Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 6066803 times)

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15500 on: October 25, 2016, 12:48:45 PM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

This is more along the lines of saying "we want the highly-paid upper management to stop doing X repetitve and administrative task, and so middle management will do it", and middle management is whining about decisions about their workload being made from above.

But yes, I get your point. I also wouldn't be doing the damned fedex, wtf.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15501 on: October 25, 2016, 12:59:21 PM »
Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

It's kind of nice being a soccer fan, MLS tickets are rarely more than $50 bucks. Even in Europe most of the tickets are less than $100. It's kind of an American thing to pay ridiculous amount of money to watch a game live.

WS tickets aren't typical FYI.

Yeah--I went to 3 Cubs games this year, at Wrigley. One was free (Face $15). One I paid about $70 for two tickets, and the third was $30.

This is the two longest title droughts playing each other in the World Series. It would be similar to West Brom playing Sunderland for the Premier League championship, or England playing Uruguay in the World Cup Finals.

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15502 on: October 25, 2016, 01:47:34 PM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

This is more along the lines of saying "we want the highly-paid upper management to stop doing X repetitve and administrative task, and so middle management will do it", and middle management is whining about decisions about their workload being made from above.

But yes, I get your point. I also wouldn't be doing the damned fedex, wtf.
If you're salaried, I can totally understand being upset being tasked more than you agreed on.  If you now have to stay later, and don't get paid more, I'd totally be mad.  Even if you have to stay later to do it, and you get paid straight overtime, I might be mad.  If I can do it in my normal time, then I probably wouldn't care. 

I have ass in chair rules.  I can't leave early, and I can't work overtime unless I go through a painful process to get approved, so task me whatever you want :)

BDWW

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15503 on: October 25, 2016, 01:53:03 PM »
Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

It's kind of nice being a soccer fan, MLS tickets are rarely more than $50 bucks. Even in Europe most of the tickets are less than $100. It's kind of an American thing to pay ridiculous amount of money to watch a game live.

Meh, not quite comparable as this is the soccer equivalent of the world cup (which is WAAAYYYYYY more than 100 bucks).

lol, should of known that would open a can of worms. A domestic league championship the same as the world cup? Eh ok. Being generous and comparing it to UEFA Champions league, tickets start at ~$200 and top out at $500.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15504 on: October 25, 2016, 01:56:15 PM »
Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

It's kind of nice being a soccer fan, MLS tickets are rarely more than $50 bucks. Even in Europe most of the tickets are less than $100. It's kind of an American thing to pay ridiculous amount of money to watch a game live.

Meh, not quite comparable as this is the soccer equivalent of the world cup (which is WAAAYYYYYY more than 100 bucks).

lol, should of known that would open a can of worms. A domestic league championship the same as the world cup? Eh ok. Being generous and comparing it to UEFA Champions league, tickets start at ~$200 and top out at $500.

LOL! In general ticket prices are bonkers. I personally think $50 for a ticket is way too much for me to spend on entertainment. The last football game I went to was a treat given by a friend, but I was dismayed to see the tickets cost $62 each, plus additional for off-site parking (you park in a non-busy part of the city and there are buses to take you to the game). As a result I don't go to sporting events anymore.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15505 on: October 25, 2016, 01:59:52 PM »
Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

It's kind of nice being a soccer fan, MLS tickets are rarely more than $50 bucks. Even in Europe most of the tickets are less than $100. It's kind of an American thing to pay ridiculous amount of money to watch a game live.

Meh, not quite comparable as this is the soccer equivalent of the world cup (which is WAAAYYYYYY more than 100 bucks).

lol, should of known that would open a can of worms. A domestic league championship the same as the world cup? Eh ok. Being generous and comparing it to UEFA Champions league, tickets start at ~$200 and top out at $500.

I cannot get in to Wrigley for less than $1,700 using a secure website. That gets me a limited view and no seat.

World Series for the Cubs. Completely different ballgame here.

Verdandi

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15506 on: October 25, 2016, 03:23:57 PM »
Overheard today:
Colleague: " you can't possibly have your retirement Set up financially by the age of 50."
Me: "um well you actually can. I will have it organized and set up by 35."
Followed by silence, followed by the explanation that they pay a ridiculously high rent and plan to go on a Safari in South africa soon.

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15507 on: October 25, 2016, 03:40:28 PM »
Overheard today:
Colleague: " you can't possibly have your retirement Set up financially by the age of 50."
Me: "um well you actually can. I will have it organized and set up by 35."
Followed by silence, followed by the explanation that they pay a ridiculously high rent and plan to go on a Safari in South africa soon.

Then they are correct!  They cannot eat their cake and then expect to collect dividends from it.

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15508 on: October 25, 2016, 10:51:01 PM »
I was at a meeting of several businesses in our community who are working with a local public educational institution for a technical training program for the businesses' employees.  Some of the businesses have been contributing cash to the educational institution to support the program's fixed costs.  These payments are quarterly and not huge, but over $1,000 and big enough to be noticed.  In my view, this is good because within my organization we have a conversation about why it's a good business decision to participate, and through this we get alignment and agreement about the program.

A new company is participating, and they have asked to pay monthly instead of quarterly to keep the expense down and under the radar.  In other words, the management at the local branch wants to participate and sees the value of the program in increasing their profitability, but they need to keep it under the radar so corporate doesn't notice.  They will be allowed to pay quarterly, of course, but isn't there something wrong with a business if their people have to cheat the system to make good business decisions for the company?


MsSindy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15509 on: October 26, 2016, 06:33:18 AM »
Meeting with me, my boss, and his peer (we're all roughly about the same age (50s) - my boss makes way more money than me and has for a long time).  We were discussing something that the peer wanted from us, and my boss says, "yeah, well I'd like to be a millionaire some day, too"  -- implying that neither the peer's request or being a millionaire is going to happen.  And I'm thinking, "huh, I'm already a millionaire!  ...and what a limiting mindset to have".  He's actually not that flashy, but spends a shit-ton on his 3 kids.  It just struck me as kind of funny.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15510 on: October 26, 2016, 06:38:46 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

I'm pretty sure that about 2/3 of management can directly be related to experience wrangling a group of toddlers in a daycare.

At least the toddlers have the excuse of being 2.

(No, I'm not at ALL annoyed at having to convince people to do work during the hours during which they're getting paid. Why do you ask?)

Cromacster

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15511 on: October 26, 2016, 07:56:44 AM »
Not myself, but my wife had a pretty good one.

She attended a retirement party for someone who had been with the company for 32 years.  Another coworker in her 40's said to her "I bet retirement isn't even on your radar yet".

My wife just smirked and half laughed.

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sleepyguy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15512 on: October 26, 2016, 08:49:13 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...
...zzz...zzz...zzz...

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15513 on: October 26, 2016, 09:10:05 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

Ha yes, I second this. Obviously with exceptions - I mean, people need to be treated fairly in the workplace-  but yeah. I have seen the situation many times where bosses have asked staff to do stuff and staff have decided that means the beginning of a 6-month debate about whether or not they 'agree' to do it. Just FFFFing do it. It's your job!! If you're not being told to work longer hours for the same pay, or do something outside your payscale, then just DO IT *in the style of Shia Labeouf*

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15514 on: October 26, 2016, 09:21:47 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

Ha yes, I second this. Obviously with exceptions - I mean, people need to be treated fairly in the workplace-  but yeah. I have seen the situation many times where bosses have asked staff to do stuff and staff have decided that means the beginning of a 6-month debate about whether or not they 'agree' to do it. Just FFFFing do it. It's your job!! If you're not being told to work longer hours for the same pay, or do something outside your payscale, then just DO IT *in the style of Shia Labeouf*

You guys would love the employees I've been blessed to manage. This is a tiny company- 6 employees in total (including me) and so we all wear multiple hats, doing whatever it takes to get the job done. This means that when things are slow, a guy from the warehouse will go around the office to clean up everything. We get the job done, whatever it is, and do so without complaining.

ducky19

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15515 on: October 26, 2016, 09:42:15 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15516 on: October 26, 2016, 09:45:20 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15517 on: October 26, 2016, 10:00:28 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

This is more along the lines of saying "we want the highly-paid upper management to stop doing X repetitve and administrative task, and so middle management will do it", and middle management is whining about decisions about their workload being made from above.

But yes, I get your point. I also wouldn't be doing the damned fedex, wtf.
We had so many layoffs that we are now "too many chiefs, not enough Indians" - lots of VPs and directors.  I get that this stuff needs to get done.  I really do.  But all the crap work seemed to roll down hill.  I used to be middle management, but alas, now there's nobody left to manage.

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15518 on: October 26, 2016, 10:03:49 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.
MMM meetup at the World Series :P

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15519 on: October 26, 2016, 10:05:59 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

I'm pretty sure that about 2/3 of management can directly be related to experience wrangling a group of toddlers in a daycare.

At least the toddlers have the excuse of being 2.

(No, I'm not at ALL annoyed at having to convince people to do work during the hours during which they're getting paid. Why do you ask?)

I have more than once pointed out that motherhood is GREAT experience for management.  I've done both.

Dollar Slice

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15520 on: October 26, 2016, 10:41:20 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

Yeah, I can sympathize.

3 years ago I was the production manager for a magazine. I also helped a tiny bit with circulation, and I did some editing/proofreading. I also did occasional IT/help desk type stuff.

In the last three years I have been asked to add the following tasks:
All of the bookkeeping, invoicing, processing checks, paying bills etc.
Payroll & HR including dealing with health insurance
Administrative paperwork of various kinds (everything from Department of Labor audit to Worker's Comp insurance etc.)
Basically everything that involves the USPS (which is a lot, when you publish magazines)
Handling all magazine subscription renewal letters
Being the office manager (all the way down to making sure there are cups and forks available)
Assisting the sales team with all paperwork/spreadsheets they don't feel like doing
Taking over the 10-hour-a-week consultant's job doing our website
Taking over the 4x-a-week MailChimp e-mails
Writing a monthly magazine column

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?
Referrals for...
Prolific Academic: http://www.prolific.ac/rp?ref=3PJ4H43L (Earn money by taking academic surveys - way better than mturk, I average ~$9/hr)
Robinhood: http://bit.ly/2uGXBPG (Get a free stock!)

PencilThinStash

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15521 on: October 26, 2016, 11:52:05 AM »
Big Boss at work finally agreed to start up a 401k. He walked into my office and set the information booklet on my desk, then said, "Nothing you need to worry about for the next 20 years, but here it is anyways."

The lack of 401k was actually something that was bothering me about this job, so I told him honestly how excited I was that it was finally being implemented. His response? "Ha ha. Very funny, PencilThinStash, no need to be sarcastic."

My immediate supervisor was in the office with me and pointed out that I was being serious (she's a major long-term planner as well), but it blew my mind that he was basically telling his younger employees that retirement planning isn't important yet. He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.

Looked through the booklet to see what funds were available. The "best" options are Target Date index funds with a 1.5% expense ratio. No company match on my contributions.

...yeah, I'm sticking with my Vanguard IRA and its .05% expense ratio. Thanks for trying, Big Boss.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15522 on: October 26, 2016, 11:53:22 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15523 on: October 26, 2016, 11:58:11 AM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.


My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.

4alpacas

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15524 on: October 26, 2016, 12:04:54 PM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.
My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.
That's so sweet! My parents didn't/don't talk about money. I've been pretty lucky avoiding debt, but I could have used a kick in the pants in investing. 

Threshkin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15525 on: October 26, 2016, 12:40:50 PM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.
My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.
That's so sweet! My parents didn't/don't talk about money. I've been pretty lucky avoiding debt, but I could have used a kick in the pants in investing.

When my daughter was in HS, she took a finance class.  One day the teacher was explaining about retirement funds and asked if anyone had a IRA or 401k.  My daughter was the only one to raise her hand.  She was embarrassed but proud as well.  I was also proud!

Beaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15526 on: October 26, 2016, 12:55:39 PM »
I have a new coworker who just started a few weeks ago and he was saying that he needs to buy a bike but all of the bikes he's seen in Colorado are thousands of dollars and he can't afford that.  I told him that I could send him a link to a good blog post* that outlines how to go about buying a bike on craigslist, and he proceeded to tell me that he thinks that's really shady and he would never buy something off craigslist, especially not using advice from a random blog.  He said he will just have to bite the bullet and buy a new bike from a store.

If he just can't handle Craigslist people, then how about at least a used bike shop?
http://www.randysrecycledcycles.com/collections/denver

Although I guess those aren't kids bikes. But I also bet you could call them up and ask them to go buy you a kids' bike and refurb it for you.

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15527 on: October 26, 2016, 01:13:57 PM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 01:15:42 PM by Zikoris »
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ducky19

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15528 on: October 26, 2016, 01:21:30 PM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

That was the first offer he got - I'm sure he's had others that beat it. But yes, it was $3k for both.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15529 on: October 26, 2016, 01:25:33 PM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

That was the first offer he got - I'm sure he's had others that beat it. But yes, it was $3k for both.

I'm curious how much your friend paid for his tickets? I'm guessing he bought them directly from the team (not through a ticket broker or scalper).

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15530 on: October 26, 2016, 01:39:54 PM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15531 on: October 26, 2016, 07:25:33 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

Ah yes - there was one company I worked for that had a running joke "Other duties as assigned" was the wording they used. 
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

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dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15532 on: October 26, 2016, 07:54:45 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

chesebert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15533 on: October 26, 2016, 08:13:08 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15534 on: October 26, 2016, 08:46:49 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

I find it hard to believe that any of these agreements prohibit asking, but I admit I've never seen one. 

myhotrs

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15535 on: October 26, 2016, 11:03:21 PM »
So my wife is decluttering and we have these nice candlesticks. We got them when my bro's ex was throwing them away. Checked on ebay to humor my wife and they retail for $3,000 new EACH. This just happened like 10 minutes ago. I'm still sitting here and can't grasp this. Someone spent $6,000 of two nice candlesticks and then threw them away.
I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

chesebert

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15536 on: October 26, 2016, 11:55:15 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

I find it hard to believe that any of these agreements prohibit asking, but I admit I've never seen one.
You can ask nicely but they will point you to the language and tell you that all of their options and shares would vest immediately and they get paid mucho money as severance if you make them do x.

BDWW

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15537 on: October 27, 2016, 12:26:56 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

Man some of those union types are ridiculous. My friend worked in the film industry for about 5 years, and the stories are somehow both hilarious and sad. On location for a commercial once, and a cooler was in the way. Asked the guy next to him to pick up the other end so they could move it five feet. "Nope, not in my contract." Um ok, "Hey you, a hand?" - to a random passerby on the street. "Sure".

Metric Mouse

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15538 on: October 27, 2016, 12:38:55 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

Man some of those union types are ridiculous. My friend worked in the film industry for about 5 years, and the stories are somehow both hilarious and sad. On location for a commercial once, and a cooler was in the way. Asked the guy next to him to pick up the other end so they could move it five feet. "Nope, not in my contract." Um ok, "Hey you, a hand?" - to a random passerby on the street. "Sure".

My career was in the entertainment industry; this is no joke.
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

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Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15539 on: October 27, 2016, 02:13:09 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15540 on: October 27, 2016, 06:32:55 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

I'd get snobby about that if, say, the only woman was regularly asked to make coffee. Because that happens, and it's bullshit, and it totally undermines any credibility your work has, and it sucks. But that's a very specific sort of situation­.

Or I'd get pissy if I was on salary and scrambling to get things done and BS assignments would mean working overtime - then, yeah, I'm not gonna make you coffee for free.

But assuming that I'm not busy, that the requests aren't vaguely discriminatory (gender, race, etc), and that I'm on salary and getting paid for it? I will totally make coffee. No problem.

MishMash

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15541 on: October 27, 2016, 07:05:05 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

I used to agree with the "well they are paying me X per hour to be a glorified secretary" until I went on vacation and came back to a STACK of unopened boxes, an old molded pizza on the breakroom counter, and a list on my desk of supplies we were out of.  They were all SO fucking lazy that they couldn't cut open the boxes that got delivered (that had office supplies in them), couldn't throw out their own ordered food, and couldn't email our office manager in GA to order crap they were out of.

I was a senior software engineer BTW.  It was simply the fact that I, the only woman in the office, routinely did the "bitch" tasks of cleaning up and ordering/organizing and every single one of them thought it was beneath them to do it while I was out.  I refused to do it after that and to say the break room went to shit is an understatement.

theadvicist

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15542 on: October 27, 2016, 07:07:55 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!


MrRealEstate

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15543 on: October 27, 2016, 07:11:49 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

I'd say it was well played and in a way that he got the message without an HR debacle.

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15544 on: October 27, 2016, 07:12:54 AM »
Wow, what an asshole.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15545 on: October 27, 2016, 07:23:10 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15546 on: October 27, 2016, 08:42:50 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15547 on: October 27, 2016, 08:49:47 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

An ex boyfriend of mine (also from Minnesota, interestingly) baked a very high quality flourless and expensive French chocolate cake for my 21st.  Our friends were all very appreciative, but my sister (whose 18th birthday it was, as well) and her friends were not very appreciative and sort of mean about it.  We should have kept our cake for ourselves. 

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15548 on: October 27, 2016, 08:54:58 AM »
I think some of the reluctance to do more menial tasks comes down to a longer-term view.  If you accept the menial tasks, more people will ask you to do them, and you'll be less available to handle more visible/high-priority/career-enhancing work.  And without the flashy stuff in your portfolio, you're less likely to get the next raise/promotion.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15549 on: October 27, 2016, 09:22:50 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

Uuughhh people. What a load of total crap they talk. You have to have a certain number of x chromosomes to be allowed to bake cookies huh. My boyfriend bakes amazing cakes and cookies all the time and I 100% support this. Only for gender equality reasons obviously ;)

Your (ex) colleagues don't deserve cookies.