Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8876343 times)

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15850 on: November 23, 2016, 01:41:30 PM »
It's like candles on a child birthday cake, those predict with 100% accuracy the quantity of amorous relationships the child is in.
I gotta have a talk with my now 20 year old sister.

Get in line--sounds like her schedule's pretty full.

Pfft, everyone needs some ambition.

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15851 on: November 23, 2016, 02:39:51 PM »
**Obviously a jest, it was never amended and slow cookers should be in standard 1970's colours.

Prairie Stash, you win the internet today.

plainjane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15852 on: November 24, 2016, 10:44:33 AM »
In Canada [...]
The ancient tradition is that the number of slow cookers received is used to predict the number of children you will have.

I was going to say, I didn't receive a slow cooker at our wedding, and we still don't have one.  But we also have no kids, so that's all fine then.

In work news, I made biscuits for my SO's work potluck today (to celebrate that the primary clients won't be emailing anyone), and I'm taking bets as to how many of the 11 are coming back home.  Currently I think 2, so we can both have Southern bennies for dinner: biscuits, ham, gravy, spinach & a poached egg.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15853 on: November 24, 2016, 05:25:15 PM »
...it is gross to ask for specific gifts from your friends and family that you have no intention of keeping at the time that you ask for them, but intend from the start to return for cash.

A friend just messaged me in horror because she received an invitation to a baby shower accompanied by a two-page list of requested gifts, and instructions to let the couple know in advance what gift they would be bringing to avoid duplication.

She sent me pictures of the list: all the big ticket items (pram, car seat, cot, bassinet) plus very specific instructions and quantities for the smaller items. (E.g. 6 x bottles in y age range.)

The blatant gift grab and air of entitlement makes my skin crawl.

My friend picked some of the cheaper items on the list (specific brands of nappy cream and moisturiser) but any enthusiasm she had for her friend's baby shower and the pregnancy in general is out the window.

My baby shower is this weekend and I didn't want to do a registry, but I was asked by a few people so I ended up putting together a short list at one of the baby stores. My partner pointed out that given that people wanted to give us things, it was stupid to turn them down.
That said I think the most expensive item was $60, and most were around $20. I would be embarrassed to expect others to spend lots on my child.

Most baby showers here are pretty casual, usually an afternoon tea with catering provided by the organisers.
I did go to one last year where the guests had to pay $20 each for food and drinks in addition to taking a gift. And it was at someones house not a restuarant. That felt cheap. I would have preferred to make a cake (and I did offer) but they had their heart set on catering. It wasn't even that good.

To me big items especially for babies = a group gift.  So instead of My mom, my sister and I all getting a $20-50 gift we may go in together and buy that stroller.

ghsebldr

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15854 on: November 24, 2016, 08:26:43 PM »
Changing post to this.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 05:36:18 PM by ghsebldr »

marion10

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15855 on: November 24, 2016, 08:35:00 PM »
How is helping him get a loan helping him?

ghsebldr

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15856 on: November 24, 2016, 08:44:57 PM »
Nothing to see here, move along.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 05:36:52 PM by ghsebldr »

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15857 on: November 25, 2016, 02:50:23 AM »
  I thought I was helping these kids (early 30s ) out but I guess there is no helping folks that won't let you help.

 Any suggestions?

Stop. You can't help people more than they will help themselves. Many people here have been in your place before (including me).

Let them know that you will help them with their budget once they have tracked their spending for one month. All their spending. Every cent. For 31 days. You will require an opening balance, every transaction and a closing balance. If they don't match then you don't have the data so can't help them.

If they won't do this then they won't do anything else you suggest so don't waste your time. This isn't mean, this is practical.

It's great that you want to help these people, but you can't do the work for them. There are people on these boards who are in their 20's and have their shit together, there are people referenced on this Wall in their 80's that will never have their shit together.

Have a search for theGrimSqueaker's posts. There is more wisdom there about what does and does not work for helping people than I could learn in eight lifetimes.

Docwhowantstoslowdown

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15858 on: November 25, 2016, 07:51:08 AM »
I must have a sick sense of fun because I always enjoy reading these and shaking my head.

In the doctor world, these stories are very common as well and it always amazes me.  I am a half time doc in my 30s doctor who works about 8 days a month.  I make good money doing it and can easily pay for everything that I need and much more.

I had a doctor approach me last week about how I was able to go half time. I told him a few basics of how I worked really hard for a few years, paid off all my loans, etc.  He said that he really was interested in that path but that he couldn't consider it now because of his student loan debt.  I basically told him to work like hell to pay that off and start building some serious savings.

Fast forward a week and I pull up into the doctors parking lot in my 2005 Highlander and there is a brand new GM Sierra Double Cab truck with his vanity plates on it.  I walk in and ask him about it and he tells me that it's a great truck and he got it for only $45,000.  He then told me that it wasn't going to delay his retirement at all because he can make the payments.

I held back and didn't facepunch the guy but just walked away shaking my head.


kayvent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15859 on: November 25, 2016, 08:13:53 AM »
I must have a sick sense of fun because I always enjoy reading these and shaking my head.

In the doctor world, these stories are very common as well and it always amazes me.  I am a half time doc in my 30s doctor who works about 8 days a month.  I make good money doing it and can easily pay for everything that I need and much more.

I had a doctor approach me last week about how I was able to go half time. I told him a few basics of how I worked really hard for a few years, paid off all my loans, etc.  He said that he really was interested in that path but that he couldn't consider it now because of his student loan debt.  I basically told him to work like hell to pay that off and start building some serious savings.

Fast forward a week and I pull up into the doctors parking lot in my 2005 Highlander and there is a brand new GM Sierra Double Cab truck with his vanity plates on it.  I walk in and ask him about it and he tells me that it's a great truck and he got it for only $45,000.  He then told me that it wasn't going to delay his retirement at all because he can make the payments.

I held back and didn't facepunch the guy but just walked away shaking my head.

I don't know your relationship with your colleague but I would have been critical, but kind, at this moment. I'd have said something like "If you'd have gotten a 35,000$ vehicle instead, then over the next 5 years you'd have been able to put 10,000$ against your student loans that we talked about or taken more time off." Opportunity cost is a very real cost that many people (I at times too) often overlook and are uneducated on.

Docwhowantstoslowdown

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15860 on: November 25, 2016, 10:39:07 AM »
I must have a sick sense of fun because I always enjoy reading these and shaking my head.

In the doctor world, these stories are very common as well and it always amazes me.  I am a half time doc in my 30s doctor who works about 8 days a month.  I make good money doing it and can easily pay for everything that I need and much more.

I had a doctor approach me last week about how I was able to go half time. I told him a few basics of how I worked really hard for a few years, paid off all my loans, etc.  He said that he really was interested in that path but that he couldn't consider it now because of his student loan debt.  I basically told him to work like hell to pay that off and start building some serious savings.

Fast forward a week and I pull up into the doctors parking lot in my 2005 Highlander and there is a brand new GM Sierra Double Cab truck with his vanity plates on it.  I walk in and ask him about it and he tells me that it's a great truck and he got it for only $45,000.  He then told me that it wasn't going to delay his retirement at all because he can make the payments.

I held back and didn't facepunch the guy but just walked away shaking my head.

I don't know your relationship with your colleague but I would have been critical, but kind, at this moment. I'd have said something like "If you'd have gotten a 35,000$ vehicle instead, then over the next 5 years you'd have been able to put 10,000$ against your student loans that we talked about or taken more time off." Opportunity cost is a very real cost that many people (I at times too) often overlook and are uneducated on.

Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be. 

kayvent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15861 on: November 25, 2016, 01:35:09 PM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.

This gets me in trouble but I wouldn't call that being judgmental. If my daughter wasn't paying attention and crossed the street while a car is about to cross her path, grabbing her by whatever I can reach quick enough and yanking her back to safety is quiet likely to hurt her badly. That would not make me a rough parent though. It would make me a loving parent.

For someone you love, you want the best for them. For someone you love, you seek to edify them and rebuke them when they make a mistake. Similarly, you hope that those whom love you have words like a refiner's fire: that it removes impurities from you and strengthens you. (I feel devastated when I find out that I've been making a mistake and no one around me fills me in until much time has progressed.)  I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.

The line between so-called 'tough love' and being judgmental is a hard one; I've found a smile and looking forwards tends to clue the listener into the fact that I'm trying to be nice.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2016, 01:38:09 PM by kayvent »

gimp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15862 on: November 25, 2016, 08:19:16 PM »
Yeah, but he doesn't love the other guy, they're just coworkers.

Docwhowantstoslowdown

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15863 on: November 26, 2016, 08:15:27 AM »
I guess I could have had a little more guidance but the guy is a GAM and just a guy a work with. Not exactly a close friend or relative.  He had already bought the truck and can make his own decisions. I think that sometimes the frugality brand comes off as arrogant and I try really hard not to be that way.  I've bitten my tongue on my than a few occasions in the doctors lounge when money comes up.


frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15864 on: November 26, 2016, 10:37:20 AM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.

This gets me in trouble but I wouldn't call that being judgmental. If my daughter wasn't paying attention and crossed the street while a car is about to cross her path, grabbing her by whatever I can reach quick enough and yanking her back to safety is quiet likely to hurt her badly. That would not make me a rough parent though. It would make me a loving parent.

For someone you love, you want the best for them. For someone you love, you seek to edify them and rebuke them when they make a mistake. Similarly, you hope that those whom love you have words like a refiner's fire: that it removes impurities from you and strengthens you. (I feel devastated when I find out that I've been making a mistake and no one around me fills me in until much time has progressed.)  I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.

The line between so-called 'tough love' and being judgmental is a hard one; I've found a smile and looking forwards tends to clue the listener into the fact that I'm trying to be nice.

He did though.  He explained the basics to him and told him how to achieve his goals, and he turned around and bought a $45k suv with vanity license plates. 

You might feel stupid when you realize you've been making a mistake, but when you look back on it and people did warn you about and your response was basically "fuck off I know what I'm doing" can you really be that mad at them?

BuffaloStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15865 on: November 26, 2016, 08:06:12 PM »
You might feel stupid when you realize you've been making a mistake, but when you look back on it and people did warn you about and your response was basically "fuck off I know what I'm doing" can you really be that mad at them?

I feel like this was me in my early 20's. What a difference even 5 years can make.

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15866 on: November 26, 2016, 09:12:47 PM »
You might feel stupid when you realize you've been making a mistake, but when you look back on it and people did warn you about and your response was basically "fuck off I know what I'm doing" can you really be that mad at them?

I feel like this was me in my early 20's. What a difference even 5 years can make.

I think most of us have been there.  :)

Saw a funny instance of this on the forums the other day.
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lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15867 on: November 27, 2016, 09:00:32 PM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.

I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.


This seems a bit odd. I try to be friendly to my work colleagues but I certainly don't love them.

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15868 on: November 28, 2016, 01:00:34 AM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.
I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.
This seems a bit odd. I try to be friendly to my work colleagues but I certainly don't love them.

I suspect this is about different uses of the word 'love' rather than a romantic entanglement with every colleague. The Greek word agape, translates to love in English but the meaning is closer to caring for a fellow human or charitable feeling towards everyone.

Some religions have a concept of finding something to love about every person or expressing (charitable) love to all humans.

You may well be describing the same thing but using words differently.

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15869 on: November 28, 2016, 01:31:10 AM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.
I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.
This seems a bit odd. I try to be friendly to my work colleagues but I certainly don't love them.

I suspect this is about different uses of the word 'love' rather than a romantic entanglement with every colleague. The Greek word agape, translates to love in English but the meaning is closer to caring for a fellow human or charitable feeling towards everyone.

Some religions have a concept of finding something to love about every person or expressing (charitable) love to all humans.

You may well be describing the same thing but using words differently.
It's a lot more fun picturing them trying to set up secret trysts with 47 different people, both male and female.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with two kids.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15870 on: November 28, 2016, 02:05:23 AM »
Maybe. I have a really hard time not being judgmental in situations like that and just thought it was better to let him be.
I don't know your relationship with your colleague but for me I try to love my work colleagues.
This seems a bit odd. I try to be friendly to my work colleagues but I certainly don't love them.

I suspect this is about different uses of the word 'love' rather than a romantic entanglement with every colleague. The Greek word agape, translates to love in English but the meaning is closer to caring for a fellow human or charitable feeling towards everyone.

Some religions have a concept of finding something to love about every person or expressing (charitable) love to all humans.

You may well be describing the same thing but using words differently.
It's a lot more fun picturing them trying to set up secret trysts with 47 different people, both male and female.

So that's what people mean when they say they enjoy their work too much to retire...

LeRainDrop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15871 on: November 28, 2016, 01:11:26 PM »
Sounds like the Duck Club.  Original post and update.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15872 on: November 28, 2016, 02:26:26 PM »
Husband and his team had to fly interstate for an awards night last week.

His boss (the guy presenting said awards) somehow forgot to pack anything but t-shirts and jeans.

So he bought a dress shirt and tie at the airport. $440.

The guy has no assets, no investments, no savings, and recently defaulted on a $35,000 bill owed to his former financial planner.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15873 on: November 28, 2016, 02:37:06 PM »
Sounds like the Duck Club.  Original post and update.

Ahh... Thanks for the reminder. I hadn't seen the update.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15874 on: November 28, 2016, 02:53:51 PM »
Husband and his team had to fly interstate for an awards night last week.

His boss (the guy presenting said awards) somehow forgot to pack anything but t-shirts and jeans.

So he bought a dress shirt and tie at the airport. $440.

The guy has no assets, no investments, no savings, and recently defaulted on a $35,000 bill owed to his former financial planner.

Wait... what? How can you default on a bill owed to your financial planner? How can you owe that much to your financial planner? That makes no sense.

And I'm assuming that the "dress shirt and tie" meant "dress shirt, dress slacks, and tie" or "suit and shirt and tie" or "slacks shirt tie and shoes". Right? Because that doesn't pass the sniff test. I've "had" to buy a dress shirt in the airport before. Sure didn't spend $440. Don't think it was possible, even though I did overspend at $60. Even a Brooks Brothers full retail high end shirt isn't much more than $200, and the ties probably slightly less than that.


EDIT: Just saw your location. Australia--don't know the price of shirts there. That still seems slightly improbable based on the stores that we have in the US in airports, but not impossible. Although I'm still skeptical of just a shirt and tie. Why wouldn't you buy slacks if you're wearing a tie?
« Last Edit: November 28, 2016, 02:56:08 PM by mtn »

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15875 on: November 28, 2016, 03:09:37 PM »
Why wouldn't you buy slacks if you're wearing a tie?

Save money by presenting the awards sitting

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15876 on: November 28, 2016, 03:30:30 PM »


His boss (the guy presenting said awards) somehow forgot to pack anything but t-shirts and jeans.

So he bought a dress shirt and tie at the airport. $440.

The guy has no assets, no investments, no savings, and recently defaulted on a $35,000 bill owed to his former financial planner.

So much fail without even getting to owing $35k to hsi former financial planner.

How the hell do you forget to pack non-relax clothes for a business trip? Also, what the F are you doing spending $440 for a shirt and tie. I know you're in AUS, but c'mon prices can't be that much different. It would have been far cheaper for him to take a cab to the nearest mall, or at the least just borrow a tie from someone and get a decent dress shirt.

I have a cousin that's been spoiled rotten by his parents to the point where he thinks cheap things are beneath him. For one wedding the airline misplaced his check-in bag (yes he had a check-in bag for a 2 day trip) so he got a ride to the mall where he bought a brand new suit, shirt, and tie and it was all really nice stuff. When he found out that they found his bag and would bring it to him with enough time to wear it for the wedding, he decided to keep the new clothes. He's done this for things that he'd forgotten to pack, including something as trivial as a white shirt (undershirt). I remember when he was in town for a wedding we all offered to lend/give him one of ours and he went ahead and bought one. My brother drove him to the mall and was with him when he bought it was speechless by it, and wouldn't dare say how much he paid for it (I kept trying to figure it out).

aceyou

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15877 on: November 28, 2016, 08:36:27 PM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check?? 



arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15878 on: November 28, 2016, 09:34:14 PM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Having taught, and administered some events where teachers got extra pay, yes... many teachers couldn't wait, because they'd have already spent the money in expectation of getting it.  I've literally heard this comment when they found out extra pay would be delayed "But I've already spent the money!"
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with two kids.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15879 on: November 28, 2016, 10:24:13 PM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Having taught, and administered some events where teachers got extra pay, yes... many teachers couldn't wait, because they'd have already spent the money in expectation of getting it.  I've literally heard this comment when they found out extra pay would be delayed "But I've already spent the money!"

Not just teachers.

Whenever I claimed work expenses in my old job, the accountant would be incredibly apologetic if she couldn't process it that day.

Then I watched my now-former boss have a go at her till she paid his expenses out of her own wallet so he could buy lunch.

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15880 on: November 28, 2016, 10:40:54 PM »
At my job, approved expense reports turned in by Wednesday at 9:00am are paid on Friday, just like any other invoice.  Since the supervisor has to approve them, best bet is to get them turned in earlier than Wednesday at 8:59am.  In what world do people expect to get money immediately?

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15881 on: November 29, 2016, 02:02:55 AM »
At my job, approved expense reports turned in by Wednesday at 9:00am are paid on Friday, just like any other invoice.  Since the supervisor has to approve them, best bet is to get them turned in earlier than Wednesday at 8:59am.  In what world do people expect to get money immediately?

In many cases for teachers it's more like getting paid ~2 months later.

(Say, summer school activity in June.  Processed in July, paid in Aug... and extra payments always came on the end of the month paycheck.)

But still.  That's how it always goes.  You'd think they'd learn.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with two kids.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

theadvicist

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15882 on: November 29, 2016, 03:17:31 AM »
He's done this for things that he'd forgotten to pack, including something as trivial as a white shirt (undershirt). I remember when he was in town for a wedding we all offered to lend/give him one of ours and he went ahead and bought one. My brother drove him to the mall and was with him when he bought it was speechless by it, and wouldn't dare say how much he paid for it (I kept trying to figure it out).

I was once in a holiday rental with my parents (as a grown up). There was no washing machine. On the last day my dad comments has to drive to the nearest city (12 miles away) to buy a vest (I think this is what you call an undershirt? Like a tank top only for old men to wear under their shirt). 

My mum says, "A vest? You've got loads of vests!", and he says, "Oh, I'm wearing my LAST one today. That's it, out of vests. I'll go later on".

I'm like.... can't you just wash yesterdays vest in the sink?

He grew up in an age before washing machines and yet it never occurred to him that there was a solution to 'no more clean vests' other than drive 12 miles and buy one. My mind boggled. Dunno how I ended up here!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15883 on: November 29, 2016, 05:02:47 AM »
Sounds like the Duck Club.  Original post and update.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15884 on: November 29, 2016, 06:04:11 AM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Wow... there's just no good response to that. "Uh, yeah, it is pretty nice, actually."

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15885 on: November 29, 2016, 07:54:45 AM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Having taught, and administered some events where teachers got extra pay, yes... many teachers couldn't wait, because they'd have already spent the money in expectation of getting it.  I've literally heard this comment when they found out extra pay would be delayed "But I've already spent the money!"

Not just teachers.

Whenever I claimed work expenses in my old job, the accountant would be incredibly apologetic if she couldn't process it that day.

Then I watched my now-former boss have a go at her till she paid his expenses out of her own wallet so he could buy lunch.

I would be incredibly annoyed to come out of pocket for any expenses at work and then have to wait to get reimbursed*.  Whether or not I can afford it is not the issue, the company requiring that I float it a loan is.  Either give me a company CC, or don't expect me to incur the expense.  It's their job to figure out a way to purchase things, not mine to do it on their behalf.


All that said, berating the secretary and demanding money out of her wallet isn't right at all. 



*Unless I'm doing it because I want to, i.e. for miles/points/etc, but the ability to do that is indicative of poor corporate controls.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15886 on: November 29, 2016, 09:25:05 AM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Having taught, and administered some events where teachers got extra pay, yes... many teachers couldn't wait, because they'd have already spent the money in expectation of getting it.  I've literally heard this comment when they found out extra pay would be delayed "But I've already spent the money!"

Not just teachers.

Whenever I claimed work expenses in my old job, the accountant would be incredibly apologetic if she couldn't process it that day.

Then I watched my now-former boss have a go at her till she paid his expenses out of her own wallet so he could buy lunch.

I would be incredibly annoyed to come out of pocket for any expenses at work and then have to wait to get reimbursed*.  Whether or not I can afford it is not the issue, the company requiring that I float it a loan is.  Either give me a company CC, or don't expect me to incur the expense.  It's their job to figure out a way to purchase things, not mine to do it on their behalf.


All that said, berating the secretary and demanding money out of her wallet isn't right at all. 



*Unless I'm doing it because I want to, i.e. for miles/points/etc, but the ability to do that is indicative of poor corporate controls.

I think it's good for people to have reserves so that when a situation like this comes up, you aren't scrambling, but I do believe that workers should be paid on time and in full. If the employer cannot do so (without adequate notice given*) than the workers should be entitled to compensation.

Unfortunately shit happens. Last year the day after Christmas, my warehouse manager called in a panic because his bank had pulled the wrong amount of his account, like instead of taking $800 for his mortgage they pulled out $1800, and it would take them a week to fix. I loaned him $1000 for this week. What pissed me off is that the bank's response was essentially, "We've waive any overdraft fees," but otherwise no compensation was given for his inconvenience.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15887 on: November 29, 2016, 09:35:41 AM »

Unfortunately shit happens. Last year the day after Christmas, my warehouse manager called in a panic because his bank had pulled the wrong amount of his account, like instead of taking $800 for his mortgage they pulled out $1800, and it would take them a week to fix. I loaned him $1000 for this week. What pissed me off is that the bank's response was essentially, "We've waive any overdraft fees," but otherwise no compensation was given for his inconvenience.

I'd get a new bank. If they messed up and couldn't get him the $1,000 for an entire week? That is out of line.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15888 on: November 29, 2016, 09:44:22 AM »

Unfortunately shit happens. Last year the day after Christmas, my warehouse manager called in a panic because his bank had pulled the wrong amount of his account, like instead of taking $800 for his mortgage they pulled out $1800, and it would take them a week to fix. I loaned him $1000 for this week. What pissed me off is that the bank's response was essentially, "We've waive any overdraft fees," but otherwise no compensation was given for his inconvenience.

I'd get a new bank. If they messed up and couldn't get him the $1,000 for an entire week? That is out of line.

I said as much but he didn't want to. He uses the same bank as my company does so I offered to kick up a storm for him but he told me to let it go.

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15889 on: November 29, 2016, 09:55:56 AM »
I coach and have to show my keys before I get my last paycheck as protocol at the end of a season.  The amount probably is something like 500 dollars.  After showing the keys to the secretary...

secretary (looking a little distressed): I just wanted to give you a heads up that the money won't be able to get put onto your next paycheck in time, so you won't receive the money for two more weeks. 

me: That's fine, as long as I get it.

Secretary: (pauses for a bit)...Wow, must be nice being independently wealthy! (in a bit of a put off tone)

At that point, I was pretty much speechless.  I mean, first off, who would even say that:)  And really, her definition of independently wealthy is being able to wait an extra 2 weeks for a supplemental check for 500 that's on top of my normal check??

Having taught, and administered some events where teachers got extra pay, yes... many teachers couldn't wait, because they'd have already spent the money in expectation of getting it.  I've literally heard this comment when they found out extra pay would be delayed "But I've already spent the money!"

Not just teachers.

Whenever I claimed work expenses in my old job, the accountant would be incredibly apologetic if she couldn't process it that day.

Then I watched my now-former boss have a go at her till she paid his expenses out of her own wallet so he could buy lunch.

I would be incredibly annoyed to come out of pocket for any expenses at work and then have to wait to get reimbursed*.  Whether or not I can afford it is not the issue, the company requiring that I float it a loan is.  Either give me a company CC, or don't expect me to incur the expense.  It's their job to figure out a way to purchase things, not mine to do it on their behalf.


All that said, berating the secretary and demanding money out of her wallet isn't right at all. 



*Unless I'm doing it because I want to, i.e. for miles/points/etc, but the ability to do that is indicative of poor corporate controls.

I think it's good for people to have reserves so that when a situation like this comes up, you aren't scrambling, but I do believe that workers should be paid on time and in full. If the employer cannot do so (without adequate notice given*) than the workers should be entitled to compensation.

Unfortunately shit happens. Last year the day after Christmas, my warehouse manager called in a panic because his bank had pulled the wrong amount of his account, like instead of taking $800 for his mortgage they pulled out $1800, and it would take them a week to fix. I loaned him $1000 for this week. What pissed me off is that the bank's response was essentially, "We've waive any overdraft fees," but otherwise no compensation was given for his inconvenience.

That's different though than having to bail out the company.  I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15890 on: November 29, 2016, 10:12:52 AM »
Everyday, I listen to this local Fresno, Cali radio station on the way to work which has fun call-in segments and today the discussion was: "Embarassed: I did ______ during Black Friday." So here I am thinking its going to be some stories of suckas in long lines fighting over on consumer items and immediately I want to turn off the radio, but, instead, I stay tuned.

Come to find out, the first half hour of callers bragged about spending all of their rent money on stuff.

wth.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15891 on: November 29, 2016, 10:30:53 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?  That's the only time I fill out expense reports for reimbursement.  It also never occurred to me that I should expect to get reimbursed the same day I get back.  Accounting does check runs once a week and always includes any employees in the next run (instead of doing net-30 like any other vendor), which I consider perfectly reasonable.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15892 on: November 29, 2016, 10:33:01 AM »

Come to find out, the first half hour of callers bragged about spending all of their rent money on stuff.

wth.

YUP! I frequently question how someone could possibly do that, but then I realize that the people that would do that would likely look at me with confusion as to how I did not. At my gym the other week someone asked me what I thought of Uber's service here in the Twin Cities and was absolutely shocked that I haven't ever used it. He was slightly mollified when he found I live in the suburbs and not in the North Loop as he does. He would be even more shocked if he were to find out that I rarely drink.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15893 on: November 29, 2016, 10:36:17 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?

I've had a card at 4 different companies and I've always either gotten it A) when I started or B) as soon as it was discussed I should travel somewhere.  And I've always kept it once it was opened. 

So yeah, I do.  Why shouldn't I?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15894 on: November 29, 2016, 10:42:43 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?

I've had a card at 4 different companies and I've always either gotten it A) when I started or B) as soon as it was discussed I should travel somewhere.  And I've always kept it once it was opened. 

So yeah, I do.  Why shouldn't I?

Because for most companies that's unreasonable, imo, for something that will get used once for food and incidentals for a couple days.  I can use my credit card and get reimbursed before my bill comes.  I work for a small company, it just wouldn't even make logical sense to make them acquire a new credit card for that.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15895 on: November 29, 2016, 10:48:13 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?

I've had a card at 4 different companies and I've always either gotten it A) when I started or B) as soon as it was discussed I should travel somewhere.  And I've always kept it once it was opened. 

So yeah, I do.  Why shouldn't I?

Because for most companies that's unreasonable, imo, for something that will get used once for food and incidentals for a couple days.  I can use my credit card and get reimbursed before my bill comes.  I work for a small company, it just wouldn't even make logical sense to make them acquire a new credit card for that.

I suppose if your company is really really small, but otherwise, I don't see what's unreasonable about it.  It is a minimal amount of paperwork and no real cost to the company.  It is likely just a call to the bank "we need an extra card" "Okay, it's on its way."  I think when I've gotten them I've just been directed to call Chase or AMEX or whomever and request one. 

But I will admit I've only worked for F500 companies. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15896 on: November 29, 2016, 11:17:14 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?

I've had a card at 4 different companies and I've always either gotten it A) when I started or B) as soon as it was discussed I should travel somewhere.  And I've always kept it once it was opened. 

So yeah, I do.  Why shouldn't I?

Because for most companies that's unreasonable, imo, for something that will get used once for food and incidentals for a couple days.  I can use my credit card and get reimbursed before my bill comes.  I work for a small company, it just wouldn't even make logical sense to make them acquire a new credit card for that.

I suppose if your company is really really small, but otherwise, I don't see what's unreasonable about it.  It is a minimal amount of paperwork and no real cost to the company.  It is likely just a call to the bank "we need an extra card" "Okay, it's on its way."  I think when I've gotten them I've just been directed to call Chase or AMEX or whomever and request one. 

But I will admit I've only worked for F500 companies.

What loan? You don't have to pay your cc company for between 4-8 weeks depending on the timing of the purchase.  Why would it be unreasonable to have a policy to reimburse expenses on a regular schedule?  My company only does it on pay day which is fortnightly.  There will never be a situation where I haven't been reimbursed well before any cc purchase is required to be paid before it starts accruing interest.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15897 on: November 29, 2016, 11:22:07 AM »
I've had a corporate credit card plenty of times, and would have no problem taking care of expenses, large and small, with that card and submitting an expense report that would then pay the card.  No big deal at all.  But if I was expected to pick up those expenses and then wait for reimbursement, nope, not going to happen.  I'm not loaning the company money, and frankly, it's a controls failure waiting to happen for the company to have to reimburse employees.  If they want me to be able to do that, issue me a card.  No card, not getting money from me.

What about when out of town for training or a conference?  You'd expect them to acquire a card for you to use for 3 days then cancel it when you return?

I've had a card at 4 different companies and I've always either gotten it A) when I started or B) as soon as it was discussed I should travel somewhere.  And I've always kept it once it was opened. 

So yeah, I do.  Why shouldn't I?

Because for most companies that's unreasonable, imo, for something that will get used once for food and incidentals for a couple days.  I can use my credit card and get reimbursed before my bill comes.  I work for a small company, it just wouldn't even make logical sense to make them acquire a new credit card for that.

I suppose if your company is really really small, but otherwise, I don't see what's unreasonable about it.  It is a minimal amount of paperwork and no real cost to the company.  It is likely just a call to the bank "we need an extra card" "Okay, it's on its way."  I think when I've gotten them I've just been directed to call Chase or AMEX or whomever and request one. 

But I will admit I've only worked for F500 companies.

Any business large or small will have a credit card (only exception would be solo businesses).  I agree the extra effort to get the employee a card is probably less than the extra work reimbursing them later.  I've also always gotten one that stayed in my desk drawer indefinitely.

Even for unexpected expenses, it can be advanced to the employee and then sorted out.  Conferences and hotels can be paid directly, and incidentals can be advanced at a per diem rate to minimize paperwork.  Only exceptional expenses need to be reimbursed.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15898 on: November 29, 2016, 11:33:26 AM »
When I worked for the state and traveled I had to put expenses on my CC and wait about a month to get back. No big deal. The state is not about to give every employee a CC.  I traveled regularly about 2-3x's/month and never got a card and that was in 2 different states.  I don't think it is unreasonable to wait awhile to be paid back.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15899 on: November 29, 2016, 11:48:48 AM »
Oh, no, I declined my firm's offer of the company credit card and always used my own card so that I could rack up the rewards.  I LOVED getting to charge business expenses to my card and then get reimbursed!  Our system was very streamlined through an online expense report, which my assistant prepared, and as long as it was submitted by Tuesday afternoon, then the reimbursement would get direct-deposited into my bank account by Friday morning.  I ALWAYS got reimbursement long before my credit card payment was due, so this was just an awesome system that worked to my advantage.