Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8881136 times)

Cromacster

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1600
  • Location: Minnesnowta
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15400 on: October 26, 2016, 07:56:44 AM »
Not myself, but my wife had a pretty good one.

She attended a retirement party for someone who had been with the company for 32 years.  Another coworker in her 40's said to her "I bet retirement isn't even on your radar yet".

My wife just smirked and half laughed.


sleepyguy

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 671
  • Location: Oakville, Ontario
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15401 on: October 26, 2016, 08:49:13 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

Torran

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 375
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15402 on: October 26, 2016, 09:10:05 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

Ha yes, I second this. Obviously with exceptions - I mean, people need to be treated fairly in the workplace-  but yeah. I have seen the situation many times where bosses have asked staff to do stuff and staff have decided that means the beginning of a 6-month debate about whether or not they 'agree' to do it. Just FFFFing do it. It's your job!! If you're not being told to work longer hours for the same pay, or do something outside your payscale, then just DO IT *in the style of Shia Labeouf*

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3638
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15403 on: October 26, 2016, 09:21:47 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

Ha yes, I second this. Obviously with exceptions - I mean, people need to be treated fairly in the workplace-  but yeah. I have seen the situation many times where bosses have asked staff to do stuff and staff have decided that means the beginning of a 6-month debate about whether or not they 'agree' to do it. Just FFFFing do it. It's your job!! If you're not being told to work longer hours for the same pay, or do something outside your payscale, then just DO IT *in the style of Shia Labeouf*

You guys would love the employees I've been blessed to manage. This is a tiny company- 6 employees in total (including me) and so we all wear multiple hats, doing whatever it takes to get the job done. This means that when things are slow, a guy from the warehouse will go around the office to clean up everything. We get the job done, whatever it is, and do so without complaining.

ducky19

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 476
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15404 on: October 26, 2016, 09:42:15 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1277
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15405 on: October 26, 2016, 09:45:20 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5972
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15406 on: October 26, 2016, 10:00:28 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

This is more along the lines of saying "we want the highly-paid upper management to stop doing X repetitve and administrative task, and so middle management will do it", and middle management is whining about decisions about their workload being made from above.

But yes, I get your point. I also wouldn't be doing the damned fedex, wtf.
We had so many layoffs that we are now "too many chiefs, not enough Indians" - lots of VPs and directors.  I get that this stuff needs to get done.  I really do.  But all the crap work seemed to roll down hill.  I used to be middle management, but alas, now there's nobody left to manage.

MrMoogle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1112
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Huntsville, AL
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15407 on: October 26, 2016, 10:03:49 AM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.
MMM meetup at the World Series :P

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5972
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15408 on: October 26, 2016, 10:05:59 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

I'm with you so much on this!  (caveat for situations like MM1970 points out, of course).  I see this with the changes management makes in the clerical jobs.  Like, your whole job is to punch keys on a keyboard.  Now you are punching keys in a different program, or under different circumstances.  Why protest?  Are you so *in love* with what you do now, that doing something different is causing some kind of emotional pain?  I just don't get it.

And management has to tiptoe around their hang-ups just to get them to do their job (as it evolves over time).  Effort that should be unnecessary, if you ask me.  Grr.

I'm pretty sure that about 2/3 of management can directly be related to experience wrangling a group of toddlers in a daycare.

At least the toddlers have the excuse of being 2.

(No, I'm not at ALL annoyed at having to convince people to do work during the hours during which they're getting paid. Why do you ask?)

I have more than once pointed out that motherhood is GREAT experience for management.  I've done both.

Dollar Slice

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3848
  • Age: 41
  • Location: New York City
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15409 on: October 26, 2016, 10:41:20 AM »
Overheard at work and pissing me off: "Oh, this team of people is refusing to do *thing that has been determined they will be doing as part of their daily duties* because they feel like the decision to do it has been imposed on them."

Like... Yes? Yes, in fact, that's the trade you make by having a job. You accept that someone else can tell you want the job entails, and in return you get X amount of money. If you are unhappy with that, you have options: you can look for another job, you can quit and live on savings, you can protest (if you're part of a union, I guess - and, frankly, this is not a big thing, so good luck protesting).

But saying "I want to get paid while not accomplishing tasks that have been determined I should do because I didn't decide to do it" is just... lady. you are missing the point so hard. If you want to stay home and have money, work to be FI. Until then, you are selling your time, and you do your job. WTF.

That's a slippery slope though, and there are probably times when a protest is warranted (not making a judgment here).

Signed,
A senior female engineer who finally said "fuck you, do your own damn Fed ex".

Yeah, I can sympathize.

3 years ago I was the production manager for a magazine. I also helped a tiny bit with circulation, and I did some editing/proofreading. I also did occasional IT/help desk type stuff.

In the last three years I have been asked to add the following tasks:
All of the bookkeeping, invoicing, processing checks, paying bills etc.
Payroll & HR including dealing with health insurance
Administrative paperwork of various kinds (everything from Department of Labor audit to Worker's Comp insurance etc.)
Basically everything that involves the USPS (which is a lot, when you publish magazines)
Handling all magazine subscription renewal letters
Being the office manager (all the way down to making sure there are cups and forks available)
Assisting the sales team with all paperwork/spreadsheets they don't feel like doing
Taking over the 10-hour-a-week consultant's job doing our website
Taking over the 4x-a-week MailChimp e-mails
Writing a monthly magazine column

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

PencilThinStash

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 191
  • Age: 28
  • Location: Chicago Suburbs
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15410 on: October 26, 2016, 11:52:05 AM »
Big Boss at work finally agreed to start up a 401k. He walked into my office and set the information booklet on my desk, then said, "Nothing you need to worry about for the next 20 years, but here it is anyways."

The lack of 401k was actually something that was bothering me about this job, so I told him honestly how excited I was that it was finally being implemented. His response? "Ha ha. Very funny, PencilThinStash, no need to be sarcastic."

My immediate supervisor was in the office with me and pointed out that I was being serious (she's a major long-term planner as well), but it blew my mind that he was basically telling his younger employees that retirement planning isn't important yet. He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.

Looked through the booklet to see what funds were available. The "best" options are Target Date index funds with a 1.5% expense ratio. No company match on my contributions.

...yeah, I'm sticking with my Vanguard IRA and its .05% expense ratio. Thanks for trying, Big Boss.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8114
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15411 on: October 26, 2016, 11:53:22 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8114
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15412 on: October 26, 2016, 11:58:11 AM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.


My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.

4alpacas

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1891
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15413 on: October 26, 2016, 12:04:54 PM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.
My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.
That's so sweet! My parents didn't/don't talk about money. I've been pretty lucky avoiding debt, but I could have used a kick in the pants in investing. 

Threshkin

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 903
  • Location: Colorado
    • My Journal
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15414 on: October 26, 2016, 12:40:50 PM »
He's got a couple kids around my age, I imagine they're getting similar advice from him. Kind of sad, really.
My Mom opened a Roth IRA for me for some of my high school job earnings.  It was more of teach compound interest thing ("this $2k will grow tax free to $100k by the time you retire") but I guess I was lucky to get that help.
That's so sweet! My parents didn't/don't talk about money. I've been pretty lucky avoiding debt, but I could have used a kick in the pants in investing.

When my daughter was in HS, she took a finance class.  One day the teacher was explaining about retirement funds and asked if anyone had a IRA or 401k.  My daughter was the only one to raise her hand.  She was embarrassed but proud as well.  I was also proud!

Beaker

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 336
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15415 on: October 26, 2016, 12:55:39 PM »
I have a new coworker who just started a few weeks ago and he was saying that he needs to buy a bike but all of the bikes he's seen in Colorado are thousands of dollars and he can't afford that.  I told him that I could send him a link to a good blog post* that outlines how to go about buying a bike on craigslist, and he proceeded to tell me that he thinks that's really shady and he would never buy something off craigslist, especially not using advice from a random blog.  He said he will just have to bite the bullet and buy a new bike from a store.

If he just can't handle Craigslist people, then how about at least a used bike shop?
http://www.randysrecycledcycles.com/collections/denver

Although I guess those aren't kids bikes. But I also bet you could call them up and ask them to go buy you a kids' bike and refurb it for you.

Zikoris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3141
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Vancouver, BC
  • Vancouverstachian
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15416 on: October 26, 2016, 01:13:57 PM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 01:15:42 PM by Zikoris »

ducky19

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 476
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15417 on: October 26, 2016, 01:21:30 PM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

That was the first offer he got - I'm sure he's had others that beat it. But yes, it was $3k for both.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3638
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15418 on: October 26, 2016, 01:25:33 PM »
Just the tickets.

Chatting sports over instant msg to a coworker of mine in the US.  Nice but generally complains about money problems, underwater mortgage, car payments, kids expenses, nothing saved for retirement, working til 75, etc etc. 

Told me he's going to all the World Series games all for a fantastic deal of $2500 (3 games).

me ---> <shock of silence>

Is that for the whole trip everything included or just the tickets?  I'm paying a lot less than that to go to Europe for a month...

My neighbor has season tickets to the Cubs, and has already been offered $3000 for each game of 3 and 4 for two tickets. He's planning on selling those and going to game 5 for free. He told me of another guy he knew who was already up to $6000 for a pair for one game. It's the Cubs. This shit hasn't happened in 71 years (108 if they win). I'd never spend that much myself, but I can say I get it.

$3000 for two tickets, so $1,500 a ticket? Or is it $3000 a ticket? I might be interested at the $1,500 a ticket. Seriously.

That was the first offer he got - I'm sure he's had others that beat it. But yes, it was $3k for both.

I'm curious how much your friend paid for his tickets? I'm guessing he bought them directly from the team (not through a ticket broker or scalper).

MrMoogle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1112
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Huntsville, AL
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15419 on: October 26, 2016, 01:39:54 PM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5302
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15420 on: October 26, 2016, 07:25:33 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

Ah yes - there was one company I worked for that had a running joke "Other duties as assigned" was the wording they used. 

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8114
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15421 on: October 26, 2016, 07:54:45 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

chesebert

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15422 on: October 26, 2016, 08:13:08 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8114
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15423 on: October 26, 2016, 08:46:49 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

I find it hard to believe that any of these agreements prohibit asking, but I admit I've never seen one. 

myhotrs

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15424 on: October 26, 2016, 11:03:21 PM »
So my wife is decluttering and we have these nice candlesticks. We got them when my bro's ex was throwing them away. Checked on ebay to humor my wife and they retail for $3,000 new EACH. This just happened like 10 minutes ago. I'm still sitting here and can't grasp this. Someone spent $6,000 of two nice candlesticks and then threw them away.

chesebert

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15425 on: October 26, 2016, 11:55:15 PM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"
You can refuse, resign and get paid mucho money if you have an agreement in writing. C suite employees often have these clauses as part of their diamond parachute deals. Not applicavle for peons.

I find it hard to believe that any of these agreements prohibit asking, but I admit I've never seen one.
You can ask nicely but they will point you to the language and tell you that all of their options and shares would vest immediately and they get paid mucho money as severance if you make them do x.

BDWW

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 414
  • Location: MT
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15426 on: October 27, 2016, 12:26:56 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

Man some of those union types are ridiculous. My friend worked in the film industry for about 5 years, and the stories are somehow both hilarious and sad. On location for a commercial once, and a cooler was in the way. Asked the guy next to him to pick up the other end so they could move it five feet. "Nope, not in my contract." Um ok, "Hey you, a hand?" - to a random passerby on the street. "Sure".

Metric Mouse

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5302
  • FU @ 22. F.I.R.E before 23
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15427 on: October 27, 2016, 12:38:55 AM »

At some point I started refusing. At some point you can't just keep saying "Yes, boss!" You're supposed to have a job description - you have an agreement that you will take X money to do do Y job. Is it really OK to hire someone to be a print production manager and then tell them to do accounting and insurance instead?

I agree with the above posters -- barring illegal discrimination situations, yes it's OK to ask someone to do a different job.  This thread is making me think that if I ever run a business, every job posting will say "As an employee, you will be expected to complete any business task provided by management.  Your primary tasks will be XYZ."  If someone says "that's not in my job description," I'll pull the job posting out of my desk.  I guess I'd be a crappy manager.

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.*

*I would understand if it was something like "make the girl get the coffee" but it wasn't like that.  More like "the adults are talking can this guy sitting here not doing anything grab some coffee?"

Something like the bolded above has been in every job description I've ever had. 

Dollar Slice, I hope you are paid by the hour!

I would have thought so, and even if not to me it's implicit in your employment unless you have a specific contract ("I'm the sound guy, but I can't plug in the power because I'm not in the electrician's union")

Man some of those union types are ridiculous. My friend worked in the film industry for about 5 years, and the stories are somehow both hilarious and sad. On location for a commercial once, and a cooler was in the way. Asked the guy next to him to pick up the other end so they could move it five feet. "Nope, not in my contract." Um ok, "Hey you, a hand?" - to a random passerby on the street. "Sure".

My career was in the entertainment industry; this is no joke.

Torran

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 375
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15428 on: October 27, 2016, 02:13:09 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1592
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15429 on: October 27, 2016, 06:32:55 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

I'd get snobby about that if, say, the only woman was regularly asked to make coffee. Because that happens, and it's bullshit, and it totally undermines any credibility your work has, and it sucks. But that's a very specific sort of situation­.

Or I'd get pissy if I was on salary and scrambling to get things done and BS assignments would mean working overtime - then, yeah, I'm not gonna make you coffee for free.

But assuming that I'm not busy, that the requests aren't vaguely discriminatory (gender, race, etc), and that I'm on salary and getting paid for it? I will totally make coffee. No problem.

MishMash

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15430 on: October 27, 2016, 07:05:05 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

I used to agree with the "well they are paying me X per hour to be a glorified secretary" until I went on vacation and came back to a STACK of unopened boxes, an old molded pizza on the breakroom counter, and a list on my desk of supplies we were out of.  They were all SO fucking lazy that they couldn't cut open the boxes that got delivered (that had office supplies in them), couldn't throw out their own ordered food, and couldn't email our office manager in GA to order crap they were out of.

I was a senior software engineer BTW.  It was simply the fact that I, the only woman in the office, routinely did the "bitch" tasks of cleaning up and ordering/organizing and every single one of them thought it was beneath them to do it while I was out.  I refused to do it after that and to say the break room went to shit is an understatement.

theadvicist

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1449
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15431 on: October 27, 2016, 07:07:55 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!


MrRealEstate

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 82
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Modesto, CA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15432 on: October 27, 2016, 07:11:49 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

I'd say it was well played and in a way that he got the message without an HR debacle.

arebelspy

  • Administrator
  • Senior Mustachian
  • *****
  • Posts: 27157
  • Age: -999
  • Location: Traveling the World
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15433 on: October 27, 2016, 07:12:54 AM »
Wow, what an asshole.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with two kids.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

Torran

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 375
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15434 on: October 27, 2016, 07:23:10 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3638
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15435 on: October 27, 2016, 08:42:50 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

onlykelsey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2127
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15436 on: October 27, 2016, 08:49:47 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

An ex boyfriend of mine (also from Minnesota, interestingly) baked a very high quality flourless and expensive French chocolate cake for my 21st.  Our friends were all very appreciative, but my sister (whose 18th birthday it was, as well) and her friends were not very appreciative and sort of mean about it.  We should have kept our cake for ourselves. 

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2814
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15437 on: October 27, 2016, 08:54:58 AM »
I think some of the reluctance to do more menial tasks comes down to a longer-term view.  If you accept the menial tasks, more people will ask you to do them, and you'll be less available to handle more visible/high-priority/career-enhancing work.  And without the flashy stuff in your portfolio, you're less likely to get the next raise/promotion.

Torran

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 375
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15438 on: October 27, 2016, 09:22:50 AM »
On the females being expected to make coffee thing:

Me (female): "Hey co-worker, would you like a drink?" (I was going to the kitchen to make one for myself, it was understood we all offered each time we did).

Co-worker (male): "Yes please, I'll have a tea. After all, making tea is women's work!" [Chuckle].

I went and made myself a drink, returned to my desk.

Co-worker: "Hey, where's my drink?!"

Me: "Oh, you said that was women's work. So I didn't make you one. You see, I'm a lady".

This tale maybe only works in an English accent? Anyway, he got the message.

And I know I played into other class stereotypes, but seriously, he was so taken aback. He was slack-jawed speechless that I didn't make him a drink. The joke was a way to make it less confrontational. After all, he was just joking, right? Well, me too!

Oh this is fabulous. I'm gonna tuck this away for an opportune moment.

I'm female (maybe not obvious from my username) and the particular office i'm in is not rife with any sexist BS. At least not that I've come across. Sometimes I've be making coffee for a meeting of female senior managers and clients etc.
But if any guy tried to 'jokingly' make a 'joke' about tea/sandwiches/kitchens and where women 'belong' I would 100% make him a cup of fuck you. It's just, why? Why be that asshole?

Raging but also celebrating on your behalf for how you responded.

I like how delicately this was done, gets the point across without causing unnecessary conflict. If the co-worker complained further, he would be the one isolated, whereas unfortunately if theadvicist had started something, she would be the one looking bad.

I personally hate this shit and hate anyone thinks there automatically has to be gender roles. At a previous job I was bored one night and baked cookies, mostly because I wanted them. Since I had extras and knew that if I kept them they would be promptly consumed by me, I brought them into work. I can't tell you how many snide comments were said about how "women bake cookies," as if I was any less of a man for baking. Very few people said thank you, and as a result I stopped bringing them in. Each time I baked them, I would share them with my friends, people that would at least have the decency to show some appreciation.

Uuughhh people. What a load of total crap they talk. You have to have a certain number of x chromosomes to be allowed to bake cookies huh. My boyfriend bakes amazing cakes and cookies all the time and I 100% support this. Only for gender equality reasons obviously ;)

Your (ex) colleagues don't deserve cookies.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3636
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15439 on: October 27, 2016, 09:23:01 AM »
So my wife is decluttering and we have these nice candlesticks. We got them when my bro's ex was throwing them away. Checked on ebay to humor my wife and they retail for $3,000 new EACH. This just happened like 10 minutes ago. I'm still sitting here and can't grasp this. Someone spent $6,000 of two nice candlesticks and then threw them away.
What the @#$ing @#$#@%^#%

onlykelsey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2127
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15440 on: October 27, 2016, 09:26:30 AM »

Uuughhh people. What a load of total crap they talk. You have to have a certain number of x chromosomes to be allowed to bake cookies huh. My boyfriend bakes amazing cakes and cookies all the time and I 100% support this. Only for gender equality reasons obviously ;)

Your (ex) colleagues don't deserve cookies.

My husband is the official sewer/mender.  I support it solely for gender equality reasons and not for the health of my fingerpads or general laziness.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3636
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15441 on: October 27, 2016, 09:33:45 AM »
Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.
Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"
On Friday, a certain senior manager stopped by my cube while I was finishing up a draft of our weekly report. I told him that I could add the final piece of XYZ missing information to a report via a 5-minute phone call to my counterpart in the organization that produced that section.

My organization being what it is, people thinking the way they do, he decided it was better to stand over me while dictating a phone call to a higher-ranking guy in the same shop, then give up and drag us both to his office while they debated for half an hour over how to write... a single sentence.

FTR, I called the 30-min duration in my head, in advance - that is how predictably inefficient this guy is with time.

The single sentence, which I had already proposed in concept, and which really could not have ended up much differently than it did, was something along the lines of "we are awaiting a decision by (other agency) on this proposal." Because that's what was happening at the time, and nothing else. But, the more people you get involved in these things, the longer it takes.

Because these guys are both so much higher than I am in the chain, I knew in advance that I wouldn't really be part of the conversation. This could be really frustrating on some level, but I managed to take the same approach as above. At least I wasn't under the gun for any other deadlines, the chairs up there are comfy, and I was getting about forty bucks an hour to lean back in said chair and stay just awake enough to engage, if/when invited. No need to be mad, except as a taxpayer....
« Last Edit: October 27, 2016, 09:35:34 AM by zephyr911 »

mlejw6

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Alexandria, VA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15442 on: October 27, 2016, 10:09:00 AM »

Uuughhh people. What a load of total crap they talk. You have to have a certain number of x chromosomes to be allowed to bake cookies huh. My boyfriend bakes amazing cakes and cookies all the time and I 100% support this. Only for gender equality reasons obviously ;)

Your (ex) colleagues don't deserve cookies.

My husband is the official sewer/mender.  I support it solely for gender equality reasons and not for the health of my fingerpads or general laziness.

My husband is a brilliant chef, and does all our cooking. So much so that he took over the kitchen when we moved in together. But his baking is... less brilliant. He loves to experiment, which doesn't work as well as a baker. I've gotten him to refine his chocolate chip cookie recipe and his brownie recipe because those are important to me, but every once in a while he decides to experiment again. It rarely goes well.

I used to make great banana bread because I'd memorized my grandmother's recipe. Whenever he makes banana bread, it's crap.

I've stopped asking for banana bread. At least I still make the pies. I refuse to give him the chance to screw those up.

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1648
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15443 on: October 27, 2016, 10:14:53 AM »
Meetings like your's Zephyr911 sometimes make me question whether what I was witnessing was reality b/c they are so absurd.

I attended a meeting with a couple dozen people once only to have it devolve into discussion about a few keywords and statements (basically editing the mission statement of the department).

This went on and on with the rest of us watching/listening until a few of us just stood up and left. Let the ~ three people (boss and two senior subordinates) most vested in this debate work it out - the rest of us have alot of work to do.

The amount of money that meeting cost indirectly (manhours, salaries) was incredible. For a mission statement level paragraph.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5972
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15444 on: October 27, 2016, 10:37:02 AM »

Funny, this reminds me of when I was a highly paid summer associate (internship) at a law firm.  Now, I was never personally asked to get a partner coffee, but some other interns were and complained about it.  I'm like, hey guys, if they want to pay me $100/hour to get them coffee, that's fine by me.

Man, this sounds like me. I don't make anywhere near $100/hr, but I definitely have thought many times in my career "Hey, you want to pay me $X to hand out name tags? Cool!"

My boyfriend used to do exam invigilating for the long ones like the LSAT, and I think he felt pretty similarly - he'd just bring a book with him. It paid a little over minimum wage, but it was on the weekend, and more than you make reading at home.
I feel like the more you make, the more you should be willing to do whatever is needed.  You should not ask the receptionist who makes minimum wage to handle the company's 401k.

Yep, couldn't agree more. It's outrageous when junior/inexperienced members of staff are casually asked to create a 'strategy' for a dept (I speak from experience here, not me, but colleagues) and then criticised because it's not 'right' or good enough. Gives me the rage.

But on the other hand, I've heard so many colleagues get very angry about being asked to make coffee for a meeting of senior management. I will happily do that job because it's freaking EASY and if they want to pay me x amount to go make people coffees, then uh yes I'm gonna be ok with that. People can be really snobby about it though (it's 'beneath' them).

I used to agree with the "well they are paying me X per hour to be a glorified secretary" until I went on vacation and came back to a STACK of unopened boxes, an old molded pizza on the breakroom counter, and a list on my desk of supplies we were out of.  They were all SO fucking lazy that they couldn't cut open the boxes that got delivered (that had office supplies in them), couldn't throw out their own ordered food, and couldn't email our office manager in GA to order crap they were out of.

I was a senior software engineer BTW.  It was simply the fact that I, the only woman in the office, routinely did the "bitch" tasks of cleaning up and ordering/organizing and every single one of them thought it was beneath them to do it while I was out.  I refused to do it after that and to say the break room went to shit is an understatement.

I can definitely relate. It all depends on the workplace.  When my startup was a startup, the CEO would routinely take out the trash on trash day.  We were expected to keep the place tidy, etc.

But then we grew to over 100 people. It comes with growing pains.  And then shrinking pains.  I do lots of things that are "beneath" me, but you know - I had to draw the line at Fed Ex.  I'm no better at it than anyone else, and it got old doing Fed Ex for 4-7 other people who "don't know how and only need the help once a month".  Part of it is that I watched a guy we hired...he didn't do his job at all.  Slacked off.  Took credit for everyone's work.  In meetings would talk loudly about things...he was usually wrong, but he was loudly wrong.  He would throw other people under the bus.  And then he'd expect me (and another woman) to do the tasks that he didn't want to do (documentation) because "he didn't know how".  Talk about savvy.  ONLY working on high profile projects, even if you are bad at them.  Yeah, he got promoted twice.

Doing the crap work gets you nowhere.  At least not here.

dividendman

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1074
  • Age: 36
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15445 on: October 27, 2016, 11:14:47 AM »
Keeping with the "doing the crap" theme:

I'm a fairly high ranking upper-middle management person at MegaCorp. I drink coffee when I get into work early in the morning, usually a cup or three. Since we're in software and I get in early, I'm usually the one making the first 2-3 jugs of coffee simultaneously. I don't mind doing it.

When I go for my second cup, and they're all empty, I am fairly annoyed and usually say, pretty loudly "Can't we be human beings? If you finish the coffee make some more!". Then I proceed to make more coffee.

Once I was making the second round of coffee and some person came in and goes "YOU'RE making coffee?" like someone of my rank can't make coffee. What the fuck? I just said "Uhh, yeah, it's not going to make itself."

Why do people think being a person isn't required at work?

If you make a mess, clean it up. If you finish something, get some more. Are people just stupid or something?

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8114
  • Registered member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15446 on: October 27, 2016, 11:22:48 AM »
I think some of the reluctance to do more menial tasks comes down to a longer-term view.  If you accept the menial tasks, more people will ask you to do them, and you'll be less available to handle more visible/high-priority/career-enhancing work.  And without the flashy stuff in your portfolio, you're less likely to get the next raise/promotion.

This is true if it legitimately takes away from your productive time or alters others perception of you.  But if you aren't doing anything productive at the moment, I think getting coffee makes you look like a team player. 


Another example from work is assistant use.  Some people will push anything and everything to their assistant, even if it doesn't save any time.  Some people will ask their assistant to print documents and bring it to their desk.  Now if you have a million files that need to be collated, tabbed, and bindered that makes sense.  But it takes me more time to attach a file to an email and send it to my assistant than to just print it out and grab it from the printer 20 feet away.  I can even get coffee for me and my neighbor on the way.  I'm not above printing, faxing, or anything else and certainly nobody ever refused to staff me on a project because "oh he's the guy who prints his own files!"

PMG

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 998
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15447 on: October 27, 2016, 11:36:12 AM »
You could hang passive aggressive notes on the coffeemaker.

Keeping with the "doing the crap" theme:

I'm a fairly high ranking upper-middle management person at MegaCorp. I drink coffee when I get into work early in the morning, usually a cup or three. Since we're in software and I get in early, I'm usually the one making the first 2-3 jugs of coffee simultaneously. I don't mind doing it.

When I go for my second cup, and they're all empty, I am fairly annoyed and usually say, pretty loudly "Can't we be human beings? If you finish the coffee make some more!". Then I proceed to make more coffee.

Once I was making the second round of coffee and some person came in and goes "YOU'RE making coffee?" like someone of my rank can't make coffee. What the fuck? I just said "Uhh, yeah, it's not going to make itself."

Why do people think being a person isn't required at work?

If you make a mess, clean it up. If you finish something, get some more. Are people just stupid or something?

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3636
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15448 on: October 27, 2016, 11:42:19 AM »
Meetings like your's Zephyr911 sometimes make me question whether what I was witnessing was reality b/c they are so absurd.

I attended a meeting with a couple dozen people once only to have it devolve into discussion about a few keywords and statements (basically editing the mission statement of the department).

This went on and on with the rest of us watching/listening until a few of us just stood up and left. Let the ~ three people (boss and two senior subordinates) most vested in this debate work it out - the rest of us have alot of work to do.

The amount of money that meeting cost indirectly (manhours, salaries) was incredible. For a mission statement level paragraph.

My director came running in all excited about 11:30 and spent 15 or 20 minutes explaining something that had to be done, then another 10 minutes making me come along and watch while he explained it to the guy who *actually had to do it*. I still can't figure out why I was involved there.

Even more bizarre, this was a complete rewrite of a set of products that we spent all of September, so they could be staffed and revised repeatedly for two weeks in October, and sat on for the next two weeks. But the new version needs to be done in two hours.* >.<

*Okay, okay, just the concept/shell... but seriously, the way things go from last to first priority around here (and vice versa) is insane.

Dollar Slice

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3848
  • Age: 41
  • Location: New York City
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #15449 on: October 27, 2016, 11:49:23 AM »
Doing the crap work gets you nowhere.  At least not here.

I'm at a small company so it's not the crap work that I mind so much (we all take out our own trash, take the mail to the mailbox, etc.). It's more being given tons of highly skilled work that I don't know how to do with zero training or help. I once had a colleague get mad at me because I told them I couldn't do something they'd promised a client. They were asking me to do something that involved fairly advanced HTML coding and I had zero experience with HTML. I've had the accountant that the company hired get impatient with me because I didn't know what tax forms he was talking about - because I have zero experience with bookkeeping and business taxes. It's not reasonable to expect that your employee can and will do literally anything you drop on them, immediately and with no training. Sure, you can tell your HR manager to go code software instead, but it's a bad choice for everyone involved. I am really baffled by their expectations of me.