Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8911153 times)

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18950 on: October 25, 2017, 09:44:28 AM »
Found an overpriced, half eaten takeout sandwich with mold on it in the fridge at work.  I threw it out.

This seems to be a frequent occurrence at my work. People will go out for lunch, put their leftover pizza, sandwiches, etc in the fridge and forget about them.. for weeks! I tend to get pretty salty when this insanity leaves me no room to store my own lunch for the day. Luckily there are a couple of us who make a habit of purging any uneaten items.

My office admin throws out everything on Fridays. She's really serious about it. One person in the office brings a 12pk of soda every Monday and drinks it throughout the week and lets her throw out whatever's left on Fridays. I have a deal that if he brings Diet Coke or Root Beer I get the leftover. It almost makes up for the wasted fridge space.

IMO, the best system requires you to put your name and date on the object.  It gets tossed on Friday a week after the date, or if the date is in the future.  If you really want the thing for another week, you can update the date.  This basically ensures that you actively want the thing in the fridge
The best system is to work with adults who are responsible. 

My room has 20 people in it, and we have a mini-fridge.  If a few people leave stuff in there, it fills up quickly, that it forces us to resolve it immediately, but there's rarely a problem.  I think we end up having a fridge cleanout every ~3 months, just so we can clean it.


Our work fridge is emptied of everything and cleaned every 2 weeks, whether it needs it or not. It's pretty nice, actually! It's basically never dirty.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18951 on: October 25, 2017, 10:47:55 AM »
RE: food/fridge at work.

The best system I've seen is a initial/date on the containers.   Anyone can feel free to ditch stuff >3 days old (except condiments).

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18952 on: October 25, 2017, 10:56:46 AM »
This madness happens where I work.  Breakers kept flipping due to too many space heaters too.  It drives me crazy.  Just keep it somewhere between 45 and 85 and I'm content.

A friend of mine's company kept issuing warnings about space heaters, which the residents of the cubicle farm laughed at and ignored. Until the day the old wiring in the cubicle walls finally caught fire under the load.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18953 on: October 25, 2017, 11:00:01 AM »
This madness happens where I work.  Breakers kept flipping due to too many space heaters too.  It drives me crazy.  Just keep it somewhere between 45 and 85 and I'm content.

A friend of mine's company kept issuing warnings about space heaters, which the residents of the cubicle farm laughed at and ignored. Until the day the old wiring in the cubicle walls finally caught fire under the load.

I blame the cubicle people less than facilities.  If you're keeping a building so cold that some people have to use space heaters, turn down the A/C!

ketchup

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18954 on: October 25, 2017, 11:02:40 AM »
This madness happens where I work.  Breakers kept flipping due to too many space heaters too.  It drives me crazy.  Just keep it somewhere between 45 and 85 and I'm content.

A friend of mine's company kept issuing warnings about space heaters, which the residents of the cubicle farm laughed at and ignored. Until the day the old wiring in the cubicle walls finally caught fire under the load.

I blame the cubicle people less than facilities.  If you're keeping a building so cold that some people have to use space heaters, turn down the A/C!
In my case, the HVAC system in our rather-old-and-hodgepodge building is a clusterfuck, so often there's a 10F variance in temperature between certain areas/rooms (and the focus of the HVAC system has to be on lab space that needs to stay 20-25C to be compliant).  But rather than just dealing with it, people flip out and overcompensate.

turketron

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18955 on: October 25, 2017, 11:20:39 AM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

ketchup

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18956 on: October 25, 2017, 11:24:20 AM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.
I've also run into people keeping their space heaters right next to their computers... I've seen more than a few partially-melted computers that somehow still function.

Debts_of_Despair

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18957 on: October 25, 2017, 11:58:24 AM »
https://youtu.be/0RpmwqaxrwA

I had been wondering from where they casted the person who likes spoiled milk.  Looks like they even caught them at the office fridge.  Barf!

DarkandStormy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18958 on: October 25, 2017, 12:07:02 PM »
Co-worker today shared his plan is to always have a house payment.

He bought his house in 2001 and estimates he has refinanced 4-5 times since then plus a couple of HELOCs.  Said he probably owes $20k more NOW than when he first purchased in 2001.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18959 on: October 25, 2017, 12:36:02 PM »
I hope that co-worker also has a plan to remain employed, even after his health has deteriorated.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18960 on: October 25, 2017, 12:43:34 PM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

For offices and cubicle farms the best and cheapest solution is a feet warmer mat. Because if you feel cold its mostly the feet (cold air down, air there moves around too, surface may be cool). Also that are only 40W not 400W+
No, the best solution is a floor heating. But that is often not possible to add. 


Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18961 on: October 25, 2017, 03:12:08 PM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

Then add in that the temperature of the building is typically set to the average comfort level for men, without considering the comfort of women, and you've set up systematic discrimination against women. (We're talking about population wide, not individual people). There was an article about this, if I can find it I'll add.

SciLearner357

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18962 on: October 25, 2017, 03:21:51 PM »

As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

Then add in that the temperature of the building is typically set to the average comfort level for men, without considering the comfort of women, and you've set up systematic discrimination against women. (We're talking about population wide, not individual people). There was an article about this, if I can find it I'll add.

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/science/chilly-at-work-a-decades-old-formula-may-be-to-blame.html?_r=0

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18963 on: October 25, 2017, 03:39:54 PM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

Then add in that the temperature of the building is typically set to the average comfort level for men, without considering the comfort of women, and you've set up systematic discrimination against women. (We're talking about population wide, not individual people). There was an article about this, if I can find it I'll add.
This makes a lot of sense!  I keep a couple of sweaters at work. And this week, it's almost 100 out - so I find myself taking a 10 minute stroll outside to warm up.

Of course at night I get too hot as soon as my husband comes to bed.  He generates heat.

Debts_of_Despair

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18964 on: October 25, 2017, 03:49:15 PM »

As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

Then add in that the temperature of the building is typically set to the average comfort level for men, without considering the comfort of women, and you've set up systematic discrimination against women. (We're talking about population wide, not individual people). There was an article about this, if I can find it I'll add.

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/science/chilly-at-work-a-decades-old-formula-may-be-to-blame.html?_r=0

Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18965 on: October 25, 2017, 03:52:03 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Friar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18966 on: October 25, 2017, 03:54:57 PM »

As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

Then add in that the temperature of the building is typically set to the average comfort level for men, without considering the comfort of women, and you've set up systematic discrimination against women. (We're talking about population wide, not individual people). There was an article about this, if I can find it I'll add.

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/science/chilly-at-work-a-decades-old-formula-may-be-to-blame.html?_r=0

Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

It's a good question. I'm male, naturally quite warm, and even with my shirt sleeves rolled up I feel our office is too stuffy.

I suppose the proper solution would be to turn the heat up and allow us to not have to wear shirts and smart trousers. If I could rock around in shorts I'd happily do so.

On the topic of women's wearing fewer clothes than men, I remember reading the clothing rules on our company intranet.

"Men: smart trousers and shirt" "Women: ..."

Literally no guidance for women. I hardly think that's fair and equal!

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18967 on: October 25, 2017, 03:57:11 PM »
Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

More than gender I've found that size of the person has more of an effect on how hot/cold someone gets.  Even in myself.  I gained 20 lbs over the past couple years (on purpose) and am cold way less often than I used to be.  My larger family members are perpetually hot, regardless of gender, and the ones that weren't always large also didn't used to run hot.  So I would say if you're cold all the time, gain some weight, and if you're hot, lose some :-)

Debts_of_Despair

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18968 on: October 25, 2017, 04:40:31 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

Debts_of_Despair

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18969 on: October 25, 2017, 04:44:38 PM »
Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

More than gender I've found that size of the person has more of an effect on how hot/cold someone gets.  Even in myself.  I gained 20 lbs over the past couple years (on purpose) and am cold way less often than I used to be.  My larger family members are perpetually hot, regardless of gender, and the ones that weren't always large also didn't used to run hot.  So I would say if you're cold all the time, gain some weight, and if you're hot, lose some :-)

Can't say I agree with that.  I'm in the best shape of my adult life, exercise rigorously 4+ times per week and find that I sweat more easily than I ever have.  On the contrary, I often hear overweight people complain that they are cold, probably due to poor circulation.

RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18970 on: October 25, 2017, 04:47:06 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

I'd be perfectly happy with 72F. The problem is that lots of workplaces (my own included) set the temp between 65-68F. I wear a sweater every single day without a problem, but my hands get so cold that they get stiff and painful. I feel like a general shift warmer wouldn't be that much to ask.

Although, I should point out that I don't sit near a window. The window people are always complaining it's hot while I'm freezing in the middle of an open floor plan.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18971 on: October 25, 2017, 04:56:32 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

No but it can toughen up and adapt.  MMM and ERE have posts on this exact subject :-)

kayvent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18972 on: October 25, 2017, 05:07:39 PM »
As someone who nearly always runs warm, I may be a bit biased, but I feel like an office should be on the cold side - you can always put on a sweater when you're cold, but there's only so much clothing you can remove (unless you have a very tolerant workplace...) when you're hot. Space heaters are a whole separate issue due to the fire hazard and potential to overload circuits.

This is a bit sexist. Women don’t have as many options as men in professional outfit choices to have warm attire. Added to that women tend to physically be smaller and that their cloths tend to be thinner, it becomes really unfair to women. Google “AC is sexist” for further insight.

turketron

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18973 on: October 25, 2017, 05:38:26 PM »
This is a bit sexist. Women don’t have as many options as men in professional outfit choices to have warm attire. Added to that women tend to physically be smaller and that their cloths tend to be thinner, it becomes really unfair to women. Google “AC is sexist” for further insight.

I didn't mention anything about gender or dress codes, so that certainly wasn't my intention. I work in a casual office where both men & women wear roughly the same thing- typically shorts & t-shirts in summer and jeans & hoodies in winter.

RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18974 on: October 25, 2017, 05:56:17 PM »
This is a bit sexist. Women don’t have as many options as men in professional outfit choices to have warm attire. Added to that women tend to physically be smaller and that their cloths tend to be thinner, it becomes really unfair to women. Google “AC is sexist” for further insight.

I didn't mention anything about gender or dress codes, so that certainly wasn't my intention. I work in a casual office where both men & women wear roughly the same thing- typically shorts & t-shirts in summer and jeans & hoodies in winter.

In a casual work environment, I definitely agree with you. When you get into the business casual range it does become harder. Grab a random men's and women's shirt for work and the men's will be notably thicker. I shop specifically for work shirts that can be worn with an undershirt (harder than you would think!) so that I can have that extra layer.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18975 on: October 25, 2017, 07:09:03 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

I'd be perfectly happy with 72F. The problem is that lots of workplaces (my own included) set the temp between 65-68F. I wear a sweater every single day without a problem, but my hands get so cold that they get stiff and painful.
I used to work in Houston.  The office was really cold, so I put in a request to have the temperature checked.  The maintenance guys came out and measured it with a fancy gizmo, and came up with 62 F.  They said "yeah, that's normal.  We try to keep it at 62-64 degrees."

I kept our thermostat at home at 75F at least.  I could have acclimated to either, but it was really tough to switch between the two twice per day.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18976 on: October 25, 2017, 07:10:30 PM »
Yup I don't mind wearing a sweeter, but when I have to break out gloves to work on my computer that's when I complain.

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18977 on: October 25, 2017, 07:47:58 PM »
Co-worker today shared his plan is to always have a house payment.

He bought his house in 2001 and estimates he has refinanced 4-5 times since then plus a couple of HELOCs.  Said he probably owes $20k more NOW than when he first purchased in 2001.

That's not the worst plan ever, assuming all of the proceeds were properly invested.

...somehow, I find that unlikely.

remizidae

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18978 on: October 25, 2017, 09:04:06 PM »
This is a bit sexist. Women don’t have as many options as men in professional outfit choices to have warm attire. Added to that women tend to physically be smaller and that their cloths tend to be thinner, it becomes really unfair to women. Google “AC is sexist” for further insight.

I didn't mention anything about gender or dress codes, so that certainly wasn't my intention. I work in a casual office where both men & women wear roughly the same thing- typically shorts & t-shirts in summer and jeans & hoodies in winter.

In a casual work environment, I definitely agree with you. When you get into the business casual range it does become harder. Grab a random men's and women's shirt for work and the men's will be notably thicker. I shop specifically for work shirts that can be worn with an undershirt (harder than you would think!) so that I can have that extra layer.

I agree. Women's shirts are made from lighter fabric and expose more arm and neck. No tie. Skirts are generally cooler than pants. Even women's shoes and socks expose more of the feet than men's. Of course, no one is *forcing* women to wear these clothes, but society exercises a strong influence over what we wear.

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18979 on: October 25, 2017, 09:22:03 PM »
Meh. As a woman, I'd rather need to throw on a cardigan than have all my male colleagues sweat it out in suits. I've never had trouble finding clothing warm enough to work comfortably in an office. I'm pretty sure they sell pants, sweaters, tights, blazers, turtlenecks, and knee-high socks everywhere.

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18980 on: October 25, 2017, 09:33:38 PM »
Meh. As a woman, I'd rather need to throw on a cardigan than have all my male colleagues sweat it out in suits. I've never had trouble finding clothing warm enough to work comfortably in an office. I'm pretty sure they sell pants, sweaters, tights, blazers, turtlenecks, and knee-high socks everywhere.

I will concur... The issue is the breeze / wind, really.  Whether that is the draft the occurs when you open the office door, or the AC vent over your head.

Inaya

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18981 on: October 25, 2017, 10:10:09 PM »
Meh. As a woman, I'd rather need to throw on a cardigan than have all my male colleagues sweat it out in suits. I've never had trouble finding clothing warm enough to work comfortably in an office. I'm pretty sure they sell pants, sweaters, tights, blazers, turtlenecks, and knee-high socks everywhere.
For the most part I agree, but when I've got on a long-sleeved shirt, a cardigan, and a blanket and still have cold hands, it might be a bit on the chilly side.

Seppia

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18982 on: October 25, 2017, 11:00:26 PM »
"AC is sexist" may be the most unintentionally funny thing I've read in a while.

Aside from that, AC should be erring on the warmer side for energy efficiency/saving and environmental reasons.

It's incredible how wasteful is an AC set to "winter has came" temperatures.

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18983 on: October 26, 2017, 12:51:11 AM »
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18984 on: October 26, 2017, 12:57:06 AM »
Biologically, there is a tendency for women to feel colder, and men to feel warmer. There's all sorts of exceptions of course, but there is a biologic difference. There are also cultural expectations for men and women that result in men tending to wear more clothing in the summer than women, and women to wear less clothing in the winter than men.

More than gender I've found that size of the person has more of an effect on how hot/cold someone gets.  Even in myself.  I gained 20 lbs over the past couple years (on purpose) and am cold way less often than I used to be.  My larger family members are perpetually hot, regardless of gender, and the ones that weren't always large also didn't used to run hot.  So I would say if you're cold all the time, gain some weight, and if you're hot, lose some :-)

Yes, that is true. It is the surface/volume relation. The bigger you are, the more volume to produce per surface area you have. That is also the reasons why animals in cold areas tend to be begger then their relatives in the warmer parts of the word. Just look at penguins.

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Can't say I agree with that.  I'm in the best shape of my adult life, exercise rigorously 4+ times per week and find that I sweat more easily than I ever have.  On the contrary, I often hear overweight people complain that they are cold, probably due to poor circulation.
On the other hand that is true, too. Because the heat gets produced in your muscles a lot more then anywhere else. If you train so much your body might also have learned to anticipate and gets sweaty before it heats up to feverish temeratures.

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They said "yeah, that's normal.  We try to keep it at 62-64 degrees."
17°C? In my socialist Germany that would be illegal except for heavy bodily work. Don't you have worker protection laws?

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In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.
LOL I guess you are an engineer or programmer, not a manager, and never participated in leadership training. Using brains to solve a problem would make all that motivation schemes and example setting totally useless!

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18985 on: October 26, 2017, 01:35:57 AM »
Quote
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.
LOL I guess you are an engineer or programmer, not a manager, and never participated in leadership training. Using brains to solve a problem would make all that motivation schemes and example setting totally useless!

Spot on: engineer!

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18986 on: October 26, 2017, 02:52:32 AM »
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.

Good on you! As someone who runs cold, 18 degrees (65?) would be just about acceptable for me to spend the day sitting down in normal business attire IF I were permitted certain discreet cloning modifications at my desk (leg warmers and long fingerless gloves) and IF it were actually a constant 18 degrees. Any breeze or draught or window is likely to create not only a cold spot but also moving air. In these circumstances aiming for 20 and achieving 18 is a more likely scenario. If I were cold in an office and leg warmers and gloves had not helped, I would have no qualms about bringing in a space heater or electric blanket.

I did once work in an insanely hot office (centrally controlled heating that apparently went on on 1st September and off on 1st May and was always set to max. It was bloody uncomfortable but better than freezing my extremities off. Yes, you can't always take more clothing off, but if half the office is melting their computers with unauthorised heat sources, you have a problem.

kayvent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18987 on: October 26, 2017, 05:29:54 AM »
In my home city, about a decade ago, a strange (and unfortunate) stat occurred. We had an incredibly cold winter then a blazing summer. In the summer, we had more people die from hypothermia than heat stroke and in the winter more people expired from heat stroke than hypothermia. It was a sober reminder that sometimes we try to over-compensate.

MightyAl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18988 on: October 26, 2017, 06:31:49 AM »
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.

A good mechanical company could fix that problem in a week.  Over the years things get changed and moved and when minor repairs are made adjustments are made.  The system needs to be rebalanced and not only temp but air flow needs to be measured.  It really isn't a big deal.  I used to have to deal with it all the time when I was in charge of 4 large hospitals.  Of course if the system is more than 30 years old it might need to be torn out and completely replaced.

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18989 on: October 26, 2017, 06:52:50 AM »
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.

A good mechanical company could fix that problem in a week.  Over the years things get changed and moved and when minor repairs are made adjustments are made.  The system needs to be rebalanced and not only temp but air flow needs to be measured.  It really isn't a big deal.  I used to have to deal with it all the time when I was in charge of 4 large hospitals.  Of course if the system is more than 30 years old it might need to be torn out and completely replaced.

The building is only 10 years old. Open plan floors with a central core (kinda like a doughnut), and walls of glass which allow in a lot of heat when it is sunny. The cooling comes from one line of vents, so the closer you are to that, the colder your desk is. Oh, and all the people important enough to decide to invest in staff comfort have their own offices with individual temperature control, so they DGAF.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18990 on: October 26, 2017, 07:56:15 AM »
In our office, the issue is the uneven distribution of heat or cooling, rather than the inability to heat or cool. I'm baffled why we don't map out areas that are warmer or cooler, and offer people desks based on their temperature preference. I got my team to do that and it stopped the majority of the temperature complaints.

Every single office I have ever worked in (all filled with engineers & programmers) has adopted some variant of this plus various home made baffles made out of paper or cardboard to modify direction of air currents. We have a number of people who come to work in t-shirt & shorts every day of the year, others who will be in coats even at 21C+.

Minimum temperature in a UK workplace is supposed to be 16C, unless it's work outdoors or involving physical activity. There is no legal maximum (as people could be working in a furnace, bakery or similar location.)

Next week, I'll be working in India. Offices there are usually freezing, people often wear sweaters etc. to work and take them off as they leave in the evening. Seems to be a case of "we've got powerful aircon, so we're gonna use it"

Inaya

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18991 on: October 26, 2017, 08:26:05 AM »

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Can't say I agree with that.  I'm in the best shape of my adult life, exercise rigorously 4+ times per week and find that I sweat more easily than I ever have.  On the contrary, I often hear overweight people complain that they are cold, probably due to poor circulation.
On the other hand that is true, too. Because the heat gets produced in your muscles a lot more then anywhere else. If you train so much your body might also have learned to anticipate and gets sweaty before it heats up to feverish temeratures.

I'm not sure sweat is necessarily tied to ambient temperature either. I tend to be cold most of the time, and I am fairly petite. But I will sweat given the slightest exertion, whether it is 90F/32C or 20F/-7C. When I walk to the train in sub-freezing temperatures, I'll sweat--then I'm miserable on the train because the lukewarm breeze from the heating vents feels like a cold breeze. (Won't even discuss the summer when the train AC makes my office look positively toasty.)

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18992 on: October 26, 2017, 08:38:11 AM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

No but it can toughen up and adapt.  MMM and ERE have posts on this exact subject :-)
I'm not sure this is a good argument, since it could also apply to both women and men complaining.  It is unfortunate, that those who tend to be the warmest tend to have to wear the most and thickest clothes. 

If I didn't work off-site, I'd have to wear long sleeves year round.  Our dress code is very old-school: a lot of people still wear suit and ties daily where at a similar company they'd be in polo shirts, or even t-shirts in some cases. 

Metta

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18993 on: October 26, 2017, 08:52:10 AM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

No but it can toughen up and adapt.  MMM and ERE have posts on this exact subject :-)
I'm not sure this is a good argument, since it could also apply to both women and men complaining.  It is unfortunate, that those who tend to be the warmest tend to have to wear the most and thickest clothes. 

Yes, it applies to complainypants of both genders. My office used to be too cold in the summer and too warm in the winter for me, partially because my house is kept colder in winter and warmer in summer to reduce energy usage. So going back and forth was a bit of a shock for my body each day. Once I realized that this was a matter of the mind as much as the body and decided to simply adjust wherever I was, things got better.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18994 on: October 26, 2017, 10:16:21 AM »
Yes, it applies to complainypants of both genders. My office used to be too cold in the summer and too warm in the winter for me, partially because my house is kept colder in winter and warmer in summer to reduce energy usage. So going back and forth was a bit of a shock for my body each day. Once I realized that this was a matter of the mind as much as the body and decided to simply adjust wherever I was, things got better.
This!  At my old job, they kept the thermostat at 62-64 degrees in the summer (while it was 95 outside).  At home, our thermostat was at 75 or 78.  It was tough having to adjust to a 15 degree change twice every day.

honeybbq

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18995 on: October 26, 2017, 10:37:13 AM »
I have a space heater in my office and no I'm not sharing. I work in a hospital and it's FREEZING. Plus it's a zillion year old building.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18996 on: October 26, 2017, 10:53:14 AM »
Yes, it applies to complainypants of both genders. My office used to be too cold in the summer and too warm in the winter for me, partially because my house is kept colder in winter and warmer in summer to reduce energy usage. So going back and forth was a bit of a shock for my body each day. Once I realized that this was a matter of the mind as much as the body and decided to simply adjust wherever I was, things got better.
This!  At my old job, they kept the thermostat at 62-64 degrees in the summer (while it was 95 outside).  At home, our thermostat was at 75 or 78.  It was tough having to adjust to a 15 degree change twice every day.

Sounds more like a 30 degree change if you bike commute or like to spend time outside in the summer like I do.   

ixtap

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18997 on: October 26, 2017, 10:56:40 AM »
Yes, it applies to complainypants of both genders. My office used to be too cold in the summer and too warm in the winter for me, partially because my house is kept colder in winter and warmer in summer to reduce energy usage. So going back and forth was a bit of a shock for my body each day. Once I realized that this was a matter of the mind as much as the body and decided to simply adjust wherever I was, things got better.
This!  At my old job, they kept the thermostat at 62-64 degrees in the summer (while it was 95 outside).  At home, our thermostat was at 75 or 78.  It was tough having to adjust to a 15 degree change twice every day.

Sounds more like a 30 degree change if you bike commute or like to spend time outside in the summer like I do.

In South Florida, only inhabited spaces had AC. I had to go through at least a 15 degree + humidity differential change to go to the bathroom, much less walking across campus to teach a class.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18998 on: October 26, 2017, 01:45:22 PM »
Even if that is true, and the setpoint was raised, what are men supposed to do?  Strip down to their underwear?

Learn to deal with heat?  If 75F instead of 72F can even be considered 'heat'.

Not possible to tell your body to shut off its sweat glands.

No but it can toughen up and adapt.  MMM and ERE have posts on this exact subject :-)
I'm not sure this is a good argument, since it could also apply to both women and men complaining.  It is unfortunate, that those who tend to be the warmest tend to have to wear the most and thickest clothes. 

Yes, it applies to complainypants of both genders. My office used to be too cold in the summer and too warm in the winter for me, partially because my house is kept colder in winter and warmer in summer to reduce energy usage. So going back and forth was a bit of a shock for my body each day. Once I realized that this was a matter of the mind as much as the body and decided to simply adjust wherever I was, things got better.
I'm sure everyone here has an exception to the "suck it up" for hot flashes, right?

Dabnasty

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18999 on: October 26, 2017, 02:50:15 PM »
I'm sure everyone here has an exception to the "suck it up" for hot flashes, right?
Serious question, how much does setting the AC a few degrees cooler help?

If you're talking about at home I guess you can set it to whatever you want though.