Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5493977 times)

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13800 on: June 26, 2016, 11:04:26 PM »
Boss: "I was audited a couple of years ago after I got a letter from the ATO saying I was owed a $14,000 refund. Apparently payroll at [former employer] had been massively over-taxing me... it was great!"

MostlyBearded

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13801 on: June 27, 2016, 05:48:59 AM »
He also thinks his poor situation in life is the results of us being in the EU.

At least he doesn't have to worry about that anymore

LMAO!

Both hilarious and tragic at the same time!

rockstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13802 on: June 27, 2016, 07:28:34 AM »

I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.


Hey now!  I pay a service to mow my lawn too!  But that is because it would take me 3+ years to pay for a large enough lawn mower to manage my 2.2 acre of grassland in about an hour.  So, am I doing it wrong?

Yes. You should be letting a farming neighbor graze or bale on the land for $1/year, then file for an agricultural exemption on your taxes.

I have one of the last old farmhouses in the area.  I'm surrounded on 3 sides by subdivided neighborhoods, all less than 10 years old.  The last real farm is actually behind my property, and my 13 acres of woods sits between us, so any grazing that could be had would require a herd be 'herded' around the streets; which would only happen once before the newest neighbors called the city.  The guy that owns that farm is getting old, and reducing his cattle anyway.  But you did touch on an idea I had some weeks ago.  I learned about a tiny species of sheep, called a "Baby Doll".  I looked into buy a pair of non-breeding sheep (neutered males, basicly) as new household pets.  They are adorable.  Then I discovered that in order to actually reduce the need for grass cutting, I'd have to get about a dozen just for my 2 acres of cut lawn.  It would still work if I were willing to buy a young flock in spring, and then sell them for slaughter come fall, but I don't think I have the heart and I know that my family would revolt.  Still thinking about surprising my wife with a pair for her birthday though.  (They are social animals, and don't do well individually)

http://www.mylittlesheep.com/

And yes, that little black one on the front page is full grown.  The white one at the bottom of that same page is the young one.

Oh my lord, I can't even stand the cuteness! Now I want sheep, thanks a lot Moonshadow!

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13803 on: June 27, 2016, 08:22:31 AM »

I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.


Hey now!  I pay a service to mow my lawn too!  But that is because it would take me 3+ years to pay for a large enough lawn mower to manage my 2.2 acre of grassland in about an hour.  So, am I doing it wrong?

Yes. You should be letting a farming neighbor graze or bale on the land for $1/year, then file for an agricultural exemption on your taxes.

I have one of the last old farmhouses in the area.  I'm surrounded on 3 sides by subdivided neighborhoods, all less than 10 years old.  The last real farm is actually behind my property, and my 13 acres of woods sits between us, so any grazing that could be had would require a herd be 'herded' around the streets; which would only happen once before the newest neighbors called the city.  The guy that owns that farm is getting old, and reducing his cattle anyway.  But you did touch on an idea I had some weeks ago.  I learned about a tiny species of sheep, called a "Baby Doll".  I looked into buy a pair of non-breeding sheep (neutered males, basicly) as new household pets.  They are adorable.  Then I discovered that in order to actually reduce the need for grass cutting, I'd have to get about a dozen just for my 2 acres of cut lawn.  It would still work if I were willing to buy a young flock in spring, and then sell them for slaughter come fall, but I don't think I have the heart and I know that my family would revolt.  Still thinking about surprising my wife with a pair for her birthday though.  (They are social animals, and don't do well individually)

http://www.mylittlesheep.com/

And yes, that little black one on the front page is full grown.  The white one at the bottom of that same page is the young one.

Oh my lord, I can't even stand the cuteness! Now I want sheep, thanks a lot Moonshadow!

We've got 4 lambs currently grazing a piece of land the size of a small city lot, and not keeping up with it. If your aim is lamb on the table, that's fine, but if you want to avoid mowing, you'll need a fair lot of them.

Also, dear lord, but they're stupid animals. Right up there with chickens.

Digital Dogma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13804 on: June 27, 2016, 09:41:11 AM »

I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.


Hey now!  I pay a service to mow my lawn too!  But that is because it would take me 3+ years to pay for a large enough lawn mower to manage my 2.2 acre of grassland in about an hour.  So, am I doing it wrong?

Yes. You should be letting a farming neighbor graze or bale on the land for $1/year, then file for an agricultural exemption on your taxes.
Watch out for farmers running equipment that leaks oil all over the place, had one guy show up to do this with a constant spray of oil coming out the bottom of his tractor. It pays to take a look at what sort of equipment they'll be using before it enters your property. A hydraulic line can blow on anybody, but continuing to use faulty equipment till it goes is a farmer thing to do.

rockstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13805 on: June 27, 2016, 11:02:45 AM »

I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.


Hey now!  I pay a service to mow my lawn too!  But that is because it would take me 3+ years to pay for a large enough lawn mower to manage my 2.2 acre of grassland in about an hour.  So, am I doing it wrong?

Yes. You should be letting a farming neighbor graze or bale on the land for $1/year, then file for an agricultural exemption on your taxes.

I have one of the last old farmhouses in the area.  I'm surrounded on 3 sides by subdivided neighborhoods, all less than 10 years old.  The last real farm is actually behind my property, and my 13 acres of woods sits between us, so any grazing that could be had would require a herd be 'herded' around the streets; which would only happen once before the newest neighbors called the city.  The guy that owns that farm is getting old, and reducing his cattle anyway.  But you did touch on an idea I had some weeks ago.  I learned about a tiny species of sheep, called a "Baby Doll".  I looked into buy a pair of non-breeding sheep (neutered males, basicly) as new household pets.  They are adorable.  Then I discovered that in order to actually reduce the need for grass cutting, I'd have to get about a dozen just for my 2 acres of cut lawn.  It would still work if I were willing to buy a young flock in spring, and then sell them for slaughter come fall, but I don't think I have the heart and I know that my family would revolt.  Still thinking about surprising my wife with a pair for her birthday though.  (They are social animals, and don't do well individually)

http://www.mylittlesheep.com/

And yes, that little black one on the front page is full grown.  The white one at the bottom of that same page is the young one.

Oh my lord, I can't even stand the cuteness! Now I want sheep, thanks a lot Moonshadow!

We've got 4 lambs currently grazing a piece of land the size of a small city lot, and not keeping up with it. If your aim is lamb on the table, that's fine, but if you want to avoid mowing, you'll need a fair lot of them.

Also, dear lord, but they're stupid animals. Right up there with chickens.

Oh I won't be getting any - we're not really animal people, don't own a house (or plan to), and enjoy travel too much to get any sort of farm animal. I just like looking at the cute baby faces. I have heard that they are pretty dumb though!

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13806 on: June 27, 2016, 05:41:05 PM »

Oh I won't be getting any - we're not really animal people, don't own a house (or plan to), and enjoy travel too much to get any sort of farm animal. I just like looking at the cute baby faces. I have heard that they are pretty dumb though!

I can't say if it's true or not, but I've conversed (by email) with several Baby Doll breeders, and they all say that the Baby Doll isn't nearly as stupid and danger prone as other breeds of sheep.  I've been told that they won't constantly challenge fences, and that they learn to trust their humans, but they are still not as smart as most dogs.  I've also been told that they can jump a whole lot higher than most other breeds of sheep as well, and that's saying something; or if not actually higher, higher by comparison to their actual size.  Most say they can jump a 4 foot fence, but won't generally try it.

Daleth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13807 on: June 28, 2016, 08:26:03 AM »
He also thinks his poor situation in life is the results of us being in the EU.

At least he doesn't have to worry about that anymore

LMAO!

That is NOT funny. Not the way I'm feeling today :(   I'm Scottish, so that should tell you something.

Christ I feel your pain. I so hope the UK manages to quite literally hold itself together and stay in the EU. And failing that, I hope Scotland and Northern Ireland manage to remain in the EU no matter what happens to idiotic England and Wales.

deadlymonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13808 on: June 28, 2016, 08:42:37 AM »

I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.


Hey now!  I pay a service to mow my lawn too!  But that is because it would take me 3+ years to pay for a large enough lawn mower to manage my 2.2 acre of grassland in about an hour.  So, am I doing it wrong?

Yes. You should be letting a farming neighbor graze or bale on the land for $1/year, then file for an agricultural exemption on your taxes.

I have one of the last old farmhouses in the area.  I'm surrounded on 3 sides by subdivided neighborhoods, all less than 10 years old.  The last real farm is actually behind my property, and my 13 acres of woods sits between us, so any grazing that could be had would require a herd be 'herded' around the streets; which would only happen once before the newest neighbors called the city.  The guy that owns that farm is getting old, and reducing his cattle anyway.  But you did touch on an idea I had some weeks ago.  I learned about a tiny species of sheep, called a "Baby Doll".  I looked into buy a pair of non-breeding sheep (neutered males, basicly) as new household pets.  They are adorable.  Then I discovered that in order to actually reduce the need for grass cutting, I'd have to get about a dozen just for my 2 acres of cut lawn.  It would still work if I were willing to buy a young flock in spring, and then sell them for slaughter come fall, but I don't think I have the heart and I know that my family would revolt.  Still thinking about surprising my wife with a pair for her birthday though.  (They are social animals, and don't do well individually)

http://www.mylittlesheep.com/

And yes, that little black one on the front page is full grown.  The white one at the bottom of that same page is the young one.

Another option is that you can get wallabies.  They are also social so they need to be in pairs and are good jumpers.  But can also be housetrained.  They only need a shelter outside (heated if it gets cold) and are freaking mini kangaroos....how awesome is that?  They graze as well so offer the same benefits as sheep.

http://www.needcoffee.com/2010/07/03/your-new-pet-wallaby/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1181951/Meet-lawnmower-legs-Why-wallabies-taking-Englands-gardens-leaps-bounds.html
« Last Edit: June 28, 2016, 08:44:59 AM by deadlymonkey »

fattest_foot

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13809 on: June 28, 2016, 10:50:31 AM »
Just received an email about an upcoming lunch seminar and the message made me shudder to think about working that long:

"You will spend over 100,000 hours at work in your lifetime, so you may as well enjoy as many as them as possible!"

Yikes, I keep a running tab on about how much time I have left.

And here I was feeling a bit overwhelmed at another 11,000 hours or so.

Daleth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13810 on: June 28, 2016, 11:30:25 AM »
Just received an email about an upcoming lunch seminar and the message made me shudder to think about working that long:

"You will spend over 100,000 hours at work in your lifetime, so you may as well enjoy as many as them as possible!"

Over 100,000? Dude, that's more than 50 years. WTF?

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13811 on: June 28, 2016, 11:47:29 AM »
Just received an email about an upcoming lunch seminar and the message made me shudder to think about working that long:

"You will spend over 100,000 hours at work in your lifetime, so you may as well enjoy as many as them as possible!"

Over 100,000? Dude, that's more than 50 years. WTF?

I started working at 13... I don't plan to work much (if any) past 50, but still...

PDM

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13812 on: June 28, 2016, 11:16:11 PM »
Another option is that you can get wallabies.  They are also social so they need to be in pairs and are good jumpers.  But can also be housetrained.  They only need a shelter outside (heated if it gets cold) and are freaking mini kangaroos....how awesome is that?  They graze as well so offer the same benefits as sheep.

http://www.needcoffee.com/2010/07/03/your-new-pet-wallaby/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1181951/Meet-lawnmower-legs-Why-wallabies-taking-Englands-gardens-leaps-bounds.html

This just seems like a bad idea to me. The benefits of your traditional farm animals are thousands of years of domestication. Also them wallabies can be mean. Real mean. 

In Australia, the only native kept are rescue animals being rehabilitated for release. Mostly because its illegal to keep most native critters and partially because they're kinda crappy pets.

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/wildlifelicences/cantkeepnativemammals.htm

Cute little guys though.
Buzz kill out.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13813 on: June 28, 2016, 11:20:22 PM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13814 on: June 28, 2016, 11:24:17 PM »

Another option is that you can get wallabies.

I'm pretty sure that I'd have a hard time getting wallabies in Kentucky, and I'm fairly certain that species from the Australian continent require as special animal license in this state anyway.  Also, barely domesticated animals, prone to aggression towards children, and can jump a huge fence.  So no thanks.

LeRainDrop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13815 on: June 28, 2016, 11:34:19 PM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)

Eww, gross!  I hate the sound of someone clipping their nails.  It freaks me out that I might find someone's nail clippings lying around somewhere.  So creepy!

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13816 on: June 29, 2016, 05:22:47 AM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)

Eww, gross!  I hate the sound of someone clipping their nails.  It freaks me out that I might find someone's nail clippings lying around somewhere.  So creepy!
Why are people so grossed out by finger nails? Sure, doing it in public isn't great, but to some people it's just a step removed from taking a dump on someone else's desk.

boarder42

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13817 on: June 29, 2016, 06:12:53 AM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)

Eww, gross!  I hate the sound of someone clipping their nails.  It freaks me out that I might find someone's nail clippings lying around somewhere.  So creepy!
Why are people so grossed out by finger nails? Sure, doing it in public isn't great, but to some people it's just a step removed from taking a dump on someone else's desk.

yeah its just fingernails. 
PM me about how to save 6% on your annual grocery Bill!

There is a 35k starwood bonus right now as well. PM me for the info.

Nickyd£g

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13818 on: June 29, 2016, 06:21:04 AM »
He also thinks his poor situation in life is the results of us being in the EU.

At least he doesn't have to worry about that anymore

Thanks Daleth, I'm still upset but hoping to diety that the trigger is never pulled.  Failing that, Sturgeon performs a miracle and gets us into the EU and out of the UK.
LMAO!

That is NOT funny. Not the way I'm feeling today :(   I'm Scottish, so that should tell you something.

Christ I feel your pain. I so hope the UK manages to quite literally hold itself together and stay in the EU. And failing that, I hope Scotland and Northern Ireland manage to remain in the EU no matter what happens to idiotic England and Wales.
A goal without a plan is just a wish

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13819 on: June 29, 2016, 06:26:59 AM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)

Eww, gross!  I hate the sound of someone clipping their nails.  It freaks me out that I might find someone's nail clippings lying around somewhere.  So creepy!
Why are people so grossed out by finger nails? Sure, doing it in public isn't great, but to some people it's just a step removed from taking a dump on someone else's desk.

I'm not going to collect his nail clippings and force-feed them to him as punishment. I just think there is a time and a place. The place is, obviously, not work*, and the time is not when you're being paid to do a job.


*Sydney Trains also not the place, but that didn't stop the three separate people I've encountered doing just that...

Miss Piggy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13820 on: June 29, 2016, 06:49:51 AM »
Currently overhearing a co-worker clip his fingernails at his desk.

At least, I was overhearing it. I grabbed my headphones as soon as I realised what I was hearing.

(Not money-related but I had to share the horror with someone.)


Eww, gross!  I hate the sound of someone clipping their nails.  It freaks me out that I might find someone's nail clippings lying around somewhere.  So creepy!
Why are people so grossed out by finger nails? Sure, doing it in public isn't great, but to some people it's just a step removed from taking a dump on someone else's desk.

I'm not going to collect his nail clippings and force-feed them to him as punishment. I just think there is a time and a place. The place is, obviously, not work*, and the time is not when you're being paid to do a job.


*Sydney Trains also not the place, but that didn't stop the three separate people I've encountered doing just that...

For the record, the place and time is NEVER, EVER on an airplane while letting your nail clippings simply drop to the floor, without cleaning them up.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 03:49:42 PM by Miss Piggy »

deadlymonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13821 on: June 29, 2016, 08:19:44 AM »

Another option is that you can get wallabies.

I'm pretty sure that I'd have a hard time getting wallabies in Kentucky, and I'm fairly certain that species from the Australian continent require as special animal license in this state anyway.  Also, barely domesticated animals, prone to aggression towards children, and can jump a huge fence.  So no thanks.

Different strokes......you would need a license but there are several Kentucky based breeders.  They are not prone to aggression, can be kept indoors, they can jump but not crazy high (6 foot fence recommended) and can be quite friendly especially if hand raised.  Just a suggestion if you wanted something more unique than a sheep or goat.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13822 on: June 29, 2016, 09:48:47 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13823 on: June 29, 2016, 10:12:11 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13824 on: June 29, 2016, 10:45:14 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

This. Ever go out and try to stock a kitchen with the basics of cooking? Butter, milk, eggs, flour, sugar, garlic, garlic powder, chile powder, salt, pepper, onion, yeast, etc. Most of these things you buy once a year or so, and rarely at the same time. But if you're buying them all at once it looks like a lot--and we haven't even gotten to the main dish, just the seasonings.

One thing that I'm not convinced on is always cheaper at home is alfredo sauce. But I think that has more to do with the fact that mine is so good so when I make it we eat too much of it in one sitting. Another thing that is impossible to do as cheap as a restaurant is pizza. (What you call pizza and what I call pizza are probably not the same quality--you can tell me you make a good pizza for cheap, and I'd agree with you if it didn't make us both be wrong)

Tjat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13825 on: June 29, 2016, 10:58:19 AM »
I think what also happens is that most people really don't know how to "cook at home." Homemade spaghetti and meatballs turns into frozen pre-packaged meatballs and boboli pasta. People want the convenience of fast food/take-out but have no idea how to cook or common sense.


MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13826 on: June 29, 2016, 11:27:08 AM »
I think what also happens is that most people really don't know how to "cook at home." Homemade spaghetti and meatballs turns into frozen pre-packaged meatballs and boboli pasta. People want the convenience of fast food/take-out but have no idea how to cook or common sense.
When "cook at home" = frozen dinner, it's worse and almost as expensive as fast food.  Cook from scratch = cheaper and better.

Digital Dogma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13827 on: June 29, 2016, 11:27:36 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

Its funny, as a general rule the IGA stores near me are more expensive than your Stop and Shop style stores for nearly everything thats not on sale or an IGA generic brand. But they have 2.99, 3.99 and 4.99 large containers of spices (maybe 2 cups worth per bottle). I make a lot of BBQ rubs which require large quantities of chili powder and paprika, I've saved an ungodly amount of money by purchasing the larger IGA spice containers over the years.

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13828 on: June 29, 2016, 11:32:26 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

Its funny, as a general rule the IGA stores near me are more expensive than your Stop and Shop style stores for nearly everything thats not on sale or an IGA generic brand. But they have 2.99, 3.99 and 4.99 large containers of spices (maybe 2 cups worth per bottle). I make a lot of BBQ rubs which require large quantities of chili powder and paprika, I've saved an ungodly amount of money by purchasing the larger IGA spice containers over the years.
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13829 on: June 29, 2016, 12:01:31 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13830 on: June 29, 2016, 12:11:14 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13831 on: June 29, 2016, 12:15:13 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative. 

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13832 on: June 29, 2016, 01:07:52 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13833 on: June 29, 2016, 03:32:12 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13834 on: June 29, 2016, 03:36:26 PM »
Coworker tells me about her daughter's ex odd boyfriend who was into reel mowers and coupon clipping... I just kept a straight face...

onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13835 on: June 29, 2016, 03:38:12 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

Are you and your friend of the same gender?

Several male to female transgender friends have confirmed that when they order food a certain level of spiciness, they get significantly LESS spicy food now.  Fascinating.

Rural

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13836 on: June 29, 2016, 03:42:15 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

Are you and your friend of the same gender?

Several male to female transgender friends have confirmed that when they order food a certain level of spiciness, they get significantly LESS spicy food now.  Fascinating.


Ask if their Thai hot is Bangkok hot or Phuket hot. They'll decide you know what you're asking for.

limeandpepper

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13837 on: June 29, 2016, 08:16:49 PM »
Or just be specific and say you want x number of bird's eye chillies in the dish if you're having Thai food. That'll do it. (When my partner and I were in Thailand, every now and then a vendor would ask how many chillies we want, which I thought was a good idea, because saying mild, spicy, or very spicy leaves quite a bit of room for interpretation. I find bird's eye chillies tend to be fairly consistent with their spiciness, unlike some other types of chillies, so that worked well. Though you do also need to have a rough idea of the approximate size of the dish, of course.)

Mike2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13838 on: June 29, 2016, 09:06:34 PM »
Two coworkers have recently bought almost new cars with interest rates around 20%.  Neither can afford sales tax so neither car has been registered properly and one is running on plates from a previous car and the other on expired temporary plates.  They both make just above minimum wage.

Magilla

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13839 on: June 29, 2016, 10:42:04 PM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I get this a lot.  I'm white but I love and can handle very spicy food (like Thai/SriLankan very hot levels).  Whenever I ask for Thai hot or highest levels of hot the waiters give me weird looks like "yea right white boy" and bring me something I consider barely medium.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13840 on: June 30, 2016, 07:34:01 AM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I get this a lot.  I'm white but I love and can handle very spicy food (like Thai/SriLankan very hot levels).  Whenever I ask for Thai hot or highest levels of hot the waiters give me weird looks like "yea right white boy" and bring me something I consider barely medium.

I remember getting Thai food from a place in Champagne, Illinois like 10 years ago. I ordered it very spicy because I love spicy foods (Indian heritage) and was insistent that it be made that way. The cook made my pad thai and kept turning to me and yelling, "SPICY" as he added spices to it. The waitress gave me my food with a wicked smile on her face, and it was absolutely delicious!

Dezrah

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13841 on: June 30, 2016, 08:16:32 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13842 on: June 30, 2016, 08:25:36 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

Yup, here in Minnesota there are a lot of people with Scandinavian ancestry and I guess their culture doesn't have spicy foods. A former coworker would sweat while eating Italian sausages from a pizza.

Magilla

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13843 on: June 30, 2016, 08:31:31 AM »
My sister had a friend in college who had a hard time eating out because American food was too spicy for him.  He was from somewhere in South America in a region where they prefer their food unseasoned and bland.  Cheeseburger?  Too spicy.  Southwestern rice?  Too spicy.  It really is all relative to what you grew up with.

This is probably the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard with respect to spiciness, and my mother once said that a spaghetti sauce that a friend made was too spicy because he stirred it with a spoon he has used to make spicy sauce (nobody else could detect anything).

Also, where the hell in South America they don't eat spicier food than most of US (excluding SW)?

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13844 on: June 30, 2016, 08:34:42 AM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I get this a lot.  I'm white but I love and can handle very spicy food (like Thai/SriLankan very hot levels).  Whenever I ask for Thai hot or highest levels of hot the waiters give me weird looks like "yea right white boy" and bring me something I consider barely medium.

I remember getting Thai food from a place in Champagne, Illinois like 10 years ago. I ordered it very spicy because I love spicy foods (Indian heritage) and was insistent that it be made that way. The cook made my pad thai and kept turning to me and yelling, "SPICY" as he added spices to it. The waitress gave me my food with a wicked smile on her face, and it was absolutely delicious!

Not sure why it is--maybe because I hung out with Mexicans (illegals, who'd tell the lady selling tacos out of a Toyota Corolla to stop by where we worked to sell said tacos)--but I love spicy food and I'm so white I'm nearly clear. There is a thai place in Bloomington IL that is the only place where I've found something that is too spicy for me so far. Well, the Buffalo Wild Wings super hot sauce is too much for me as well, but I think that is mostly because it just tastes bad. Indian Food I've not tried too much of because I just can't convince my palate to like it. I just don't like it.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13845 on: June 30, 2016, 08:39:14 AM »

I'm always amazed that people limit their experiences and mind by how they grew up.  For the first 10 years of my life I grew up in an Eastern European coutry where mustard was considered "spicy!" and never seen any Asian, African etc foods.  Now not only do I eat super spicy food, but love a huge variety of cuisines and love trying new things. 

Anyway, I know people are different, just amazes me how closed off people can be to new experiences just because they didn't grow up that way.

I agree with you to an extent. I grew up with spicy food so spice doesn't bug me, but for someone that doesn't, spicy foods just won't go down easy with them. Even if they can tolerate it, they may not enjoy their meal, and that is the most important part. That said, I wish more people would be willing to try something that's a little spicer than they like. I've lost count of the people that won't go out for Thai food because they think it's all spicy and won't listen when I (or anyone else) tells that that they can make the food really mild.

Then there's those that don't go out for Thai food or other different cuisines simply because they don't think they will like it. It's one thing if you've tried it and didn't enjoy it, but I really don't have a whole lot of respect for people that just aren't willing to try something new. Same goes with sushi, you don't have to order sashimi if it's new to you, but I would encourage you to at least try the California Roll...which is cooked.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13846 on: June 30, 2016, 08:41:37 AM »
Well, the Buffalo Wild Wings super hot sauce is too much for me as well, but I think that is mostly because it just tastes bad. Indian Food I've not tried too much of because I just can't convince my palate to like it. I just don't like it.

Agreed! The spiciest I will order at BW's is Hot. I've had their blazing and the spice just ruins the flavor in my mind. No worried about not liking Indian food, I'm not a huge fan either. There is usually only one thing I'll ever order at a restaurant and it's the dish my mom is famous within the family for making.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13847 on: June 30, 2016, 08:51:35 AM »

Then there's those that don't go out for Thai food or other different cuisines simply because they don't think they will like it. It's one thing if you've tried it and didn't enjoy it, but I really don't have a whole lot of respect for people that just aren't willing to try something new. Same goes with sushi, you don't have to order sashimi if it's new to you, but I would encourage you to at least try the California Roll...which is cooked.

Oh, man, this is my dad. Once he tries it, he loves it, but he's always convinced he's gonna hate it.

Typical way this goes:
Me: let's go to this Vietnamese place!
Him: oh, no, I hate Vietnamese food. Too spicy/fishy/slimy/whatever.
Me: *death glare* you're acting like a toddler. You've never had it. You'll like it. We're going.

And once we're there, without fail, he chats with the waiter, asks for recommendations, LOVES the food, and requests that we go back.

So far, we've done that exact pattern for Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, Indian, Ethiopian, Louisiana-type southern food, Tex-mex, and full-on Mexican. Oh, and Brazilian BBQ. the only one he liked but didn't love was Ethiopian.

And yet, the next time I suggest a new type of food? Pattern repeats.

Torran

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13848 on: June 30, 2016, 09:09:16 AM »
In the office today:-

"Once you've bought all the ingredients, it works out just as cheap to get takeaway than to cook at home"

I am very suspicious of their claim that they have ever actually bought ingredients and cooked at home.

I think this is a common (and understandable) misconception by people that have never really cooked and are trying to start.  If you don't already have a fully stocked kitchen, then the first several meals are very expensive as you have to go out and buy every little thing like spices, condiments, butter, etc.  Recipe calls for 2 Tbsp of flour to thicken?  Well shit now I have to buy a whole bag.  That kind of thing.

If you can direct them to a place to buy things in bulk ('bulk' as in ability to buy just a little, bring your own container, etc, not 'mass quantity') that helps a lot, especially for spices.  Going from zero spices to a full spice rack by trying to buy mccormick jars at the grocery store will break the bank quick.

This. Ever go out and try to stock a kitchen with the basics of cooking? Butter, milk, eggs, flour, sugar, garlic, garlic powder, chile powder, salt, pepper, onion, yeast, etc. Most of these things you buy once a year or so, and rarely at the same time. But if you're buying them all at once it looks like a lot--and we haven't even gotten to the main dish, just the seasonings.

One thing that I'm not convinced on is always cheaper at home is alfredo sauce. But I think that has more to do with the fact that mine is so good so when I make it we eat too much of it in one sitting. Another thing that is impossible to do as cheap as a restaurant is pizza. (What you call pizza and what I call pizza are probably not the same quality--you can tell me you make a good pizza for cheap, and I'd agree with you if it didn't make us both be wrong)

Hahaha this made me laugh out loud :)

I appreciate someone who understands the importance of pizza. Pizza should never be half-assed. (And nope, I have never cooked it from home, because it would be a sad affair, not as good as the local Italian place, regrets all round, etc).

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13849 on: June 30, 2016, 09:25:10 AM »
Kroger here has a small selection of large quantities of spices for like 2x the price of their small stuff, but at least 10x the quantity.  For a few things I use constantly, I'll drive to Kroger to get these, instead of walking to the Target behind my apartment.

I buy as many spices as I can at the local Indian grocery. A helpful hint: when they say "extra-hot", they mean "weapons-grade".

I should probably get some of those for my roommate.  He ate a slice of ghost pepper the other day and said it was 'warm.'

I used to live in a house and help integrate refugees that my local congregation was "fostering" (long story).  I lived with a pregnant Burmese woman who would put on latex gloves and goggles (quite the sight!) to happily eat peppers so hot that they blistered your skin and irritated your eyes from a distance. 

I used to think of myself as having NO tolerance for spice, but moving back to the northeast out of Texas reminded me it's all relative.

Yeah, I moved from Phoenix to NJ and I can't find spicy foods at restaurants here. "Thai hot" should be hotter than 'hot' and it is, well, not.  In AZ, medium (3 on a 1-5 scale) is about as much as I can handle.

How to you look?  I swear whenever they say "how hot do you want it on a scale from 1-10?" they also do an adjustment, like if you look super white they subtract two, and if you look Thai they add three.

edit: I developed this theory based on a single data point once when me and a friend ordered the same hotness level but received different amount of hot.

I am very white.  My roommate (the ghost pepper eater) told the waitress at the last Thai place we went to that he wants his food incredibly spicy, like "try to kill me."  It still wasn't, lol.