Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4762539 times)

zolotiyeruki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1899
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12950 on: March 17, 2016, 09:32:29 AM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.

dsmexpat

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 223
  • Age: 28
  • Location: New Mexico
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12951 on: March 17, 2016, 09:42:14 AM »
Hell, I should have contacted McDonalds to become a brand ambassador first. If I'm going to do something I might as well get paid for it.


On a possibly related note, there's a company called dietbet which I've been exploiting pretty hard in the last three months too. Basically you and a bunch of other random strangers put money into a pool and bet that you'll lose x percent of your body weight in y months. Losers lose their stake, winners divide the pool between them.

I am extremely averse to losing money so I threw a lot of money in and then every time I felt like pizza I got to ask myself if I was willing to forfeit all that money for the pizza. I have shitty food discipline but extremely good financial discipline so I am smashing these bets with ease and clearing about $100/month in winnings. It's not much but it's working extremely well for me.

ransom132

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 89
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12952 on: March 17, 2016, 09:49:26 AM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.
I heard the samething with a scientist who did the samething, except he only ate twinkies, oreos and all the junk food and proved his point that it is possible to lose weight by eating junk food. However, with that said, it is not recommended it because of the lack of vitamins and minerals that comes from veggies and fruits...also eating alot of stuff with sugar in it can contribute to diabetes even if you eat 2000 calories of junk food per day. He only did it to show that it is possible to eat fast food and still lose weight.

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1128
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12953 on: March 17, 2016, 10:04:24 AM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.
I heard the samething with a scientist who did the samething, except he only ate twinkies, oreos and all the junk food and proved his point that it is possible to lose weight by eating junk food. However, with that said, it is not recommended it because of the lack of vitamins and minerals that comes from veggies and fruits...also eating alot of stuff with sugar in it can contribute to diabetes even if you eat 2000 calories of junk food per day. He only did it to show that it is possible to eat fast food and still lose weight.

There was an education video that I watched from Eastern Illinois University that followed two graduate students (I think they were a weightlifter and a former gymnast, male and female respectively) who ate nothing but fast food for 30 days. They both were healthier in every single metric at the end of the month, and these were two healthy people to begin with. They were relatively liberal in what they called fast food (a deli sandwich counted, for instance) but it was very enlightening.

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12954 on: March 17, 2016, 11:17:35 AM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.
I heard the samething with a scientist who did the samething, except he only ate twinkies, oreos and all the junk food and proved his point that it is possible to lose weight by eating junk food. However, with that said, it is not recommended it because of the lack of vitamins and minerals that comes from veggies and fruits...also eating alot of stuff with sugar in it can contribute to diabetes even if you eat 2000 calories of junk food per day. He only did it to show that it is possible to eat fast food and still lose weight.

There was an education video that I watched from Eastern Illinois University that followed two graduate students (I think they were a weightlifter and a former gymnast, male and female respectively) who ate nothing but fast food for 30 days. They both were healthier in every single metric at the end of the month, and these were two healthy people to begin with. They were relatively liberal in what they called fast food (a deli sandwich counted, for instance) but it was very enlightening.

No food is 'healthy', in and of itself - you, as a person, can be healthy, and eating a varied diet in reasonable quantities tends to help with that, but it's definitely not the only metric. (Nor, I'd argue, is being fat or not - you can be thin and desperately unhealthy, and you can be fat and healthy by every metric that you can measure.)

Also, the people who continually argue that 'everything homemade is better, because it's homemade!' drive me up the wall, TBH. SOMETIMES it's better/healthier/cheaper/whatever to make it yourself. I'd trust a good bakery to make a better croissant than I can make, for example.

BUT: having the tools and knowledge to do it yourself gives you more power to potentially make it better and potentially save money. Whether it's worth it is always depends.

I'd definitely argue that making routine meals at home is ABSOLUTELY worth it (more fresh fruits and veggies for less time and money!), but other people disagree. *shrugs*


Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12955 on: March 17, 2016, 11:23:53 AM »
New Overheard at Work (god, it seems like my job is a freakin GOLDMINE of these these days...)

Colleague, last week: "I have 3 kids under 5, of COURSE I need full-time daycare plus a nanny to help with drop-offs or pick them up and help cook dinner (neither she nor her husband cook), PLUS a cleaning lady who spends AT LEAST a day a week at the house! After all, my husband and I are both professionals, we can afford this, and it's absolutely worth it for quality of life!" (To be fair: she and her husband are probably making 120KCAD pre-tax, and daycare is heavily subsidized in Quebec, so ok, if you can afford it, that's your deal.)

Colleague, this week: "My accountant just did my taxes and we owe almost 5K! Our line of credit is maxed out, we have no savings, and my car needs major repairs! I don't know what I'm donna do!!"
Me: "... Maybe cut down on the household staff and learn to cook your own dinners and clean your own house? That'd loosen up a good 1K/month, no?"
Colleague: "Oh, no, I couldn't do that! The household help is too necessary!"
*headdesk*

This, you guys, THIS is what happens when you try to live like an aristrocrat without the inherited money.

ohyonghao

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 622
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Hillsboro, OR
    • OhYongHao Life Blog
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12956 on: March 17, 2016, 11:58:32 AM »
On a possibly related note, there's a company called dietbet which I've been exploiting pretty hard in the last three months too. Basically you and a bunch of other random strangers put money into a pool and bet that you'll lose x percent of your body weight in y months. Losers lose their stake, winners divide the pool between them.

I am extremely averse to losing money so I threw a lot of money in and then every time I felt like pizza I got to ask myself if I was willing to forfeit all that money for the pizza. I have shitty food discipline but extremely good financial discipline so I am smashing these bets with ease and clearing about $100/month in winnings. It's not much but it's working extremely well for me.

Glad to hear you like Diet Bet, I used that the year before and was able to purchase some bike equipment from the proceeds :-D  It really was a motivator to lose a lot of weight.  Now I'm at the point where it would be a struggle to lose 4% or 10% of my body weight.  Keep up the good work.  In a year when you look back at the first pictures it's amazing the amount of change that has happened.

serpentstooth

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1408
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12957 on: March 17, 2016, 12:07:52 PM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.
I heard the samething with a scientist who did the samething, except he only ate twinkies, oreos and all the junk food and proved his point that it is possible to lose weight by eating junk food. However, with that said, it is not recommended it because of the lack of vitamins and minerals that comes from veggies and fruits...also eating alot of stuff with sugar in it can contribute to diabetes even if you eat 2000 calories of junk food per day. He only did it to show that it is possible to eat fast food and still lose weight.

There was an education video that I watched from Eastern Illinois University that followed two graduate students (I think they were a weightlifter and a former gymnast, male and female respectively) who ate nothing but fast food for 30 days. They both were healthier in every single metric at the end of the month, and these were two healthy people to begin with. They were relatively liberal in what they called fast food (a deli sandwich counted, for instance) but it was very enlightening.

No food is 'healthy', in and of itself - you, as a person, can be healthy, and eating a varied diet in reasonable quantities tends to help with that, but it's definitely not the only metric. (Nor, I'd argue, is being fat or not - you can be thin and desperately unhealthy, and you can be fat and healthy by every metric that you can measure.)

Also, the people who continually argue that 'everything homemade is better, because it's homemade!' drive me up the wall, TBH. SOMETIMES it's better/healthier/cheaper/whatever to make it yourself. I'd trust a good bakery to make a better croissant than I can make, for example.

BUT: having the tools and knowledge to do it yourself gives you more power to potentially make it better and potentially save money. Whether it's worth it is always depends.

I'd definitely argue that making routine meals at home is ABSOLUTELY worth it (more fresh fruits and veggies for less time and money!), but other people disagree. *shrugs*

Michael Pollan (or Mark Bittman?) once said that if you cooked all your own junk food yourself, you wouldn't get fat.

I always felt this displayed a lack of skill in the kitchen, a lack of imagination, or both.

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12958 on: March 17, 2016, 12:53:51 PM »
I've been dieting since the New Year, both money and food, and I'm going to speak up in support of McDonalds. Portion sizes have inflated pretty hugely over my short lifetime (and I imagine even more so for the older posters) but that doesn't mean you actually have to order the biggest portion. The one next to my work is currently showing 2 cheeseburgers as the smallest meal and has a new double quarter pounder (so I guess half a pound) option but if you walk in and ask them to make you a cheeseburger they'll do it. It's a easy self contained lunch that costs $1.07 and has enough calories to get you to dinner but not enough to kill you.

Today I'm eating leftovers and my lunch probably costs about $2-$3 (pork loin roasted in a teriyaki sauce with rice) and while it's better than a burger it's certainly not cheaper.

McDonalds is certainly too expensive if you decide to eat 2000 calories of it in one sitting and doing that won't do your heart any good either. But that's not a strike against McDonalds, that's user error. I've lost 23lb so far this year and am saving about 85% of my gross income while including fast food in my diet.
That's a good point--there's a science teacher who lost 60+ lbs while eating exclusively McDonald's.  He did it by simply limiting his diet to 2000 calories/day and exercising 45 minutes/day 5x/week.
I heard the samething with a scientist who did the samething, except he only ate twinkies, oreos and all the junk food and proved his point that it is possible to lose weight by eating junk food. However, with that said, it is not recommended it because of the lack of vitamins and minerals that comes from veggies and fruits...also eating alot of stuff with sugar in it can contribute to diabetes even if you eat 2000 calories of junk food per day. He only did it to show that it is possible to eat fast food and still lose weight.

There was an education video that I watched from Eastern Illinois University that followed two graduate students (I think they were a weightlifter and a former gymnast, male and female respectively) who ate nothing but fast food for 30 days. They both were healthier in every single metric at the end of the month, and these were two healthy people to begin with. They were relatively liberal in what they called fast food (a deli sandwich counted, for instance) but it was very enlightening.

No food is 'healthy', in and of itself - you, as a person, can be healthy, and eating a varied diet in reasonable quantities tends to help with that, but it's definitely not the only metric. (Nor, I'd argue, is being fat or not - you can be thin and desperately unhealthy, and you can be fat and healthy by every metric that you can measure.)

Also, the people who continually argue that 'everything homemade is better, because it's homemade!' drive me up the wall, TBH. SOMETIMES it's better/healthier/cheaper/whatever to make it yourself. I'd trust a good bakery to make a better croissant than I can make, for example.

BUT: having the tools and knowledge to do it yourself gives you more power to potentially make it better and potentially save money. Whether it's worth it is always depends.

I'd definitely argue that making routine meals at home is ABSOLUTELY worth it (more fresh fruits and veggies for less time and money!), but other people disagree. *shrugs*

Michael Pollan (or Mark Bittman?) once said that if you cooked all your own junk food yourself, you wouldn't get fat.

I always felt this displayed a lack of skill in the kitchen, a lack of imagination, or both.


WTF.

Seriously.

Fries that I make at home are not any better for me than fries I order in a restaurant.

... the only caveat, I suppose, is that fries cost 1$ to order and are a significant pain in the ass to make, so I make then way less often than I'd order them in a restaurant.

mm1970

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4096
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12959 on: March 17, 2016, 01:07:43 PM »
Quote
... the only caveat, I suppose, is that fries cost 1$ to order and are a significant pain in the ass to make, so I make then way less often than I'd order them in a restaurant.

I'm pretty sure that was the point.  I don't remember which one said it.

There was a period of time when I decided that I was going to be that way with bread.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3474
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12960 on: March 17, 2016, 01:28:08 PM »
New Overheard at Work (god, it seems like my job is a freakin GOLDMINE of these these days...)

Colleague, last week: "I have 3 kids under 5, of COURSE I need full-time daycare plus a nanny to help with drop-offs or pick them up and help cook dinner (neither she nor her husband cook), PLUS a cleaning lady who spends AT LEAST a day a week at the house! After all, my husband and I are both professionals, we can afford this, and it's absolutely worth it for quality of life!" (To be fair: she and her husband are probably making 120KCAD pre-tax, and daycare is heavily subsidized in Quebec, so ok, if you can afford it, that's your deal.)

Colleague, this week: "My accountant just did my taxes and we owe almost 5K! Our line of credit is maxed out, we have no savings, and my car needs major repairs! I don't know what I'm donna do!!"
Me: "... Maybe cut down on the household staff and learn to cook your own dinners and clean your own house? That'd loosen up a good 1K/month, no?"
Colleague: "Oh, no, I couldn't do that! The household help is too necessary!"
*headdesk*

This, you guys, THIS is what happens when you try to live like an aristrocrat without the inherited money.
I can understand (and forgive) initial ignorance of causal relationships. Outright refusal to accept and act on new information illustrating causal relationships is inexcusable.

And if it takes one person a whole day to clean their house, I'm guessing they got one big enough for all three kids to play football indoors on cold winter days.
I am not a cog. I am an organizational lubricant.

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12961 on: March 17, 2016, 01:30:51 PM »
New Overheard at Work (god, it seems like my job is a freakin GOLDMINE of these these days...)

Colleague, last week: "I have 3 kids under 5, of COURSE I need full-time daycare plus a nanny to help with drop-offs or pick them up and help cook dinner (neither she nor her husband cook), PLUS a cleaning lady who spends AT LEAST a day a week at the house! After all, my husband and I are both professionals, we can afford this, and it's absolutely worth it for quality of life!" (To be fair: she and her husband are probably making 120KCAD pre-tax, and daycare is heavily subsidized in Quebec, so ok, if you can afford it, that's your deal.)

Colleague, this week: "My accountant just did my taxes and we owe almost 5K! Our line of credit is maxed out, we have no savings, and my car needs major repairs! I don't know what I'm donna do!!"
Me: "... Maybe cut down on the household staff and learn to cook your own dinners and clean your own house? That'd loosen up a good 1K/month, no?"
Colleague: "Oh, no, I couldn't do that! The household help is too necessary!"
*headdesk*

This, you guys, THIS is what happens when you try to live like an aristrocrat without the inherited money.
I can understand (and forgive) initial ignorance of causal relationships. Outright refusal to accept and act on new information illustrating causal relationships is inexcusable.

And if it takes one person a whole day to clean their house, I'm guessing they got one big enough for all three kids to play football indoors on cold winter days.

Not even. She just feels like 'every week' tasks includes dusting baseboards, washing all the windows, etc. Things I do, if we're lucky, every 2-4 months.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1247
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12962 on: March 17, 2016, 01:31:23 PM »
All this love for pharmacists ignores the original question. Why do you need to be a chemist to work in a pharmacy?

Or was the poster using the British term for pharmacist, which is chemist. In any event, chemistry is a key basis for pharmaceuticals (drugs), along with biological sciences (how the drugs act in the body, targets, metabolism, etc.).
The difference between a US pharmacy and a UK chemist really confused my old British boyfriend. I said I'd bought something at CVS, and he made a joke about the version control system, and I said "no, the pharmacy." Then he was very confused by why I was buying snacks and shampoo at the chemist. And yeah, from what I remember on visits there, chemists are *tiny* and only have medicine, not all the convenience store stuff American ones have.

Being able to charge convenience store prices for small items that can be had much more cheaply at the grocery store has to allow for a gigantic sales margin on things besides medicines.
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

domo

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 27
  • Age: 31
  • Location: New Orleans
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12963 on: March 17, 2016, 02:18:55 PM »
Eh, pizza can be had far more cheaply from a restaurant than at home. Economies of scale, and all that. I don't want a pound of mozzarella (or pepperoni, or other topping) going moldy in my fridge. If I only buy the amount I need, it's way too expensive. A large pizza can be had for as little as $5-6, depending on the special.
However, can we stop talking about food? I am on a diet and I can't have any pizza right now.
Yes, I know if I worked out more, it'd be fine. When I was training for a 100-mile bike race I could put away an entire large pepperoni pizza by myself. That's one of the nice things about doing speed drills for 8 hours.

JLee

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3347
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12964 on: March 17, 2016, 02:33:14 PM »
Eh, pizza can be had far more cheaply from a restaurant than at home. Economies of scale, and all that. I don't want a pound of mozzarella (or pepperoni, or other topping) going moldy in my fridge. If I only buy the amount I need, it's way too expensive. A large pizza can be had for as little as $5-6, depending on the special.
However, can we stop talking about food? I am on a diet and I can't have any pizza right now.
Yes, I know if I worked out more, it'd be fine. When I was training for a 100-mile bike race I could put away an entire large pepperoni pizza by myself. That's one of the nice things about doing speed drills for 8 hours.

I ran the numbers on this when I was staying with my SO in Canada (and groceries are generally more expensive there)...I'm pretty sure we were around $3/pizza. Cheese was the most expensive part. You can freeze mozzarella, btw.

maco

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12965 on: March 17, 2016, 02:54:41 PM »
Eh, pizza can be had far more cheaply from a restaurant than at home. Economies of scale, and all that. I don't want a pound of mozzarella (or pepperoni, or other topping) going moldy in my fridge. If I only buy the amount I need, it's way too expensive. A large pizza can be had for as little as $5-6, depending on the special.
However, can we stop talking about food? I am on a diet and I can't have any pizza right now.
Yes, I know if I worked out more, it'd be fine. When I was training for a 100-mile bike race I could put away an entire large pepperoni pizza by myself. That's one of the nice things about doing speed drills for 8 hours.

I ran the numbers on this when I was staying with my SO in Canada (and groceries are generally more expensive there)...I'm pretty sure we were around $3/pizza. Cheese was the most expensive part. You can freeze mozzarella, btw.
You can freeze pepperoni, too. When I told my stepdad that we get pillow packs of pepperoni because Costco's freezer pizza is only cheese, he told me to freeze it because thin slices like that go off faster in the fridge.

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1478
  • Location: UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12966 on: March 17, 2016, 02:57:38 PM »
I was working on location in a cafe today and overheard this very opinionated conversation going on behind me with three young men, all about mid-twenties and looking like they had not been to bed after a night out last night, all about political philosophy (the purpose of voting, Donald Trump, the role of the state etc).

Then the chief yoof said, "I think we should get rid of the state pension because let's be honest, if you haven't got your life sorted out by 65 then you've really fucked up. I mean, who can't get together enough in 45 years to last you another 20?"

I just looked at him and thought, "You had better have several thousand pounds in your private pension right now, mate, or you are talking out of your arse."

shelivesthedream

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1478
  • Location: UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12967 on: March 17, 2016, 03:03:17 PM »
Eh, pizza can be had far more cheaply from a restaurant than at home. Economies of scale, and all that. I don't want a pound of mozzarella (or pepperoni, or other topping) going moldy in my fridge. If I only buy the amount I need, it's way too expensive. A large pizza can be had for as little as $5-6, depending on the special.
However, can we stop talking about food? I am on a diet and I can't have any pizza right now.
Yes, I know if I worked out more, it'd be fine. When I was training for a 100-mile bike race I could put away an entire large pepperoni pizza by myself. That's one of the nice things about doing speed drills for 8 hours.

I ran the numbers on this when I was staying with my SO in Canada (and groceries are generally more expensive there)...I'm pretty sure we were around $3/pizza. Cheese was the most expensive part. You can freeze mozzarella, btw.

We have had the conversation about whether restaurant, frozen or homemade pizza is cheaper, it's here: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/does-anyone-never-go-out-to-eat/msg964651/#msg964651

ohyonghao

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 622
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Hillsboro, OR
    • OhYongHao Life Blog
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12968 on: March 17, 2016, 04:45:52 PM »
Yesterday I was talking to a coworker about my recent vacation to Taiwan.  I told him how I wanted to retire there, with my wife who's a native.  His reply was, "Sounds like a good plan in 10 years."

I'm thinking, shouldn't take that long at all to get to the point to retire there, by my calculations we're about 3-5 years out.  Though I do suppose it's better than thinking it's a good idea in 20 years (we're both in our 30's).

jamesvt

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 51
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12969 on: March 17, 2016, 09:34:03 PM »
I was working on location in a cafe today and overheard this very opinionated conversation going on behind me with three young men, all about mid-twenties and looking like they had not been to bed after a night out last night, all about political philosophy (the purpose of voting, Donald Trump, the role of the state etc).

Then the chief yoof said, "I think we should get rid of the state pension because let's be honest, if you haven't got your life sorted out by 65 then you've really fucked up. I mean, who can't get together enough in 45 years to last you another 20?"

I just looked at him and thought, "You had better have several thousand pounds in your private pension right now, mate, or you are talking out of your arse."
How is what he said antimustachian?

Sam E

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 173
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12970 on: March 18, 2016, 08:45:46 AM »
Is there anything at a pharmacy that actually requires a chemist ?
Synthesis of Aspirin and Acetaminophen is probably an undergrad lab exercise but you aren't likely to be making up many of the drugs sold.

It's a good job other professions didn't get in on this, I would hate to have to wait for the in-store metallurgist at home depot to sell me some bolts. Although down in Oregon you do need the station's specialist petrochemical hydrodynamicist to pump the gas
 

Pharmacists aren't chemists in the first place. Their education is in pharmacology, not chemistry.

jinga nation

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 520
  • Location: 'Murica's Wang
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12971 on: March 18, 2016, 11:40:21 AM »
I was working on location in a cafe today and overheard this very opinionated conversation going on behind me with three young men, all about mid-twenties and looking like they had not been to bed after a night out last night, all about political philosophy (the purpose of voting, Donald Trump, the role of the state etc).

Then the chief yoof said, "I think we should get rid of the state pension because let's be honest, if you haven't got your life sorted out by 65 then you've really fucked up. I mean, who can't get together enough in 45 years to last you another 20?"

I just looked at him and thought, "You had better have several thousand pounds in your private pension right now, mate, or you are talking out of your arse."
How is what he said antimustachian?
What many say and what they do IRL are polar opposites. Plus, UK citizens rely on the dole aka public pension. Not everyone has a private pension.
If I genuinely enjoy my profession and workplace, is there a reason to FIRE? Keep Calm and Carry On Milking.

dsmexpat

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 223
  • Age: 28
  • Location: New Mexico
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12972 on: March 18, 2016, 12:32:44 PM »
The dole is absolutely  not a public pension. The dole is unemployment benefit for people without work. Pensions are pensions. Two couldn't be more different.

geekette

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
  • Location: Cary, NC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12973 on: March 18, 2016, 02:20:33 PM »
Speaking of why it takes so long to fill a prescription, there was a blog from a pharmacist (going by the name of Drug Monkey) about 10 years ago, which probably still holds, at least in many pharmacies:

Quote
You come to the counter. I am on the phone with a drunk dude who wants the phone number to the grocery store next door. After I instruct him on the virtues of 411, you tell me your doctor was to phone in your prescription to me. Your doctor hasn't, and you're unwilling to wait until he does. Being in a generous mood, I call your doctors office and am put on hold for 5 minutes, then informed that your prescription was phoned in to my competitor on the other side of town. Phoning the competitor, I am immediately put on hold for 5 minutes before speaking to a clerk, who puts me back on hold to wait for the pharmacist. Your prescription is then transferred to me, and now I have to get the 2 phone calls that have been put on hold while this was being done. Now I return to the counter to ask if we've ever filled prescriptions for you before. For some reason, you think that "for you" means "for your cousin" and you answer my question with a "yes", whereupon I go the computer and see you are not on file.

The phone rings.

You have left to do something very important, such as browse through the monster truck magazines, and do not hear the three PA announcements requesting that you return to the pharmacy. You return eventually, expecting to pick up the finished prescription.....

The phone rings.

......only to find out that I need to ask your address, phone number, date of birth, if you have any allergies and insurance coverage. You tell me you're allergic to codeine. Since the prescription is for Vicodin I ask you what exactly codeine did to you when you took it. You say it made your stomach hurt and I roll my eyes and write down "no known allergies" You tell me......

The phone rings.

.....you have insurance and spend the next 5 minutes looking for your card. You give up and expect me to be able to file your claim anyway. I call my competitor and am immediately put on hold. Upon reaching a human, I ask them what insurance they have on file for you. I get the information and file your claim, which is rejected because you changed jobs 6 months ago. A dingus barges his way to the counter to ask where the bread is.

The phone rings.

I inform you that the insurance the other pharmacy has on file for you isn't working. You produce a card in under 10 seconds that you seemed to be unable to find before. What you were really doing was hoping your old insurance would still work because it had a lower copay. Your new card prominently displays the logo of Nebraska Blue Cross, and although Nebraska Blue cross does in fact handle millions of prescription claims every day, for the group you belong to, the claim should go to a company called Caremark, whose logo is nowhere on the card.

The phone rings.

A lady comes to the counter wanting to know why the cherry flavored antacid works better than the lemon cream flavored antacid. What probably happened is that she had a milder case of heartburn when she took the cherry flavored brand, as they both use the exact same ingredient in the same strength. She will not be satisfied though until I confirm her belief that the cherry flavored brand is the superior product. I file your claim with Caremark, who rejects it because you had a 30 day supply of Vicodin filled 15 days ago at another pharmacy. You swear to me on your mother's'....

The phone rings.

.......life that you did not have a Vicodin prescription filled recently. I call Caremark and am immediately placed on hold. The most beautiful woman on the planet walks buy and notices not a thing. She has never talked to a pharmacist and never will. Upon reaching a human at Caremark, I am informed that the Vicodin prescription was indeed filled at another of my competitors. When I tell you this, you say you got hydrocodone there, not Vicodin. Another little part of me dies.

The phone rings.

It turns out that a few days after your doctor wrote your last prescription, he told you to take it more frequently, meaning that what Caremark thought was a 30-day supply is indeed a 15 day supply with the new instructions. I call your doctor's office to confirm this and am immediately placed on hold. I call Caremark to get an override and am immediately placed on hold. My laser printer has a paper jam. It's time for my tech to go to lunch. Caremark issues the override and your claim goes though. Your insurance saves you 85 cents off the regular price of the prescription.

The phone rings.

At the cash register you sign....

The phone rings.

......the acknowledgement that you received a copy of my HIPAA policy and that I offered the required OBRA counseling for new prescriptions. You remark that you're glad that your last pharmacist told you you shouldn't take over the counter Tylenol along with the Vicodin, and that the acetaminophen you're taking instead seems to be working pretty well. I break the news to you that Tylenol is simply a brand name for acetaminophen and you don't believe me. You fumble around for 2 minutes looking for your checkbook and spend another 2 minutes making out a check for four dollars and sixty seven cents. You ask why the tablets look different than those you got at the other pharmacy. I explain that they are from a different manufacturer. Tomorrow you'll be back to tell me they don't work as well.

Now imagine this wasn't you at all, but the person who dropped off their prescription three people ahead of you, and you'll start to have an idea why.....your prescription takes so damn long to fill.

pancakes

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 448
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12974 on: March 19, 2016, 09:33:48 PM »
We have a new person at work who is a terrible enabler to one of our younger team members when it comes to spending.

We get paid monthly and the new team member immediately transfers a percentage of their pay into savings (I'm pretty sure the younger team member doesn't know this). In the last week of our pay cycle they both complain about being down to their last $40 or so, which only makes the one who is struggling feel as though their spending behaviour is normal.

The truth is that their situations are completely different. The younger team member is in debt and is spending every cent of their pay each month where as the newer team member has very healthy savings and is only spending the money they have budgeted to spend.

I keep hearing statements like "you have to rewards yourself sometimes" and "you are doing really well, you should feel great about your progress", when the fact is that they are doing absolutely terribly. It is taking more than two years to pay off $6000 of debt (while I was earning the same income, I saved over $50k in two years).

nnls

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 658
  • Location: Perth, AU
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12975 on: March 19, 2016, 10:00:16 PM »
We have a new person at work who is a terrible enabler to one of our younger team members when it comes to spending.

We get paid monthly and the new team member immediately transfers a percentage of their pay into savings (I'm pretty sure the younger team member doesn't know this). In the last week of our pay cycle they both complain about being down to their last $40 or so, which only makes the one who is struggling feel as though their spending behaviour is normal.

The truth is that their situations are completely different. The younger team member is in debt and is spending every cent of their pay each month where as the newer team member has very healthy savings and is only spending the money they have budgeted to spend.

I keep hearing statements like "you have to rewards yourself sometimes" and "you are doing really well, you should feel great about your progress", when the fact is that they are doing absolutely terribly. It is taking more than two years to pay off $6000 of debt (while I was earning the same income, I saved over $50k in two years).

Its weird that the new person at work isnt trying to encourage the others to save a little bit, or at the very least doesnt mention that they put a percentage away each month

pancakes

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 448
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12976 on: March 19, 2016, 10:42:29 PM »

Its weird that the new person at work isnt trying to encourage the others to save a little bit, or at the very least doesnt mention that they put a percentage away each month

I don't know that it is purposeful or just trying to fit in and relate to new people. They will talk to me about their savings and to the other person about the lack of money in their transaction account.

I'm finding it frustrating as I had been trying to encourage this person for a long time now and am very careful not to enable them by making excuses for them or making it seem like living pay to pay is normal. I've been trying to convince them that the freedom they'd gain by having financial security will help them more than whatever it is they want to spend their money on.

The person with the debt/spending issue convinced that their stress can be overcome by spending. Most recently they have spend $4k on a renovation on the house that they rent from their parents because they believed that once that aspect of their life is 'fixed' they'd be in the right mental state to start saving. Prior to that it was another renovation, some new furniture, landscaping, new clothing, a holiday, etc, and then they'd be able to save.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 10:44:06 PM by pancakes »

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1247
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12977 on: March 20, 2016, 08:20:23 AM »
The person with the debt/spending issue convinced that their stress can be overcome by spending. Most recently they have spend $4k on a renovation on the house that they rent from their parents because they believed that once that aspect of their life is 'fixed' they'd be in the right mental state to start saving. Prior to that it was another renovation, some new furniture, landscaping, new clothing, a holiday, etc, and then they'd be able to save.

There's always something, with some folks, that prevents them from a beneficial course of action. In "The War of Art", Steven Pressfield describes a phenomenon he calls "Resistance" (with a capital R) that takes on a variety of different forms, one of which is finding any excuse in the world to not do what needs to be done in order to accomplish the desired results. I'd say the would-be savers are experiencing the same problem.
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

horsepoor

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2517
  • Location: Boise, ID
  • Growing a Pony 'Stache
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12978 on: March 23, 2016, 08:30:51 PM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

LeRainDrop

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1766
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12979 on: March 23, 2016, 09:08:50 PM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

On the flip side, you can buy an American Girl doll for like $115.  That's way less expensive than a real kid.

zolotiyeruki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1899
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12980 on: March 23, 2016, 10:45:30 PM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

On the flip side, you can buy an American Girl doll for like $115.  That's way less expensive than a real kid.
At this point I feel obligated to post a link to this hilarious (spoof) article...

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12981 on: March 24, 2016, 06:48:38 AM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

On the flip side, you can buy an American Girl doll for like $115.  That's way less expensive than a real kid.
At this point I feel obligated to post a link to this hilarious (spoof) article...

Parent-tip: yes, doll clothes really DO cost that much, and for some reason they're hard to find used. For larger baby-appearing dolls, though, it's WAY cheaper to get 'preemie' clothing on sale than to buy 'doll' clothes (7$/outfit instead of 35+ per outfit, which is more than I'd pay for my kid's clothes, so like hell am I paying that for a doll...).

For child-appearing dolls, my parents and grandmother used that as an intro-to-sewing for me, when I was a kid. You can make basic sundresses, shirts, and skirts really easily, and most kids will be motivated to learn that (and it's a transferable skillset that can be used to mend clothes and whatnot as an adult).

theadvicist

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1107
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12982 on: March 24, 2016, 08:38:56 AM »
This really hasn't been my experience at all. I've always routinely written off adjustments under $1, under $10, under $100, depending on context. If you're making a payment of $1K and you only have support for $900 of it, that's a problem. But if you're booking a tax accrual of $1M and your calculation is out of balance by $100, who cares? Move on.

That said, I once had a manager reject a journal entry because it contained a $0.01 adjustment for which I had not provided support. Everyone who heard about it thought it was ridiculous, though.

This is my experience too. I'm a book-keeper, and I hate being even 1p out. But the accountant? Rounds EVERYTHING. Sometimes down, sometimes up, sometimes to the nearest pound, sometimes to the nearest hundred pounds. Drives me crazy!

Also, rounding makes things harder! I feel this way about our VAT return. It's not hard to use decimals, honestly, I can do it. But rounding leads to inconsistencies, and, especially when you are copying across from figures with pence to figures without, transcription errors. We have pence, let's use them!

ringer707

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 156
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12983 on: March 24, 2016, 11:16:04 AM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

I wonder if the woman was referring to the gift cards they're selling. I know Costco was selling $100 American Girl gift cards for $79.99, which can then be used to buy anything. Though I don't doubt the doll outfits are that expensive. I LOVED American Girl dolls when I was little. I shudder to think how much my parents spent on them for me. Thank god there wasn't one of the stores near us back then. My niece now loves it, and my brother builds her furniture for the dolls out of wood scraps. They're usually substantially more beautiful than the actual furniture as he builds high-end timber frame homes and works with quality pieces of wood.

Scandium

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
  • Location: EastCoast
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12984 on: March 24, 2016, 11:18:18 AM »
Was in Starbuck's today (I know, I know, but just drip coffee in my own mug...) and overheard this woman telling her friend about a coupon from CostCo to get two American Doll outfits for $79.99.  What?  I can get myself two outfits for that much.  People really spend that much on doll outfits?!

On the flip side, you can buy an American Girl doll for like $115.  That's way less expensive than a real kid.
At this point I feel obligated to post a link to this hilarious (spoof) article...

Search youtube for "my fake baby"... Prepare to be scared, and scarred.
Those were expensive, but I guess still less than a real one.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2648
  • Location: Emmaus, PA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12985 on: March 24, 2016, 12:33:00 PM »
My 401k provider sent me the "great news! you're on track to contribute the legal maximum this year" email, and also prompted me to see how I stack up against people my age in contribution rate and account balance. Their answer is that people 20-29 are contributing 7% of their income to their 401ks and have an average account balance of $9,700.

This link seems to be publicly available.

slugline

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1007
  • Location: Houston, TX USA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12986 on: March 24, 2016, 01:05:48 PM »
My 401k provider sent me the "great news! you're on track to contribute the legal maximum this year" email, and also prompted me to see how I stack up against people my age in contribution rate and account balance. Their answer is that people 20-29 are contributing 7% of their income to their 401ks and have an average account balance of $9,700.

This link seems to be publicly available.

I've seen this before. The fine print says that they're only counting people actively contributing to a workplace retirement savings  plan. So I've been wondering if someone who changes jobs and rolls over their old savings into an IRA suddenly gets counted as a zero in this survey. . . .

Warlord1986

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 497
  • Age: 30
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12987 on: March 24, 2016, 08:38:34 PM »
My supervisor has complained, several times in my hearing, about how little he is paid. He buys lunch at least three times a week, and drives a F150 truck.

A co-worker doesn't complain quite as much, but he does buy coffee. Then he'll sit literally steps away from the coffee machine which is always full of coffee. :/

gimp

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2344
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12988 on: March 25, 2016, 04:13:03 PM »
I am buying a radar detector. That qualifies for this thread, right? Speeding costs more than driving more sedately, and I'm spending money to be able to drive faster.

Primm

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1239
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Australia
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12989 on: March 25, 2016, 04:14:02 PM »
I am buying a radar detector. That qualifies for this thread, right? Speeding costs more than driving more sedately, and I'm spending money to be able to drive faster.

Not unless you meant to post it in "What have you done to save money?" and not in "Overheard at work..."


gimp

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2344
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12990 on: March 25, 2016, 06:49:16 PM »
Well, I talked about it at work with my coworkers, does that count?

Tom Bri

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 514
  • Location: Small Town, Flyover Country
  • More just cheap, than Mustachian
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12991 on: March 26, 2016, 07:20:47 PM »
I recently completed a degree and got licensed. There are many paths to this degree, typically taking two years. I got hired last week and in our new-hire orientation we got to talking about school. I paid $12K total for mine, including texts, pre-rec classes, no student loans. Other people mention $40K debts to get their degrees. Huh? We got hired by the same company, to do the same job, for the same salary.
I can see it costing more for some people, I tested out of some classes, and had already done many pre-recs. So I can see maybe $20K to get this degree. But, $40K?

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3201
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12992 on: March 26, 2016, 10:19:17 PM »
My 401k provider sent me the "great news! you're on track to contribute the legal maximum this year" email, and also prompted me to see how I stack up against people my age in contribution rate and account balance. Their answer is that people 20-29 are contributing 7% of their income to their 401ks and have an average account balance of $9,700.

This link seems to be publicly available.

Thanks for the link. I'm punching well above my age, even in my zip code (which is higher than national). It is weird that for 20-29 the results were the same for both my zip code and for national.

johnny847

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3151
    • My Blog
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12993 on: March 26, 2016, 10:23:37 PM »
I recently completed a degree and got licensed. There are many paths to this degree, typically taking two years. I got hired last week and in our new-hire orientation we got to talking about school. I paid $12K total for mine, including texts, pre-rec classes, no student loans. Other people mention $40K debts to get their degrees. Huh? We got hired by the same company, to do the same job, for the same salary.
I can see it costing more for some people, I tested out of some classes, and had already done many pre-recs. So I can see maybe $20K to get this degree. But, $40K?

Anybody can decide to go to an expensive private school for a ton of money.
I certainly did. But because I am lucky enough to have frugal parents who heavily prioritized education, they paid for everything without any loans. Many others are not so lucky.

MandalayVA

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1360
  • Location: Richmond VA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12994 on: March 27, 2016, 08:21:31 AM »
I am buying a radar detector. That qualifies for this thread, right? Speeding costs more than driving more sedately, and I'm spending money to be able to drive faster.

Just don't use it in Virginia, radar detectors are illegal here.
"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."  Hunter S. Thompson

"I do understand though, it seems everyone wants us to be incensed or outraged at all times. It's pretty tiring now..."  Devin Townsend

Follow my road here:  The Road To Mandalay



CabinetGuy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 111
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12995 on: March 27, 2016, 08:32:22 AM »
Overheard in supermarket line.  Guy behind me starts talking to cashier:

"Hey, just got a job at the hospital cleaning up.  It's 12.50 and hour and 40 hours a week."

Cashier: " That's more than you were making here."

"Yeah, it's great."

As the SO and I were pulling out the parking lot, I see him get into a brand new Tacoma extended cab.  Quite possibly the most expensive and useless truck on the market.  How the hell does he have any money left at the end of the month?

MissNancyPryor

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 236
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Northwest USA
  • The Stewardess is Flying the Plane!
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12996 on: March 27, 2016, 08:06:58 PM »
At our monthly leaders' meeting (Director level and his staff of managers) we were reviewing business practices including retirement benefits.  The  HR rep was showing the pension scale with reductions for early retirement, the usual stuff we should be knowledgable about for our own staff's questions.  My leader-team peers were complaining, the usual "I wish" kind of remarks, and the Director was leading the whining about wishing he could retire now.  I don't get it.  Every one of those guys has been in their roles 10+ years and are very highly compensated, including a $40K+ bonus annually, and not one of them had it together to be able to retire (everyone is around 50 years old).  Well, except me.....  but I didn't say that out loud. 

I had learned my lesson earlier while talking to one of them over beers about my plan to retire early and his response was, "Don't worry, I won't tell anyone."  I had briefly forgotten that being FI is a threat to some and could affect how I am treated at work.  Better keep my mouth shut until it is time to go.  I am GenX and the last thing I am going to do is wait for some figgin pension from a big corporation.  I elected the additional contribution into my 401(K) in lieu of the pension so it is 100% portable and untouchable by any future bankruptcy or merger or any other shenanigans by the company-- my generation witnessed Ford, United Airlines, Kaiser Aluminum, Enron and others and saw what pensioners got handed during reorganizations and BK's.  DH and I have always presumed we would get no pensions and no SS and have planned accordingly, so there may be lots of gravy on the biscuit when we hit 62.  Nothing hurts like hearing a broken down and lackluster co-worker bemoan needing to get to some magic age for a pension or SS.  FTS! 

rencelas

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 21
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12997 on: March 27, 2016, 08:36:58 PM »
At our monthly leaders' meeting (Director level and his staff of managers) we were reviewing business practices including retirement benefits.  The  HR rep was showing the pension scale with reductions for early retirement, the usual stuff we should be knowledgable about for our own staff's questions.  My leader-team peers were complaining, the usual "I wish" kind of remarks, and the Director was leading the whining about wishing he could retire now.  I don't get it.  Every one of those guys has been in their roles 10+ years and are very highly compensated, including a $40K+ bonus annually, and not one of them had it together to be able to retire (everyone is around 50 years old).  Well, except me.....  but I didn't say that out loud. 

It's shocking to me, too. My old boss (170k+/year, typical 80k bonuses) was always whining about not having enough money. If I made his salary for 3 years, with those bonuses, I'd have already retired.

That said, I run a good sized manufacturing plant, and I drive the crappiest car in our lot. It's kind of eye opening to me to see how many of my employees drive brand new trucks and such with a $40k income. I couldn't imagine spending a year's salary on an automobile.

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12998 on: March 27, 2016, 08:38:59 PM »
I am buying a radar detector. That qualifies for this thread, right? Speeding costs more than driving more sedately, and I'm spending money to be able to drive faster.

Just don't use it in Virginia, radar detectors are illegal here.

In my younger years I had a radar detector I used everywhere especially VA.

What kept me out of trouble though I discovered was cruise control. Without cruise my speed climbs until I'm driving ~80 mph in a rush to get home.

I'm far more patient now a few years older.

Cruise, "good" stereo, and music I love.

JordanOfGilead

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12999 on: March 28, 2016, 06:38:38 AM »
I recently completed a degree and got licensed. There are many paths to this degree, typically taking two years. I got hired last week and in our new-hire orientation we got to talking about school. I paid $12K total for mine, including texts, pre-rec classes, no student loans. Other people mention $40K debts to get their degrees. Huh? We got hired by the same company, to do the same job, for the same salary.
I can see it costing more for some people, I tested out of some classes, and had already done many pre-recs. So I can see maybe $20K to get this degree. But, $40K?
Keep in mind that if they elected to live on campus, that can be paid for with student loans too and often costs as much as, or more than, tuition.