Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 6409561 times)

MustachiansWitness

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 36
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18250 on: July 21, 2017, 12:07:01 PM »
Maybe she's sick and tired of having a headphone jack.

This would be a deal breaker for me. Bluetooth RF waves next to my head whenever I want to listen to music? No thanks, brain tumors are really inconvenient to deal with.
To be fair, they do come with a Lightning-headphone adapter so you can use any ol' normal headphones, but adapters are stupid.

Yep, and the problem with the adapter is you can't charge and play music at the same time. I frequently connect my iphone to my speakers at home via auxiliary cord, and like to charge it at the same time. I'd be doubtful that the 7 made any strides in the battery life department, either.

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2860
  • Age: 26
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18251 on: July 21, 2017, 12:22:41 PM »
Maybe she's sick and tired of having a headphone jack.

This would be a deal breaker for me. Bluetooth RF waves next to my head whenever I want to listen to music? No thanks, brain tumors are really inconvenient to deal with.
To be fair, they do come with a Lightning-headphone adapter so you can use any ol' normal headphones, but adapters are stupid.

Yep, and the problem with the adapter is you can't charge and play music at the same time. I frequently connect my iphone to my speakers at home via auxiliary cord, and like to charge it at the same time. I'd be doubtful that the 7 made any strides in the battery life department, either.
I do the same thing in the car on long roadtrips, and it's pretty frustrating.  I've overall found battery life to be excellent, but my metric is my previous phone, which had hilariously bad battery life (half dead by 3pm with zero usage).  My iPhone 7 will last two days on a charge with reasonable use, and at minimum one day of heavy use.

infogoon

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 829
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18252 on: July 21, 2017, 12:32:26 PM »
If you'd like to do away with the AUX cord in the car, Bluetooth adapters are super-cheap these days. Here's one that I use, it works great.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NGYVRMW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My favorite part is that it has a slide power switch, so I can just leave it switched on. Some other models require a button to turn on.

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2860
  • Age: 26
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18253 on: July 21, 2017, 12:38:25 PM »
If you'd like to do away with the AUX cord in the car, Bluetooth adapters are super-cheap these days. Here's one that I use, it works great.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NGYVRMW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My favorite part is that it has a slide power switch, so I can just leave it switched on. Some other models require a button to turn on.
Thanks.  I might get something like that, but I'm already piping my phone's audio through a cassette adapter in my car, so I'm a bit reluctant to add extra points of failure. :)

Roe

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 137
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18254 on: July 22, 2017, 10:51:02 AM »
Conversation with a, usually, bright colleague. He tells me he will retire in five years.

"I don't know how it will work out. The government has scammed me. I have no savings and no money left over for saving, none at all. My house is a huge money sink, it makes it impossible to save ."

I made the humble suggestion that he would downscale his house, but that was also impossible.
Beans&rice, my love!

Playing with Fire UK

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2056
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18255 on: July 22, 2017, 11:04:59 AM »
Conversation with a, usually, bright colleague. He tells me he will retire in five years.

"I don't know how it will work out. The government has scammed me. I have no savings and no money left over for saving, none at all. My house is a huge money sink, it makes it impossible to save ."

I made the humble suggestion that he would downscale his house, but that was also impossible.

That poor colleague, they sound so unlucky with the impossibility of downsizing the house, impossible to save, impossible to spend less. If only they could have been luckier or made better decisions.

Thanks for sharing Roe! I hope to hear more stories about this colleague as retirement gets closer!

BuffaloStache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 543
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18256 on: July 23, 2017, 10:18:03 PM »
...
I made the humble suggestion that he would downscale his house, but that was also impossible.

This. My wife and I have been living in a small 2 bedroom Condo for 4 months now with a baby son, *and* my mother temporarily living here to be babysitter. Is it slightly crowded? yes. Does it allow us to keep ~50%+ SR with a small child? yes.

We'll get the bigger house eventually (and keep this condo to rent it out), but not that much bigger.
"As a cure for worrying, work is better than whisky." -Thomas Edison

My Log | Take surveys as a side-hustle! Use my referral link

HairyUpperLip

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 894
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18257 on: July 24, 2017, 08:07:27 AM »
...
And a work friend said ...

Two words that should not be next to each other, IMHO.

Co-workers are co-workers, and friends are friends, and the never the twain shall meet.

I have a rule. I do not befriend co-workers.

HairyUpperLip

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 894
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18258 on: July 24, 2017, 08:14:03 AM »
Hey, hey, hey, back off the Timmies.

Oh, quite the opposite, my good friend. There is a rational reason to wait in line for Timmies. Wasting fifteen minutes of your morning commute blocking the Starbucks parking lot, not so much. Intelligence test, pay $4 for a cup of burnt and bitter, waste a quarter hour of your life=fail.
In Canada a Starbucks Venti (20 oz, largest size available) coffee is $2.17, Tim Horton large (20 oz)is $1.99, the X-Large is 24 oz, $2.19. You can tell which people don't actually pat attention to prices when they say Starbucks costs $4 for a coffee. If you're going to mock people, at least get it right.

Waiting in either drive thru is a fail.

In all fairness, I drink black coffee. So when I go to sbux it's only $2 and some change for me. But the majority of the people seem to ordering mixes of sugar and syrup for $4-8 a cup so I don't think people are out of line saying $4 for sbux.

HairyUpperLip

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 894
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18259 on: July 24, 2017, 08:54:27 AM »
I work in a small office (3 rooms, 4-7 people depending on the day). We have two new people who were given the nicest room to themselves. So far I've observed:

1. Coins in their garbage can
2. Dumping the recycle in the trash, and dumping trash in the recycle
3. Leaving the office for the day without shutting off lights
4. Leaving the office for the day without shutting off air conditioner (window unit)

I got some new recycle bins for the office that are bright blue and marked with recycle symbols, and I'm hoping they were simply confused about which bin(s) to use. I'm usually the last to leave so I've been shutting off lights and A/C if I notice that they're on. Today everyone's left and one of the new guys left the A/C on and shut the door to that office. So I'm thinking he is trying to give me a hint that it should be left alone...? Presumably so it's not hot when he comes in tomorrow morning. But what an incredible waste to leave the A/C on for 16 hours because you can't spend 30 minutes letting it cool down. :-(

As a guy that grew up in America I do not understand why Americans require such an excessive amount of AC and cold air. Hung out with a friend the other night and he had his house set to 72. Man, I was freezing the whole time.

Finallyunderstand

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 69
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18260 on: July 24, 2017, 10:05:30 AM »
A guy I know just hit 100,000 miles on his 2014 vehicle.  Drives a lot for work.  He is now looking to get a new vehicle because his warranty just ended.  I ran his vehicle through kelly blue book.  Estimated about $7k value.  He mentions he owes about $2k more than its worth right now so he's prepared when he trades it in to need to pay that off.   He's wanting to get a brand new small SUV "with all the options" that runs about $29k, plus taxes, fees, etc.  He "needs" the suv to carry things for his job.  Something he's managed to do without an SUV for 3 years now.

He's worried his current car may have some issues now that it's out of warranty so the logical thing to do is spend $25k to make sure you don't have to fix... tranmission, brakes, new tires?!?!?!?!  Hard to wrap my head around the logic.  I tried offering up some subtle knowledge nuggets but had to stop before I got too aggressive. 

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2860
  • Age: 26
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18261 on: July 24, 2017, 10:35:23 AM »
A guy I know just hit 100,000 miles on his 2014 vehicle.  Drives a lot for work.  He is now looking to get a new vehicle because his warranty just ended.  I ran his vehicle through kelly blue book.  Estimated about $7k value.  He mentions he owes about $2k more than its worth right now so he's prepared when he trades it in to need to pay that off.   He's wanting to get a brand new small SUV "with all the options" that runs about $29k, plus taxes, fees, etc.  He "needs" the suv to carry things for his job.  Something he's managed to do without an SUV for 3 years now.

He's worried his current car may have some issues now that it's out of warranty so the logical thing to do is spend $25k to make sure you don't have to fix... tranmission, brakes, new tires?!?!?!?!  Hard to wrap my head around the logic.  I tried offering up some subtle knowledge nuggets but had to stop before I got too aggressive.
Well, why risk maybe having to pay $3k for a new transmission when you can definitely pay $29k for a vehicle that's more expensive to run!?  You'd be a fool!

tyort1

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1681
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Denver, Colorado
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18262 on: July 24, 2017, 11:30:39 AM »
A guy I know just hit 100,000 miles on his 2014 vehicle.  Drives a lot for work.  He is now looking to get a new vehicle because his warranty just ended.  I ran his vehicle through kelly blue book.  Estimated about $7k value.  He mentions he owes about $2k more than its worth right now so he's prepared when he trades it in to need to pay that off.   He's wanting to get a brand new small SUV "with all the options" that runs about $29k, plus taxes, fees, etc.  He "needs" the suv to carry things for his job.  Something he's managed to do without an SUV for 3 years now.

He's worried his current car may have some issues now that it's out of warranty so the logical thing to do is spend $25k to make sure you don't have to fix... tranmission, brakes, new tires?!?!?!?!  Hard to wrap my head around the logic.  I tried offering up some subtle knowledge nuggets but had to stop before I got too aggressive.

Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.
Frugalite in training.

financialfreedomsloth

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 173
  • Location: Belgium
    • financial freedom sloth
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18263 on: July 24, 2017, 11:56:56 AM »
A guy I know just hit 100,000 miles on his 2014 vehicle.  Drives a lot for work.  He is now looking to get a new vehicle because his warranty just ended.  I ran his vehicle through kelly blue book.  Estimated about $7k value.  He mentions he owes about $2k more than its worth right now so he's prepared when he trades it in to need to pay that off.   He's wanting to get a brand new small SUV "with all the options" that runs about $29k, plus taxes, fees, etc.  He "needs" the suv to carry things for his job.  Something he's managed to do without an SUV for 3 years now.

He's worried his current car may have some issues now that it's out of warranty so the logical thing to do is spend $25k to make sure you don't have to fix... tranmission, brakes, new tires?!?!?!?!  Hard to wrap my head around the logic.  I tried offering up some subtle knowledge nuggets but had to stop before I got too aggressive.
I must be the exception to that rule. I actually do not like new cars. My dad got a newish car for the first time in his life and I swear the dashboard looks like the cockpit of plan a gazillion buttons and all have 4 different functions depending if you push them, pull them up, pull them back or push them forward... And all for crazy stuff like the driver who can also control the backseat passenger windows? Euh what's the point? I just want a car that drives when it has to drive, stops when it has to stop, a radio and lights that work. Everything else I do not need and I certainly do not need 50 buttons to control it all. I wouldn't even mind still having to manually wind down the windows ...

Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.
http://financialfreedomsloth.com/

achieving financial freedom one lazy step at a time

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 846
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18264 on: July 24, 2017, 12:05:45 PM »
I must be the exception to that rule.

We're all the exception to a lot of rules.  That's why we hang out here :-)

And all for crazy stuff like the driver who can also control the backseat passenger windows?

Uh, that's not newfangled car tech.  That's been around since what, the 70s?  60s?  I like that ability.  I can create airflow without it blowing directly on my face and being loud right next to my left ear.  Sunroof open + back windows down 2 inches and front windows up = perfect airflow w/ minimal noise.

BDWW

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 310
  • Location: MT
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18265 on: July 24, 2017, 12:19:01 PM »
I work in a small office (3 rooms, 4-7 people depending on the day). We have two new people who were given the nicest room to themselves. So far I've observed:

1. Coins in their garbage can
2. Dumping the recycle in the trash, and dumping trash in the recycle
3. Leaving the office for the day without shutting off lights
4. Leaving the office for the day without shutting off air conditioner (window unit)

I got some new recycle bins for the office that are bright blue and marked with recycle symbols, and I'm hoping they were simply confused about which bin(s) to use. I'm usually the last to leave so I've been shutting off lights and A/C if I notice that they're on. Today everyone's left and one of the new guys left the A/C on and shut the door to that office. So I'm thinking he is trying to give me a hint that it should be left alone...? Presumably so it's not hot when he comes in tomorrow morning. But what an incredible waste to leave the A/C on for 16 hours because you can't spend 30 minutes letting it cool down. :-(

As a guy that grew up in America I do not understand why Americans require such an excessive amount of AC and cold air. Hung out with a friend the other night and he had his house set to 72. Man, I was freezing the whole time.

Location and acclimation matter. We AC to 72/73 because it's miserable otherwise. On the other hand, I wear a hoodie all winter and the only time it briefly crossed my mind to break out the actual winter coat was a trek to the grocery store last winter when it was -20F.

Imma

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 442
  • Location: Europe
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18266 on: July 24, 2017, 12:40:41 PM »
Coworker is 50 year old and has two fairly young kids. He lives in a 150 m2 home in a very desirable part of town where prices have gone up massively the last few years. (Houses are smaller in here, the average is about 100 m2, so he already has a pretty big house).
Finds out that his house is now worth EUR 100.000 more than what he paid for it. Decides he needs a change of scenery and he can afford it, since he's now rich. Buys a 180 m2 house around the corner in the same booming neighbourhood that's 120.000 EUR more expensive than his old house. Spends 20.000 EUR on 'necessary renovation' on a house that's 8 years old and high quality. One of the very necessary things is taking out the bathtub from the bathroom because they really need two showers in one bathroom. Doesn't trust banks and insurance companies and our company doesn't offer a pension scheme (although his wife's employer does I think, but she earns less than him). Is extremely proud of himself that he put 20% down on the house with a 30-year mortgage. 10 years before retirement, with little pension and two kids that are going to be dependent for the next 15 years.

Same guy once impulsively bought a new car that he liked when he saw it parked outside a dealership and used this incident as an illustration to show how adventurous he was instead of stupid.

He's a nice guy and we sit next to each other. I really try to give him friendly advice sometimes, but I bite my tongue most of the times. I'd hate to see him getting in massive problems, but he's heading there. Our company isn't doing too well and he's been there for 20 years, never developed his skills, doesn't have formal qualifications. He earns a pretty decent wage because he's been there for so long but if our company would go bust, he'd likely earn half in his next job. Especially with a young family, that's a disaster waiting to happen.

BTDretire

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1527
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18267 on: July 24, 2017, 02:35:47 PM »

Weren't you complaining in a different thread about a person using multiple EBT cards to pay for groceries (ie, 'cheating the system'), and yet here you are admitting to much worse and much more serious cheating.  Interesting.
Ya, no justification for it. Period. That said, :-)
I didn't steal taxpayer money.
The school district drew an arbitrary line, on this side you go to school A, on the side you go to school B. I* chose to say I lived on the other side of the line.
 As to my daughter starting school early, again, an arbitrary line, if your birthday is on this side of the line, you wait until next year, if it's on the other side you start now.
We had here tested, it we were told she is way ready start school.
 We started her early. Her kindergarten teacher told us one day, that my daughter told her, "from now on I'm keeping everything I know under a sheet" It was at that point the teacher realized how much she was relying on my daughter to help other students. A lot of this was teaching the other kids how to use the computer programs. The teacher said she backed off.
It all worked out very well, she graduated HS. 4th in a class of 400+, a year early.
She now has 2 BS degrees, working on a Masters, and has an interview at a dental college the day after tomorrow.
 Zero guilt. Also don't agree with your cheating scale, if you really want to make a cheating scale :-)

*the truth is, I would have never have made this decision. I'm a rule follower whether it be regulatory or social. I consider it a bit of a fault of mine. Even on my mothers deathbed, we were discussing some financial manipulation** thing, and I said, "I didn't think it was right to do that", and she said, you always were my honest child, I was 57 at the time.
 My wife came from a different country and rules are not good things. We have constant irritations, usually because she is doing something I wouldn't.
 The communists imposed rules, the capitalists hated those rules. I suppose that is where a lot of her attitude about authority comes from. You could not save money, because the government changed the currency often and you could only exchange a fixed amount. Then the old currency was worthless.
 Also, negotiating over price, you have a product for sale, some people pay $4 others pay $9, because they don't negotiate.  Most sales here are fixed price. (stores) I think being raised with the mentality that the price is whatever you can get someone else to pay, has an effect on everyday life.
 It doesn't seem to be immoral to get more money from one person than the next one for exactly the same thing.

**Being self employed we can split the business income 50/50 or 100% to one. All SS tax are paid into one account and the payout is much larger. Then the spouse gets 50% of the wage earners
benefit, but never paid in. (at least that's how I understood it then)
 This is when I said, "I didn't think it was right to do that", and she said, you always were my honest child.
btw, my accountant does this. It's legal, is it moral?


tyort1

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1681
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Denver, Colorado
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18268 on: July 24, 2017, 03:20:58 PM »

Weren't you complaining in a different thread about a person using multiple EBT cards to pay for groceries (ie, 'cheating the system'), and yet here you are admitting to much worse and much more serious cheating.  Interesting.
Ya, no justification for it. Period. That said, :-)
I didn't steal taxpayer money.

True, but you did game the system for self gain.  And I'd say cheating to get your daughter into an excellent school is much more valuable than someone using EBT cards for a few extra bucks at the grocery store. 

I only pointed it out because I see this type of thing all the time from my family.  When they (the hard working, deserving white people) cheat, it's called "being smart" and "gaming the system".  When others (lazy brown/black/white-trash people) do it, it's MORAL OUTRAGE time. 

I just find it funny, that's all.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 03:29:34 PM by tyort1 »
Frugalite in training.

BTDretire

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1527
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18269 on: July 24, 2017, 04:04:02 PM »
"it's called "being smart"


  Did you just call me smart?
You're are no stump yourself!  :-)

LennStar

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 912
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18270 on: July 25, 2017, 05:11:04 AM »
I've overall found battery life to be excellent, but my metric is my previous phone, which had hilariously bad battery life (half dead by 3pm with zero usage).  My iPhone 7 will last two days on a charge with reasonable use, and at minimum one day of heavy use.
My dumb phone goes a week without charge (and is already 4 years old). Quite smart, right?

KodeBlue

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 157
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18271 on: July 25, 2017, 06:22:01 AM »
The school district drew an arbitrary line, on this side you go to school A, on the side you go to school B. I* chose to say I lived on the other side of the line lie.
 
Edited for clarity.

iowajes

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5304
  • Location: United States
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18272 on: July 25, 2017, 06:41:29 AM »
...
And a work friend said ...

Two words that should not be next to each other, IMHO.

Co-workers are co-workers, and friends are friends, and the never the twain shall meet.

I have a rule. I do not befriend co-workers.

To me a work friend is a friend at work. I have a few work friends, the people I eat lunch with (maybe go out to eat with on a blue moon), hang out with at corporate events, etc.  I don't see them outside of work so they aren't friend-friends, just work friends.

When I leave a job, on the rare occasion a work friend makes the jump to real friend. It's rare.

My current job I do have one real friend who works at the same company as I do. Our paths don't ever cross during work though.

dividendman

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
  • Age: 35
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18273 on: July 25, 2017, 08:17:54 AM »
To me a work friend is a friend at work. I have a few work friends, the people I eat lunch with (maybe go out to eat with on a blue moon), hang out with at corporate events, etc.  I don't see them outside of work so they aren't friend-friends, just work friends.

When I leave a job, on the rare occasion a work friend makes the jump to real friend. It's rare.

My current job I do have one real friend who works at the same company as I do. Our paths don't ever cross during work though.

Good. We don't want to kill independent George.

rockstache

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3509
  • Age: 2013
  • Location: Northeast
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18274 on: July 25, 2017, 10:45:46 AM »
To me a work friend is a friend at work. I have a few work friends, the people I eat lunch with (maybe go out to eat with on a blue moon), hang out with at corporate events, etc.  I don't see them outside of work so they aren't friend-friends, just work friends.

When I leave a job, on the rare occasion a work friend makes the jump to real friend. It's rare.

My current job I do have one real friend who works at the same company as I do. Our paths don't ever cross during work though.

Good. We don't want to kill independent George.

Worlds collide.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3496
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18275 on: July 25, 2017, 11:28:28 AM »
You could drop a grand on a cat if you wanted a Savannah. They're majestic AF though, the size of a dog, and can eat small children. I would totally own a Savannah if I weren't a frugal person looking to have no more pets.

They're frequently stolen, though, and they aren't known for being kind to furniture or easy to housebreak.

Facts don't matter sometimes when it interferes with someone wanting a beautiful pet. Lots of people went out and got Clownfish for their kids' fish bowl after Finding Nemo came out and plenty of people got (and then abandoned) dalmatians after 101 Dalmatians.

shelivesthedream

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2506
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18276 on: July 26, 2017, 01:52:49 AM »
My husband's boss is getting married in September. They are having what I would call a proper wedding: flowers, bridesmaids, big reception, etc. They're both mid-thirties and his fiancée has a good job - I'm sure they can afford it if that's how they really want to spend their money. His house comes with his job so she's going to move in with him, but she already owns a house in a fancy part of town about twenty minutes  away. My husband told me last night that's she's keeping it. Fair enough, I said, she'll probably be able to rent it out for a lot of money. No, he said, she's keeping it...as is. As her house. Even though she'll be living with her then-husband. So...as some weekend getaway house just up the road?! Does not compute.

frugledoc

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 494
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18277 on: July 26, 2017, 02:35:42 AM »
My husband's boss is getting married in September. They are having what I would call a proper wedding: flowers, bridesmaids, big reception, etc. They're both mid-thirties and his fiancée has a good job - I'm sure they can afford it if that's how they really want to spend their money. His house comes with his job so she's going to move in with him, but she already owns a house in a fancy part of town about twenty minutes  away. My husband told me last night that's she's keeping it. Fair enough, I said, she'll probably be able to rent it out for a lot of money. No, he said, she's keeping it...as is. As her house. Even though she'll be living with her then-husband. So...as some weekend getaway house just up the road?! Does not compute.

So she's going to use it as a massive woman cave?


shelivesthedream

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2506
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18278 on: July 26, 2017, 05:35:09 AM »
My husband's boss is getting married in September. They are having what I would call a proper wedding: flowers, bridesmaids, big reception, etc. They're both mid-thirties and his fiancée has a good job - I'm sure they can afford it if that's how they really want to spend their money. His house comes with his job so she's going to move in with him, but she already owns a house in a fancy part of town about twenty minutes  away. My husband told me last night that's she's keeping it. Fair enough, I said, she'll probably be able to rent it out for a lot of money. No, he said, she's keeping it...as is. As her house. Even though she'll be living with her then-husband. So...as some weekend getaway house just up the road?! Does not compute.

So she's going to use it as a massive woman cave?

Unclear whether it's going to stay HER house or whether it's going to become THEIR extra house. Sounds like the latter. Either way, it's too far to be a handy woman cave but too close to be a weekend getaway.

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1265
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18279 on: July 26, 2017, 05:59:19 AM »
My husband's boss is getting married in September. They are having what I would call a proper wedding: flowers, bridesmaids, big reception, etc. They're both mid-thirties and his fiancée has a good job - I'm sure they can afford it if that's how they really want to spend their money. His house comes with his job so she's going to move in with him, but she already owns a house in a fancy part of town about twenty minutes  away. My husband told me last night that's she's keeping it. Fair enough, I said, she'll probably be able to rent it out for a lot of money. No, he said, she's keeping it...as is. As her house. Even though she'll be living with her then-husband. So...as some weekend getaway house just up the road?! Does not compute.

So she's going to use it as a massive woman cave?

Unclear whether it's going to stay HER house or whether it's going to become THEIR extra house. Sounds like the latter. Either way, it's too far to be a handy woman cave but too close to be a weekend getaway.

Odd... "his house comes with his job" any chance that the job or the perk goes away at some point?

shelivesthedream

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2506
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18280 on: July 26, 2017, 06:10:02 AM »
My husband's boss is getting married in September. They are having what I would call a proper wedding: flowers, bridesmaids, big reception, etc. They're both mid-thirties and his fiancée has a good job - I'm sure they can afford it if that's how they really want to spend their money. His house comes with his job so she's going to move in with him, but she already owns a house in a fancy part of town about twenty minutes  away. My husband told me last night that's she's keeping it. Fair enough, I said, she'll probably be able to rent it out for a lot of money. No, he said, she's keeping it...as is. As her house. Even though she'll be living with her then-husband. So...as some weekend getaway house just up the road?! Does not compute.

So she's going to use it as a massive woman cave?

Unclear whether it's going to stay HER house or whether it's going to become THEIR extra house. Sounds like the latter. Either way, it's too far to be a handy woman cave but too close to be a weekend getaway.

Odd... "his house comes with his job" any chance that the job or the perk goes away at some point?

Perk will never go away (it's a key part of their compensation), obviously at some point he could be fired if he does something really horrendous but he's planning to be here for the long haul. It's not the keeping the house at all (who doesn't love a rental property?), it's the idea of keeping it empty.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18281 on: July 26, 2017, 08:19:01 AM »

Facts don't matter sometimes when it interferes with someone wanting a beautiful pet. Lots of people went out and got Clownfish for their kids' fish toilet bowl after Finding Nemo came out and plenty of people got (and then abandoned) dalmatians after 101 Dalmatians.

FTFY
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

RWD

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1673
  • Location: Mississippi
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18282 on: July 26, 2017, 09:15:03 AM »

Facts don't matter sometimes when it interferes with someone wanting a beautiful pet. Lots of people went out and got Clownfish for their kids' fish toilet bowl after Finding Nemo came out and plenty of people got (and then abandoned) dalmatians after 101 Dalmatians.

FTFY

"All drains lead to the ocean."

TreesBikesLove

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 69
  • Location: PDX Suburb
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18283 on: July 26, 2017, 09:47:23 AM »
Uncle tells the vet to put it to sleep, since there are plenty more free ones where that one came from. His idea was not well received. My aunt stayed behind to calm the vet down and negotiate a solution.

While your Uncle's reaction was completely logical he has to realize that pet people are not rational. Owning a pet is an emotional decision and that is fine; just don't try to explain yourself in a logical way to these people.

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1265
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18284 on: July 26, 2017, 09:55:53 AM »
Uncle tells the vet to put it to sleep, since there are plenty more free ones where that one came from. His idea was not well received. My aunt stayed behind to calm the vet down and negotiate a solution.

While your Uncle's reaction was completely logical he has to realize that pet people are not rational. Owning a pet is an emotional decision and that is fine; just don't try to explain yourself in a logical way to these people.

Needs to find a country/farm vet.

icbatbh

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • Location: UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18285 on: July 27, 2017, 04:13:57 AM »
Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.

I agree. A colleague of mine had a 5 year old small van with low milage that broke down once. After spending £600 to repair it he then traded it in as a deposit on a brand new pick up truck on finance, because the van was 'too unreliable'.

The funny thing is he only uses the van/pickup truck as a second vehicle because he doesn't want to run up excess mileage charges on his leased BMW.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18286 on: July 27, 2017, 09:12:40 AM »
I agree. A colleague of mine had a 5 year old small van with low milage that broke down once. After spending £600 to repair it he then traded it in as a deposit on a brand new pick up truck on finance, because the van was 'too unreliable'.

The funny thing is he only uses the van/pickup truck as a second vehicle because he doesn't want to run up excess mileage charges on his leased BMW.

Ho.
Lee.
Shiiiiiiite.
It it possible to more fully defeat the purpose of leasing a vehicle? I can't even imagine.
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

cheapass

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 503
  • Location: Dallas, Texas
  • On track for FIRE @ 40
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18287 on: July 27, 2017, 09:18:52 AM »
Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.

I agree. A colleague of mine had a 5 year old small van with low milage that broke down once. After spending £600 to repair it he then traded it in as a deposit on a brand new pick up truck on finance, because the van was 'too unreliable'.

The funny thing is he only uses the van/pickup truck as a second vehicle because he doesn't want to run up excess mileage charges on his leased BMW.

I'd be tempted to calculate how much money he just wasted with the 1) leased BMW and 2) replacing a second vehicle and then convert it to opportunity cost of invested dollars 10 or 20 years from now. I bet it's in the hundreds of thousands.
Every single decision you make with money either shortens or lengthens your working career.

RWD

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1673
  • Location: Mississippi
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18288 on: July 27, 2017, 10:11:38 AM »
Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.

I agree. A colleague of mine had a 5 year old small van with low milage that broke down once. After spending £600 to repair it he then traded it in as a deposit on a brand new pick up truck on finance, because the van was 'too unreliable'.

The funny thing is he only uses the van/pickup truck as a second vehicle because he doesn't want to run up excess mileage charges on his leased BMW.

I'd be tempted to calculate how much money he just wasted with the 1) leased BMW and 2) replacing a second vehicle and then convert it to opportunity cost of invested dollars 10 or 20 years from now. I bet it's in the hundreds of thousands.

Assumptions:
2017 BMW 330i lease for 36 months at $419/month with $4344 down. New BMW leased again every 36 months.
2017 Ford F-150 financed for 60 months at $427/month with 2841 down. Traded in for new F-150 with same terms after 60 months.
15% depreciation per year.
5% investment returns post inflation (all calculations using 2017 dollars).
Mustachian buys a $10k car every five years, replacing their old one.
Ignoring extra insurance costs and other additional expenses from owning two newer cars.

After 10 years the car clown will have ~$114k less net worth than the Mustachian with one car. Or ~$132k less net worth than a car-free Mustachian.
After 20 years the car clown will have ~$294k less net worth than the Mustachian with one car. Or ~$343k less net worth than a car-free Mustachian.

MrMoogle

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 971
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Huntsville, AL
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18289 on: July 27, 2017, 10:14:01 AM »
Most people just don't like driving older cars.  They like driving new cars.  The crap about the warrantee running out is just rationalization to justify that he really wants: a new car.

I agree. A colleague of mine had a 5 year old small van with low milage that broke down once. After spending £600 to repair it he then traded it in as a deposit on a brand new pick up truck on finance, because the van was 'too unreliable'.

The funny thing is he only uses the van/pickup truck as a second vehicle because he doesn't want to run up excess mileage charges on his leased BMW.

I'd be tempted to calculate how much money he just wasted with the 1) leased BMW and 2) replacing a second vehicle and then convert it to opportunity cost of invested dollars 10 or 20 years from now. I bet it's in the hundreds of thousands.

Assumptions:
2017 BMW 330i lease for 36 months at $419/month with $4344 down. New BMW leased again every 36 months.
2017 Ford F-150 financed for 60 months at $427/month with 2841 down. Traded in for new F-150 with same terms after 60 months.
15% depreciation per year.
5% investment returns post inflation (all calculations using 2017 dollars).
Mustachian buys a $10k car every five years, replacing their old one.
Ignoring extra insurance costs and other additional expenses from owning two newer cars.

After 10 years the car clown will have ~$114k less net worth than the Mustachian with one car. Or ~$132k less net worth than a car-free Mustachian.
After 20 years the car clown will have ~$294k less net worth than the Mustachian with one car. Or ~$343k less net worth than a car-free Mustachian.
Yeah, but the Mustachian will have an unreliable car.  So it seems worth it to me. /s

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18290 on: July 27, 2017, 10:33:53 AM »
Yeah, but the Mustachian will have an unreliable car.  So it seems worth it to me. /s

I mean, can you really put a price on reliable transportation? I know I'd spend 300 grand to avoid possibly visiting a mechanic slightly more often during my peak years.... xD
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

Imma

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 442
  • Location: Europe
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18291 on: July 27, 2017, 10:54:53 AM »
$350.000 .... and my coworkers think I lost my mind for cycling 2 miles to work every day. I don't have a car, so it's literally every day.

Cost of buying a fairly new and barely used good quality brand city bike in 2008: EUR 350.
Small maintenance 2008-2016: EUR 50
Large maintenance 2016: EUR 150 (basically everything new except frame)
One time bike tire repair when I was far away from home and couldn't fix it myself: EUR 30.

Total for 9 years: EUR 580  or 65 EUR/year. Plus 5 hours of guaranteed exercise every week and it's a pretty scenic route.
Amount of times the weather was so bad the past year I had to take the bus: 2. (at EUR 3 for a return ticket).

I'm pretty sure my coworkers feel sorry for me and talk about it behind my back. And they don't even know that we take 'we don't drive' so literally that neither my partner or I actually have a driver's license.

cheapass

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 503
  • Location: Dallas, Texas
  • On track for FIRE @ 40
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18292 on: July 27, 2017, 11:03:58 AM »
Yeah, but the Mustachian will have an unreliable car.  So it seems worth it to me. /s

I mean, can you really put a price on reliable transportation? I know I'd spend 300 grand to avoid possibly visiting a mechanic slightly more often during my peak years.... xD

Yeah it's totally worth working an extra 5 years. GAAAHHHH!!!!!
Every single decision you make with money either shortens or lengthens your working career.

LennStar

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 912
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18293 on: July 27, 2017, 11:42:11 AM »
$350.000 .... and my coworkers think I lost my mind for cycling 2 miles to work every day. I don't have a car, so it's literally every day.

Cost of buying a fairly new and barely used good quality brand city bike in 2008: EUR 350.
Small maintenance 2008-2016: EUR 50
Large maintenance 2016: EUR 150 (basically everything new except frame)
One time bike tire repair when I was far away from home and couldn't fix it myself: EUR 30.

Total for 9 years: EUR 580  or 65 EUR/year. Plus 5 hours of guaranteed exercise every week and it's a pretty scenic route.
Amount of times the weather was so bad the past year I had to take the bus: 2. (at EUR 3 for a return ticket).

I'm pretty sure my coworkers feel sorry for me and talk about it behind my back. And they don't even know that we take 'we don't drive' so literally that neither my partner or I actually have a driver's license.
That's too bad. You never know when you could need one. And if it is just to carry that big piece of furniture for 2 km instead of paying 40€ delivery.

Imma

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 442
  • Location: Europe
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18294 on: July 27, 2017, 01:08:40 PM »
$350.000 .... and my coworkers think I lost my mind for cycling 2 miles to work every day. I don't have a car, so it's literally every day.

Cost of buying a fairly new and barely used good quality brand city bike in 2008: EUR 350.
Small maintenance 2008-2016: EUR 50
Large maintenance 2016: EUR 150 (basically everything new except frame)
One time bike tire repair when I was far away from home and couldn't fix it myself: EUR 30.

Total for 9 years: EUR 580  or 65 EUR/year. Plus 5 hours of guaranteed exercise every week and it's a pretty scenic route.
Amount of times the weather was so bad the past year I had to take the bus: 2. (at EUR 3 for a return ticket).

I'm pretty sure my coworkers feel sorry for me and talk about it behind my back. And they don't even know that we take 'we don't drive' so literally that neither my partner or I actually have a driver's license.
That's too bad. You never know when you could need one. And if it is just to carry that big piece of furniture for 2 km instead of paying 40€ delivery.

I agree it's a useful skill to have, and I certainly wouldn't mind being able to drive, it's just totally not cost effective.

A driver's license costs about EUR 2500 in my country. Then after you get your license, you need to either buy a car or rent one frequently to learn to drive because only after you pass the test you really learn to drive on your own (without the instructor correcting you when you almost get yourself killed). If you add up all costs for learning to drive, buying or renting a car, tax, petrol, insurance etc you might well spend EUR 10.000 before you can say you're a good driver and you're not going to forget that skill even when you only drive infrequently. To put that in perspective, that's 2/3 of what I earn in a year.

That's a lot of money for something you'll barely use in your daily life. Neither me or my s/o had that kind of money when we turned 18 and we were sensible enough not to take out a loan for it. By the time we were financially stable enough to be able to afford to learn to drive (which is about now, at 27/31) we've gotten so used to living without a car I wouldn't even know what to use it for. I guess we could indeed use it to haul furniture from the store, but we hardly ever buy furniture and our thrift store delivers for EUR 10. We carried a desk home for 2 km a while ago and it was surprisingly easy. The grocery store and most online stores deliver for free these days. We could drive to family out of town, but taking the train would be more efficient. I literally can't even think of 10 places I would go to if I had a car (although I'm sure if you do have one, you get used to it soon enough).

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4976
  • Location: BC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18295 on: July 27, 2017, 03:00:03 PM »
Imma,  why so much for a driver's license?  Does it include insurance (on the driver) rather than insurance being bought on the car like in the USA?

DD is getting her license.

$15 for the learners permit, $34 for the road test x 2,  plus paying for repeats.
$200 to add her to the car's insurance policy, for the year.
We paid about $700 for lessons plus practice / teaching her ourselves.  Some parents don't pay for lessons with outside instructors, however.

Total minimum is about $300 plus fuel, plus my time to teach her.

Paul der Krake

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3672
  • Age: 9
  • Warned Member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18296 on: July 27, 2017, 03:25:49 PM »
In most European countries, the State wants to be convinced you actually know how to drive. That means strict learning school requirements with a professional, and you must usually be proficient with a manual gearbox.

You should expect 2000 in Germany, 1500 in France, and about 1200 in Belgium. Less in Spain and Portugal, but still well over what's customary in North America.

Imma

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 442
  • Location: Europe
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18297 on: July 27, 2017, 03:59:20 PM »
Yes, that's the reason (I'm in the Netherlands) . You can't just learn to drive from your parents, you can only learn from an instructor. Expect instruction to cost €40-€60 per hour and on average you'll need about 40. The driving theory exam costs €30, the road test about €250. The actual driver's license is €40 and before that you'll need to get a medical statement that you're fit to drive. If you get the all clear without needing further checks, that statement costs €30, if there are any concerns it's €60-120.

And yes, it's right that in here you learn to drive a manual. You can take a special exam for just automatic cars and you'll get a special driving license. As most cars are manual in here, very few people do that voluntarily - only if they just don't manage to learn driving a manual.

But if you only need to spend $300 on a license, of course that's a skill you need to learn. It is a really convenient thing to be able to do, even if you're not planning on buying your own car for the time being. You'll never know what happens. A while back we went to a festival 4 hours away with some friends. We took the train, the other couple drove. Only the guy had his driver's license. He sustained a bad knee injury and couldn't drive back. Another friend had to travel all that way just to get the other couple's car home. In situations like that it would be really convenient if more people were able to drive. I think about 50% of women in our group of friends don't drive and 25% of men. Men seem to be more interested in cars and more often have jobs that require a license. I know my partner wants a license more than I do (but he wants money in his investments more than he wants a driving license).

markbike528CBX

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 519
  • Location: the Everbrown part of the Evergreen State (WA)
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18298 on: July 27, 2017, 04:00:09 PM »
Some basic physics might need to be included if I was the State :-) And the fact that the laws of physics DO apply even on the German Autobahn.   

I was on the Autobahn (A6 near Stuttgart?) at my max comfortable speed (~100km/hr) for the very rainy wet conditions, and in a smaller Peugeot, when I was passed at about 130-140km/hr (85-90mph) by a newer 3 series BMW.  Sure enough, 10km down the road, the car had shed pieces while bouncing from guardrail to guardrail.

That being said, I would agree that Euro drivers are generally better, if no more careful, than US drivers.

My favorite Autobahn memory is being in a group of 3 cars at 200km/hr (120mph) in the right (slow) lane, cuz, you never know how fast the traffic behind you might be, and one NEVER hogs the left lane.   We made it at least 5km that way before we had to pass anyone.

Feivel2000

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 168
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Germany
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #18299 on: July 27, 2017, 11:05:39 PM »


Some basic physics might need to be included if I was the State :-) And the fact that the laws of physics DO apply even on the German Autobahn.

In the German theoretical driver license test you need to know the formula to calculate the expected distance to stop the car.