Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8053699 times)

Debonair

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16750 on: February 07, 2017, 03:36:11 AM »
One of my coworkers told me yesterday that his family does not grocery shop because they 'always eat out' and only make dinner at home about once a month.  He explained that this is because he and his wife have 2 kids, ages 4 and 6, and so eating out is easier since they do not have to clean up the mess the kids make.  He then said that his kids will sometimes complain "Oh, do we have to go to Carabba's again?"  He also mentioned that his daughter has trouble staying awake in school, but they just can't get her to bed any earlier because by the time they go out to dinner, get home, and do their nighttime routine it is after 9pm!  I was completely blown away that a family would think it's normal and sensible to eat out every day, but managed to mask my surprise and swallow any critical comments.  He also said they've just stopped buying groceries because they just expire before they can use them - all of them also buy lunch everyday.  How many people out there are living this way without stopping to think about how much money they're wasting??

omg I can't even! I don't understand people who regularly keep their small children up too late. Yes I was invited to 2 super bowl parties. No I didn't go because bedtime is 7pm. Yep 7pm sorry, sleep come first.  We make very rare exceptions to drive back from family events (already in our PJ's).    Also how are those kids ever going to learn to cook????? Oy vay. This is wrong on so many levels not aligned with my values without even considering finances.
7 pm.  Ah, 7 pm would be glorious.  I wonder how much of this is kid personality, family style, etc.

For the most part, the people I know whose kids go to bed that early (6-7:30 pm) have a stay at home parent.  I don't know why there is the difference?  But at least in my cohort, that seems to be the case. 

We would have a very hard time with 7 pm.  We don't get home until 5:30 pm most days (that's just a regular day, not a sports day).  We don't finish dinner until 6:30 or 7 pm.  There would be no down time, play time bath time.

Neither one of my boys is a sleeper.  They are always on the low end for the age.  So, if at age 2 you should be sleeping 12-14 hours a day, they would be at 11.5 to 12. 
If at a different age, you should be sleeping 10-12, they would be at 10.

In any event, the big boy sleeps from 9 pm to 6:30 or 7 or 7:30 am (he's 10).
The little guy sleeps from 9:30 until 7:30 (he's 4).  Plus he naps at preschool, for 1 to 2.5 hours.

The naps kill me (he will go to sleep an hour earlier on weekends when he doesn't nap, important because I go to sleep at 9.)  Yesterday he fell asleep on the couch at 4, and napped for 1.5 hours.  I knew that was going to be  a mistake.  I put him to bed as normal and he was STILL AWAKE at 10:35 pm.



I do have two friends who are SAHMs with kids who stay up late. But generally, these families are night owls.  So the kids go to bed at 9 (aged 6 and 4), and the parents are up until midnight.  The entire "night" is shifted a few hours later.

I realize every kid and family is different. I'm a sleeper and my kids seems to take after me.  You seem aware of what type of kid you have (not much of a sleeper) and adjust your schedule accordingly. The part that bugged me in the OP story (I guess not really 'OP' in this thread) is that the children seemed to be seeing some negative effects "trouble staying awake in school" due to the sleep schedule. If the kids were happy as a clam and doing well on that schedule I'd say more power to 'em. As I noted my values are that as a parent I should respect my child's need for sleep... whatever that need it. The people going out to eat don't seem to be doing that.

I did actually go to Walmart before my late shift the other night (10pm) and saw a bunch of very tired kids. I try very hard to have a 'mile in their shoes' type attitudes, but it's hard.

I think some of it is cultural. I remember when I moved to Taiwan I was suprised to see so many families out late. Combine mid day naps and with a flexible view on sleep and I see families out with kids at late hours. Now when I visit the USA it feels weird to see 7-11 empty at 1AM and not see kids on the streets.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16751 on: February 08, 2017, 01:16:49 AM »
I think some of it is cultural. I remember when I moved to Taiwan I was suprised to see so many families out late. Combine mid day naps and with a flexible view on sleep and I see families out with kids at late hours. Now when I visit the USA it feels weird to see 7-11 empty at 1AM and not see kids on the streets.
Right? Isn't is amazing how some people think "this is the worst thing to do ever' and other cultures are 'umm... we do this all the time.'  Travel can really change one's perspectives on many topics. Proper child rearing is just one.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16752 on: February 08, 2017, 01:51:40 AM »
I think some of it is cultural. I remember when I moved to Taiwan I was suprised to see so many families out late. Combine mid day naps and with a flexible view on sleep and I see families out with kids at late hours. Now when I visit the USA it feels weird to see 7-11 empty at 1AM and not see kids on the streets.
Right? Isn't is amazing how some people think "this is the worst thing to do ever' and other cultures are 'umm... we do this all the time.'  Travel can really change one's perspectives on many topics. Proper child rearing is just one.

There is a book about this called 'Do Parents Matter?' by Sarah and Robert LeVine

wenchsenior

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16753 on: February 10, 2017, 10:37:51 AM »
This thread is reminding me of how, growing up, there were two distinct dinner hours: kids (~7 pm) and parents (~9 pm), often with two completely separate dinner menus. Sometimes both of these were an hour later in the summer because of extra sunlight. 

Were I to have had kids, I would have had to do the same thing. I cannot even fathom how people want to eat dinner before 8 pm, and that is stretching it for me. Left to my own devices, I often don't even contemplate or begin cooking until about 8-8:15 pm.  Sometimes I'll try to eat earlier if I'm getting up early, but it is a struggle.

On the other hand, I am also a little surprised to see small kids out late. Aeons ago I worked at Blockbuster Video, and people would regularly bring toddlers and young grade schoolers in to rent videos right before we closed at midnight. 

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16754 on: February 10, 2017, 10:41:03 AM »
This thread is reminding me of how, growing up, there were two distinct dinner hours: kids (~7 pm) and parents (~9 pm), often with two completely separate dinner menus. Sometimes both of these were an hour later in the summer because of extra sunlight. 

Were I to have had kids, I would have had to do the same thing. I cannot even fathom how people want to eat dinner before 8 pm, and that is stretching it for me. Left to my own devices, I often don't even contemplate or begin cooking until about 8-8:15 pm.  Sometimes I'll try to eat earlier if I'm getting up early, but it is a struggle.

On the other hand, I am also a little surprised to see small kids out late. Aeons ago I worked at Blockbuster Video, and people would regularly bring toddlers and young grade schoolers in to rent videos right before we closed at midnight.

There are some studies that have shown that eating earlier helps to keep the weight off--even with the exact same caloric input and output. So that is one reason. Another reason is that if I eat earlier, I can then make popcorn later--since getting married, my popcorn for dinner nights have drastically fallen, but I still want my damn popcorn.

wenchsenior

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16755 on: February 10, 2017, 10:53:19 AM »
This thread is reminding me of how, growing up, there were two distinct dinner hours: kids (~7 pm) and parents (~9 pm), often with two completely separate dinner menus. Sometimes both of these were an hour later in the summer because of extra sunlight. 

Were I to have had kids, I would have had to do the same thing. I cannot even fathom how people want to eat dinner before 8 pm, and that is stretching it for me. Left to my own devices, I often don't even contemplate or begin cooking until about 8-8:15 pm.  Sometimes I'll try to eat earlier if I'm getting up early, but it is a struggle.

On the other hand, I am also a little surprised to see small kids out late. Aeons ago I worked at Blockbuster Video, and people would regularly bring toddlers and young grade schoolers in to rent videos right before we closed at midnight.

There are some studies that have shown that eating earlier helps to keep the weight off--even with the exact same caloric input and output. So that is one reason. Another reason is that if I eat earlier, I can then make popcorn later--since getting married, my popcorn for dinner nights have drastically fallen, but I still want my damn popcorn.

Heh. Considering how I struggle to keep weight on, I should maybe start eating at midnight?

lcerrito

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16756 on: February 10, 2017, 12:16:46 PM »
Today at work the IT guy was admiring my co-worker's  new Bose wireless noise canceling headphones, and asked him what they cost. My co-worker replied, "Free!" After much exclamation and questioning, he admitted they were "Best Buy 12 months same as cash, so basically free." He said he would spend $30 on something stupid every month anyway, so why not. The IT guy was very excited, and said something about how he had a student loan disbursement coming that he could use.

Unrelated and slightly off topic, but same IT guy and same co-worker:
IT Guy: Remind me to get you a new keyboard! There's HAIR growing on this thing!
Co-Worker: "Oh, no, that's okay. I like that keyboard."
IT Guy: "..."
I had tears streaming down my face from trying not to laugh, since another co-worker had made the same comment that morning.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16757 on: February 11, 2017, 10:45:13 AM »
Maybe the coworker likes to stroke the keyboard's fur... (ICK! ICK! ICK!)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16758 on: February 12, 2017, 06:25:49 AM »
This thread is reminding me of how, growing up, there were two distinct dinner hours: kids (~7 pm) and parents (~9 pm), often with two completely separate dinner menus. Sometimes both of these were an hour later in the summer because of extra sunlight. 

Were I to have had kids, I would have had to do the same thing. I cannot even fathom how people want to eat dinner before 8 pm, and that is stretching it for me. Left to my own devices, I often don't even contemplate or begin cooking until about 8-8:15 pm.  Sometimes I'll try to eat earlier if I'm getting up early, but it is a struggle.

On the other hand, I am also a little surprised to see small kids out late. Aeons ago I worked at Blockbuster Video, and people would regularly bring toddlers and young grade schoolers in to rent videos right before we closed at midnight.

Ha.  Growing up, we had dinner between 5 and 6.  Bed at 9-10 (as older kids, I have no idea what bedtime was when we were little).  I went to friends' houses who ate later, like around 7:30 or 8:00 and thought it was awful and they were crazy! 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16759 on: February 12, 2017, 08:34:14 AM »
haha i think the money goes into a sportsbet or something account so everyone can see the bets. I know that's how it works with the lotto club some people are members of. they have a shared lotto account and everyone can see the numbers and how much has been won

My dad is in a lotto club like this at his work. I keep telling him that I think it's a waste of his money, but at least since they use a similar site to count the money he knows exactly where his money is going...

Maybe Lotto clubs re Mustachian...

The some of the guys at the ol' refinery put in a buck a week to their lotto club, there are 5 of them, and one of the designers goes and buys their  5 tickets and posts it on the wall.  All winning are of course rolled over to pay for next weeks tickets.

It means everyone only plays a dollar, never more, and its ever so slightly environmentally friendly since all 5 5 tickets are on one print out instead of 5 individual ones. They do seem to spend more than a dollar's worth of billable time talking about it and planning better numbers, so maybe there are getting a good deal?

It would seem, that if you have to play the lotto, this is the most cost effective way to do it.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16760 on: February 12, 2017, 01:58:22 PM »
Anyone ever thought that perhaps all the short term choices by our government and short term thinking by some businesses leads to short term thinking by consumers? Makes it easier to encourage people to make poor choices that keeps them poor?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16761 on: February 12, 2017, 02:13:14 PM »
Anyone ever thought that perhaps all the short term choices by our government and short term thinking by some businesses leads to short term thinking by consumers? Makes it easier to encourage people to make poor choices that keeps them poor?

I think businesses make decisions on how to maximize profits and quarterly stock prices, governments make decisions based on what is easiest and can get them re-elected.  Both tend to lead to short term thinking and don't take into consideration the long term impacts.  I don't believe that anyone is sitting around a conference table and devising ways to keep people poor, even if that is the final outcome. 
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16762 on: February 12, 2017, 02:14:26 PM »
Anyone ever thought that perhaps all the short term choices by our government and short term thinking by some businesses leads to short term thinking by consumers? Makes it easier to encourage people to make poor choices that keeps them poor?

It definitely normalizes the behavior. However I don't believe consumers need help thinking in the short term; they manage it stunningly well all by themselves. Otherwise the credit card industry wouldn't be anywhere near as well established as it is.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16763 on: February 12, 2017, 07:12:40 PM »
My boss told me that my co-worker had called him last weekend to ask if he could get $25 out of the petty cash so he could pay his cell phone bill before it gets turned off. A few days later that co-worker proceeded to tell me that he had gone bowling that Saturday night and ate out with his family at Red Lobster. Probably a $100 night. What the actual fuck?

That... seems like something the boss should not be sharing.  Sort of a * move.

I'd be upset if I was the coworker in that situation.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16764 on: February 13, 2017, 06:28:47 AM »
My coworkers were late to our usual 'coffee run' (to the kitchen to use the company-provided Keurigs), because they were shopping. Apparently Lids is having a huge sale on MLB gear. One guy said he bought 10 shirts - I said I recently had to pare down my clothing because dresser was full, and his response was 'that's when you overflow to the guest bedroom closets'. Kidding? Not sure.

The bad part is...I'm thinking about buying a couple things too. *facepalm*
Though I won't feel guilty at all about buying a few gift items (because it is a good deal), it's the things I want but don't need that are haunting me.

Same coworker as above said he's just careful not to keep too much in checking account because he will spend it all (guess it's good to know yourself). He has a huge DVD collection, and video games -- he unwraps unplayed video games so wife doesn't realize how many haven't been used yet. Really awesome guy, just definitely not mustachian.

My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16765 on: February 13, 2017, 08:22:32 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16766 on: February 13, 2017, 09:41:17 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).

Same here! My 2004 Camry has a tape deck that stopped working (loved using it to listen to my Ipod) and so I just bought an aftermarket system and installed it.

My parents are trying to convince me to buy a new car because it has 160k miles on it, my response is to ask, "Are you planning on paying for it?" I don't get the point of buying a Toyota car unless you're looking to run it to the ground because they are well-built and aside from regular maintenance I've had no issues with it (knock on wood). I want to get as much mileage out of this car as I can and hopefully by the time I look for a new car Tesla's Model 3 will be readily available and there will be additional electric cars out there in the market.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16767 on: February 13, 2017, 09:57:24 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).

Same here! My 2004 Camry has a tape deck that stopped working (loved using it to listen to my Ipod) and so I just bought an aftermarket system and installed it.

My parents are trying to convince me to buy a new car because it has 160k miles on it, my response is to ask, "Are you planning on paying for it?" I don't get the point of buying a Toyota car unless you're looking to run it to the ground because they are well-built and aside from regular maintenance I've had no issues with it (knock on wood). I want to get as much mileage out of this car as I can and hopefully by the time I look for a new car Tesla's Model 3 will be readily available and there will be additional electric cars out there in the market.

"I don't get the point of buying a Toyota car unless you're looking to run it to the ground"

This. So much this. By and large, they're all just uninspiring, boring appliances that do exactly what they need to reliably and inexpensively. We were just at the auto show this weekend. Sat in a ton of cars. There were exactly two Toyotas that I liked--the 4Runner and the Tacoma. Everything else, I just don't see the point in unless you're going to buy it to drive it forever. Otherwise, why not get something with some mojo?

(Disclaimer: Car nut here, have owned 3 different Toyotas and will likely own one again in the future)

marielle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16768 on: February 13, 2017, 10:01:19 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).

Same here! My 2004 Camry has a tape deck that stopped working (loved using it to listen to my Ipod) and so I just bought an aftermarket system and installed it.

My parents are trying to convince me to buy a new car because it has 160k miles on it, my response is to ask, "Are you planning on paying for it?" I don't get the point of buying a Toyota car unless you're looking to run it to the ground because they are well-built and aside from regular maintenance I've had no issues with it (knock on wood). I want to get as much mileage out of this car as I can and hopefully by the time I look for a new car Tesla's Model 3 will be readily available and there will be additional electric cars out there in the market.

Exactly! I feel like right now is a terrible time to buy a new car, because great electric cars are just around the corner. It's crazy to think that my next car will probably be electric. At least I hope, I'm at 150k miles but it's a Mitsubishi so we'll see about reliability. I see several over 200k miles on Craigslist, but not too many of them over 300k...but it's possible because no one is selling some that high? Also, my car is notorious for being abused by idiots and teenagers.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16769 on: February 13, 2017, 10:13:19 AM »
Exactly! I feel like right now is a terrible time to buy a new car, because great electric cars are just around the corner. It's crazy to think that my next car will probably be electric. At least I hope, I'm at 150k miles but it's a Mitsubishi so we'll see about reliability. I see several over 200k miles on Craigslist, but not too many of them over 300k...but it's possible because no one is selling some that high? Also, my car is notorious for being abused by idiots and teenagers.
Same boat.  If my 2006 Sentra gets to 200K miles, probably buying another car then simply because if I'm doing my math right and future mileage is around the projection, I'll have been driving this thing for around 25 years, so 15 years from now, electric cars are likely to be AMAZING.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16770 on: February 13, 2017, 10:22:30 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).
Since my car has a USB port I don't think I'll ever go back to wanting an audio jack.

ketchup

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16771 on: February 13, 2017, 10:34:16 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).
Since my car has a USB port I don't think I'll ever go back to wanting an audio jack.
Does the USB port typically do anything other than play audio files off a flash drive?  I have one too but I'm pretty sure that's all mine does (and I know it doesn't have enough juice to charge anything).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16772 on: February 13, 2017, 10:42:32 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).
Since my car has a USB port I don't think I'll ever go back to wanting an audio jack.
Does the USB port typically do anything other than play audio files off a flash drive?  I have one too but I'm pretty sure that's all mine does (and I know it doesn't have enough juice to charge anything).

You can also use it to charge your phone should the need arise.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16773 on: February 13, 2017, 11:33:09 AM »
The USB port does something OTHER than charge my phone?  2014 Mazda3, bought used so no real walk through.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16774 on: February 13, 2017, 11:45:28 AM »
The USB port does something OTHER than charge my phone?  2014 Mazda3, bought used so no real walk through.

Yep, here's your specific car: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mr46e5fCDtk&t=57s

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16775 on: February 13, 2017, 12:11:15 PM »
So we got 2 new interns at work today and I finally have a story. The girl got dropped off by her dad who apparently took 2 weeks off to drop her off every day. It would take approx 75 min for her one way to get there, using cheap public transport or a bit less than an hour if she took the train. Counting in real time connections and delays.

The guy though was even more of a charm. He asked me if there were 'smoskes' ordered somewhere at the company. Smoskes is Flemish closest translation I could find is something like the sandwiches from Subway. Normal price 3-4 Euros a piece. Sadly I couldn't help him more than referring him to the HR department (small company) as they order sandwiches before a certain hour there. I had the idea that packing a lunchbox was a very new thing for him. And he had some problems understanding why you don't ask people about their wage.

I just amn't sure if I am just too frugal or they are quite spendy.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16776 on: February 13, 2017, 01:17:16 PM »
So we got 2 new interns at work today and I finally have a story. The girl got dropped off by her dad who apparently took 2 weeks off to drop her off every day. It would take approx 75 min for her one way to get there, using cheap public transport or a bit less than an hour if she took the train. Counting in real time connections and delays.

The guy though was even more of a charm. He asked me if there were 'smoskes' ordered somewhere at the company. Smoskes is Flemish closest translation I could find is something like the sandwiches from Subway. Normal price 3-4 Euros a piece. Sadly I couldn't help him more than referring him to the HR department (small company) as they order sandwiches before a certain hour there. I had the idea that packing a lunchbox was a very new thing for him. And he had some problems understanding why you don't ask people about their wage.

I just amn't sure if I am just too frugal or they are quite spendy.

Is the internship only two weeks and her dad is just going to drop her off every day?

gReed Smith

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16777 on: February 13, 2017, 03:30:16 PM »
And he had some problems understanding why you don't ask people about their wage.

A friend of mine is an immigrant from South Korea, and he told me that in Korea, asking someone how much money they make is polite conversation when you're getting to know someone.  I kind of wish it was more common to discuss salaries, at least with coworkers.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16778 on: February 13, 2017, 03:32:49 PM »
So we got 2 new interns at work today and I finally have a story. The girl got dropped off by her dad who apparently took 2 weeks off to drop her off every day. It would take approx 75 min for her one way to get there, using cheap public transport or a bit less than an hour if she took the train. Counting in real time connections and delays.

The guy though was even more of a charm. He asked me if there were 'smoskes' ordered somewhere at the company. Smoskes is Flemish closest translation I could find is something like the sandwiches from Subway. Normal price 3-4 Euros a piece. Sadly I couldn't help him more than referring him to the HR department (small company) as they order sandwiches before a certain hour there. I had the idea that packing a lunchbox was a very new thing for him. And he had some problems understanding why you don't ask people about their wage.

I just amn't am just not sure if I am just too frugal or they are quite spendy.

The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.

I had a new coworker years ago who was asking everyone about their salaries and other personal financial info.  We quickly took him aside and told him it was inappropriate.  It turns out that in his birthplace (part of China), those were very normal questions to ask.  But then we had a second new guy, years later, who told everyone all of his own personal info (what he paid in rent, how much money was in his bank account).  That second guy was born in the US; he was just a braggart.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16779 on: February 13, 2017, 03:39:30 PM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16780 on: February 13, 2017, 04:30:03 PM »
... we had a second new guy, years later, who told everyone all of his own personal info (what he paid in rent, how much money was in his bank account) ... he was just a braggart.

Was he bragging about paying a lot or a little in rent?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16781 on: February 13, 2017, 04:43:59 PM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

Well, it ain't.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16782 on: February 13, 2017, 05:20:37 PM »
My family had a Korean student living with them as he completed high school in the US.  He told us how when he first came to the country, he thought Americans were rude, condescending, and racist for casually smiling at him. 

Apparently in South Korea it is not common to smile at strangers.  You could smile at children or the mentally disabled to make them feel comfortable.  So if a passing stranger smiled at you, they were implying they believed you were a bit slow mentally.

It took a while before he realized these people were smiling at everyone, not just him, and it was just a thing Americans did.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16783 on: February 13, 2017, 05:24:33 PM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).
Since my car has a USB port I don't think I'll ever go back to wanting an audio jack.
Does the USB port typically do anything other than play audio files off a flash drive?  I have one too but I'm pretty sure that's all mine does (and I know it doesn't have enough juice to charge anything).

You can also use it to charge your phone should the need arise.

You missed sentence two of his post.  :)

Typically that should work though, but apparently not with his.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16784 on: February 13, 2017, 05:29:07 PM »
... we had a second new guy, years later, who told everyone all of his own personal info (what he paid in rent, how much money was in his bank account) ... he was just a braggart.

Was he bragging about paying a lot or a little in rent?

I think it was a lot, as in "look how fancy an apartment I have!"  He gave us so much personal info, I almost think we could have gotten his SSN just by asking.  We called him "Topper," like the Dilbert character, because he had to "top" the stories anyone else told.

Normal person to group:  "I ran a 5K last weekend.  It was pretty fun, so I might do this more regularly."
Our Topper replies: "When I was in high school, I was on track and was top of my division!"

Normal person to group: "I saw this guy on the subway who was breakdancing!  It was really cool."
Our Topper replies: "That's nothing!  When I lived in Specific City, there was this guy who got on the subway and was soooo druuuunk he threw up over everything!"

My family had a Korean student living with them as he completed high school in the US.  He told us how when he first came to the country, he thought Americans were rude, condescending, and racist for casually smiling at him. 

Apparently in South Korea it is not common to smile at strangers.  You could smile at children or the mentally disabled to make them feel comfortable.  So if a passing stranger smiled at you, they were implying they believed you were a bit slow mentally.

It took a while before he realized these people were smiling at everyone, not just him, and it was just a thing Americans did.

Oh wow!  I would be really interested in a culture shock thread, if anyone knows of one that is going on the forums.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16785 on: February 14, 2017, 03:54:33 AM »
My colleague for whom I am mentor, told me today that she also had brought lunch from home, and calculated after lunch how much she had saved. It's good to have inspired someone else to save money.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16786 on: February 14, 2017, 06:25:55 AM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

Well, it ain't.

I'm just being argumentative on the internet today, so: I studied English grammar as part of an Eng lit/lang degree. Most grammar rules were made up in the 18th century to give English some sort of gravitas in line with Latin, instead of it being viewed as a mongrel language. People were quite anxious for English to be seen as a legitimate language, because of snobbery.

Since then a lot of grammar 'rules' have gradually come into being through common usage. A lot of the rules have vanished over time.

The only rule we were given as gospel was that *as long as* people understand your meaning, your grammar is fine.

So when correcting someone's grammar, you have no real basis for doing so. Grammar was not invented by some divine being, it's just trial and error. If enough people say amn't, it will come into being.

Right throw stuff at me if you want now.

gReed Smith

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16787 on: February 14, 2017, 08:42:28 AM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

Well, it ain't.

I'm just being argumentative on the internet today, so: I studied English grammar as part of an Eng lit/lang degree. Most grammar rules were made up in the 18th century to give English some sort of gravitas in line with Latin, instead of it being viewed as a mongrel language. People were quite anxious for English to be seen as a legitimate language, because of snobbery.

Since then a lot of grammar 'rules' have gradually come into being through common usage. A lot of the rules have vanished over time.

The only rule we were given as gospel was that *as long as* people understand your meaning, your grammar is fine.

So when correcting someone's grammar, you have no real basis for doing so. Grammar was not invented by some divine being, it's just trial and error. If enough people say amn't, it will come into being.

Right throw stuff at me if you want now.

I'll throw the first stone:  as someone from an Appalachian coal town, I can tell you that grammar and pronunciation matters.  I have a degree from a top law school and people still think I'm a dirty stupid hillbilly because my grammar isn't perfect and I can drift back into that old twang/slurred speech when I'm excited or feeling relaxed.  It's worth learning and following the "rules."
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 10:32:55 AM by gReed Smith »

Dave1442397

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16788 on: February 14, 2017, 09:24:03 AM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

Well, it ain't.

I'm just being argumentative on the internet today, so: I studied English grammar as part of an Eng lit/lang degree. Most grammar rules were made up in the 18th century to give English some sort of gravitas in line with Latin, instead of it being viewed as a mongrel language. People were quite anxious for English to be seen as a legitimate language, because of snobbery.

Since then a lot of grammar 'rules' have gradually come into being through common usage. A lot of the rules have vanished over time.

The only rule we were given as gospel was that *as long as* people understand your meaning, your grammar is fine.

So when correcting someone's grammar, you have no real basis for doing so. Grammar was not invented by some divine being, it's just trial and error. If enough people say amn't, it will come into being.

Right throw stuff at me if you want now.

I'll throw the first stone:  as someone from an Appalachian coal town, I can tell you that grammar and pronunciation matters.  I have a degree from a top law school and people still think I'm a dirty stupid hillbilly because my grammar isn't perfect and I can drift back into that old twang/slurred speach when I'm excited or feeling relaxed.  It's worth learning and following the "rules."

If you want to be taken seriously, grammar matters.

A co-worker was telling me how his previous company sent him out with the sales team for a new financial product. He noticed that the brochure had some mistakes, the most glaring example being apostrophes used incorrectly. He said the meeting was the best he'd ever been to. The CEO of the prospective client company read through the brochure, circled every mistake with a red pen, handed it back and said "If you can't even get this right, why do you think I'd be interested in your product?".

On another note, it was funny to hear amn't again. It was frequently used by Dubliners when I was a kid...not so sure about these days.

From an online source: "The NOAD has a note about using aren't, and amn't: The contraction aren't is used in standard English to mean "am not" in questions, as in "I'm right, aren't I?" ... The nonstandard (although logical) form amn't is restricted to Scottish, Irish, and dialect use."

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16789 on: February 14, 2017, 09:29:41 AM »
The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.
Yeah, I wish "amn't" was a more widely-accepted term. :(

Well, it ain't.

I'm just being argumentative on the internet today, so: I studied English grammar as part of an Eng lit/lang degree. Most grammar rules were made up in the 18th century to give English some sort of gravitas in line with Latin, instead of it being viewed as a mongrel language. People were quite anxious for English to be seen as a legitimate language, because of snobbery.

Since then a lot of grammar 'rules' have gradually come into being through common usage. A lot of the rules have vanished over time.

The only rule we were given as gospel was that *as long as* people understand your meaning, your grammar is fine.

So when correcting someone's grammar, you have no real basis for doing so. Grammar was not invented by some divine being, it's just trial and error. If enough people say amn't, it will come into being.

Right throw stuff at me if you want now.

I'll throw the first stone:  as someone from an Appalachian coal town, I can tell you that grammar and pronunciation matters.  I have a degree from a top law school and people still think I'm a dirty stupid hillbilly because my grammar isn't perfect and I can drift back into that old twang/slurred speach when I'm excited or feeling relaxed.  It's worth learning and following the "rules."

Both can be useful.  There are times when you want your audience to know you are well-educated and intelligent, and there are times when, if they think you're a little less sophisticated or educated, that's okay too.  Sometimes you want them to think less of you because they'll feel you are less formidable, sometimes because it makes you seem less threatening.  I don't talk to my guys in the shop the same way I talk to the CEO. 
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16790 on: February 14, 2017, 09:36:23 AM »
Grammar matters because we rely on language to communicate. Using poor speech shifts the burden of understanding to your conversation partners and signals that you simply don't care. I have no interest in trying to parse poor communicators' unpunctuated streams of consciousness on the off-chance that there may be something of interest in there.

aetherie

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16791 on: February 14, 2017, 09:46:23 AM »
I have no interest in trying to parse poor communicators' unpunctuated streams of consciousness on the off-chance that there may be something of interest in there.

You would not enjoy Tumblr.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16792 on: February 14, 2017, 09:50:50 AM »
While I absolutely agree with everything Paul just said, I was thrilled to see "amn't" in the wild. It's creative, fresh, and makes perfect sense. "Of course you would contract 'am not' into amn't!", I said to myself.

Grammar matters, and mis-use of grammar is bad. But this wasn't a mis-use of grammar. IMHYCO.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16793 on: February 14, 2017, 09:51:34 AM »
True. Much good comments :)

I think grammar matters sometimes (I and it's useful, and I studied it because I found it fascinating. (It's like a map of a small part of your brain!!)

And sure there are many settings (professional, meeting your other half's parents) when you'd want to be articulate and make a good impression.

However when I see people pulling others up on their 'incorrect' use of grammar I just think... uugh why. Why though. Just leave them alone. If you understood what they meant, then they successfully communicated. Job done.




MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16794 on: February 14, 2017, 09:53:56 AM »


A co-worker was telling me how his previous company sent him out with the sales team for a new financial product. He noticed that the brochure had some mistakes, the most glaring example being apostrophes used incorrectly. He said the meeting was the best he'd ever been to. The CEO of the prospective client company read through the brochure, circled every mistake with a red pen, handed it back and said "If you can't even get this right, why do you think I'd be interested in your product?".


Yeah that is a fair bit of criticism. It frustrates me to no end when my dad sends out long emails to customers because his grammar absolutely sucks. Thankfully he'll email what he wants to say to me and I'll clean it up for him though every once in a while he'll forget to do so.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16795 on: February 14, 2017, 09:54:25 AM »
True. Much good comments :)

I think grammar matters sometimes (I and it's useful, and I studied it because I found it fascinating. (It's like a map of a small part of your brain!!)

And sure there are many settings (professional, meeting your other half's parents) when you'd want to be articulate and make a good impression.

However when I see people pulling others up on their 'incorrect' use of grammar I just think... uugh why. Why though. Just leave them alone. If you understood what they meant, then they successfully communicated. Job done.

Ironically all my posts are riddled with typos.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16796 on: February 14, 2017, 09:56:31 AM »
I have no interest in trying to parse poor communicators' unpunctuated streams of consciousness on the off-chance that there may be something of interest in there.
You would not enjoy Tumblr.

Tumblr feels like "Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra" only with gifs.  Every once in a while I try, but my brain doesn't like working that way. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16797 on: February 14, 2017, 10:43:09 AM »
My coworkers are currently all trying to convince me to buy a new car, or a sports car, or anything fancier than my last car ('05 Prius). I am shopping for a car (totalled the last one), but they really can't seem to understand that for me a car is a functional vehicle and hardly any of the "features" are important to me. "Don't you want an audio jack?" gets them a blank stare and an "I don't think I had one in my last car." I understand that these things matter to some people, but if they don't matter to me why should I pay for them?
Not just that, but an audio jack in particular is a pretty dumb reason to get one car over another.  My current car has one (2009), but I got one with my aftermarket radio in my last car (1992) which set me back all of ~$40 (the radio, not the car).
Since my car has a USB port I don't think I'll ever go back to wanting an audio jack.
Does the USB port typically do anything other than play audio files off a flash drive?  I have one too but I'm pretty sure that's all mine does (and I know it doesn't have enough juice to charge anything).

You can also use it to charge your phone should the need arise.

You can get a plug for the 'cigarette' socket that has usb ports, then plug in both your phone and mp3 player for long trips.  That's what I did with my recently totaled 2009 Corolla (with audio jack cord).

Coworkers and retired boss are convinced that I need a 4-wheel drive new (or very low mileage) car, since once or twice a year I go on a road trip up north at the holidays.  Granted, the accident happened because of snow, but I don't think that's a reason to buy a new Subaru.  In fact, I'm looking at another '09 Toyota with 100k miles on it.  They are of the opinion that it's just not safe without all the new tech.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16798 on: February 14, 2017, 10:53:23 AM »
However when I see people pulling others up on their 'incorrect' use of grammar I just think... uugh why. Why though. Just leave them alone. If you understood what they meant, then they successfully communicated. Job done.

With This Herring was very POLITELY pointing out English conjugation to a poster who is from Belgium. WTH even said "English is a silly language" to make clear that they weren't mocking the OP but pointing out something that might seem logical but is not actually correct. In my experience, people who are not native English speakers would rather be gently corrected than continue to say something incorrectly.

The word "am" doesn't have contractions the way "are" and "is" do.  English is a silly language.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #16799 on: February 14, 2017, 10:56:05 AM »
I have no interest in trying to parse poor communicators' unpunctuated streams of consciousness on the off-chance that there may be something of interest in there.
You would not enjoy Tumblr.

Tumblr feels like "Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra" only with gifs.  Every once in a while I try, but my brain doesn't like working that way. 

And yes, I am aware that I am complaining about allusions by using one of my own.

Tumblr is worse than what went down at Tanagra