Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4933697 times)

Magilla

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13850 on: June 30, 2016, 08:31:31 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13851 on: June 30, 2016, 08:34:42 AM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I get this a lot.  I'm white but I love and can handle very spicy food (like Thai/SriLankan very hot levels).  Whenever I ask for Thai hot or highest levels of hot the waiters give me weird looks like "yea right white boy" and bring me something I consider barely medium.

I remember getting Thai food from a place in Champagne, Illinois like 10 years ago. I ordered it very spicy because I love spicy foods (Indian heritage) and was insistent that it be made that way. The cook made my pad thai and kept turning to me and yelling, "SPICY" as he added spices to it. The waitress gave me my food with a wicked smile on her face, and it was absolutely delicious!

Not sure why it is--maybe because I hung out with Mexicans (illegals, who'd tell the lady selling tacos out of a Toyota Corolla to stop by where we worked to sell said tacos)--but I love spicy food and I'm so white I'm nearly clear. There is a thai place in Bloomington IL that is the only place where I've found something that is too spicy for me so far. Well, the Buffalo Wild Wings super hot sauce is too much for me as well, but I think that is mostly because it just tastes bad. Indian Food I've not tried too much of because I just can't convince my palate to like it. I just don't like it.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13852 on: June 30, 2016, 08:39:14 AM »

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

I agree with you to an extent. I grew up with spicy food so spice doesn't bug me, but for someone that doesn't, spicy foods just won't go down easy with them. Even if they can tolerate it, they may not enjoy their meal, and that is the most important part. That said, I wish more people would be willing to try something that's a little spicer than they like. I've lost count of the people that won't go out for Thai food because they think it's all spicy and won't listen when I (or anyone else) tells that that they can make the food really mild.

Then there's those that don't go out for Thai food or other different cuisines simply because they don't think they will like it. It's one thing if you've tried it and didn't enjoy it, but I really don't have a whole lot of respect for people that just aren't willing to try something new. Same goes with sushi, you don't have to order sashimi if it's new to you, but I would encourage you to at least try the California Roll...which is cooked.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13853 on: June 30, 2016, 08:41:37 AM »
Well, the Buffalo Wild Wings super hot sauce is too much for me as well, but I think that is mostly because it just tastes bad. Indian Food I've not tried too much of because I just can't convince my palate to like it. I just don't like it.

Agreed! The spiciest I will order at BW's is Hot. I've had their blazing and the spice just ruins the flavor in my mind. No worried about not liking Indian food, I'm not a huge fan either. There is usually only one thing I'll ever order at a restaurant and it's the dish my mom is famous within the family for making.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13854 on: June 30, 2016, 08:51:35 AM »

Then there's those that don't go out for Thai food or other different cuisines simply because they don't think they will like it. It's one thing if you've tried it and didn't enjoy it, but I really don't have a whole lot of respect for people that just aren't willing to try something new. Same goes with sushi, you don't have to order sashimi if it's new to you, but I would encourage you to at least try the California Roll...which is cooked.

Oh, man, this is my dad. Once he tries it, he loves it, but he's always convinced he's gonna hate it.

Typical way this goes:
Me: let's go to this Vietnamese place!
Him: oh, no, I hate Vietnamese food. Too spicy/fishy/slimy/whatever.
Me: *death glare* you're acting like a toddler. You've never had it. You'll like it. We're going.

And once we're there, without fail, he chats with the waiter, asks for recommendations, LOVES the food, and requests that we go back.

So far, we've done that exact pattern for Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, Indian, Ethiopian, Louisiana-type southern food, Tex-mex, and full-on Mexican. Oh, and Brazilian BBQ. the only one he liked but didn't love was Ethiopian.

And yet, the next time I suggest a new type of food? Pattern repeats.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13855 on: June 30, 2016, 09:09:16 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

This. Ever go out and try to stock a kitchen with the basics of cooking? Butter, milk, eggs, flour, sugar, garlic, garlic powder, chile powder, salt, pepper, onion, yeast, etc. Most of these things you buy once a year or so, and rarely at the same time. But if you're buying them all at once it looks like a lot--and we haven't even gotten to the main dish, just the seasonings.

One thing that I'm not convinced on is always cheaper at home is alfredo sauce. But I think that has more to do with the fact that mine is so good so when I make it we eat too much of it in one sitting. Another thing that is impossible to do as cheap as a restaurant is pizza. (What you call pizza and what I call pizza are probably not the same quality--you can tell me you make a good pizza for cheap, and I'd agree with you if it didn't make us both be wrong)

Hahaha this made me laugh out loud :)

I appreciate someone who understands the importance of pizza. Pizza should never be half-assed. (And nope, I have never cooked it from home, because it would be a sad affair, not as good as the local Italian place, regrets all round, etc).

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13856 on: June 30, 2016, 09:25:10 AM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I am very white.  My roommate (the ghost pepper eater) told the waitress at the last Thai place we went to that he wants his food incredibly spicy, like "try to kill me."  It still wasn't, lol.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13857 on: June 30, 2016, 09:30:31 AM »
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mlejw6

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13858 on: June 30, 2016, 09:36:30 AM »
This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

Hey! Not being able to handle spice is not about not trying new things. I grew up eating bland food, and I admit that I prefer eating blander foods. But, I'll try spicy foods. I love a good curry! And Ethiopian! Since I don't eat it on a regular basis, I can't increase my tolerance. So I always have to ask for mild spice. Then, sometimes, I can't eat it all because it is too spicy. A burning mouth is not pleasant, no matter how exciting it is. If I ate spicy foods more regularly, I'm sure I could increase my tolerance. But, I will certainly try it.

Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.
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zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13859 on: June 30, 2016, 10:37:10 AM »
And yet, the next time I suggest a new type of food? Pattern repeats.
Oh, I dunno--you keep taking him out to eat.  Sounds like the pattern is working for him! :P

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13860 on: June 30, 2016, 10:38:52 AM »
And yet, the next time I suggest a new type of food? Pattern repeats.
Oh, I dunno--you keep taking him out to eat.  Sounds like the pattern is working for him! :P

It would if he'd let me PAY!

(To his credit: we work in the same industry, and occasionally together, so he can expense the meals)

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13861 on: June 30, 2016, 10:57:13 AM »
I've found that it's all in the description. My father-in-law had no interest in Indian food, even when I invited him over for homemade curry, but he sure liked that "chicken in spicy tomato sauce" I made.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13862 on: June 30, 2016, 10:59:53 AM »
I've found that it's all in the description. My father-in-law had no interest in Indian food, even when I invited him over for homemade curry, but he sure liked that "chicken in spicy tomato sauce" I made.
LOL!

Next time you could try telling him it's an English dish?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13863 on: June 30, 2016, 11:03:08 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

I just think some people have naturally stronger palates than others.  DBF and I are both white and raised on non-spicy food.  I took to spicy food quickly and have gradually increased my tolerance levels, while he has finally started adding Frank's Red Hot diluted with ranch to some items in small quantities, but any more is painful for him.

And I love horseradish, but sometimes I run over my tolerance of it quickly.  Why are prepared horseradish (horseradish + vinegar) and spreadable horseradish cheese so easy to eat, but horseradish cheddar on a sandwich gets into my soft palate and makes me choke?

Meanwhile, CloseFriend's Chinese girlfriend (I don't know in which part of China she grew up) has NO tolerance for spicy foods.  She brought these jerky-like snack sticks to a party and kept mentioning how "spicy" they were, but no one else thought they were spicy.  Maybe they had a little black pepper?  She tries to eat some mildly spicy foods, but it's difficult for her.  There's no point in her forcing herself to eat spicy things if it will just cause her pain.
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auntie_betty

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13864 on: June 30, 2016, 11:30:13 AM »
I've found that it's all in the description. My father-in-law had no interest in Indian food, even when I invited him over for homemade curry, but he sure liked that "chicken in spicy tomato sauce" I made.

My kids rebelled the first time I took them out for an Indian as they 'knew they wouldn't like it'. They were amazed the curry tasted just like mummy's chicken stew :)

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13865 on: June 30, 2016, 11:40:13 AM »
This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

Hey! Not being able to handle spice is not about not trying new things. I grew up eating bland food, and I admit that I prefer eating blander foods. But, I'll try spicy foods. I love a good curry! And Ethiopian! Since I don't eat it on a regular basis, I can't increase my tolerance. So I always have to ask for mild spice. Then, sometimes, I can't eat it all because it is too spicy. A burning mouth is not pleasant, no matter how exciting it is. If I ate spicy foods more regularly, I'm sure I could increase my tolerance. But, I will certainly try it.

Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.

Sure, but most ethnic places will make a "mild" version.  In fact, most make this version by default to cater to American tastes.

Magilla

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13866 on: June 30, 2016, 12:29:02 PM »
This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

Hey! Not being able to handle spice is not about not trying new things. I grew up eating bland food, and I admit that I prefer eating blander foods. But, I'll try spicy foods. I love a good curry! And Ethiopian! Since I don't eat it on a regular basis, I can't increase my tolerance. So I always have to ask for mild spice. Then, sometimes, I can't eat it all because it is too spicy. A burning mouth is not pleasant, no matter how exciting it is. If I ate spicy foods more regularly, I'm sure I could increase my tolerance. But, I will certainly try it.

Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.

I didn't mean to imply not eating spicy foods = no trying new things.  It's just one of the aspects of not trying new things.  Most people that "hate" spicy foods (of any level) also do not like to try new things.  For me I didn't just go to hot right away.  I started eating a variety of foods, found I liked things a little spicy and as I ate more spicy food my tolerance and appreciation increased.  For a novice eating something spicier than they can handle will ruin the food.  For me, the right food is enhanced by the spiciness.  Not everything should be spicy either.  Also, and this drives me nuts at restaurants, making something hot does not mean cook it without chillies then at the end add hot sauce or some hot chili powder.  It has to cook with the peppers and chillies to develop all the flavor.  Cooking with habaneros is a whole different ball game than just adding one chopped up at the end.

There is also a huge difference between "spicy" and "spices".  You can make dishes with lots of spices that are not spicy at all and vice versa.

Anyway, we have a lot of people in our family/friend circle that won't eat a lot of things for the stupidest reasons and it's just one of those things that annoys me sometimes.  One nephew won't eat blueberries whole but he loves blueberry pureed... mind-boggling!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13867 on: June 30, 2016, 01:05:54 PM »

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?


I'd say most of South American cuisine is not spicy, but feel free to correct me on that.  I know Peruvian is up there, but in other countries even the "aji" is about as tame as black pepper

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13868 on: June 30, 2016, 01:07:36 PM »

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?


I'd say most of South American cuisine is not spicy, but feel free to correct me on that.  I know Peruvian is up there, but in other countries even the "aji" is about as tame as black pepper

Not sure if this is typical, but I have Chilean friends who think black pepper is spicy.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13869 on: June 30, 2016, 01:15:35 PM »

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?


I'd say most of South American cuisine is not spicy, but feel free to correct me on that.  I know Peruvian is up there, but in other countries even the "aji" is about as tame as black pepper

Not sure if this is typical, but I have Chilean friends who think black pepper is spicy.

I have a white friend (well, scottish - she's so white she's practically see-through, except for the red hair) who swears that carrots are spicy. And that lettuce is super full of flavour and salad dressing rips off her tongue.

I'm just assuming everyone processes things differently.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13870 on: June 30, 2016, 01:16:29 PM »
Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?
I'd say most of South American cuisine is not spicy, but feel free to correct me on that.  I know Peruvian is up there, but in other countries even the "aji" is about as tame as black pepper
Not sure if this is typical, but I have Chilean friends who think black pepper is spicy.
My wife is Argentinean and I have struggled for years to acclimate her to the level of heat my pasty white ass prefers (my influences are primarily Asian, with some Southwest US thrown in). To her and the rest I've met, like your Chileans, a pinch of black pepper is spicy - her family doesn't even keep it at the table with the salt like we do. Their foods are sweet, creamy, savory, salty, and everything else but fiery.

You may find chimichurri with red and/or black pepper, but I'm pretty sure the genuinely spicy types are foreign inventions. When I see it down there, it's basically herbs, oil, acids (vinegar and/or lemon juice) and salt.
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cube.37

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13871 on: June 30, 2016, 01:17:31 PM »
This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

Hey! Not being able to handle spice is not about not trying new things. I grew up eating bland food, and I admit that I prefer eating blander foods. But, I'll try spicy foods. I love a good curry! And Ethiopian! Since I don't eat it on a regular basis, I can't increase my tolerance. So I always have to ask for mild spice. Then, sometimes, I can't eat it all because it is too spicy. A burning mouth is not pleasant, no matter how exciting it is. If I ate spicy foods more regularly, I'm sure I could increase my tolerance. But, I will certainly try it.

Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.

I completely agree with the bolded statement above. I've eaten korean food my entire life, enjoy the spiciest korean foods, and never thought that kimchi could even be considered spicy. Apparently it is to some of my friends. To me it's the equivalent of a pickle - you eat it to freshen up a dish. If I'm eating spaghetti and can't find pickles, I often replace pickles with kimchi...I've heard of mexicans who eat chiles for dessert that can't bear mild korean spices, and vice versa.

I've gotten accustomed to being able to eat the spiciest levels of east asian and american foods - I think everything tastes better with at least some crushed red pepper, if not other spices. I recently got a gyro from a foodtruck in NJ, asked for the spiciest version of the dish and thought I was going to die. I don't like wasting food (or giving up), so I finished the dish with tears in my eyes and my hands shaking...I was in physical shock for the next 30 min or so.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13872 on: June 30, 2016, 01:19:10 PM »
I have a white friend (well, scottish - she's so white she's practically see-through, except for the red hair) who swears that carrots are spicy. And that lettuce is super full of flavour and salad dressing rips off her tongue.

I'm just assuming everyone processes things differently.
Now we're just getting silly. Pass the haggis, ye wee lassie! >.<

But FTR, all I mean to say, as above, is that the S.Am. anecdote probably *is* representative, or at least jives with my own anecdotes.
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frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13873 on: June 30, 2016, 02:08:08 PM »
I have a white friend (well, scottish - she's so white she's practically see-through, except for the red hair) who swears that carrots are spicy. And that lettuce is super full of flavour and salad dressing rips off her tongue.

I'm just assuming everyone processes things differently.

Is she this guy?


onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13874 on: June 30, 2016, 02:37:38 PM »
This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

Hey! Not being able to handle spice is not about not trying new things. I grew up eating bland food, and I admit that I prefer eating blander foods. But, I'll try spicy foods. I love a good curry! And Ethiopian! Since I don't eat it on a regular basis, I can't increase my tolerance. So I always have to ask for mild spice. Then, sometimes, I can't eat it all because it is too spicy. A burning mouth is not pleasant, no matter how exciting it is. If I ate spicy foods more regularly, I'm sure I could increase my tolerance. But, I will certainly try it.

Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.

I completely agree with the bolded statement above. I've eaten korean food my entire life, enjoy the spiciest korean foods, and never thought that kimchi could even be considered spicy. Apparently it is to some of my friends. To me it's the equivalent of a pickle - you eat it to freshen up a dish. If I'm eating spaghetti and can't find pickles, I often replace pickles with kimchi...I've heard of mexicans who eat chiles for dessert that can't bear mild korean spices, and vice versa.

I've gotten accustomed to being able to eat the spiciest levels of east asian and american foods - I think everything tastes better with at least some crushed red pepper, if not other spices. I recently got a gyro from a foodtruck in NJ, asked for the spiciest version of the dish and thought I was going to die. I don't like wasting food (or giving up), so I finished the dish with tears in my eyes and my hands shaking...I was in physical shock for the next 30 min or so.

For me, anything prepared on a fajita-style pan that is spicy is impossible to be around.  I have a moderate (obviously this is relative...) tolerance for spice, but if someone in an indian or mexican restaurant orders a dish cooked on that hot steel platter, I have to physically leave the restaurant to avoid dying of a coughing fit/crying for two hours. 

I also find "oily" spices harder to tolerate.  Like... fresh peppers that stick around in your mouth are not my friend.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13875 on: June 30, 2016, 04:47:36 PM »
Spicy does not equal Hot.  There are lots of spices that have strong flavors that are not "hot" at all.

I spent a fair amount of time is SE Asia and Thai dishes are not hot at all.  The same goes for Malaysian and Philippine food.  Even Korean food like Kimch Jjigae (soup) which looks like a pot of boiling lava from all the red pepper is not really super spicy.  Korean red pepper is milder than it looks.

Here in the US many people demand HOT spicy food, often hotter than the same dish back home.  It strikes me as a macho attitude.  Too much heat drowns out the subtle nuances and great flavors of many dishes. 

Don't get me wrong, I like spicy foods, but not when heat used as a substitute for good flavor.  Well made Thai Tom Yang soup is great, even when it makes your eyes water.  But crappy Tom Yang is still crappy even when it is hot.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13876 on: June 30, 2016, 09:54:57 PM »
In bay area we have a South Indian restaurant (south India eats way more spicy food than the North) that makes food so much spicier than their main branch in India - only because Indians from all over USA come here for the spicy food. It's become like a trademark of this particular branch and their spiciness levels are ridiculous. People coming from India always comment how spicy everything is in that restaurant (even their buttermilk is spicy because they add a lot of green chillies to it - we usually pair buttermilk or plain yogurt with spicy hot food to cool the stomach linings).

I can make almost everything on their menu at home at half the hotness level and still get that authentic taste. Needless to say, we've stopped going there now because of the ridiculous hotness levels.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 09:57:31 PM by cutenila »

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13877 on: June 30, 2016, 09:58:24 PM »
Spicy does not equal Hot.  There are lots of spices that have strong flavors that are not "hot" at all.

I spent a fair amount of time is SE Asia and Thai dishes are not hot at all.  The same goes for Malaysian and Philippine food.  Even Korean food like Kimch Jjigae (soup) which looks like a pot of boiling lava from all the red pepper is not really super spicy.  Korean red pepper is milder than it looks.

Here in the US many people demand HOT spicy food, often hotter than the same dish back home.  It strikes me as a macho attitude.  Too much heat drowns out the subtle nuances and great flavors of many dishes. 

Don't get me wrong, I like spicy foods, but not when heat used as a substitute for good flavor.  Well made Thai Tom Yang soup is great, even when it makes your eyes water.  But crappy Tom Yang is still crappy even when it is hot.

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain.  I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13878 on: July 01, 2016, 04:14:18 AM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13879 on: July 01, 2016, 06:45:34 AM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!
I believe spicy food makes your sinuses run.  You actually produce more mucus to try to cool them.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13880 on: July 01, 2016, 07:01:02 AM »
Two coworkers have recently bought almost new cars with interest rates around 20%.  Neither can afford sales tax so neither car has been registered properly and one is running on plates from a previous car and the other on expired temporary plates.  They both make just above minimum wage.
How is that possible? Here the dealers collect the sales tax for all purchases, either in cash or rolled into a loan/lease. Tax, tag, and title fees upfront and center for Aunt Flo(rida).
Maybe y'all in Missouri have it different.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13881 on: July 01, 2016, 07:11:54 AM »
Two coworkers have recently bought almost new cars with interest rates around 20%.  Neither can afford sales tax so neither car has been registered properly and one is running on plates from a previous car and the other on expired temporary plates.  They both make just above minimum wage.
How is that possible? Here the dealers collect the sales tax for all purchases, either in cash or rolled into a loan/lease. Tax, tag, and title fees upfront and center for Aunt Flo(rida).
Maybe y'all in Missouri have it different.

If you buy used from a private party (and yes, you can get a loan for that) then you pay the tax later at the DMV. Similarly, if you buy a car from out of state you pay the sales tax for the state you live in so the dealer wouldn't have a hand in that.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13882 on: July 01, 2016, 08:22:22 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

Yup, here in Minnesota there are a lot of people with Scandinavian ancestry and I guess their culture doesn't have spicy foods. A former coworker would sweat while eating Italian sausages from a pizza.

+1  This describes my whole life.  I'm not Scandinavian but definitely northern Europe and I don't like any seasoned and dried meats, or cheeseburger, or spicy foods at all.  When pizza comes with pepperoni on it, and I take it off before eating it, the places where the pepperoni were are still hot and spicy to me.  I eat lots and lots of bland foods very happily.  My husband loooove spice and thinks I live a very sad life.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13883 on: July 01, 2016, 10:59:07 AM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!

My husband loves really spicy food. I have slowly worked up from "Literally no chilli at all, please, and even paprika is a bit much" to "I'll have the mild, please". I can sometimes take medium if copious yoghurt is available. It has definitely improved my life to go from no chilli at all to mild, but I don't have much interest in improving my chilli tolerance any further. However, sometimes I'll watch my husband sweating and his nose running when he's slightly over-reached himself and say "See? That's what it's like for me" and he'll say "But I LIKE this!" And I think he's not just being macho, I think he actually does.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13884 on: July 01, 2016, 11:06:48 AM »
Also, I noticed there are different spicy flavors - not just chiles. My husband, who can eat the spiciest chile you can think of and not blink twice, can't stand horseradish (or wasabi). I love a good horseradish and wasabi - he won't eat sushi - I love it. Certain mustards are spicy. I love a good spicy dijon mustard, but my husband prefers bland yellow mustard - what? I know these aren't comparable to a ghost pepper, but since I don't eat ghost peppers I don't care.
If I remember correctly, there are 2 types of spicy. Chilis belongs to one, wasabi to the other.
You can distinguish between both by where you feel the hot (the most): On the front/nearly whole tongue (Chili) or on the back of the tongue/upper throat (wasabi).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13885 on: July 01, 2016, 11:30:50 AM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!

My husband loves really spicy food. I have slowly worked up from "Literally no chilli at all, please, and even paprika is a bit much" to "I'll have the mild, please". I can sometimes take medium if copious yoghurt is available. It has definitely improved my life to go from no chilli at all to mild, but I don't have much interest in improving my chilli tolerance any further. However, sometimes I'll watch my husband sweating and his nose running when he's slightly over-reached himself and say "See? That's what it's like for me" and he'll say "But I LIKE this!" And I think he's not just being macho, I think he actually does.

My heat tolerance has crept up to the point where my nose starts running before I even notice heat in my mouth.  I eat a a brand of hot sauce that is way too hot for most people, but I like it for the flavor.  I'm not trying to brag.  I'm just saying you have to go higher and higher to get the fix.  I used to push the limits on the pain as part of the machoness thing, but now I rarely eat anything that causes me real pain any more.   You really do just get addicted to that subtle burn. 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2016, 11:33:25 AM by dougules »

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13886 on: July 01, 2016, 12:05:50 PM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!

My husband loves really spicy food. I have slowly worked up from "Literally no chilli at all, please, and even paprika is a bit much" to "I'll have the mild, please". I can sometimes take medium if copious yoghurt is available. It has definitely improved my life to go from no chilli at all to mild, but I don't have much interest in improving my chilli tolerance any further. However, sometimes I'll watch my husband sweating and his nose running when he's slightly over-reached himself and say "See? That's what it's like for me" and he'll say "But I LIKE this!" And I think he's not just being macho, I think he actually does.

My heat tolerance has crept up to the point where my nose starts running before I even notice heat in my mouth.  I eat a a brand of hot sauce that is way too hot for most people, but I like it for the flavor.  I'm not trying to brag.  I'm just saying you have to go higher and higher to get the fix.  I used to push the limits on the pain as part of the machoness thing, but now I rarely eat anything that causes me real pain any more.   You really do just get addicted to that subtle burn.

Anyone else get hiccups when they eat spicy food?  I love spicy food and have a decent tolerance for the burn, except that if I eat something over a fairly low threshold of spice, it triggers hiccups almost without fail.  Sometimes watery eyes come with the hiccups, especially if the spice hits a certain part of my soft palate.  Once the hiccups subside I can enjoy the rest of the meal.  Its annoying because it makes me look like I'm trying to show off or something by eating something hotter than I can tolerate, but I can tolerate it, enjoy it, and seek it out when I'm in the right mood-- I just have to deal with one or two minutes of involuntary hiccups. 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13887 on: July 01, 2016, 12:29:21 PM »
As a kid I got the hiccups thing from spicey food but luckily that has resolved as an adult. Though maybe it's the food I'm eating. My parents have a lot of Indian and Sri Lankan friends so I'd get authentic/home cooked food. Now I usually only get restaurant style food, or what I cook myself, which isn't nearly as spicey.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13888 on: July 01, 2016, 12:42:56 PM »

I don't know about this.  Pho is some good stuff, and it's usually hot enough to make my tongue go numb even if it is room temperature.  Also, I've had both a ghost pepper & a scotch bonnet pepper straight.  The ghost pepper was hot, but the scotch bonnet actually blistered the inside of my mouth it was so hot.  Worse, the scotch bonnet has a delayed effect.  The hot part is in a thick gel on the inside, but the outside flesh is sweet.  So I had enough time to chew and swallow the entire thing before the wave of pain. I could feel the outlines of my sinuses ache for two days.

Kind of off off topic, but I love the feeling you describe (within in reason, and when it lasts for minutes not days). I have often wondered why the power to clear sinuses this way has never been harnessed by the huge cold remedy industry. Here, at least, everything seems to be menthol based and focusses on cooling to clear airways. But I ate a chilli the other day and I swear I could feel it clearing out my ears!

My husband loves really spicy food. I have slowly worked up from "Literally no chilli at all, please, and even paprika is a bit much" to "I'll have the mild, please". I can sometimes take medium if copious yoghurt is available. It has definitely improved my life to go from no chilli at all to mild, but I don't have much interest in improving my chilli tolerance any further. However, sometimes I'll watch my husband sweating and his nose running when he's slightly over-reached himself and say "See? That's what it's like for me" and he'll say "But I LIKE this!" And I think he's not just being macho, I think he actually does.

My heat tolerance has crept up to the point where my nose starts running before I even notice heat in my mouth.  I eat a a brand of hot sauce that is way too hot for most people, but I like it for the flavor.  I'm not trying to brag.  I'm just saying you have to go higher and higher to get the fix.  I used to push the limits on the pain as part of the machoness thing, but now I rarely eat anything that causes me real pain any more.   You really do just get addicted to that subtle burn.

I have the same problem with dark beer. Got addicted to thicker and thicker... Going back down the ladder sucks, now that even Guinness feels thin and watery.

Meanwhile, most friends try one sip of my drink and practically spit it out, complaining about how they don't want to "chew their beer."

On the bright side, nobody steals my beer now!

LeRainDrop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13889 on: July 01, 2016, 02:58:54 PM »
On the bright side, nobody steals my beer now!

Except for Jack :-/

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13890 on: July 01, 2016, 05:35:30 PM »
Cutenila: would that be Saravanaa Bhavan by any chance? Because they have some spicy spicy food for sale in their converted Coco's building. That said, I do love a good idli and dosa. Recs?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13891 on: July 01, 2016, 08:53:16 PM »
It has definitely improved my life to go from no chilli at all to mild, but I don't have much interest in improving my chilli tolerance any further.

I'm not sure there's really an advantage to building up a tolerance beyond being able to enjoy/tolerate regular (sane) levels of heat.  Anything beyond that is like building up an alcohol tolerance -- you just need more to have the same enjoyment, which is more work than just enjoying a regular amount.  This also ties into:

Quote
However, sometimes I'll watch my husband sweating and his nose running when he's slightly over-reached himself and say "See? That's what it's like for me" and he'll say "But I LIKE this!" And I think he's not just being macho, I think he actually does.

I've read that capsaicin (the chemical in chilis that is spicy hot) is addictive because it releases endorphines.  On top of that, you build up a tolerance as discussed above.  Like a literal "it hurts so good"


I have the same problem with dark beer. Got addicted to thicker and thicker... Going back down the ladder sucks, now that even Guinness feels thin and watery.


Also a problem with hoppy beers, as your hops receptors (sorry don't know the actual name) can get saturated.  The result is if you drink, say, IPAs every day you completely lose your sense of taste for the bitterness of hops and need to get hoppier and hoppier brews.  The kinds of brews normal people will spit out due to bitterness.  But if you stop drinking IPAs for a month your next IPA you will say "wow, that's hoppier than I remember"
« Last Edit: July 01, 2016, 08:56:49 PM by dragoncar »

firelight

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13892 on: July 01, 2016, 10:32:05 PM »
Cutenila: would that be Saravanaa Bhavan by any chance? Because they have some spicy spicy food for sale in their converted Coco's building. That said, I do love a good idli and dosa. Recs?
Hadilly, this is Anjappar in Milpitas. Their food is super spicy. Saravana bhavan is more on the medium scale for most food items in their menu. Do give Anjappar a try if you love spicy food.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13893 on: July 01, 2016, 11:39:24 PM »

[/quote]

Also a problem with hoppy beers, as your hops receptors (sorry don't know the actual name) can get saturated.  The result is if you drink, say, IPAs every day you completely lose your sense of taste for the bitterness of hops and need to get hoppier and hoppier brews.  The kinds of brews normal people will spit out due to bitterness.  But if you stop drinking IPAs for a month your next IPA you will say "wow, that's hoppier than I remember"
[/quote]

The struggle is real...my favorite beers are around 70-80 IBUs and it is really hard for me to find a beer that really seems hoppy anymore. Had a free keystone with a friend a while back and it tasted as sweet as a soda.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13894 on: July 02, 2016, 12:13:50 AM »
All this foam sure is spicy.  And it's even turning a little hoppy!

Hadilly

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13895 on: July 02, 2016, 08:03:45 PM »
Last spice hijack here. Thank you Cutenila. Will search it out the next time I am in Milpitas!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13896 on: July 04, 2016, 03:03:56 AM »
Work lunch at a restaurant last week: Colleague 1 put it all on his credit card, and today asked each of us to deposit $30 by bank transfer to cover their part of the meal.

I mentioned in passing thanks for taking care of it, and that I had made the bank transfer.

Colleague 2, also present, apologises that 'his bank' will not permit such a deposit - he only has access to credit - but he will be able to transfer funds by Friday. (Payday.)

Colleague 2 spends $20-30 on takeaway food every single day, because YOLO.

Pecunia non olet

theadvicist

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13897 on: July 04, 2016, 06:15:36 AM »

I believe spicy food makes your sinuses run.  You actually produce more mucus to try to cool them.

Thanks MrMoogle, that explains why it wouldn't be a good cold remedy. Unless it loosens everything up I guess. Anyway, this thread sure is getting foamy, I'll shush.

Elle 8

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13898 on: July 04, 2016, 06:49:21 AM »
...
Anyone else get hiccups when they eat spicy food?  ...

Yes!  I'm the only one I know that this happens to.  Glad to know there are others.  But it's only certain kinds of peppers (jalapeno is one) that it happens with.  I usually start to pick them out once it happens but next time maybe I'll wait a few minutes and then continue and see what happens.

pbkmaine

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13899 on: July 04, 2016, 06:53:57 AM »
...
Anyone else get hiccups when they eat spicy food?  ...

Yes!  I'm the only one I know that this happens to.  Glad to know there are others.  But it's only certain kinds of peppers (jalapeno is one) that it happens with.  I usually start to pick them out once it happens but next time maybe I'll wait a few minutes and then continue and see what happens.

Not me. Instead, it's raw carrots.