Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5880435 times)

craiglepaige

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17200 on: March 27, 2017, 06:22:07 PM »
One of the younger guys(22yo - I think) told me today that for the past four months, since his girlfriend got a new job farther from their apartment, they have not made one meal at home, other than a breakfast here or there on weekends. So at least, Monday through Friday they eat 2-3 meals out - each.

He said they decided yesterday to change that and he prepped food for the whole workweek. I'm glad about that but how the heck do you go four months without cooking more than a quick breakfast?
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marielle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17201 on: March 27, 2017, 06:59:39 PM »
One of the younger guys(22yo - I think) told me today that for the past four months, since his girlfriend got a new job farther from their apartment, they have not made one meal at home, other than a breakfast here or there on weekends. So at least, Monday through Friday they eat 2-3 meals out - each.

He said they decided yesterday to change that and he prepped food for the whole workweek. I'm glad about that but how the heck do you go four months without cooking more than a quick breakfast?

Most Americans do this regularly. It might not be all restaurant food but also frozen meals that just need microwaving. Its easy to forget that there's people that don't cook, but it's actually the norm. That's why kitchens and pantries are so tiny unless you buy a 2000+ sqft house. :/ At least that's my theory anyway, since the kitchen should be the most important part of a house but isn't anymore.

briesas

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17202 on: March 27, 2017, 07:36:29 PM »
She smokes about 2 packs a week at $50 a pop ($1/cig). Plus her partner smokes even more. Total: $800/month

Cigarettes come in packs of 50 and are $50 there?  Not sure which of those numbers is weirder..

OMG, I looked this up, and yes, there is a $40+ tax on a pack of cigarettes in Australia. And they are sold in packs of 20-50 with various increments in between.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3572446/Budget-2016-cigarettes-40-packets-make-Australia-world-s-expensive.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cigarette_pack (source for packs of 50)

I have to come out here as a smoker, which is totally un-mustachian, as it is pretty clearly destroying my health (and even though I equate smoking with pleasure, it's not really the pursuit of happiness). But, I roll my own and use pipe tobacco, which is the same as cigarette tobacco, just cut differently, as I understand it -- and it is not taxed at the rate cigarettes are in the U.S.  It costs me $1 per pack!

« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 07:40:20 PM by briesas »

nnls

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17203 on: March 27, 2017, 11:04:12 PM »
She smokes about 2 packs a week at $50 a pop ($1/cig). Plus her partner smokes even more. Total: $800/month

Cigarettes come in packs of 50 and are $50 there?  Not sure which of those numbers is weirder..

OMG, I looked this up, and yes, there is a $40+ tax on a pack of cigarettes in Australia. And they are sold in packs of 20-50 with various increments in between.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3572446/Budget-2016-cigarettes-40-packets-make-Australia-world-s-expensive.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cigarette_pack (source for packs of 50)

I have to come out here as a smoker, which is totally un-mustachian, as it is pretty clearly destroying my health (and even though I equate smoking with pleasure, it's not really the pursuit of happiness). But, I roll my own and use pipe tobacco, which is the same as cigarette tobacco, just cut differently, as I understand it -- and it is not taxed at the rate cigarettes are in the U.S.  It costs me $1 per pack!

yes here in Australia, cigarettes here are about $1 each. And the price goes up every year, but people continue to smoke even though its crazy expensive and bad for you. I do not understand it.

Even tobacco that you roll yourself is expensive

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17204 on: March 28, 2017, 07:36:47 AM »
She smokes about 2 packs a week at $50 a pop ($1/cig). Plus her partner smokes even more. Total: $800/month

Cigarettes come in packs of 50 and are $50 there?  Not sure which of those numbers is weirder..

OMG, I looked this up, and yes, there is a $40+ tax on a pack of cigarettes in Australia. And they are sold in packs of 20-50 with various increments in between.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3572446/Budget-2016-cigarettes-40-packets-make-Australia-world-s-expensive.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cigarette_pack (source for packs of 50)

I have to come out here as a smoker, which is totally un-mustachian, as it is pretty clearly destroying my health (and even though I equate smoking with pleasure, it's not really the pursuit of happiness). But, I roll my own and use pipe tobacco, which is the same as cigarette tobacco, just cut differently, as I understand it -- and it is not taxed at the rate cigarettes are in the U.S.  It costs me $1 per pack!

yes here in Australia, cigarettes here are about $1 each. And the price goes up every year, but people continue to smoke even though its crazy expensive and bad for you. I do not understand it.

Even tobacco that you roll yourself is expensive

Then you do not understand addiction.

talltexan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17205 on: March 28, 2017, 01:21:50 PM »
My co-worker had a plan all set to sell her house and buy a new house, with closings on the same day.

Of course, a problem is developing with the buyer's financing. She's rescheduling:

1. closing to sell,
2. closing to buy,
3. delivery of furniture,
4. work she's doing to swap out fixtures in her own house immediately before #1...

I understand that there's a delicate balance to these real estate transactions, but the further I get down this list, the more the problem seems self-created to me.

RWD

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17206 on: March 28, 2017, 02:04:53 PM »
My co-worker had a plan all set to sell her house and buy a new house, with closings on the same day.

Of course, a problem is developing with the buyer's financing. She's rescheduling:

1. closing to sell,
2. closing to buy,
3. delivery of furniture,
4. work she's doing to swap out fixtures in her own house immediately before #1...

I understand that there's a delicate balance to these real estate transactions, but the further I get down this list, the more the problem seems self-created to me.

The bolded part above may not be legal. The buyer should reasonably expect anything bolted down during their inspection to remain unchanged when they take possession. Unless otherwise stated in the contract, of course.

Sdeeze

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17207 on: March 28, 2017, 02:40:44 PM »
Less overheard at work and more a conversation that I initiated, but still kind of took me aback because it came from a coworker who seems on the level financially in a lot of different ways. For example, this guy brings his lunch most days and has managed to provide vehicles on the cheap for his family by learning how to extensively wrench on Jeep Cherokee models and then find cheap deals on craigslist and fixing them up.

So, I was just kind of trying to get some easy sympathy from him (which is kind of narcissistic and I do recognize that) by telling how I had my 'check engine' light come on less than two days after getting my fiance's car titled in her name (gifted from her dad) and less than a week before we're getting married. Checked the code out, and it's the catalytic converter having issues which still could be a ton of different things within the component (cracks, buildup, etc) and most of the solutions involve replacing the converter. So I'm complaining that I'll most probably have to spend over $1k taking care of this issue right before I get married (yay emergency fund!) and boy ain't it shame, etc etc.

I'm paraphrasing but he said very close the following, "Oh, that's just an emissions thing. My check light has been on with the same code since shortly after I got my current Cherokee, it's been fine so far." To be clear, one of the downsides of this issue is that you may be just dumping a bunch of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere, which may not affect performance to a noticeable degree but sure is terrible for the environment, especially if it's an issue on your daily driver. Driving is already bad enough in so many ways without letting issues like this go on for years.

What I didn't tell him is that I needed to get it up to code because in the near future I'm going to be moving to one of those terrible restrictive code-enforcing urban hellholes that actually gives a damn about your emissions. In addition to, you know, trying not to be a terrible human being that subsidizes my lifestyles by externalizing the costs to the environment instead. I'm far from perfect but I do try.

I actually think this is a great example of the difference between being cheap vs being frugal.
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marielle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17208 on: March 28, 2017, 05:13:38 PM »
To be clear, one of the downsides of this issue is that you may be just dumping a bunch of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere, which may not affect performance to a noticeable degree but sure is terrible for the environment, especially if it's an issue on your daily driver. Driving is already bad enough in so many ways without letting issues like this go on for years.

Doesn't seem much different than just driving an old car that gets 10-12 mpg with terrible emissions, or a sports car with bad gas mileage. Unless you think that's just as bad. If the car was on its last leg and it needed a $1000 repair just to fix the emissions, to be honest I wouldn't fix it either. Not sure what's worse, driving an old car with bad emissions and "reusing/reducing" waste or buying a new car. Regardless I feel like it's a moot point anyway..there's way more effective ways to help the environment than anything car related, for example reducing our dependency on animal agriculture which creates significantly more emissions than all of transportation combined.

thesvenster

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17209 on: March 28, 2017, 05:47:10 PM »
Less overheard at work and more a conversation that I initiated, but still kind of took me aback because it came from a coworker who seems on the level financially in a lot of different ways. For example, this guy brings his lunch most days and has managed to provide vehicles on the cheap for his family by learning how to extensively wrench on Jeep Cherokee models and then find cheap deals on craigslist and fixing them up.

So, I was just kind of trying to get some easy sympathy from him (which is kind of narcissistic and I do recognize that) by telling how I had my 'check engine' light come on less than two days after getting my fiance's car titled in her name (gifted from her dad) and less than a week before we're getting married. Checked the code out, and it's the catalytic converter having issues which still could be a ton of different things within the component (cracks, buildup, etc) and most of the solutions involve replacing the converter. So I'm complaining that I'll most probably have to spend over $1k taking care of this issue right before I get married (yay emergency fund!) and boy ain't it shame, etc etc.

I'm paraphrasing but he said very close the following, "Oh, that's just an emissions thing. My check light has been on with the same code since shortly after I got my current Cherokee, it's been fine so far." To be clear, one of the downsides of this issue is that you may be just dumping a bunch of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere, which may not affect performance to a noticeable degree but sure is terrible for the environment, especially if it's an issue on your daily driver. Driving is already bad enough in so many ways without letting issues like this go on for years.

What I didn't tell him is that I needed to get it up to code because in the near future I'm going to be moving to one of those terrible restrictive code-enforcing urban hellholes that actually gives a damn about your emissions. In addition to, you know, trying not to be a terrible human being that subsidizes my lifestyles by externalizing the costs to the environment instead. I'm far from perfect but I do try.

I actually think this is a great example of the difference between being cheap vs being frugal.

If you care that much, don't drive a car. And putting some extra CO into the atmosphere is a very minor environmental sin.

CmFtns

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17210 on: March 28, 2017, 06:20:53 PM »
Less overheard at work and more a conversation that I initiated, but still kind of took me aback because it came from a coworker who seems on the level financially in a lot of different ways. For example, this guy brings his lunch most days and has managed to provide vehicles on the cheap for his family by learning how to extensively wrench on Jeep Cherokee models and then find cheap deals on craigslist and fixing them up.

So, I was just kind of trying to get some easy sympathy from him (which is kind of narcissistic and I do recognize that) by telling how I had my 'check engine' light come on less than two days after getting my fiance's car titled in her name (gifted from her dad) and less than a week before we're getting married. Checked the code out, and it's the catalytic converter having issues which still could be a ton of different things within the component (cracks, buildup, etc) and most of the solutions involve replacing the converter. So I'm complaining that I'll most probably have to spend over $1k taking care of this issue right before I get married (yay emergency fund!) and boy ain't it shame, etc etc.

I'm paraphrasing but he said very close the following, "Oh, that's just an emissions thing. My check light has been on with the same code since shortly after I got my current Cherokee, it's been fine so far." To be clear, one of the downsides of this issue is that you may be just dumping a bunch of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere, which may not affect performance to a noticeable degree but sure is terrible for the environment, especially if it's an issue on your daily driver. Driving is already bad enough in so many ways without letting issues like this go on for years.

What I didn't tell him is that I needed to get it up to code because in the near future I'm going to be moving to one of those terrible restrictive code-enforcing urban hellholes that actually gives a damn about your emissions. In addition to, you know, trying not to be a terrible human being that subsidizes my lifestyles by externalizing the costs to the environment instead. I'm far from perfect but I do try.

I actually think this is a great example of the difference between being cheap vs being frugal.

If you care that much, don't drive a car. And putting some extra CO into the atmosphere is a very minor environmental sin.

I agree was expecting some unmustacian money story... Instead of spending $1k to fix your catalytic converter you could buy $1k in carbon offsets to plant trees or whatever and offset far more co2 than your broken car makes.
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RidetheRain

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17211 on: March 29, 2017, 11:19:18 AM »
Ok. So this isn't so bad, but it's the principle of the thing.

My office has a mix of two companies. My client and my contracting company. The client has a really lax dress code (jeans, t-shirts, flip-flops are all cool) while my company has a typical business-casual code. No big deal, you gotta look professional for the client. The benefit of this difference means that we can occasionally have a "jeans-week" for big events like finishing a deliverable, holidays, etc. We can also occasionally purchase "tickets" for wearing jeans that are put towards charity events. All good - charity mixed with comfy clothes is something I can absolutely get behind at $5/day.

What I can't get behind is the fact that they have stopped using money from the "tickets" for charity and started using them for things like an office pot-luck or a client-only brunch. At that point, it became paying $5/day for the privilege of wearing jeans when you have perfectly good work pants. What a complete waste of money.

I should mention that my clients are wonderful people and some of them noticed the ridiculousness and purchased tickets as well despite having no need for them since they can wear jeans every day. Financial solidarity is much appreciated.

MillieLincoln

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17212 on: March 29, 2017, 04:26:26 PM »
RidetheRain- What a strange idea!! It is kind of neat when applied to charity, but strange to be able to pay to modify the dress code. Considering it's funding potlucks, though, I agree- work pants are good 'nuff.


My overheard-at-work is on my next-door cubicle buddy: he was trying to get me to pre-order a Nintendo Switch ($300 + extra controllers + games), seemed skeptical at my choice to get a $150 Moto instead of the gotta-have-it $600 iPhone (and the expensive plan to go with), and was showing off his new $300 fancy backpack for our office's travel season (the office provides us with basic backpacks/luggage for free).

We travel 2-5 days at a time, 4-6x per year, for a total of about 8-15 days. The Switch, iPhone and backpack ($1200+) were all justified for making traveling more comfortable and fun, even though our office covers everything we need while we're out.

Another co-worker was complaining in February about money being tight because she was paying back her credit-card-financed Christmas presents.

Agh!

kayvent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17213 on: March 29, 2017, 06:37:16 PM »
My overheard-at-work is on my next-door cubicle buddy: he was trying to get me to pre-order a Nintendo Switch ($300 + extra controllers + games), seemed skeptical at my choice to get a $150 Moto instead of the gotta-have-it $600 iPhone (and the expensive plan to go with), and was showing off his new $300 fancy backpack for our office's travel season (the office provides us with basic backpacks/luggage for free).

As a slight aside, I always feel a bit jealous when Americans quote prices. The exchange rate (actually PPP) between USD and Monopoly money is horrible at the moment. The base model iPhone is 1050 CAD, Switch is 400 CAD, and the baseline plan for an iPhone is 120 CAD per month.

Lentils4Lunch

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17214 on: March 29, 2017, 07:18:54 PM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

ducky19

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17215 on: March 29, 2017, 07:28:59 PM »
I've spent the last year listening to an employee of mine drone on and on about the pains of building a custom home. She and her husband combined might make what my wife and I make (she's a teacher at Headstart and is waaay underpaid), yet they spent over $400k on this house. We live in a LCOL area - median homes are in the $165k range - so this is definitely more house than they need for the three of them. We paid $210k for our place, which is less than half what they spent (last I heard with overruns, attorney fees, etc. they were approaching $459k). I was barely comfortable with $210k, but we also opted for a 15 year mortgage. Makes me kinda sad really, especially since they both work for the same company and literally have all their eggs in one basket.

Dave1442397

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17216 on: March 30, 2017, 06:05:49 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

We bought our house in 2001 for $220k, and almost every one of my co-workers was buying a McMansion for $445k+. I remember the mortgage company telling me we could get a mortgage for close to $500k - no thanks.

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17217 on: March 30, 2017, 06:20:58 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

We bought our house in 2001 for $220k, and almost every one of my co-workers was buying a McMansion for $445k+. I remember the mortgage company telling me we could get a mortgage for close to $500k - no thanks.
I paid 55k for mine in a lcol area and felt like it was more than I needed. I have friends (we are all 3-4 years out of college and I work with two of them) dropping 200k on houses and I can't wrap my head around it. One couple with no plans of having kids bought a 3 bed 2 bath. I understand wanting to have room for guests, but that seems a little excessive, especially considering I have a two bedroom 1.5 bath with a full basement for 25% the price.

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17218 on: March 30, 2017, 07:46:48 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

I've mentioned this before, but my coworkers seem to alternate between calling my (perfectly nice, safe, middle-class) neighborhood "the ghetto" and complaining about their long commutes and huge mortgages. Look down all you want, you're the fool who still has a bank note on his house and car at 60.

farfromfire

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17219 on: March 30, 2017, 08:42:26 AM »
One of the younger guys(22yo - I think) told me today that for the past four months, since his girlfriend got a new job farther from their apartment, they have not made one meal at home, other than a breakfast here or there on weekends. So at least, Monday through Friday they eat 2-3 meals out - each.

He said they decided yesterday to change that and he prepped food for the whole workweek. I'm glad about that but how the heck do you go four months without cooking more than a quick breakfast?
That reminds me - a coworker of mine who earns 55k has been eating out every single meal for the 6 months he's been with us. Every meal!

Some are at a cheap cafeteria, some at expensive cafes, but between the meals and the obnoxiously noisy snacks he eats throughout the day, he easily spends 15k a year on food. While we complained about our 6-10 week reimbursement procedure, he told me he basically has no money in his checking. He's 32.

CptCool

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17220 on: March 30, 2017, 08:47:25 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

We bought our house in 2001 for $220k, and almost every one of my co-workers was buying a McMansion for $445k+. I remember the mortgage company telling me we could get a mortgage for close to $500k - no thanks.
I paid 55k for mine in a lcol area and felt like it was more than I needed. I have friends (we are all 3-4 years out of college and I work with two of them) dropping 200k on houses and I can't wrap my head around it. One couple with no plans of having kids bought a 3 bed 2 bath. I understand wanting to have room for guests, but that seems a little excessive, especially considering I have a two bedroom 1.5 bath with a full basement for 25% the price.

In my area, a lot of neighborhoods are majority 3br/2ba houses, which might be the case for your friends as well.

gReed Smith

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17221 on: March 30, 2017, 09:10:20 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

I've mentioned this before, but my coworkers seem to alternate between calling my (perfectly nice, safe, middle-class) neighborhood "the ghetto" and complaining about their long commutes and huge mortgages. Look down all you want, you're the fool who still has a bank note on his house and car at 60.

I have that too.  My coworkers think I live in the ghetto because -HORROR!- it's a racially integrated middle-class neighborhood. But the truth is, it's an extremely homogeneous neighborhood where everyone drives a truck or van to work, works hard and appreciates what they have.

Spiffy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17222 on: March 30, 2017, 10:50:09 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.
Oooh, the nosey person in me wants to do that too! How does one go about this?

dandarc

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17223 on: March 30, 2017, 11:24:46 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.
Oooh, the nosey person in me wants to do that too! How does one go about this?
It is public record in most jurisdictions.  You just go to the property-appraiser or county clerk's website and search.
Link to my journal, so I can find it quickly - http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/dandarc's-journal/

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17224 on: March 30, 2017, 11:42:13 AM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.

We bought our house in 2001 for $220k, and almost every one of my co-workers was buying a McMansion for $445k+. I remember the mortgage company telling me we could get a mortgage for close to $500k - no thanks.
I paid 55k for mine in a lcol area and felt like it was more than I needed. I have friends (we are all 3-4 years out of college and I work with two of them) dropping 200k on houses and I can't wrap my head around it. One couple with no plans of having kids bought a 3 bed 2 bath. I understand wanting to have room for guests, but that seems a little excessive, especially considering I have a two bedroom 1.5 bath with a full basement for 25% the price.

In my area, a lot of neighborhoods are majority 3br/2ba houses, which might be the case for your friends as well.

Two extra bedrooms is certainly a luxury, but I think it's understandable.  If they can afford it, I see the reasoning as: you want an office space and guest room.  Moreover, the extra bedrooms likely cost very little in $/sqft since 1 and 2br homes are uncommon and often higher $/sqft.  In summary, I think a lot of us would make this "mistake". 

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17225 on: March 30, 2017, 12:04:52 PM »
My good friend at work posted the other day that they bought a new car. When I asked him about it, he said that they had finally eliminated their credit card debt after several years of work, so they are celebrating by adding more debt, "like good consumers". There was a smiley face at the end of that sentence, but....

I find his situation an interesting one. We started at the same company within six months of each other in the same job role with similar degrees from the same school. I did benefit from several years of subsidized housing due to a family situation, but otherwise our situations are very similar. We both got our companies to pay for our master's degrees. Our career trajectories have been a little different as I went into management and he headed in the research direction. He married an IT professional (later turned stay-at-home parent) and I married an engineer. I really hope he has been putting money into 401(k) because I don't think they have any other savings. A couple of years back he talked about how they were using YouNeedaBudget to help them spend within their means after they realized they were spending beyond their means with credit cards.

Contrast to my fortunate situation having married someone who was always very frugal. Our net worth is in the $1.5+ range and I think we should be done in another 5 years, max. The funny thing is that on the outside our lifestyles don't seem too much different, with the exception that he would always buy lunch during the workweek whereas I mostly brought mine. Obviously there are a million other decisions that add up to big differences, not just lunch, but I have a hard time seeing drastic differences between us other than a commitment to saving on one side and not the other.
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Dave1442397

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17226 on: March 30, 2017, 01:43:55 PM »
One of my guilty little pleasures is looking up what my co-workers paid for their homes. I feel downright giddy when I see that they've paid $100k to $200k more than me for the privilege of owning a piece of the real estate pie in this very high cost of living metro area. Sure, our house is small and not in the fancy school district, but for me, it's our golden ticket out of the cube farm.
Oooh, the nosey person in me wants to do that too! How does one go about this?

You can also just go to zillow.com, pick a house, and look at "Price / Tax History". Around here it only shows the most recent price paid for the house.

I used it to check a co-worker who just moved to Georgia - $775k for a 6800sq ft house. He must be working hard!

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17227 on: March 30, 2017, 01:51:41 PM »
You can also just go to zillow.com, pick a house, and look at "Price / Tax History". Around here it only shows the most recent price paid for the house.

I used it to check a co-worker who just moved to Georgia - $775k for a 6800sq ft house. He must be working hard!

Christ that's a big house.  My sister owned a 5000sq ft house, which was a beautiful and comfortable house, but ridiculously big.  6800, I can't even imagine living in a house that big... there'd be parts of the house I'd wander in to and go 'shit, i forgot about this room'.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17228 on: March 30, 2017, 01:54:45 PM »
Christ that's a big house.  My sister owned a 5000sq ft house, which was a beautiful and comfortable house, but ridiculously big.  6800, I can't even imagine living in a house that big... there'd be parts of the house I'd wander in to and go 'shit, i forgot about this room'.
I do that sometimes in my 1400 square foot house.  Even if it was free, I don't think I'd want to live in a 5000+ foot house.
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marielle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17229 on: March 30, 2017, 02:00:53 PM »
A girl at work (27 yrs old I think) recently had her mom's house burn down and she told me she had $20k of shoes she lost. Not even including heels or her kid's shoes, but her Jordans and other shoes that are often $160 a pair. She's been collecting them since high school.

She's making $11-$12 an hour right now, and made like $18 an hour in the past. So $20k is not a small chunk by any means.

They did have insurance on the house but not enough to cover everything after the house itself.

I'm glad I don't really have anything to lose if my house/apartment burns down (other than pets of course). The two most expensive things would be my bike, then my mattress.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17230 on: March 30, 2017, 02:51:55 PM »
Good Lord!.

Quote
I'm glad I don't really have anything to lose if my house/apartment burns down (other than pets of course)

Isn't that an amazingly freeing feeling? I had family members whose house was burglarized while they were on vacation and they lost a lot of valuable items (coins, antiques, tools). They went through a ton of stress, time, money, and hassle with the police reporting, installing a security system and cameras, and being paranoid about always locking their house. I don't envy that.

If our house were to burn down the only things I would care about are 1) photos (backup drives are in the safe, but need to be rotated out more frequently) and 2) my toddler's favorite stuffed animal, 3) sentimental papers from childhood that are meaningless to anyone but me. Everything else can be replaced or is something we can live without.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17231 on: March 30, 2017, 03:02:50 PM »
A girl at work (27 yrs old I think) recently had her mom's house burn down and she told me she had $20k of shoes she lost. Not even including heels or her kid's shoes, but her Jordans and other shoes that are often $160 a pair. She's been collecting them since high school.

She's making $11-$12 an hour right now, and made like $18 an hour in the past. So $20k is not a small chunk by any means.

They did have insurance on the house but not enough to cover everything after the house itself.

I'm glad I don't really have anything to lose if my house/apartment burns down (other than pets of course). The two most expensive things would be my bike, then my mattress.
Holy shit.

Holy.  Shit.

I mean everyone has their hobbies, but... holy shit.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17232 on: March 30, 2017, 03:19:13 PM »
You can also just go to zillow.com, pick a house, and look at "Price / Tax History". Around here it only shows the most recent price paid for the house.

I used it to check a co-worker who just moved to Georgia - $775k for a 6800sq ft house. He must be working hard!

Christ that's a big house.  My sister owned a 5000sq ft house, which was a beautiful and comfortable house, but ridiculously big.  6800, I can't even imagine living in a house that big... there'd be parts of the house I'd wander in to and go 'shit, i forgot about this room'.

A lot of times the rooms just get bigger. An estate sale we went to recently was kind of like this:

-Master bedroom had a king bed, then a love seat and two sitting chairs with a coffee table.
-Family Room, kitchen, and eating area all were kind of the same room, and all opened into the sunroom/breakfast nook. All enormous
-Smallest bedroom (there were 3) was bigger than our master bedroom (we have 4)

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17233 on: March 30, 2017, 03:23:11 PM »
Good Lord!.

Quote
I'm glad I don't really have anything to lose if my house/apartment burns down (other than pets of course)

Isn't that an amazingly freeing feeling? I had family members whose house was burglarized while they were on vacation and they lost a lot of valuable items (coins, antiques, tools). They went through a ton of stress, time, money, and hassle with the police reporting, installing a security system and cameras, and being paranoid about always locking their house. I don't envy that.

If our house were to burn down the only things I would care about are 1) photos (backup drives are in the safe, but need to be rotated out more frequently) and 2) my toddler's favorite stuffed animal, 3) sentimental papers from childhood that are meaningless to anyone but me. Everything else can be replaced or is something we can live without.

I'm trying to think of things that I'd really be upset about. My dogs, obviously. I consider [most] of my guitars to be living breathing creatures, I'd be upset about them. Then there are some things like my stereo that I really, really like and would be hard to replace since it is mostly vintage. But I'd be upset because it is a pain in the butt to actually replace them--they don't make a 1974 tube amp anymore. Otherwise everything is pretty replaceable. The things that aren't replaceable are heirlooms, but I'm not particularly attached to them other than the fact that the dining room set is perfect for our house.

Just a friendly reminder to everyone, take a video of everything in your house at least once a year and load it somewhere offsite (i.e. private setting youtube). Without receipts and documentation, even if the insurance did cover the shoes, would they have believed her?

Dave1442397

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17234 on: March 30, 2017, 03:53:35 PM »
You can also just go to zillow.com, pick a house, and look at "Price / Tax History". Around here it only shows the most recent price paid for the house.

I used it to check a co-worker who just moved to Georgia - $775k for a 6800sq ft house. He must be working hard!

Christ that's a big house.  My sister owned a 5000sq ft house, which was a beautiful and comfortable house, but ridiculously big.  6800, I can't even imagine living in a house that big... there'd be parts of the house I'd wander in to and go 'shit, i forgot about this room'.

A lot of times the rooms just get bigger. An estate sale we went to recently was kind of like this:

-Master bedroom had a king bed, then a love seat and two sitting chairs with a coffee table.
-Family Room, kitchen, and eating area all were kind of the same room, and all opened into the sunroom/breakfast nook. All enormous
-Smallest bedroom (there were 3) was bigger than our master bedroom (we have 4)

Maintenance is expensive, too. I have another friend with a 7500 sq ft house in Ohio. He just paid $78k for a new roof.

At least he can afford it. I wouldn't be surprised if he makes $78k in a couple of days.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2017, 05:52:15 AM by Dave1442397 »

Linda_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17235 on: March 31, 2017, 01:42:15 AM »
I had family members whose house was burglarized while they were on vacation and they lost a lot of valuable items (coins, antiques, tools). They went through a ton of stress, time, money, and hassle with the police reporting, installing a security system and cameras, and being paranoid about always locking their house. I don't envy that.

And this is smart. I've heard that burglars often visit the same house some weeks later, after the owners have replaced their stuff with new things.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17236 on: March 31, 2017, 06:39:45 AM »
I've spent the last year listening to an employee of mine drone on and on about the pains of building a custom home. She and her husband combined might make what my wife and I make (she's a teacher at Headstart and is waaay underpaid), yet they spent over $400k on this house. We live in a LCOL area - median homes are in the $165k range - so this is definitely more house than they need for the three of them. We paid $210k for our place, which is less than half what they spent (last I heard with overruns, attorney fees, etc. they were approaching $459k). I was barely comfortable with $210k, but we also opted for a 15 year mortgage. Makes me kinda sad really, especially since they both work for the same company and literally have all their eggs in one basket.

The other point to factor is that their finished product will be a perpetual outlier in their community. I lived in, and built new homes in an area that closely matched your demographics, in fact the average resale number was $164K recently. The problem with isolated homes that are 2X+  the average in a LCOL, low housing cost area is that they tend to be a real bad 'investment". In a healthy market, a new home should be about 30% more than an existing similar older one. So it should be possible to find a similar decades old place for the low $300k range in their case. Unfortunately, what I frequently observed was a picture that wasn't so bright.  I lived in a nice community where most places were fairly new and worth less than $200k. A neighbor spent well over twice that to build a large, lavish Cape Cod. When it was time to sell they listed it for the mid-400s. The place showed incredibly well, and was in mint condition. In another location it might of been a spectacular bargain.  It took five years of being listed, and continual price reductions, until the couple took an offer in the high $200s recently.  They took a loss of almost $200K since the home just didn't fit the market.

craiglepaige

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17237 on: March 31, 2017, 09:23:58 AM »
I have two different ones from today...

First one is a good one, or at least okay I guess. A 70yo coworker is retiring today. We both work for a BMW auto dealer and he has been a mechanic for 46 years. He's just kind of wandering around the shop and seems like a lost puppy. Extremely sad really. I'm not sure if he evens wants to retire.

From what he has said, he owns some properties and should be financially stabled, so not sure why the anguish. Maybe it's sentimental and I'm not seeing it but that's a whole other story, so I apologise for that.

Anyways, we were signing a farewell card in which I wrote, "Enjoy your freedom" and I saw a message from a sales lady who wrote, "Lucky you".  She's in her mid fifties and last year she told me she was in CC debt up to her eyeballs. I'm sure I wrote about that interaction here.  So to her, a 70yo with 46 years under his belt of hard labor ia lucky to finally retire. Amazing.

Same lady drove in in a Saab this morning as I was getting out of my car.

"Something wrong with the bimmer?" I asked.

"Oh no, just driving this one because I'm over my miles on the lease," she replied.

"Wait, this one is yours too?" I asked.  I was surprised because I've never seen her in the Saab.

"Yeah, I have had it for awhile," she said.

"Cool car!" I responded and started to walk away.

"This one is paid for but now I'm paying for a dead horse. I can't drive the bimmer since I'm over my miles," she said again and just shrugged her shoulders.

The Saab is a nice car. Probably 8 years old and in really good condition(I don't know my Saabs). 

Why lease another car? Why lease a car and run up the miles to the point you can't drive it, specially when you have a perfectly good running car???

I guess now I know why she considers the retiree lucky.
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mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17238 on: March 31, 2017, 09:36:10 AM »

The Saab is a nice car. Probably 8 years old and in really good condition(I don't know my Saabs). 

Why lease another car? Why lease a car and run up the miles to the point you can't drive it, specially when you have a perfectly good running car???

I guess now I know why she considers the retiree lucky.

As a former SAAB owner, and someone who dearly misses my SAAB, I would never own a SAAB if I had to rely on it. It would only be part of an equation where I had an extra car (2 for me, or 3 for my wife and I). They make BMW's look like Toyota of the 90's in terms of reliability.

cheapass

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17239 on: March 31, 2017, 09:45:41 AM »
The wife went out for a happy hour with a couple of coworkers last night. One of the CW recently took a position in a high stress, marginally higher paying role and she's been trying to convince my wife to apply for an opening in her department. For context, CW just leased (rented) a BMW and bought a fancypants luxury purse.

Check comes, CW grabs it... "Here, let me pay for this, I have money now. See, if you take that job you can have money too!"

Oh yeah, thanks for taking the bill, that $50 tab for 3 people was going to sink our family into financial catastrophe!! If only we could afford to spend money too!!
Every single decision you make with money either shortens or lengthens your working career.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17240 on: March 31, 2017, 10:02:17 AM »
The wife went out for a happy hour with a couple of coworkers last night. One of the CW recently took a position in a high stress, marginally higher paying role and she's been trying to convince my wife to apply for an opening in her department. For context, CW just leased (rented) a BMW and bought a fancypants luxury purse.

Check comes, CW grabs it... "Here, let me pay for this, I have money now. See, if you take that job you can have money too!"

Oh yeah, thanks for taking the bill, that $50 tab for 3 people was going to sink our family into financial catastrophe!! If only we could afford to spend money too!!
Condescending, but at least she didn't turn to your wife and ask if she could "cover" the bar tab this time because she was a little behind, what with her new lease at all . . .

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17241 on: March 31, 2017, 10:16:24 AM »
And this is smart. I've heard that burglars often visit the same house some weeks later, after the owners have replaced their stuff with new things.

This happened to some friends a few years ago. Think you lose peace of mind when you got robbed? How about twice? They lost some nice things.

My roomies and I were robbed years ago. I had nothing so I lost a walkman radio and not much else. Roomie #1 was a shopper and lost $2K worth of electronics and music. Remember when stereos and basic TVs were expensive?

He didn't care. Just an excuse to go shopping again.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17242 on: March 31, 2017, 10:56:46 AM »
The wife went out for a happy hour with a couple of coworkers last night. One of the CW recently took a position in a high stress, marginally higher paying role and she's been trying to convince my wife to apply for an opening in her department. For context, CW just leased (rented) a BMW and bought a fancypants luxury purse.

Check comes, CW grabs it... "Here, let me pay for this, I have money now. See, if you take that job you can have money too!"

Oh yeah, thanks for taking the bill, that $50 tab for 3 people was going to sink our family into financial catastrophe!! If only we could afford to spend money too!!
Condescending, but at least she didn't turn to your wife and ask if she could "cover" the bar tab this time because she was a little behind, what with her new lease at all . . .

Having not been a professional for very long, did it used to be a thing where people insisted on picking up the check? I ask because it seems almost second-nature for waitresses to ask "separate checks," and for us to nod our head. I prefer it this way as I pay for what I've ordered and I won't be paying for my friend's top shelf vodka.

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17243 on: March 31, 2017, 11:05:12 AM »
The wife went out for a happy hour with a couple of coworkers last night. One of the CW recently took a position in a high stress, marginally higher paying role and she's been trying to convince my wife to apply for an opening in her department. For context, CW just leased (rented) a BMW and bought a fancypants luxury purse.

Check comes, CW grabs it... "Here, let me pay for this, I have money now. See, if you take that job you can have money too!"

Oh yeah, thanks for taking the bill, that $50 tab for 3 people was going to sink our family into financial catastrophe!! If only we could afford to spend money too!!
Condescending, but at least she didn't turn to your wife and ask if she could "cover" the bar tab this time because she was a little behind, what with her new lease at all . . .

Having not been a professional for very long, did it used to be a thing where people insisted on picking up the check? I ask because it seems almost second-nature for waitresses to ask "separate checks," and for us to nod our head. I prefer it this way as I pay for what I've ordered and I won't be paying for my friend's top shelf vodka.
There's a couple ex coworkers that I'll usually (try to) buy lunch for when it's 1 on 1.  We don't go out for drinks, and it's usually just water and a meal.  But about half the time they buy lunch for me, so it works out. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17244 on: March 31, 2017, 03:42:50 PM »
The topic of saving came up at work.

One girl (early 20s) said she couldn't save more than $50/week.

Earlier in the week she had been raving about her favourite shampoo, which happens to cost $18 for 385ml (and the same for conditioner).

I'm sure the spending and lack of saving are completely unrelated...

Ebrat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17245 on: March 31, 2017, 05:22:32 PM »
The topic of saving came up at work.

One girl (early 20s) said she couldn't save more than $50/week.

Earlier in the week she had been raving about her favourite shampoo, which happens to cost $18 for 385ml (and the same for conditioner).

I'm sure the spending and lack of saving are completely unrelated...

I mean, I spend a facepunch-worthy $65 for a liter of shampoo, but it lasts me over a year, and I'm saving way more than 50 buck a week...

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17246 on: March 31, 2017, 10:40:15 PM »
I have a work issue today.  After reading about all the shame and comedy when employees complain that their paychecks are late, I feel a bit selfish for this...

I quit work on March 10th, last day, with over 6 weeks of notice given.   HR has failed to enter my final paperwork twice now, so that I have have to wait an extra 4 (FOUR!) weeks to get my vacation payout.   This was intended to be my self-created severance pay, representing 5 weeks of work.


Am I crazy to feel put out that they made mistakes and delaying payout by 4 weeks?   I don't NEED the money today.  I would just sleep better if I had control over it.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17247 on: April 01, 2017, 05:25:32 AM »
This is a little different type of story - but it makes me want to face-palm so....
I teach at a small private college. One of my freshmen advisees is working 50 hours a week to help pay for college and trying to be a pre-med major (even though she hates science classes ... but that's another post). She is currently averaging about a D in her classes and failing our most basic chemistry class (chemistry for non-science majors). Her time working is definitely causing her poor GPA.

"But I have to work to pay for college!" Me: "Yes, but working that much is causing you to fail most of your classes. What good does it do to work like a dog to pay for classes that you don't pass. If you don't pass them, they don't count - even if you transfer."

"But I have to work to pay for college ...."   Sigh.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17248 on: April 01, 2017, 05:40:50 AM »
I have a work issue today.  After reading about all the shame and comedy when employees complain that their paychecks are late, I feel a bit selfish for this...

I quit work on March 10th, last day, with over 6 weeks of notice given.   HR has failed to enter my final paperwork twice now, so that I have have to wait an extra 4 (FOUR!) weeks to get my vacation payout.   This was intended to be my self-created severance pay, representing 5 weeks of work.


Am I crazy to feel put out that they made mistakes and delaying payout by 4 weeks?   I don't NEED the money today.  I would just sleep better if I had control over it.

No, you are nor crazy. A company could also go bankrupt while you are still waiting for your money.
I don't know their agenda, but they might have done it on purpose for whatever reason. Maybe just jealousy. Ask again for your money at a level higher in the organization.

Ann

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #17249 on: April 01, 2017, 06:27:59 AM »
I have a work issue today.  After reading about all the shame and comedy when employees complain that their paychecks are late, I feel a bit selfish for this...

I quit work on March 10th, last day, with over 6 weeks of notice given.   HR has failed to enter my final paperwork twice now, so that I have have to wait an extra 4 (FOUR!) weeks to get my vacation payout.   This was intended to be my self-created severance pay, representing 5 weeks of work.


Am I crazy to feel put out that they made mistakes and delaying payout by 4 weeks?   I don't NEED the money today.  I would just sleep better if I had control over it.

While it is sad when a delayed check completely screws up someone's life because they are so financially on the edge, I don't think it's non-Mustachian to complain when a paycheck it late.  An employer expects the employees to be on time (or have projects in on time if they work from home).  Employees should expect to be paid on time.  In general the pay schedule to explained during orientation or in the employee manual.