

We had an honor snack bar at work, not military but similar type environment.  We did find out the issue with theft.  Our cleaning crew was individuals with special needs, one of them thought that the coffee can with cash was there to provided them with lunch money.  (Meaning they didn't really understand that they were stealing.)  Problem was solved by moving the cash box to an area that was occupied during cleaning time.

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21144 on: November 10, 2018, 01:49:01 AM »
Our snack bar at work used to have a ton of items, you put your cash in a steel box, honor system, no IOUs.
Now notices are up that there is a lot of theft and items will not be replenished, item variety will be reduced.
This is at a DOD site with civilians, military, and contractors.

Second time I've seen this. First time I was when I ran my team's snack fund in a different building.

We had an honor snack bar at work, not military but similar type environment.  We did find out the issue with theft.  Our cleaning crew was individuals with special needs, one of them thought that the coffee can with cash was there to provided them with lunch money.  (Meaning they didn't really understand that they were stealing.)  Problem was solved by moving the cash box to an area that was occupied during cleaning time.
I had a discussion about theft with the manager of our external cleaning service, how they were always the first to be looked at in case of theft and how he trusted each and every one of the implicitly. Couple of weeks later, I'm burning a DVD with full frontal video captured on security camera when one of his staff was rumaging through my desk drawers (and a couple of defective phones had been stolen earlier that month).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21145 on: November 10, 2018, 05:58:20 AM »
At the lunch table at work, we discussed phones, as I am looking for a new smartphone. One colleague showed me his Samsung Note 9 that he paid $1300 for, and in addition to that came a fancy case that shows the time on the outside. It looked nice, though.
It was a new record for me to hear someone in my network spent that much money on a phone.

I myself have been looking into low segment and middle segment phones. But I have difficulties finding one that completely lives up to my requirements. I found one that does, that is an older flagship phone. Another of my colleagues thinks that I save so hard on everything else that I should give myself this high segment phone that does all the things that I need, rather than a cheaper that has compromises. But I have just decided that she is right. The older flagship phones do not cost so much more than the cheaper model that I had in mind and I would like one that does the all stuff I need.

Here is the thread:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/my-next-smartphone/
The pocophone has the best specs you can find for 300 euro ..
If you want a larger screen perhaps the Honor play ...

1 300 euro for something that will be worthless in 3 to 4 years is insane!

Michael in ABQ

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21146 on: November 10, 2018, 07:44:03 AM »
I'm in the National Guard and as an officer with 15+ years.in I make pretty decent money for a weekend. One of my Soldiers was talking about his new truck he bought that was only $41k. I know he is a.GS-7, soon to be 9 at his civilian job so that's maybe $50k a year plus $6-7k from the Guard. The guy he was talking to paid a similar amount for his truck, and complained how he had to get more expensive financing through the dealership as USAA wouldn't loan him over 100% LTV to cover $7,000 in negative equity from his trade-in.

Meanwhile I'm sitting there with my used truck that I paid $2,700 cash for. Albeit, repairs have been almost $2k over the last couple of years. Still, I'll be able to sell it for probably $2-2.5k whereas these guys have already lost thousands to depreciation and will lose thousands more each year.

Oh, and the guy who bought the truck has mentioned being broke several times recently. I.e. he is down to double digits in his checking account. I think I might know why....

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21147 on: November 11, 2018, 08:57:13 AM »
And do any of them even need a truck to do actual truck things or is it just four wheels to go from A to B?

Michael in ABQ

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21148 on: November 11, 2018, 10:58:35 AM »
And do any of them even need a truck to do actual truck things or is it just four wheels to go from A to B?

I'm sure like everyone else with a truck the bed only gets used 1-2% of the time. I've had my small pickup truck for about 1.5-2 years and I think I've moved stuff in the bed maybe 10 times total. Only a handful of those were things that wouldn't fit in a normal car (Christmas trees, mattresses, etc.).

Sugaree

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #21149 on: November 11, 2018, 05:48:17 PM »
And do any of them even need a truck to do actual truck things or is it just four wheels to go from A to B?

I'm sure like everyone else with a truck the bed only gets used 1-2% of the time. I've had my small pickup truck for about 1.5-2 years and I think I've moved stuff in the bed maybe 10 times total. Only a handful of those were things that wouldn't fit in a normal car (Christmas trees, mattresses, etc.).

My husband does landscaping/maintenance type stuff at work and is required to use his own vehicle (I hate his job/boss/company) so he does use the cargo area of his Jeep daily.  We considered buying a small used fleet truck for him, but he wanted to keep what he's got.