Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4746436 times)

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13700 on: June 14, 2016, 12:48:34 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

If you pay in cash, they (either the dealership or financing company, doesn't matter) get nothing other than the profit from the sale of the car. If you finance, even at 0%, they at least have a chance at making more--if you miss a payment, you pay a late fee. If you can't make your payment for some reason, they'll renegotiate with you at a lower monthly payment and higher interest rate for longer term. But if you paid in cash? They have no chance at that.

And it means nothing to most dealerships if they get paid now or later--the exception would be the small mom and pop shops.

Fair points, except that a dealership does get paid at time of sale, the financing company buys the car from the dealer (takes title) and then you pay the financing company.  Once the sale occurs, the dealership is essentially done. 
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

Digital Dogma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13701 on: June 14, 2016, 01:55:44 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

I found this was true with many of the Subrau dealerships near me, but after many many visits around the state I found one hungry for a sale. When they'd ask about financing I'd tell them "We're not interested in financing" and they'd lose all interest in making a sale. We had a low interest car loan set up through Navy Federal Credit Union but weren't about to let that slip during negotiations. When we got past the negotiation aspect of the deal to the high-pressure sales pitch for warranty and turned down everything, we presented the high pressure salesman with the info he needed to finance the vehicle through Navy Federal. He went through all sorts of affectation that "ooh this will be so much more difficult than financing through us"... isn't that why we paid the dealership a $400 conveyance fee?

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13702 on: June 14, 2016, 02:07:09 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

I found this was true with many of the Subrau dealerships near me, but after many many visits around the state I found one hungry for a sale. When they'd ask about financing I'd tell them "We're not interested in financing" and they'd lose all interest in making a sale. We had a low interest car loan set up through Navy Federal Credit Union but weren't about to let that slip during negotiations. When we got past the negotiation aspect of the deal to the high-pressure sales pitch for warranty and turned down everything, we presented the high pressure salesman with the info he needed to finance the vehicle through Navy Federal. He went through all sorts of affectation that "ooh this will be so much more difficult than financing through us"... isn't that why we paid the dealership a $400 conveyance fee?

Why were you worried about being secretive?  Every time I've bought a car, I've gotten a pre-approval from my bank or CU at an interest rate (usually it's about 2.5%) and then went in to the dealer.  When it came time to pay, I've said, I've got this pre-approved check at 2.5%, I'll use that unless you can beat it.  All but one time (when I was buying a used car from a dealer that sold a different make, so I wasn't eligible for their captive finance arm) they've beaten the rate.  What do you gain from keeping your financing source a secret? 
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13703 on: June 14, 2016, 02:13:32 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

I found this was true with many of the Subrau dealerships near me, but after many many visits around the state I found one hungry for a sale. When they'd ask about financing I'd tell them "We're not interested in financing" and they'd lose all interest in making a sale. We had a low interest car loan set up through Navy Federal Credit Union but weren't about to let that slip during negotiations. When we got past the negotiation aspect of the deal to the high-pressure sales pitch for warranty and turned down everything, we presented the high pressure salesman with the info he needed to finance the vehicle through Navy Federal. He went through all sorts of affectation that "ooh this will be so much more difficult than financing through us"... isn't that why we paid the dealership a $400 conveyance fee?

Why were you worried about being secretive?  Every time I've bought a car, I've gotten a pre-approval from my bank or CU at an interest rate (usually it's about 2.5%) and then went in to the dealer.  When it came time to pay, I've said, I've got this pre-approved check at 2.5%, I'll use that unless you can beat it.  All but one time (when I was buying a used car from a dealer that sold a different make, so I wasn't eligible for their captive finance arm) they've beaten the rate.  What do you gain from keeping your financing source a secret?

I think he means before the sale.  Once you tell them you've obtained a good rate elsewhere, they know they won't be able to make any profit on the financing portion of the sale.  They may actually negotiate down to a reasonable vehicle price if they think they can get it all back by setting you up with a 23% loan.

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13704 on: June 14, 2016, 02:17:10 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

I found this was true with many of the Subrau dealerships near me, but after many many visits around the state I found one hungry for a sale. When they'd ask about financing I'd tell them "We're not interested in financing" and they'd lose all interest in making a sale. We had a low interest car loan set up through Navy Federal Credit Union but weren't about to let that slip during negotiations. When we got past the negotiation aspect of the deal to the high-pressure sales pitch for warranty and turned down everything, we presented the high pressure salesman with the info he needed to finance the vehicle through Navy Federal. He went through all sorts of affectation that "ooh this will be so much more difficult than financing through us"... isn't that why we paid the dealership a $400 conveyance fee?

Why were you worried about being secretive?  Every time I've bought a car, I've gotten a pre-approval from my bank or CU at an interest rate (usually it's about 2.5%) and then went in to the dealer.  When it came time to pay, I've said, I've got this pre-approved check at 2.5%, I'll use that unless you can beat it.  All but one time (when I was buying a used car from a dealer that sold a different make, so I wasn't eligible for their captive finance arm) they've beaten the rate.  What do you gain from keeping your financing source a secret?

I think he means before the sale.  Once you tell them you've obtained a good rate elsewhere, they know they won't be able to make any profit on the financing portion of the sale.  They may actually negotiate down to a reasonable vehicle price if they think they can get it all back by setting you up with a 23% loan.

Maybe I just give off the "good credit vibe" or something, but every dealer I've worked with doing this has always taken it as a challenge, if I bring them 2.5%, they're going to get me 2.4% or better come hell or high water.  Given that Subaru dealers are used to working with a reasonably affluent customer base, I doubt they are anticipating soaking anyone with a 23% loan, and I don't believe new car dealers have their own captive financing anyways (it's through the manufacturer or maybe a bank), there's nothing in it for them for a higher interest rate. 
"If I could get all the money back I ever spent on cars, I'd spend it on cars." - Nick Mason

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13705 on: June 14, 2016, 02:32:48 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

If you pay in cash, they (either the dealership or financing company, doesn't matter) get nothing other than the profit from the sale of the car. If you finance, even at 0%, they at least have a chance at making more--if you miss a payment, you pay a late fee. If you can't make your payment for some reason, they'll renegotiate with you at a lower monthly payment and higher interest rate for longer term. But if you paid in cash? They have no chance at that.

And it means nothing to most dealerships if they get paid now or later--the exception would be the small mom and pop shops.

Fair points, except that a dealership does get paid at time of sale, the financing company buys the car from the dealer (takes title) and then you pay the financing company.  Once the sale occurs, the dealership is essentially done.

Correct, except for the bolded part above (not my words). It is in both the dealer and the finance company's best interest to get you to finance. But you're right, hence the reason why making a cash offer to [most large] dealerships doesn't really help you as a negotiating tactic.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13706 on: June 14, 2016, 02:39:16 PM »
Sometimes cash/100% at front is cheaper, but many times, they push the financing so hard that it's actually worse for you if you want to pay in cash.  Go negotiate a deal on a car where they think you're financing at 0%, and then tell them at the last minute you want to pay cash, they'll try to renegotiate the deal because they want you in the financing, even at 0%.  They get kickbacks from the financing company to keep you financed, even at 0%.  Can't say I completely understand it, but I've witnessed it.

I found this was true with many of the Subrau dealerships near me, but after many many visits around the state I found one hungry for a sale. When they'd ask about financing I'd tell them "We're not interested in financing" and they'd lose all interest in making a sale. We had a low interest car loan set up through Navy Federal Credit Union but weren't about to let that slip during negotiations. When we got past the negotiation aspect of the deal to the high-pressure sales pitch for warranty and turned down everything, we presented the high pressure salesman with the info he needed to finance the vehicle through Navy Federal. He went through all sorts of affectation that "ooh this will be so much more difficult than financing through us"... isn't that why we paid the dealership a $400 conveyance fee?

Why were you worried about being secretive?  Every time I've bought a car, I've gotten a pre-approval from my bank or CU at an interest rate (usually it's about 2.5%) and then went in to the dealer.  When it came time to pay, I've said, I've got this pre-approved check at 2.5%, I'll use that unless you can beat it.  All but one time (when I was buying a used car from a dealer that sold a different make, so I wasn't eligible for their captive finance arm) they've beaten the rate.  What do you gain from keeping your financing source a secret?

I think he means before the sale.  Once you tell them you've obtained a good rate elsewhere, they know they won't be able to make any profit on the financing portion of the sale.  They may actually negotiate down to a reasonable vehicle price if they think they can get it all back by setting you up with a 23% loan.

Maybe I just give off the "good credit vibe" or something, but every dealer I've worked with doing this has always taken it as a challenge, if I bring them 2.5%, they're going to get me 2.4% or better come hell or high water.  Given that Subaru dealers are used to working with a reasonably affluent customer base, I doubt they are anticipating soaking anyone with a 23% loan, and I don't believe new car dealers have their own captive financing anyways (it's through the manufacturer or maybe a bank), there's nothing in it for them for a higher interest rate.

Yes, but that should be a completely separate issue from negotiating the price.  First discuss the price of the car, then the financing.   They will magically beat out the competitions offer by 0.1% because making some money is better than making no money, but they would give you a much much worse rate if they could get away with it.

toodleoo

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13707 on: June 14, 2016, 03:50:11 PM »
Coworker told me today: I gotta finish paying off my 401(k) loan so I can take out another loan to pay for my daughter's wedding!

*facepalm*
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lizzie

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13708 on: June 14, 2016, 04:08:48 PM »
OK, I brought this on myself intentionally, but it was kinda fun...

My boss is fond of mocking me for being, as he says, "cheap" because I do things like bring my lunch from home and bike or bus to work. Also, on the rare occasions when we do go out as a group (like to take an intern out or something), he'll pay with his credit card and we're expected to pay him back, and I expect him to give me back the change I'm owed. This makes me "cheap" even though he earns far more than I do.

Anyway, the other day after one of these lunches he stopped at the bank to get a $100 bill to give his nephew for graduation. I knew this was probably a bad idea, but I couldn't resist: I needled him by saying, "$100? That's all? I just gave my niece $500 for her graduation."***

So my boss actually calls in another coworker to berate me to her: "Can you believe Lizzie gave her niece $500 for graduation? What a faker, she's always pretending to be so frugal, bringing in her lunch blah blah blah, but she's richer than any of us!"

I said, "You know, you might want to consider that those things are actually related."

The look on his face: priceless.


***This might seem excessive, but I had my reasons, such as that I enjoy spoiling my niece because she's a sweetheart who's had a rough life and besides she can really use it.

With This Herring

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13709 on: June 14, 2016, 04:46:50 PM »
Another Chapter in the Story of Mrs. Anti-Mustachian (MAM)...

*snip description of absolute fiscal carnage, beautifully detailed*

Queue Cue my Forehead hitting the Wall once again...

FTFY
("Cue" because it is the signal to make something happen, such as when a movie director says "Cue fight scene!"  The idiom isn't about lining things up.)

*snip*
And this is where it gets worse.  Within the first week of getting the vehicle, she is talking about plans she has for her and her family.  She thinks that her current purchase is so good, that she is going to "sell" their SUV to her daughter (16 years old, just got her driver's license) in a couple of years.  That way, her and her husband can get a new vehicle again at that point, and her daughter won't have to worry about driving an old, cheap car.  Yep, her daughter is still in school, works a minimum wage job, and her mom is going to give her a real life education on how to make financing payments - on a car.  Considering the vehicle she bought, the very little maintenance they do on their vehicles, the amount of (needless) driving they would put on that vehicle in a couple of years, even the fact she smokes in the vehicle all the time, there is no doubt she will "sell" the vehicle to her daughter for more than it is worth - she says "for whatever remains on the financing of the car, is what I would sell it for." 

No, don't teach you child about making responsible financial choices.  No, rather, teach them the ways of anti-mustachianism in very real terms and make them learn hard life lessons instead - if they learn them at all. 
I've got a very young family and just typing this out, makes my stomach queezy and I'm way too worked up for my good.  Time to walk home, get some fresh air, and calm down ("keepin' calm and stachin' on!)

Oh, that's horrendous.  Is there a chance you know MAM Junior well enough to tell her "Whatever you do, don't agree to take over payments on that SUV.  Tell your parents you are uncomfortable driving it and buy a small, older, low-mileage Toyota with cash.  You'll thank me in ten years."
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TOgirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13710 on: June 15, 2016, 06:15:22 AM »
I bring my breakfast/coffee/lunch to work everyday, but often go with coworkers when they buy their food, as it makes for a nice break from the office, and a nice walk. I eat my food before or after we walk to buy theirs. Last week, a new designer pizza place opened up down the street (in one of the most expensive areas in the city) so obviously coworkers HAD TO try it out!!! They order paper thin, personal size margherita pizzas (hand tossed, blah blah...) ball of dough, three leaves of basil, some sauce, and a few spots of mozzeralla...for $10.95 plus 13% tax....when they came out of the oven, the crust had bubbled up as pizza crust does, but the bubbles were all burnt. They brought their pizzas back and we ate in a meeting room together once I grabbed my lunch from my desk. As they scraped the burnt flakes off of their pizzas, they were exclaiming "wow...these are a great deal, at a restaurant these would easily be $18 each plus tax and tip, we scored on lunch today!!!" Hmmm....my packed meals for the day cost about $3 total, and none of them are burnt...

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13711 on: June 15, 2016, 07:00:57 AM »
I bring my breakfast/coffee/lunch to work everyday, but often go with coworkers when they buy their food, as it makes for a nice break from the office, and a nice walk. I eat my food before or after we walk to buy theirs. Last week, a new designer pizza place opened up down the street (in one of the most expensive areas in the city) so obviously coworkers HAD TO try it out!!! They order paper thin, personal size margherita pizzas (hand tossed, blah blah...) ball of dough, three leaves of basil, some sauce, and a few spots of mozzeralla...for $10.95 plus 13% tax....when they came out of the oven, the crust had bubbled up as pizza crust does, but the bubbles were all burnt. They brought their pizzas back and we ate in a meeting room together once I grabbed my lunch from my desk. As they scraped the burnt flakes off of their pizzas, they were exclaiming "wow...these are a great deal, at a restaurant these would easily be $18 each plus tax and tip, we scored on lunch today!!!" Hmmm....my packed meals for the day cost about $3 total, and none of them are burnt...
THREE DOLLARS A DAY on work food? What are you, rich? ;)
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Proud Foot

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13712 on: June 15, 2016, 07:43:04 AM »
Not quite at work but on the way home yesterday I heard this ad on the radio..

"Don't know what to get Dad for Father's Day? Come down to xyz gunshop and get the latest brand name AR-15 rifle plus 1,000 rounds of ammunition for only $999!!!"

I don't have any idea of whether that is a good deal or not, but do people actually spend that much for one holiday gift?  i think the total I have spent on gifts for my Dad for all Father's Days combined is less than that!

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13713 on: June 15, 2016, 07:45:16 AM »
Not quite at work but on the way home yesterday I heard this ad on the radio..

"Don't know what to get Dad for Father's Day? Come down to xyz gunshop and get the latest brand name AR-15 rifle plus 1,000 rounds of ammunition for only $999!!!"

I don't have any idea of whether that is a good deal or not, but do people actually spend that much for one holiday gift?  i think the total I have spent on gifts for my Dad for all Father's Days combined is less than that!

They're probably advertising to anyone who wants the ammo; father's day is just the reason. I'm sure there are some people out there who will spend that much, but most won't. I think I'm taking my dad out to play golf and get lunch at White Castle.

Chris22

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13714 on: June 15, 2016, 08:51:22 AM »
Not quite at work but on the way home yesterday I heard this ad on the radio..

"Don't know what to get Dad for Father's Day? Come down to xyz gunshop and get the latest brand name AR-15 rifle plus 1,000 rounds of ammunition for only $999!!!"

I don't have any idea of whether that is a good deal or not, but do people actually spend that much for one holiday gift?  i think the total I have spent on gifts for my Dad for all Father's Days combined is less than that!

For my family, and others I know, Father's Day is the one holiday where dad maybe picks his own gift out and goes out and buys it.  And it's usually stuff like a new grill or a a tool or something that Dad needed (or "needed") anyways.  One year I told my wife don't buy me anything, I just want to go to the golf store and get a new putter.  This year I told her I am sick of dealing with the two leaky, rickety, constantly breaking plastic hose reels and crappy garden hoses we have, I'm going to go out and buy a nice metal cart and a decent, durable, quality hose that will last and not leak all over.  Stuff like that.   
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Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13715 on: June 15, 2016, 09:09:43 AM »
Huh. In my family, Father's Day (and Mother's Day) is an excuse to do something nice for the person.

So, like... My husband will probably get to sleep in and my daughter and I will make a breakfast he likes. We're having my dad over for dinner so he can spend time with his grandkid. That kind of thing. For Mother's Day, I got to sleep in and drink a latte in bed while reading a book, and my husband cut tulips from the garden and brought them in because he knows I love tulips. Maybe minor expenses in terms of ingredients, but mostly it's about effort and caring. (Ok - we got my mom flowers, because that matters to her. 15$ expense.)

My colleague, though... New bbq and tools for Father's Day! A kitchen aid bbq, because why wouldn't you spend 500$ extra for a brand name that doesn't add bbq quality! And then she complains about being broke. SIGH.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13716 on: June 15, 2016, 09:10:36 AM »
Not quite at work but on the way home yesterday I heard this ad on the radio..

"Don't know what to get Dad for Father's Day? Come down to xyz gunshop and get the latest brand name AR-15 rifle plus 1,000 rounds of ammunition for only $999!!!"

I don't have any idea of whether that is a good deal or not, but do people actually spend that much for one holiday gift?  i think the total I have spent on gifts for my Dad for all Father's Days combined is less than that!
It depends on the gun, really.  You can get a decent low-end AR-15 for $550 (plus shipping and any FFL fees), but you can also spend >$1k.  Ammo for those rifles is somewhere in the $0.25-$.40/round range, typically.

Warlord1986

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13717 on: June 15, 2016, 09:48:06 AM »
Daddy usually gets some specialty shaving cream and/or specialty coffee and/or a bottle of specialty olive oil. Each is less than $10. They work for Father's Day, Christmas, birthday, etc. The response I get tells me they're appreciated.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13718 on: June 15, 2016, 10:20:58 AM »
I bring my breakfast/coffee/lunch to work everyday, but often go with coworkers when they buy their food, as it makes for a nice break from the office, and a nice walk. I eat my food before or after we walk to buy theirs. Last week, a new designer pizza place opened up down the street (in one of the most expensive areas in the city) so obviously coworkers HAD TO try it out!!! They order paper thin, personal size margherita pizzas (hand tossed, blah blah...) ball of dough, three leaves of basil, some sauce, and a few spots of mozzeralla...for $10.95 plus 13% tax....when they came out of the oven, the crust had bubbled up as pizza crust does, but the bubbles were all burnt. They brought their pizzas back and we ate in a meeting room together once I grabbed my lunch from my desk. As they scraped the burnt flakes off of their pizzas, they were exclaiming "wow...these are a great deal, at a restaurant these would easily be $18 each plus tax and tip, we scored on lunch today!!!" Hmmm....my packed meals for the day cost about $3 total, and none of them are burnt...
THREE DOLLARS A DAY on work food? What are you, rich? ;)
Hah, funny.  Last week I was doing some  math on my work food.  Back in the day, when I'd explained to coworkers that I was packing lunches and saving $3500 a year doing it (packing for 3 people), I was eating a lot more carbs.

So I realized that my salad/ veggies/ fruit/ protein lunches are closer to $5, compares to my beans-and-rice lunches of $1.50.

But hey, I'm less chubby!

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13719 on: June 15, 2016, 10:26:51 AM »

So I realized that my salad/ veggies/ fruit/ protein lunches are closer to $5, compares to my beans-and-rice lunches of $1.50.

But hey, I'm less chubby!

I usually toss a few pounds of frozen chicken breasts in the slow cooker with two hot sauces and turn it on low for 9 hours, shred and put in a container. My lunches consist of nuking a portion of the chicken and eating it with a quick salad. The salad is extremely simple, usually just a mix of greens (spinach, kale, romaine, ect). It costs maybe $2 per lunch.

TOgirl

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13720 on: June 15, 2016, 11:11:16 AM »
I bring my breakfast/coffee/lunch to work everyday, but often go with coworkers when they buy their food, as it makes for a nice break from the office, and a nice walk. I eat my food before or after we walk to buy theirs. Last week, a new designer pizza place opened up down the street (in one of the most expensive areas in the city) so obviously coworkers HAD TO try it out!!! They order paper thin, personal size margherita pizzas (hand tossed, blah blah...) ball of dough, three leaves of basil, some sauce, and a few spots of mozzeralla...for $10.95 plus 13% tax....when they came out of the oven, the crust had bubbled up as pizza crust does, but the bubbles were all burnt. They brought their pizzas back and we ate in a meeting room together once I grabbed my lunch from my desk. As they scraped the burnt flakes off of their pizzas, they were exclaiming "wow...these are a great deal, at a restaurant these would easily be $18 each plus tax and tip, we scored on lunch today!!!" Hmmm....my packed meals for the day cost about $3 total, and none of them are burnt...
THREE DOLLARS A DAY on work food? What are you, rich? ;)
Hah, funny.  Last week I was doing some  math on my work food.  Back in the day, when I'd explained to coworkers that I was packing lunches and saving $3500 a year doing it (packing for 3 people), I was eating a lot more carbs.

So I realized that my salad/ veggies/ fruit/ protein lunches are closer to $5, compares to my beans-and-rice lunches of $1.50.

But hey, I'm less chubby!

Hahaha! I don't know if it's really $3 a day...I keep a big bag of oats at work for oatmeal, (add a scoop of protein powder and frozen berries to it), and then leftovers for lunch - usually veggies or salad, with chicken or tuna...but it sure makes me feel rich at the end of the week, when they've spent $60-70 plus on lunches and I've spent maybe $10-15 on all my breakfasts and lunches for the week...

I get how it's hard for them though - they have no time! A quote from this morning "nope, didn't pack a lunch again!!! I know I know!! I SHOULD!!! But I didn't have time because we were out for dinner!"

Let's not discuss their fancy coffee habits several times a day....while I use the keurig in the office and a reusable pod, so my cups of survival are $0.04 each...

deadlymonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13721 on: June 15, 2016, 12:23:29 PM »
Something I found out today at work, so it counts, right?

Another team in my department was supposed to have a new person start this week. Orientation Monday, then first day in the department Tuesday. He wasn't here yesterday. Today, I found out why. Monday, he emailed HR and said that he wasn't taking the job, and was going to stay with his current company. He'd accepted the job offer 2-3 weeks ago.

He's blacklisted with HR - will never even get an interview here again.

I experienced something similar to this as a grad student.  The department was interviewing for  new tenure track position and was interviewing different candidates.  As part of the process they invited the few finalists to the campus o give lectures, a general one for the undergraduates and a much more technical lecture for grad students.  As part of the process, the chair asked the grad students for input based on whom we would like to learn from.  In the end they offered the position to someone who appeared to enthusiastically want the job and did a great job interviewing.  Turns out at the last moment he turned it down because he just wanted an offer from prestigious university X to use for negotiating a position at university Y where he really wanted to work. 

That is ok and all I guess, but kind of a dick move since they had to start the whole recruiting process over again.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13722 on: June 15, 2016, 12:27:01 PM »

So I realized that my salad/ veggies/ fruit/ protein lunches are closer to $5, compares to my beans-and-rice lunches of $1.50.

But hey, I'm less chubby!

I usually toss a few pounds of frozen chicken breasts in the slow cooker with two hot sauces and turn it on low for 9 hours, shred and put in a container. My lunches consist of nuking a portion of the chicken and eating it with a quick salad. The salad is extremely simple, usually just a mix of greens (spinach, kale, romaine, ect). It costs maybe $2 per lunch.
Most of the cost comes in with the produce box,  $40 a week.  I just calculated the cost per item (approx) and that's the biggest cost.  There's also protein (often eggs), sunflower seeds, and often a bit of cheese.  It's a very nice salad.

But my "lunch" cost also includes 2 snacks - cottage cheese ($0.72), fresh fruit ($1), plus more fresh vegetables with nuts or hummus.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13723 on: June 15, 2016, 01:01:23 PM »

So I realized that my salad/ veggies/ fruit/ protein lunches are closer to $5, compares to my beans-and-rice lunches of $1.50.

But hey, I'm less chubby!

I usually toss a few pounds of frozen chicken breasts in the slow cooker with two hot sauces and turn it on low for 9 hours, shred and put in a container. My lunches consist of nuking a portion of the chicken and eating it with a quick salad. The salad is extremely simple, usually just a mix of greens (spinach, kale, romaine, ect). It costs maybe $2 per lunch.
Most of the cost comes in with the produce box,  $40 a week.  I just calculated the cost per item (approx) and that's the biggest cost.  There's also protein (often eggs), sunflower seeds, and often a bit of cheese.  It's a very nice salad.

But my "lunch" cost also includes 2 snacks - cottage cheese ($0.72), fresh fruit ($1), plus more fresh vegetables with nuts or hummus.

Fair enough, and your lunches sound tastier than mine. I recognize that my lunches are boring, but they are working for me and they are easy for me to sustain.

Slee_stack

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13724 on: June 15, 2016, 01:17:40 PM »
Fruit is also the expensive part of my lunch.  About $1 for (1) apple and (1) banana.  Overall cost is usually just under $2.  I usually have a half PB sandwich (no jelly, too sweet), some chips, almonds/raisins and the fruit.

I go out to lunch about once a quarter and then usually only if its required (and then its paid for).   I prefer to take quick lunches and leave a smidgen earlier.

bb11

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13725 on: June 15, 2016, 02:43:12 PM »
Coworker who is constantly spending lavishly on himself while making fun of me (not in a cruel way) for being frugal; in his mid-30's with very little saved despite making near $100k for years:

"I promise you in 10 years you'll have outgrown your frugality."
We both makes jokes about each other's spending, so it's not a comment I get mad at. We've talked about finances a decent amount and he knows my strategy. What is amazing to me is that he truly thinks his way is right, and that frugality is just some remnant of my youthful naivete that I will mature out of into a good consumer.

I'm amazed.  He knows your strategy--does he disagree that mathematically it is INEVITABLE that you will be ready to retire way before he is?  If so, what does he mean by "his way is right"?  Does he mean that spending is more virtuous than being frugal, because it drives the economy or something?  Does he think that it's objectively true that happiness comes from spending, and you're just delusional about being happy with low spending but some day you'll realize that and start spending more and become truly happy?  (But you'll still be way ahead of him in savings!)
As I said, I'm amazed.

I think it's a combination of denial (he will sometimes say "I wish I could have a more frugal mindset, but I just don't") and thinking that spending more truly does make you happier.

MissNancyPryor

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13726 on: June 15, 2016, 10:12:47 PM »
Bad week.  Travelling for work and the monthly leaders' meeting beating which is always cringe-worthy.  Last night the director insisted we all go out to Hard Rock Cafe.  It was absolutely terrible food served by an idiot.  Horrible prices for silly-named cocktails (only $18 with the commemorative glass!) and $6 for a beer.  My fajitas were barely edible, undercooked veggies and just a tasteless, greasy mess.  The others all sucked up to the director and raved how awesome it was.  There was hardly anyone there, the HRC is clearly way past its prime as a franchise. 

One of my peers (the guy who plays hooky all the time, I wrote about him on other threads) admitted that he bought $100 of crap from the gift shop on the prior visit and then lost is somewhere in the city, left it behind.  Hardy har har.  The director immediately popped up and said he needed to go buy some of that crap too.  No doubt on the company cc.  For crappy Chinese made shit.  What a colossal waste of time and money. 

After weeks like this it is very tempting lean really hard to the YES side of the 'do I tell them I am FIRE' debate as I finally depart.  I hate them all already, and their boorish and ridiculous behaviors this week make me think it will be fan-fucking-tastic to make sure they know when the time comes.   

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13727 on: June 15, 2016, 10:33:33 PM »
Talking funerals with a colleague.

A local cemetery charges $30,000 for a tomb within a particular mausoleum.

They also have a $2000 option for burial in the lawn cemetery and a small plaque.

Co-worker, whose mother has already bought 16 places for the family in another mausoleum, said, "Oh that's good that they have somewhere for families with no money."

(These prices exclude actual funeral expenses, e.g. coffin.)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13728 on: June 15, 2016, 10:35:14 PM »
Talking funerals with a colleague.

A local cemetery charges $30,000 for a tomb within a particular mausoleum.

They also have a $2000 option for burial in the lawn cemetery and a small plaque.

Co-worker, whose mother has already bought 16 places for the family in another mausoleum, said, "Oh that's good that they have somewhere for families with no money."

(These prices exclude actual funeral expenses, e.g. coffin.)

It never ceases to amaze me when people volunteer to be a future century's museum exhibit.

ETA: I wonder how many of our current museum exhibits weren't really wealthy, influential rulers so much as people with more money or wampum than sense.
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PDM

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13729 on: June 15, 2016, 10:42:40 PM »
I work at an organisation currently going through a major restructure looking to reduce overheads by $100mil+ due to declines in the mining industry among other things. I was discussing property and first homes with a colleague who works in a Health and Safety role and is married to an operator who works on a remote site (both with said company undergoing massive cuts).

"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

Wowsers batman! Holy debt in a time of uncertainty. Eggs in one basket much? And we're not talking San Francisco, or New York or anywhere that potentially can justify epic house prices - we're talking Brisbane, Australia.

Its ok though - they plan to own it for at least 5 years before upgrading.

KodeBlue

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13730 on: June 16, 2016, 12:57:42 AM »
$1400/mo for a car payment?! Holy crap. that's more than my mortgage, which at ~1300 is I think on the high side compared to most here!

Yeah, just for a car payment. The level of craziness is out of this world.

Almost 3 times my mortgage payment! Yikes. Next time you talk this person find something out for me...does stupid hurt?

NykkiC

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13731 on: June 16, 2016, 01:18:03 AM »
I work at an organisation currently going through a major restructure looking to reduce overheads by $100mil+ due to declines in the mining industry among other things. I was discussing property and first homes with a colleague who works in a Health and Safety role and is married to an operator who works on a remote site (both with said company undergoing massive cuts).

"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

Wowsers batman! Holy debt in a time of uncertainty. Eggs in one basket much? And we're not talking San Francisco, or New York or anywhere that potentially can justify epic house prices - we're talking Brisbane, Australia.

Its ok though - they plan to own it for at least 5 years before upgrading.

Gosh, its like you don't know that we're Australians and its therefore compulsory to spend crazy amounts of money on a stand alone home with more bedrooms than we will ever need. We also have no option except to buy in a few highly spread out cities that aren't optimised for public transport. And if you can't afford it, then you can take the advice of the new Ambassador to the United States: get a better job.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13732 on: June 16, 2016, 01:19:53 AM »
$1400/mo for a car payment?! Holy crap. that's more than my mortgage, which at ~1300 is I think on the high side compared to most here!

Yeah, just for a car payment. The level of craziness is out of this world.

Almost 3 times my mortgage payment! Yikes. Next time you talk this person find something out for me...does stupid hurt?

Ask this guy (courtesy of r/cars on Reddit).

He bought a 2010 GT-R with 66,000 miles and a dodgy history, and paid $55k on 75 month financing.

It's ok, though:

Quote
I had a good amount of equity in my 370z so buying this car wasn't the stupidest decision I've ever made.

https://m.reddit.com/r/cars/comments/4o3qda/i_picked_up_what_i_thought_was_a_dream_yesterday/?utm_source=mweb_redirect&compact=true

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13733 on: June 16, 2016, 06:42:38 AM »
"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

That costs $750,000? Are Australian dollars worth very little or something?

--checks exchange rate--

Nope, that's still insane. Equivalent to $550,000 US. My goodness.

katstache92

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13734 on: June 16, 2016, 06:47:15 AM »
Coworker: Hey do you know anything about XYZ Company for refinancing?  They sent me something in the mail that says they have a 3.29% rate for a 20 year.  So I could cut off 6 years of my mortgage and not have to pay anything more each month
Me: No, I haven't heard of them.  What are their closing costs?
Coworker: No idea, is that important?
Me: Yes, it can be 2-3 grand.  If you go with Local Bank A or Local Bank B they do not require title insurance so the closing costs are much less.  I refinanced last year for $324.
Coworker: Huh, maybe? Oh look, Local Bank A's rate for a 15 year is even less than XYZ Company.

5 minutes later.

Coworker: Hey, can you run some refinance numbers for me?
Other Guy: Sure, just send me your info.
Coworker: Thanks, XYZ Company says they have this great rate, but I don't know if it's legit.
Other Guy: Those rates are never that low, I'm always wary when I see a rate that low.  It can't be true.
Coworker: Hmm, it's still probably worth looking into.  What did you do about closing costs when you refinanced?
Other Guy: Oh, closing costs aren't important, they don't matter when you're running the numbers.
Coworker: Do you just roll them into the loan?
Other Guy: Yeah, it's like 5 bucks a month, nothing to worry about.

*Head to desk and repeat*

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13735 on: June 16, 2016, 09:58:02 AM »
"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

That costs $750,000? Are Australian dollars worth very little or something?

--checks exchange rate--

Nope, that's still insane. Equivalent to $550,000 US. My goodness.

Check out housing costs in California, NYC, etc...hell, even northern NJ. That's not unusual at all.

With This Herring

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13736 on: June 16, 2016, 10:12:47 AM »
Speaking of mortgages...

I went with a friend to a first-time homebuyers' class, as she was thinking of purchasing soon.  The class was run by a pair of realtors.  The younger realtor describes different kinds of mortgages and mentions that you can get some with only a 3% downpayment!  As the realtor is about to move onto the next topic...

Friend: *raises hand*  "I've heard about amortization of mortgages, but I don't really know what it's about.  Can you explain it?"
Realtor: "Well, it's like this.  The first payment you make is going to be mostly interest with a little bit of principal, and the next payment will be a little more principal..." *writes out the first year of a sample mortgage amortization on the board*  "...so it looks like this.  However, if you pay this month AND next month's payments at the same time, you can just cross this right off..." *crosses off next month's payment* "...and you save on interest."
Friend: "Why is there so little principal in the first few payments?"
Realtor: "That's the way the bank sets it up."

After this baffling explanation, I quietly told my friend that I would explain it to her after we got out of the class.  My friend is quite bright, so when I told her that the interest is just based on the principal balance and the monthly payment is just calculated to make the loan last a certain amount of time, she caught right on.  However, the explanation the realtor gave makes me think that the realtor really didn't understand how it works at all.  It seems like a lot of people have the idea that the earlier payments are mostly interest because the bank is run by jerks trying to wring as much out of you as they can before the loan is paid off.
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deadlymonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13737 on: June 16, 2016, 10:19:49 AM »
Talking funerals with a colleague.

A local cemetery charges $30,000 for a tomb within a particular mausoleum.

They also have a $2000 option for burial in the lawn cemetery and a small plaque.

Co-worker, whose mother has already bought 16 places for the family in another mausoleum, said, "Oh that's good that they have somewhere for families with no money."

(These prices exclude actual funeral expenses, e.g. coffin.)

I prefer the scattering of ashes, much cheaper.  Although I don't know if my family will approve a Viking funeral with longboat and flaming arrow.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13738 on: June 16, 2016, 10:21:17 AM »
$1400/mo for a car payment?! Holy crap. that's more than my mortgage, which at ~1300 is I think on the high side compared to most here!

Yeah, just for a car payment. The level of craziness is out of this world.

Almost 3 times my mortgage payment! Yikes. Next time you talk this person find something out for me...does stupid hurt?
I'd kill for either mortgage payment.  Our first one was 3x that.

Digital Dogma

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13739 on: June 16, 2016, 10:37:43 AM »
I work at an organisation currently going through a major restructure looking to reduce overheads by $100mil+ due to declines in the mining industry among other things. I was discussing property and first homes with a colleague who works in a Health and Safety role and is married to an operator who works on a remote site (both with said company undergoing massive cuts).

"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

Wowsers batman! Holy debt in a time of uncertainty. Eggs in one basket much? And we're not talking San Francisco, or New York or anywhere that potentially can justify epic house prices - we're talking Brisbane, Australia.

Its ok though - they plan to own it for at least 5 years before upgrading.
Ugh this reminds me of an example used in our ethics training which states its most ethical to be impartial when you have knowledge that two individuals in this situation have their job on the chopping block. I got that one wrong, according to my employer.

Warlord1986

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13740 on: June 16, 2016, 10:57:14 AM »
Talking funerals with a colleague.

A local cemetery charges $30,000 for a tomb within a particular mausoleum.

They also have a $2000 option for burial in the lawn cemetery and a small plaque.

Co-worker, whose mother has already bought 16 places for the family in another mausoleum, said, "Oh that's good that they have somewhere for families with no money."

(These prices exclude actual funeral expenses, e.g. coffin.)

Holy cow. My parents told me to cremate them, then scatter the ashes over a mountain somewhere cool.
Personally, I like DeadlyMonkey's idea. It sounds suitable for a warlord.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13741 on: June 16, 2016, 01:53:07 PM »
Yesterday, a financial advisor came to talk to us about diversifying and mutual or index funds and whatnot. She started out her demonstration talking about inflation. I didn't notice the charts she had in the pamphlet showing ... I guess "typical"? ... prices for things in 1934, 1980, and 2015.

So she goes "for instance, how much did you pay for your first car?"

Me: "$1800"

Financial advisor looks over, sees that I'm a 20-something, not a 60-something, throwing out that number, and goes "I don't have anywhere to go with that."

The chart had 30-something thousand as a price of a car in 2015. Whaaaaat. I've bought a brand new car before too. It was like $15,000 after the extended warranty and everything.


Our premarital counseling required us to meet with a financial counselor (a parishioner looking for easy leads- it felt really slimy!)

He asked what our dream cars were, I said a Prius, my husband said a Boxster.
Then when we went back a week later he tells me "I didn't have data on what the Prius cost, so I assumed $50k"

Um, we got married in 2004. The internet existed. Try asking Jeeves or whatever we did then rather than coming up with an INSANE number for that car.  I was so annoyed I tuned out everything else. 


(Also- I later decided a Prius was too expensive, even though I'm spendypants as far as MMM goes with cars. I paid $18k, cash of course, for my Elantra Limited).

Always fun when your pre-marital counselor goes on to have a personal meltdown a few years later. In other words they did not live by the very words they were preaching.

We went to counseling just to humor the extended family. DW and I were more thoughtful about getting married and staying happily married than the people around us. ;)

nanu

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13742 on: June 16, 2016, 01:54:22 PM »
I work at an organisation currently going through a major restructure looking to reduce overheads by $100mil+ due to declines in the mining industry among other things. I was discussing property and first homes with a colleague who works in a Health and Safety role and is married to an operator who works on a remote site (both with said company undergoing massive cuts).

"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

Wowsers batman! Holy debt in a time of uncertainty. Eggs in one basket much? And we're not talking San Francisco, or New York or anywhere that potentially can justify epic house prices - we're talking Brisbane, Australia.

Its ok though - they plan to own it for at least 5 years before upgrading.
Ugh this reminds me of an example used in our ethics training which states its most ethical to be impartial when you have knowledge that two individuals in this situation have their job on the chopping block. I got that one wrong, according to my employer.
I think employers should really replace "ethics training" with "how-to-behave-in-a-way-such-that-we-won't-get-sued training".
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MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13743 on: June 16, 2016, 01:56:10 PM »
Talking funerals with a colleague.

A local cemetery charges $30,000 for a tomb within a particular mausoleum.

They also have a $2000 option for burial in the lawn cemetery and a small plaque.

Co-worker, whose mother has already bought 16 places for the family in another mausoleum, said, "Oh that's good that they have somewhere for families with no money."

(These prices exclude actual funeral expenses, e.g. coffin.)

Holy cow. My parents told me to cremate them, then scatter the ashes over a mountain somewhere cool.
Personally, I like DeadlyMonkey's idea. It sounds suitable for a warlord.

I like this. Honestly, I"m dead. Maybe it will be ok for people to have a good service in remembrance of me, but afterwards I really don't care if they feed my corpse to Brick Top's pigs.

fattest_foot

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13744 on: June 16, 2016, 02:13:52 PM »
Coworker: Hmm, it's still probably worth looking into.  What did you do about closing costs when you refinanced?
Other Guy: Oh, closing costs aren't important, they don't matter when you're running the numbers.
Coworker: Do you just roll them into the loan?
Other Guy: Yeah, it's like 5 bucks a month, nothing to worry about.

*Head to desk and repeat*

Stories like that make me want to come up with a stupidly simple way to make a ridiculous amount of money. The person(s) who came up with monthly payments (however many decades, centuries, or millennia that was) was a genius.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13745 on: June 16, 2016, 02:20:18 PM »
Coworker: Hmm, it's still probably worth looking into.  What did you do about closing costs when you refinanced?
Other Guy: Oh, closing costs aren't important, they don't matter when you're running the numbers.
Coworker: Do you just roll them into the loan?
Other Guy: Yeah, it's like 5 bucks a month, nothing to worry about.

*Head to desk and repeat*

Stories like that make me want to come up with a stupidly simple way to make a ridiculous amount of money. The person(s) who came up with monthly payments (however many decades, centuries, or millennia that was) was a genius.

Absolutely! When I was buying my house, we were a few thousand off on price and a buddy of mine texted to see how things were going. When I told him, he was confused because it would only add like $15/month. I think that was the moment he realized that I was good with money because from thereon he would ask me questions about finances and saving as he's about to get married in two months and is starting to worry about managing his money. Him and his fiance have dramatically cut back on dining out and other things.

Mac_MacGyver

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13746 on: June 16, 2016, 02:48:31 PM »
Driving home from work yesterday I stopped at a 7-11 to check if a particular movie was in stock at the Redbox. At one of the gas pumps were two young men, about 25 years of age each asking if anyone had any change as they were out of gas and had no money. The car they were driving you ask? A brand new BMW 535 with the 30 day tags still on it. 

bb11

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13747 on: June 16, 2016, 03:14:27 PM »
"We're looking for a 3+ bedroom house, with two bathrooms and a double garage - our budget is $800,000 but we'd prefer to not go over $750,000".

That costs $750,000? Are Australian dollars worth very little or something?

--checks exchange rate--

Nope, that's still insane. Equivalent to $550,000 US. My goodness.

Check out housing costs in California, NYC, etc...hell, even northern NJ. That's not unusual at all.

+1

The median home price in San Jose, CA is now about $900k (source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/san-joses-median-home-price-hits-900000-2015-05-11). This is not some small suburb but a city with over 1 million people in it. $550k? Sounds cheap! ;)

TallFrodo

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13748 on: June 16, 2016, 09:20:52 PM »
Something I found out today at work, so it counts, right?

Another team in my department was supposed to have a new person start this week. Orientation Monday, then first day in the department Tuesday. He wasn't here yesterday. Today, I found out why. Monday, he emailed HR and said that he wasn't taking the job, and was going to stay with his current company. He'd accepted the job offer 2-3 weeks ago.

He's blacklisted with HR - will never even get an interview here again.

I experienced something similar to this as a grad student.  The department was interviewing for  new tenure track position and was interviewing different candidates.  As part of the process they invited the few finalists to the campus o give lectures, a general one for the undergraduates and a much more technical lecture for grad students.  As part of the process, the chair asked the grad students for input based on whom we would like to learn from.  In the end they offered the position to someone who appeared to enthusiastically want the job and did a great job interviewing.  Turns out at the last moment he turned it down because he just wanted an offer from prestigious university X to use for negotiating a position at university Y where he really wanted to work. 

That is ok and all I guess, but kind of a dick move since they had to start the whole recruiting process over again.

I did this to get my current job. After applying for every IT job in my town every week for months and not landing a single interview (depressing, I assure you), I widened my search to "anywhere in Australia other than a capital city." Within two weeks I had interviewed for and signed a contract for a role that knocked my pay up $12k and had more responsibilities but was throwing up all sorts of red flags and was in a town over 1000km away. That same week I had my first ever local interview which I also nailed but they were slower getting back to me. When I mentioned that I was already sitting on a signed job offer and had given my four weeks notice the local company agreed to match the higher amount (at the upper end of their pay scale) to get me to stay. The new job was a better match for what I wanted, wouldn't need moving costs or a raise in my cost of living so I took it. As soon as the ink was dry I emailed my former-next-employer stating that I was formally giving my two weeks notice to THEM as per clause X of the contract and apologizing profusely for the inconvenience due to my "personal circumstances". The response I got was "LOL see you round the traps" (did I mention the red flags?).

Either way, I used my lunch break to drop about $100 to have a bouquet of edible chocolate flowers delivered to their office with a Sorry card. The hiring manager got back to me to say thanks and that it wasn't necessary but in terms of networking I figure I'll be "the weirdo who sent flowers" now rather than "that guy who left them in the lurch for a position".



I've been working through this thread for weeks so now that I'm at the end I can finally contribute my own tales of coworker insanity. Sorry for the text dump, I've had to wade through 279 pages to share this and I guess it got to me.

My colleague at work used to make much bigger money in America and now we are very open talking in talking money. But while I'm living off every second paycheque, he's supporting 3 kids and a full-time-study-wife who is admittedly going through health problems but can't seem to delay gratification. She is a wonderful lady, a great cook and they have similar hobbies, humour and all those other things I don't ask about at work. The problem is that anything financial, she has a very unhealthy financial outlook probably partially due to not being in the workforce for 15 years. Here's a few of the shockers:

  • Mrs Colleague had a bingle / fender bender in the car park. That night while Mr Colleague is sorting out a fix (only a minor dent) she breaks down and tells him she "doesn't feel safe" in that car anymore and they "need" a new one. He points out that that isn't happening with their credit card debt, that a bigger car will just make parking even harder, that safety isn't the issue at <10km like this and that eventually gets her to agree. I find out about all this the next day when he gets a call during the day from his bank: "Mr Colleague! We're just getting back to you about your enquiry earlier today about a car loan!". He made no such call. After presumably a night full of heated discussion, I found out she had done so under both their names to prove that they COULD afford it just to prove him wrong on the first point of the argument. Apparently no intention to actually buy a car but that's the sort of thing that would have me filing charges.
  • After the above heated discussions, Mrs Colleague turned over a new leaf. She was cutting costs, eating out less and buying cheaper groceries and within a month they had paid off one of the $5000 credit cards. Mr Colleague was beaming and talked about how he left the card open as an emergency fund because he knew they had dental bills coming up for the kids. Weeks pass with no juicy gossip. The month of the dental work comes, "So you're going to put it on the emergency fund card?" "No, it's full."
  • Mrs Colleague's parents come through with a $5k loan (Emergency outpatient care, as I now know it) to make sure the work gets done (they aren't a fan of Mr Colleague so it has to go to her personal account). Mrs Colleague gets to the day of the procedure and only has $3k of it left.
  • Mr Colleague has to leave work early to sign the financing form on this dental work. Mrs Colleague insists that the money will come out of her account so instead of being a cosigner or guarantor he winds up being a second contact person? Other issues crop up in the intervening weeks but eventually he starts getting harassing calls about a late payment on her account. Apparently she has been consistently forgetting to send the money until they call but now she's ignoring their calls.  Nope. She just failed to pay her mobile bill for the past however many days so now they've restricted her number.
  • On the mobile front, he pays for the oldest kid's phone and the second one is begging Mum for a tablet for her birthday. Being an IT guy, he agrees, figuring he can pick up a decent WIFI $99-$200 android tablet out of this week's paycheque and starts comparing options online. Mrs Colleague already has it under control though - she calls up their phone company and gets him a "free" shitty tablet and bonus data to his plan for just $30 more per month for the next two years. He shrugs this one off because the eldest was already maxing out the shared data and costing him more than the $30/mo in excess data which this boost would prevent. He did pull the sim out of the tablet though.
  • His Dad (who doesn't like Mrs Colleague, it's a strange relationship) tried to send him $1000USD online just to help out and he rejected it. He takes a weird route to work because his left indicator hasn't worked for months but I think if he came up with the money to replace that all of a sudden then every other cent would be poured into "necessities" that weren't necessary until the money was in the account.
  • And one of the first stories I got from him last: After I'd known him for a few weeks "How much does a fucking trampoline cost?", "I dunno, like $200? (WRONG)". He shows me a text from Mrs Colleague, completely out of the blue, with no discussion, with no nagging from the kids, with no birthdays or other presents to justify it "Just bought the kids a trampoline. Can you put it together when you get home? :)". Apparently it was huge, cost $700 new, and the kids barely touched it after the first few days. What makes it better is that every couple weeks people try to dump their trampolines on the facebook BuySwapSell pages. Every time one comes up and it's another "$200 ready for pickup", "$150 with spare mat", "$50 due to some rust in legs", or best of all "Free if you disassemble", I forward him the link and he takes it in good cheer.
  • I almost forgot, with all of the above - he pays someone to mow his lawn.

He's a great guy, though he clearly has money issues of his own considering he once held a 6 figure job with multiple unannounced $20k+ bonuses and now has a negative net worth. He'll talk FI with me and read any blogs but openly admits that for him with his family it's just a fun thought experiment and never really makes the big changes himself. I try to temper the juicy tales that I hear with the fact that I'm only hearing HIS side of the story but considering the two leading causes of divorce, I hope the sex is good.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2016, 09:22:24 PM by TallFrodo »

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #13749 on: June 17, 2016, 04:12:22 AM »
Driving home from work yesterday I stopped at a 7-11 to check if a particular movie was in stock at the Redbox. At one of the gas pumps were two young men, about 25 years of age each asking if anyone had any change as they were out of gas and had no money. The car they were driving you ask? A brand new BMW 535 with the 30 day tags still on it.
After looking that up... Did you offer them to switch cars?
Yours bursting full with gas for theirs empty?
Sell and repeat. Nice profit for you.