Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8472033 times)

financialfreedomsloth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20500 on: July 07, 2018, 04:33:00 AM »
If I were retiring due to old age I'd seriously consider taking the regular payment because I wouldn't want to be dealing with investments and income variability at that age. I'd rather have a small annuity than a big lump sum because it'll be simpler in the future when I'm old and crazy.
If you are still smart enough to do this reasoning when you have to make the decision between annuities or lump payment you are also smart enough to chose a decent holding company with a good track record an decent dividend payment. Just consider the dividends as an annuity. Your heirs will be very grateful for it.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20501 on: July 07, 2018, 06:02:43 AM »
If I were retiring due to old age I'd seriously consider taking the regular payment because I wouldn't want to be dealing with investments and income variability at that age. I'd rather have a small annuity than a big lump sum because it'll be simpler in the future when I'm old and crazy.
If you are still smart enough to do this reasoning when you have to make the decision between annuities or lump payment you are also smart enough to chose a decent holding company with a good track record an decent dividend payment. Just consider the dividends as an annuity. Your heirs will be very grateful for it.

Will I continue to be smart enough not to write a big cheque to the donkey sanctuary, or sign it all over to my carer, or "invest" it all with a helpful Nigerian prince? I don't think my heirs would thank me for any of that. I'm much more worried about protecting capital from myself in old age than from institutional collapse.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20502 on: July 07, 2018, 10:55:58 AM »
If I were retiring due to old age I'd seriously consider taking the regular payment because I wouldn't want to be dealing with investments and income variability at that age. I'd rather have a small annuity than a big lump sum because it'll be simpler in the future when I'm old and crazy.
If you are still smart enough to do this reasoning when you have to make the decision between annuities or lump payment you are also smart enough to chose a decent holding company with a good track record an decent dividend payment. Just consider the dividends as an annuity. Your heirs will be very grateful for it.

Will I continue to be smart enough not to write a big cheque to the donkey sanctuary, or sign it all over to my carer, or "invest" it all with a helpful Nigerian prince? I don't think my heirs would thank me for any of that. I'm much more worried about protecting capital from myself in old age than from institutional collapse.

Indeed. In one branch of my family, everyone who lives long enough goes mad. Alzheimer's is a thing, and so are schizophrenia and Lewy-Body. Now the eldest generation, which lived through WWII and the preceding economic depression, tend to be tightwads so the fact they tend to go batshit crazy hasn't been a factor in family wealth retention.

I'm not as confident of my parents' generation, which in my particular family was raised in a privileged way. A fair number of them suffered from affluenza as teens and although some of them adopted more frugal habits later I don't think they are as well ingrained. My own generation (X) is more than 50% useless to begin with in my family, so I shudder to think of what aging will do to already flaky mental processes.

(Note that I'm talking only about trends in my personal extended family, not about individuals who buck the trend, and definitely not about greater human society or traits specific to different generations).

Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20503 on: July 07, 2018, 11:48:04 AM »
If I were retiring due to old age I'd seriously consider taking the regular payment because I wouldn't want to be dealing with investments and income variability at that age. I'd rather have a small annuity than a big lump sum because it'll be simpler in the future when I'm old and crazy.
If you are still smart enough to do this reasoning when you have to make the decision between annuities or lump payment you are also smart enough to chose a decent holding company with a good track record an decent dividend payment. Just consider the dividends as an annuity. Your heirs will be very grateful for it.

Will I continue to be smart enough not to write a big cheque to the donkey sanctuary, or sign it all over to my carer, or "invest" it all with a helpful Nigerian prince? I don't think my heirs would thank me for any of that. I'm much more worried about protecting capital from myself in old age than from institutional collapse.

Indeed. In one branch of my family, everyone who lives long enough goes mad. Alzheimer's is a thing, and so are schizophrenia and Lewy-Body. Now the eldest generation, which lived through WWII and the preceding economic depression, tend to be tightwads so the fact they tend to go batshit crazy hasn't been a factor in family wealth retention.

I'm not as confident of my parents' generation, which in my particular family was raised in a privileged way. A fair number of them suffered from affluenza as teens and although some of them adopted more frugal habits later I don't think they are as well ingrained. My own generation (X) is more than 50% useless to begin with in my family, so I shudder to think of what aging will do to already flaky mental processes.


I know a few people of the Depression/WWII generation who were naturally frugal and became extremely tight with money in the last stages of their life. It might be good for wealth retention but I would struggle with that just as much. I'm glad my one surviving grandparent (born in the early 30s)  is still mentally competent, but one of her friends is so extremely frugal she doesn't eat properly, or even heat her house. Her kids have convinced her to heat to at least 12C (54 F .... ) to prevent the pipes from bursting but that's it. When she's home alone she only eats one meal a day, usually the cheapest ready meal in the store, and she only eats half of it to save even more money. When she visits other people she will devour any food that's put in front of her. Now, my grandma is a good cook and few people would be able to resist her pies, but it's clear this poor lady is starving herself - and it's certainly not because of lack of money. I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

I know that my dad will end up in trouble when he gets old  - he's always had a spending problem, and in his early 60s, he already has trouble accepting reality. I know he has a large mortgage, will retire in a few years, his pension will be a quite a bit lower than his current income, and he bought a totally unsuitable home a few years back. He's always going to complain and he's never going to take responsability for anything, so I'm not going to spend much time feeling sorry for him.

fredbear

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20504 on: July 07, 2018, 12:14:10 PM »
[...
Will I continue to be smart enough not to write a big cheque to the donkey sanctuary, or sign it all over to my carer, or "invest" it all with a helpful Nigerian prince? I don't think my heirs would thank me for any of that. I'm much more worried about protecting capital from myself in old age than from institutional collapse.

A friend's parents: he was a working man, machinist, did his job.  Liked old things that worked or could be made to work; had a feel for metal.  Things did not break when he touched them.  Somehow he married well, very well.  She was a SAHM, raised 6 kids, saved their money, built up a real estate portfolio of 6 rentals all paid for.  Even with something of a mustachian background I can hardly believe how well she did.  Then she died.

There was not a lot of difference in his behavior after her death.  He still sat in front of the TV watching evangelists who needed his help to bring The Message to their corner of the world.  It seemed a harmless way for a bereft old man to pass what was left of his time.  Until one of the siblings realized he was entirely capable of sending a check for $2,000,000 to one of these TV people.  They were doing God's work.  God's work, you oughtta help.  The siblings, though all Christian, thought more of charity beginning at home than of "give away all that thou hast."  Some of them even thought the televangelists were cynical charlatans strip-mining geezers for fun and profit.  At any rate, there was an emergency meeting of the siblings and they took control of the finances.  I am not sure he even noticed. 

elliha

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20505 on: July 07, 2018, 01:49:18 PM »
If I were retiring due to old age I'd seriously consider taking the regular payment because I wouldn't want to be dealing with investments and income variability at that age. I'd rather have a small annuity than a big lump sum because it'll be simpler in the future when I'm old and crazy.
If you are still smart enough to do this reasoning when you have to make the decision between annuities or lump payment you are also smart enough to chose a decent holding company with a good track record an decent dividend payment. Just consider the dividends as an annuity. Your heirs will be very grateful for it.

Will I continue to be smart enough not to write a big cheque to the donkey sanctuary, or sign it all over to my carer, or "invest" it all with a helpful Nigerian prince? I don't think my heirs would thank me for any of that. I'm much more worried about protecting capital from myself in old age than from institutional collapse.

Indeed. In one branch of my family, everyone who lives long enough goes mad. Alzheimer's is a thing, and so are schizophrenia and Lewy-Body. Now the eldest generation, which lived through WWII and the preceding economic depression, tend to be tightwads so the fact they tend to go batshit crazy hasn't been a factor in family wealth retention.

I'm not as confident of my parents' generation, which in my particular family was raised in a privileged way. A fair number of them suffered from affluenza as teens and although some of them adopted more frugal habits later I don't think they are as well ingrained. My own generation (X) is more than 50% useless to begin with in my family, so I shudder to think of what aging will do to already flaky mental processes.


I know a few people of the Depression/WWII generation who were naturally frugal and became extremely tight with money in the last stages of their life. It might be good for wealth retention but I would struggle with that just as much. I'm glad my one surviving grandparent (born in the early 30s)  is still mentally competent, but one of her friends is so extremely frugal she doesn't eat properly, or even heat her house. Her kids have convinced her to heat to at least 12C (54 F .... ) to prevent the pipes from bursting but that's it. When she's home alone she only eats one meal a day, usually the cheapest ready meal in the store, and she only eats half of it to save even more money. When she visits other people she will devour any food that's put in front of her. Now, my grandma is a good cook and few people would be able to resist her pies, but it's clear this poor lady is starving herself - and it's certainly not because of lack of money. I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

I know that my dad will end up in trouble when he gets old  - he's always had a spending problem, and in his early 60s, he already has trouble accepting reality. I know he has a large mortgage, will retire in a few years, his pension will be a quite a bit lower than his current income, and he bought a totally unsuitable home a few years back. He's always going to complain and he's never going to take responsability for anything, so I'm not going to spend much time feeling sorry for him.

I have seen the over-drive frugality too. One lady I know would more or less only allow herself to eat a tiny bit of herring, potato, milk, yogurt and hard rye bread. If that was all she was used to eat and if she had been extremely poor it would have been understandable but she had a perhaps not great but reasonable pension and lived in perhaps the cheapest possible apartment with a minimal fee and the apartment was already paid off. She had no one to inherit her and she was over 90 at this point. She had money in the bank too and she could have spent some of that too and still had plenty to pay her funeral and live a decent life. If you lived that long you should allow yourself to have a little extra sometimes.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20506 on: July 07, 2018, 07:20:02 PM »
New co-worker changing states, I'm going to the DMV to change my driver's license but I'm going to hold off on registering my vehicle because I hear that there is something about the taxes for new registrations here in the state being high and I have a 2018 SUV and it's too expensive right now.

Raymond Reddington

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20507 on: July 08, 2018, 04:04:22 PM »
"The only real investment to buy right now is gold. When the entire monetary system collapses, gold will still have its intrinsic value, and everyone will fight for it. That's why I buy (sic: paper contracts for gold that don't generate income in any way, and do not lead to the actual owning of any gold either, for those who might believe this malarkey). I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies." -yup, a coworker actually said this.

"Anyone want to join the lottery pool? There's 35 of us in it, and the payout is gonna be huge if we win. We're buying like 500 tickets all together." -Another coworker.

lemanfan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20508 on: July 08, 2018, 11:41:16 PM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20509 on: July 08, 2018, 11:54:08 PM »
I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

PSA: My grandmother went through this phase. It was because her oesophagus had aged and she was choking on regular food. Food like lasagne and shepherd's pie were found to be better options.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20510 on: July 08, 2018, 11:57:26 PM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

Raymond Reddington

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20511 on: July 09, 2018, 01:47:55 AM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

I just love that this individual dropped that after talking about how gold was the only investment to make. Like he clearly felt a zombie apocalypse would be coming, and somehow him and his gold would survive it...but only because of the gold.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20512 on: July 09, 2018, 01:49:01 AM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

I just love that this individual dropped that after talking about how gold was the only investment to make. Like he clearly felt a zombie apocalypse would be coming, and somehow him and his gold would survive it...but only because of the gold.

It's the implied "as proof of that" lingering between the two sentences that I find peculiar.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20513 on: July 09, 2018, 03:01:23 AM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

I just love that this individual dropped that after talking about how gold was the only investment to make. Like he clearly felt a zombie apocalypse would be coming, and somehow him and his gold would survive it...but only because of the gold.

Ha, I read that as zombie movies being proof of his intellectism. They're definitely proof of mine.... [sad face]

former player

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20514 on: July 09, 2018, 03:36:18 AM »
My 10-years older co-irker picked up a brand new ~$35,000 car today! I told him while thinking about new cars is always fun, I am frugal and plan to drive my 13-year old Toyota another 200,000 miles. He said when I am older(!) and successful(!!!) I will want a new car. I chuckled to myself.

Love the bolded.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20515 on: July 09, 2018, 07:49:42 AM »
Coworker is struggling to find a storage space big and cheap enough for their budget - their garage is going to be renovated so everything inside it has to be put somewhere else. The two cars they have have never seen the inside of that garage. What's inside then? The daughter's clothes, all of them, from age 0 to now 16, books that are not fitting inside the house (and there are full shelves Everywhere), and old sentimental items that are clearly not sentimental enough for them to really take care of them. They are being left to be eaten by mice, but nothing can be thrown away unless rendered completely useless/eaten up.

She says they have found something that will hold everything for $110 per month.. Oh well, not too bad for like a month or two I say.. Oh no, she says, we have to keep it for over a year! And then, of course, it will all go back into the newly renovated garage..

They got a new car last month too.. Fancypants fast a-lot-of-horsepower bought from the dealer that she uses to go to work. How far does she live from work? 1 mile exactly. She doesn't like bicycles.

I just smile and nod.

bluebelle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20516 on: July 09, 2018, 08:13:31 AM »
Coworker is struggling to find a storage space big and cheap enough for their budget - their garage is going to be renovated so everything inside it has to be put somewhere else. The two cars they have have never seen the inside of that garage. What's inside then? The daughter's clothes, all of them, from age 0 to now 16, books that are not fitting inside the house (and there are full shelves Everywhere), and old sentimental items that are clearly not sentimental enough for them to really take care of them. They are being left to be eaten by mice, but nothing can be thrown away unless rendered completely useless/eaten up.

She says they have found something that will hold everything for $110 per month.. Oh well, not too bad for like a month or two I say.. Oh no, she says, we have to keep it for over a year! And then, of course, it will all go back into the newly renovated garage..

They got a new car last month too.. Fancypants fast a-lot-of-horsepower bought from the dealer that she uses to go to work. How far does she live from work? 1 mile exactly. She doesn't like bicycles.

I just smile and nod.
renovate a garage?  What am I missing?  I've never heard of anyone renovating a garage.

Raymond Reddington

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20517 on: July 09, 2018, 09:11:43 AM »
Coworker is struggling to find a storage space big and cheap enough for their budget - their garage is going to be renovated so everything inside it has to be put somewhere else. The two cars they have have never seen the inside of that garage. What's inside then? The daughter's clothes, all of them, from age 0 to now 16, books that are not fitting inside the house (and there are full shelves Everywhere), and old sentimental items that are clearly not sentimental enough for them to really take care of them. They are being left to be eaten by mice, but nothing can be thrown away unless rendered completely useless/eaten up.

She says they have found something that will hold everything for $110 per month.. Oh well, not too bad for like a month or two I say.. Oh no, she says, we have to keep it for over a year! And then, of course, it will all go back into the newly renovated garage..

They got a new car last month too.. Fancypants fast a-lot-of-horsepower bought from the dealer that she uses to go to work. How far does she live from work? 1 mile exactly. She doesn't like bicycles.

I just smile and nod.

1 mile? geez, i'd walk!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20518 on: July 09, 2018, 11:49:38 AM »
renovate a garage?  What am I missing?  I've never heard of anyone renovating a garage.
Typically (but not always) done because either the foundation has cracked, or the roof has sprung a leak.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20519 on: July 09, 2018, 12:30:21 PM »
renovate a garage?  What am I missing?  I've never heard of anyone renovating a garage.
Typically (but not always) done because either the foundation has cracked, or the roof has sprung a leak.

We put down granite floors in our garage to match the kitchen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20520 on: July 09, 2018, 12:45:39 PM »
renovate a garage?  What am I missing?  I've never heard of anyone renovating a garage.
Typically (but not always) done because either the foundation has cracked, or the roof has sprung a leak.

That seems very practical.

I've seen it done so people can put in a loft; or put in super fancy flooring and storage systems.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20521 on: July 09, 2018, 12:56:53 PM »
I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

PSA: My grandmother went through this phase. It was because her oesophagus had aged and she was choking on regular food. Food like lasagne and shepherd's pie were found to be better options.

Mmmmmmm...shepherd's pie. I haven't had that in a while.

As for the baby food, isn't it a lot cheaper to get some frozen veggies and a microwave?

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20522 on: July 09, 2018, 01:03:10 PM »
I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

PSA: My grandmother went through this phase. It was because her oesophagus had aged and she was choking on regular food. Food like lasagne and shepherd's pie were found to be better options.

Mmmmmmm...shepherd's pie. I haven't had that in a while.

As for the baby food, isn't it a lot cheaper to get some frozen veggies and a microwave?

You expect a bed-bound old woman to purée her own baby food? Or her no-doubt-busy-with-lives-of-their-own children? Presumably one attraction of the baby food is you can eat it at room temperature from the jar with a spoon if so desired.

Raymond Reddington

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20523 on: July 09, 2018, 02:25:26 PM »
I also used to know a lady who would only eat cans of babyfood. According to her they were tasty, value for money and easy to eat. Her children weren't happy, but they still went to the shop and bought it for her (she was bedbound).

PSA: My grandmother went through this phase. It was because her oesophagus had aged and she was choking on regular food. Food like lasagne and shepherd's pie were found to be better options.

Mmmmmmm...shepherd's pie. I haven't had that in a while.

As for the baby food, isn't it a lot cheaper to get some frozen veggies and a microwave?

Shepherd's pie is delicious.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20524 on: July 09, 2018, 03:36:07 PM »
A friend once lived a mile or two from work and found that over time his car battery would die. His commute wasn’t long enough to charge the battery so it would eventually drain. I think that is a good sign that you are too close to be using a car and should find an alternate mode of transportation.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20525 on: July 10, 2018, 01:39:49 AM »
A friend once lived a mile or two from work and found that over time his car battery would die. His commute wasn’t long enough to charge the battery so it would eventually drain. I think that is a good sign that you are too close to be using a car and should find an alternate mode of transportation.

I used to have a colleague and friend who inherited his father's car. He used it only once a year during the summer holidays. The battery was always flat when he needed it. He also has his own parking spot in the parking cellar of the apartment building. I think he could have saved a lot of money by not owning the car and rent a car every summer, as well as renting out his own parking spot to a neighbour.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20526 on: July 10, 2018, 01:42:17 AM »
A friend once lived a mile or two from work and found that over time his car battery would die. His commute wasn’t long enough to charge the battery so it would eventually drain. I think that is a good sign that you are too close to be using a car and should find an alternate mode of transportation.

I used to have a colleague and friend who inherited his father's car. He used it only once a year during the summer holidays. The battery was always flat when he needed it. He also has his own parking spot in the parking cellar of the apartment building. I think he could have saved a lot of money by not owning the car and rent a car every summer, as well as renting out his own parking spot to a neighbour.

Literally once a year? What FOR?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20527 on: July 10, 2018, 01:55:16 AM »
A friend once lived a mile or two from work and found that over time his car battery would die. His commute wasn’t long enough to charge the battery so it would eventually drain. I think that is a good sign that you are too close to be using a car and should find an alternate mode of transportation.

I used to have a colleague and friend who inherited his father's car. He used it only once a year during the summer holidays. The battery was always flat when he needed it. He also has his own parking spot in the parking cellar of the apartment building. I think he could have saved a lot of money by not owning the car and rent a car every summer, as well as renting out his own parking spot to a neighbour.

Literally once a year? What FOR?

Car-camping vacation out in the country... With a tent. Usually for 3-4 weeks.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20528 on: July 10, 2018, 07:52:26 AM »

One time I only bought herbes de provence and a lemon from Whole Foods and the cashier acted like I broke the sacred covenant of things you are allowed to buy.  "Wow, how could you only buy this????"  I still do not understand why he was so pissed...

Weird. You still probably spent around $10, right?

I handed over my wallet and said, "please leave some for the children :'("

Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20529 on: July 10, 2018, 08:19:20 AM »

One time I only bought herbes de provence and a lemon from Whole Foods and the cashier acted like I broke the sacred covenant of things you are allowed to buy.  "Wow, how could you only buy this????"  I still do not understand why he was so pissed...

Weird. You still probably spent around $10, right?

I handed over my wallet and said, "please leave some for the children :'("

Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.
I got a huge bag for about $2 when I was in the south of France. :-)

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20530 on: July 10, 2018, 08:25:38 AM »

One time I only bought herbes de provence and a lemon from Whole Foods and the cashier acted like I broke the sacred covenant of things you are allowed to buy.  "Wow, how could you only buy this????"  I still do not understand why he was so pissed...

Weird. You still probably spent around $10, right?

I handed over my wallet and said, "please leave some for the children :'("

Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.
I got a huge bag for about $2 when I was in the south of France. :-)

I planted rosemary, sage, and a variety of other herbs including lavender from $3 starts years ago. They've more than paid for themselves. So my herbes de Provence are free, fresh, and sometimes a source of side income.

merula

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20531 on: July 10, 2018, 08:44:00 AM »
Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.

You can buy bulk spices at the WF near me, otherwise you could find a local co-op with a bulk spices section. Bring your own measuring spoons and the online recipe, buy exactly the amount of each herb you need, and mix it at home. (For added Mustachianism, bring your own jars from home rather than use the provided plastic baggies.)

OtherJen

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20532 on: July 10, 2018, 11:58:10 AM »

One time I only bought herbes de provence and a lemon from Whole Foods and the cashier acted like I broke the sacred covenant of things you are allowed to buy.  "Wow, how could you only buy this????"  I still do not understand why he was so pissed...

Weird. You still probably spent around $10, right?

I handed over my wallet and said, "please leave some for the children :'("

Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.

We buy ours from Penzey’s.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20533 on: July 10, 2018, 01:03:22 PM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

I just love that this individual dropped that after talking about how gold was the only investment to make. Like he clearly felt a zombie apocalypse would be coming, and somehow him and his gold would survive it...but only because of the gold.

No, my understanding is that he and his paper contracts for gold that he did not actually get to hold in his hands would attempt to survive the zombies... Kind of like bitcoin to me.

Raymond Reddington

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20534 on: July 10, 2018, 03:15:18 PM »
I'm also an intellectual. In fact, my favorite movies are zombie movies."

But ... wha.... but... *facepalm*

I'm an academic. That makes me kind of an intellectual, right? Also like zombie movies. Of course, I don't go around proclaiming that I'm an intellectual. I do go around proclaiming that I like zombie movies.

I just love that this individual dropped that after talking about how gold was the only investment to make. Like he clearly felt a zombie apocalypse would be coming, and somehow him and his gold would survive it...but only because of the gold.

No, my understanding is that he and his paper contracts for gold that he did not actually get to hold in his hands would attempt to survive the zombies... Kind of like bitcoin to me.

I suppose he thought the paper contracts would make their brains explode?

Haha, bitcoin. I call it $#!!COIN

sapphail

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20535 on: July 11, 2018, 04:53:42 AM »
(sic: paper contracts for gold that don't generate income in any way, and do not lead to the actual owning of any gold either, for those who might believe this malarkey)

Is he talking about gold ETFs? I'm kind of surprised though, most goldbugs want the shiny stuff close on hand.

Although that said, my SO knows a goldbug who spends every spare cent on the stuff in preparation for a global financial collapse... and keeps it all in Malaysia. Where he won't be able to get at it in a hurry if everything did go to poop.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20536 on: July 11, 2018, 08:19:33 AM »
Why wouldn't these end of the world types want their gold coins right next to their ammo and bug out bag? Alot of good paper promises will do a person fleeing a zombie attack. ;)

Swish

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20537 on: July 11, 2018, 08:30:45 AM »
Today CW advised me he is buying fishing kayak for $4k. I made the mistake of being slightly excited. Oh I have a canoe its lots of fun I didn't know you did that sort of stuff? CW proceeds to tell me how he has never fished or boated really before, none of his friends do but he really likes the idea of this so he is going to try it out. The only reason he doesn't do it is because he doesn't own all the stuff. At this point it sunk in how much he was spending and I mentioned it might be prudent to rent a kayak first before he drops $4k on one. The rebuttal was this is a really great deal as its normally over $5k and he does not want to miss out. - Sadly I used to be able to relate to this kind of thinking. Now I just think SHIT his boat that needs a paddle costs more than my car.

Update:

Me: How's the new fishing Kayak working out?
CW: oh ya I am not sure it is my thing. The boat is really wobbly and because it is a kayak it is really narrow so its hard to move around at all unlike a full sized boat.
Me: Are you going to sell it then?
CW: Seriously? I just bought it. My wife would kill me if I sold it already.
Me: won't she notice you are not using it?
CW: No I stored it at my friends cabin so we can just watch tv and drink beer and she won't know.
Me: That sounds like quite the elaborate plan.
CW: it is not like I won't ever use it again so technically I just say I am going out to the lake and it is all good.

dcheesi

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20538 on: July 11, 2018, 08:37:08 AM »
Today CW advised me he is buying fishing kayak for $4k. I made the mistake of being slightly excited. Oh I have a canoe its lots of fun I didn't know you did that sort of stuff? CW proceeds to tell me how he has never fished or boated really before, none of his friends do but he really likes the idea of this so he is going to try it out. The only reason he doesn't do it is because he doesn't own all the stuff. At this point it sunk in how much he was spending and I mentioned it might be prudent to rent a kayak first before he drops $4k on one. The rebuttal was this is a really great deal as its normally over $5k and he does not want to miss out. - Sadly I used to be able to relate to this kind of thinking. Now I just think SHIT his boat that needs a paddle costs more than my car.

Update:

Me: How's the new fishing Kayak working out?
CW: oh ya I am not sure it is my thing. The boat is really wobbly and because it is a kayak it is really narrow so its hard to move around at all unlike a full sized boat.
Me: Are you going to sell it then?
CW: Seriously? I just bought it. My wife would kill me if I sold it already.
Me: won't she notice you are not using it?
CW: No I stored it at my friends cabin so we can just watch tv and drink beer and she won't know.
Me: That sounds like quite the elaborate plan.
CW: it is not like I won't ever use it again so technically I just say I am going out to the lake and it is all good.
So I guess the kayak needs to sit at the cabin just in case the wife decides to visit? Otherwise, it seems like the obvious thing to do would be to sell the kayak for beer money!

alanB

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20539 on: July 11, 2018, 08:51:10 AM »
Anyone know where I can get good/cheap herbes de provence?  The one at Whole Foods is only OK, too much rosemary.  They stopped carrying it at Trader Joes.  I have considered making it, but I don't want to keep all of the herbs that I would not use that often.

You can buy bulk spices at the WF near me, otherwise you could find a local co-op with a bulk spices section. Bring your own measuring spoons and the online recipe, buy exactly the amount of each herb you need, and mix it at home. (For added Mustachianism, bring your own jars from home rather than use the provided plastic baggies.)

I loved all of the suggestions, but this is my favorite!  At the local co-ops they will tare your containers, great idea.  @TheGrimSqueaker I also love the idea of growing and selling the excess, definitely something I will pursue in the future when I am not so time-poor.

Update:

Me: How's the new fishing Kayak working out?
CW: oh ya I am not sure it is my thing. The boat is really wobbly and because it is a kayak it is really narrow so its hard to move around at all unlike a full sized boat.
Me: Are you going to sell it then?
CW: Seriously? I just bought it. My wife would kill me if I sold it already.
Me: won't she notice you are not using it?
CW: No I stored it at my friends cabin so we can just watch tv and drink beer and she won't know.
Me: That sounds like quite the elaborate plan.
CW: it is not like I won't ever use it again so technically I just say I am going out to the lake and it is all good.

Sounds like the plot to Brokeback Mountain... you better warn him to check the kayak for notes from his wife ;P

wbranch

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20540 on: July 11, 2018, 10:21:19 AM »
This seemed like the most appropriate thread to post this. Not where I work, but I worked in twin cities area as a CPA and know people at this firm and others like it: http://www.startribune.com/former-partner-in-minneapolis-accounting-firm-loses-millions-in-noncompete-dispute/487546901/


Retired/bought out CPA firm partner violated non-compete and loses his $90k/month in retirement. I think there is some prestige involved with a job like this that make it hard to step away. The small firm I worked at had a couple partners bought when they turned 60 while I was there. One billed more hours in the year after buyout than the prior year.

SynestheticSymphony

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20541 on: July 11, 2018, 01:09:09 PM »
I am loving this thread! I sit by a few guys who should prove to be a steady source of material.



Coworker: "My wife doesn't usually get me anything for my birthday because we don't have enough money left over."

... 4 minutes later ...

Coworker: "Yeah, when my wife goes to Wal-Mart for groceries, she always spends over $700 on food."

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20542 on: July 11, 2018, 01:48:09 PM »
This seemed like the most appropriate thread to post this. Not where I work, but I worked in twin cities area as a CPA and know people at this firm and others like it: http://www.startribune.com/former-partner-in-minneapolis-accounting-firm-loses-millions-in-noncompete-dispute/487546901/


Retired/bought out CPA firm partner violated non-compete and loses his $90k/month in retirement. I think there is some prestige involved with a job like this that make it hard to step away. The small firm I worked at had a couple partners bought when they turned 60 while I was there. One billed more hours in the year after buyout than the prior year.

Non-compete agreements are funny things. I knew a fellow (now deceased) who operated a tourist destination type store in Las Vegas, NV where he manufactured and sold widgets. To expand the business, he took on what was supposed to be a silent partner, but the partner was doing some things with the store my buddy didn't approve of. Eventually my buddy was effectively forced out, with only a small fraction of the business and the inventory, *and* the partner had the business and service mark rights to my buddy's name. So my buddy was a defeated shell of a man at that time. I couldn't stand seeing him that way, but in his mind he was in a bind because of the agreement he'd signed. Because of a bad partnership decision, he was losing control of a business he'd built from the ground up and that employed many people who over the years had become his friends.

"Did the contract have a non-compete clause?" I asked him. We were hanging out in a restaurant, and I'd brought along my parents and a girlfriend. Oddly, despite his years of entrepreneurial experience, my buddy hadn't run across the non-compete concept and didn't know what it was. My dad and I explained that it limited his business options in the same line of work, within a specific time frame and within a specific distance.

"You could open up John Doe's* flower shop next door," I said, "and nobody would care because people who come to town looking for widgets aren't the same customer base. Or, maybe you could open up a widget shop in a different county or five years down the line. In the meantime, the non-compete clause is supposed to give the other guy a chance to build up his business without interference from the former owner."

I suggested that, since his former partner had been such a dick, it would be awesome if he opened up the same kind of business he had before, only bigger, with a different name obviously, right across the street from the first one. But only if he didn't have a non-compete agreement.

"You've taken out a business license before. You've leased real estate. You've got the people, some inventory, and the contacts. Also, I'm reasonably sure that there is not a piano tied to your ass." A light came into my buddy's eyes and he sat up straighter. By the time we all left the restaurant, he'd resolved to check the contract and then fight back.

My father and I continued helping my buddy refine his battle plan while my mom daydreamed and my girlfriend enjoyed a strongly mixed beverage. (The ladies did not converse. Having met recently, they cordially hated each other. It's ironic because both are women of extreme refinement, intelligence, and taste.)

"Call the new store 'Widget Overlord of Las Vegas'," I said. "Technically you'll still be naming it after yourself... what? You've been a big name in widgets here for years. If someone asks: 'who is the widget overlord of Las Vegas', what name comes to mind? Someone else's? No. That's you. So name your new store 'Widget Overlord of Las Vegas' and get around the fact they own the rights to your own name. Henry Ford learned to live with it. So can you. You sold your name, not your balls."

It turned out that there was indeed no non-compete clause in the contract because both sides decided to cheap out and write it themselves, but neither had the demonic experience or legal training (possibly the same thing) to foresee the need for such an aspect of the agreement.

And so it happened that the Widget Overlord of Las Vegas opened a competing shop, stole back most of his former customers, and lived more or less happily the rest of his days. His former partner's business became a laughingstock and then collapsed. I wish I could say I got a free widget out of the deal but it didn't occur to me to ask. Looking back, I probably should have.

* not his real name
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 06:17:27 PM by TheGrimSqueaker »

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20543 on: July 11, 2018, 02:24:23 PM »
Nice story!

nouveauRiche

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20544 on: July 11, 2018, 04:46:53 PM »
You sold your name, not your balls."

I <3 you.

AccountingForLife

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20545 on: July 11, 2018, 07:08:09 PM »
Unable to pay suppliers because the money was already spent on unnecessary expenses and ownership draws. Suppliers shut down business. Management complains that suppliers are being unfair.

Manipulating employees when responding to suppliers' requests for payment. You can only tell them a customer hasn't paid us so many times (which is a lie) before they figure out that the company is dry.

Spending millions on rent per year and not utilizing all of the space. Not even close to utilizing all of the space!

Spending millions on litigation because a tenant backed out of their lease due to the company not providing what they said they would. Surprise - litigation ends with nothing in return.

Spending hundreds of thousands of dollars per year on a consultant who does absolutely nothing for the company. Owner says he helps answer e-mails and phone calls that he otherwise could not get to.

Working out of poorly maintained buildings that haven't been cleaned in years. Wiring hanging down from ceiling, missing ceiling tiles, water leaks, rusty sinks. Employees get sick probably once a week. Then paying hundreds per month to clean HQ, but satellite buildings go uncleaned. Refusing to hire cleaning services in satellite offices.

Refusing to fix IT issues in a timely fashion. Our sales manager has been without access to his sales program for several weeks now. A rep just got a new computer, but the owner is refusing to grant access to the software on his new machine, for reasons unknown.

Not using a budget or cash flow forecast of any kind. Ignoring advice from professionals and shooting from the hip when it comes to company finances.

Refusing to pay taxes on time.

Using passive-aggressiveness anytime legitimate issues are brought up.

« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 07:15:25 PM by AccountingForLife »

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20546 on: July 12, 2018, 12:25:50 AM »
Accounting for Life: Run away, run away. What a car crash.

RocksRock

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20547 on: July 12, 2018, 01:20:54 AM »
renovate a garage?  What am I missing?  I've never heard of anyone renovating a garage.
Typically (but not always) done because either the foundation has cracked, or the roof has sprung a leak.

That seems very practical.

I've seen it done so people can put in a loft; or put in super fancy flooring and storage systems.

They live in a row of flats, and the row of flats has a row of free-standing garages. And yes, the foundation is probably not the best and the exterior is rotting. Latest is that they will actually keep the storage space three years, not two, since they are expecting the whole row of garages to be torn down and rebuilt. So that's $4000 for keeping stuff of essentially no value..

I'd also walk. Or bike. Or anything else than driving. Could have helped them with the excess weight also for sure.. But it takes tiiiime compared to driving.

Swish

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20548 on: July 12, 2018, 01:39:17 PM »
Update:

Me: How's the new fishing Kayak working out?
CW: oh ya I am not sure it is my thing. The boat is really wobbly and because it is a kayak it is really narrow so its hard to move around at all unlike a full sized boat.
Me: Are you going to sell it then?
CW: Seriously? I just bought it. My wife would kill me if I sold it already.
Me: won't she notice you are not using it?
CW: No I stored it at my friends cabin so we can just watch tv and drink beer and she won't know.
Me: That sounds like quite the elaborate plan.
CW: it is not like I won't ever use it again so technically I just say I am going out to the lake and it is all good.

Sounds like the plot to Brokeback Mountain... you better warn him to check the kayak for notes from his wife ;P

hahaha my sides actually hurt right now.

Dee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #20549 on: July 12, 2018, 06:38:07 PM »
What a great story, GrimSqueaker!