Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 5071130 times)

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12800 on: March 04, 2016, 06:00:27 PM »
Do your apples come out like 'alpples' instead?

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12801 on: March 04, 2016, 06:02:07 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Smokystache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12802 on: March 04, 2016, 07:50:34 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

I used to spend a lot of time at/in the crik.  Catching bullfrogs and trying to catches grinnies ( ground squirrels).
« Last Edit: March 05, 2016, 08:08:51 PM by Smokystache »

KateH

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12803 on: March 05, 2016, 03:51:50 AM »
I work with a woman who is  retiring in January with a good sized pension.  She was discussing the amount of taxes she was going to have withheld from her pension check and stated "I need to get the same refund I get now otherwise I won't be able to pay my bills." 

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12804 on: March 05, 2016, 09:24:33 PM »
"poke 3  (pōk)
n. Chiefly Southern US
A sack; a bag.
[Middle English, probably from Old North French; see pocket.]

Word History: A pig in a poke is a colorful vernacular expression used to describe something offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value. Naturally, a buyer cannot inspect the pig if it is covered by a poke—that is, a bag or sack. The word poke meaning "bag" is not confined to just the American South—in many parts of Scotland, poke bag is still used of a little paper bag for carrying purchases like candy. Poke first appears in English in the 1200s and probably comes from Old North French, the northern dialect of Old French. The Old North French word in turn is probably of Germanic origin and is related to words like Icelandic poki, "bag." Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket, meaning "pouch, small bag," which in turn comes from Anglo-Norman pokete, a diminutive of Old North French poke. Pouche, a variant form of Old North French poke, is the source of the English word pouch." (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/poke)

Old North French via Scotland via Scottish American south, fascinating.

Also the modern English word "pocket".
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12805 on: March 05, 2016, 10:00:38 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

Astatine

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12806 on: March 06, 2016, 02:27:35 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12807 on: March 06, 2016, 02:38:56 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12808 on: March 06, 2016, 05:58:45 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

Rural

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12809 on: March 06, 2016, 04:24:25 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12810 on: March 06, 2016, 07:07:53 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

I just used it and it nailed my (unaccented) NY/NJ dialect.

Vertical Mode

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12811 on: March 06, 2016, 10:39:12 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

I just used it and it nailed my (unaccented) NY/NJ dialect.

I would think if anyone would break it, it would've been someone from my neck of the woods...where wicked smaht guys go ta Hahvahd.

Really thick Boston accents can be quite harsh, sometimes even a lifelong Bostonian (me) can barely understand what is being said.
"That is why you will never be a good detective, Cato. It's so obvious, it cannot POSSIBLY be a trap..."

Link to my Journal: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/trending-vertical-vertical-modes-journal/

Ralph2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12812 on: March 07, 2016, 04:47:38 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12813 on: March 07, 2016, 11:34:33 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?
I'm from Shaler (but if you're only "near-ish" Pittsburgh, then North Hills is a bigger target for me to name), and I do not know what a grinny is.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12814 on: March 07, 2016, 11:38:50 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12815 on: March 07, 2016, 11:45:30 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

Me neither, but I read it a second time and I'm pretty sure I understand the first story now. The second one still baffles me.

Ralph2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12816 on: March 07, 2016, 01:32:00 PM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

Me neither, but I read it a second time and I'm pretty sure I understand the first story now. The second one still baffles me.

Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.



maco

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12817 on: March 07, 2016, 01:52:30 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

dsmexpat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12818 on: March 07, 2016, 01:57:41 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

Vertical Mode

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12819 on: March 07, 2016, 02:00:39 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

Also a nice metaphor for the inevitability of taxes. ;-)
"That is why you will never be a good detective, Cato. It's so obvious, it cannot POSSIBLY be a trap..."

Link to my Journal: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/trending-vertical-vertical-modes-journal/

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12820 on: March 07, 2016, 03:30:11 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

Also a nice metaphor for the inevitability of taxes. ;-)

Except for my bucket doesn't leak, and hasn't for several years.

nnls

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12821 on: March 07, 2016, 03:42:34 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain
« Last Edit: March 07, 2016, 03:45:18 PM by nnls »

Basenji

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12822 on: March 07, 2016, 05:06:20 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Ralph2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12823 on: March 07, 2016, 09:07:22 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Yeah sorry, Admino is the unit admin officer (Air force)and Padre is the chaplain, both locations were military.

Don't do a lot of writing on line and when I do I forget the wider audience sometimes.
Will do better next time.

nnls

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12824 on: March 07, 2016, 09:13:54 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Yeah sorry, Admino is the unit admin officer (Air force)and Padre is the chaplain, both locations were military.

Don't do a lot of writing on line and when I do I forget the wider audience sometimes.
Will do better next time.

I am glad I got Padre right and admino for admin officer makes a lot of sense :)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12825 on: March 08, 2016, 02:14:19 AM »
We just got bonuses at work that exceeded the previous bonuses by double. 16.3% of our salary.

There's one guy at work who had it spent THAT DAY on parts for his brand quad and used snow mobile. Other guys are spending it on new vehicles "once momma has her new car paid off I'm scrapping my 07 chevy and buying a new Denali"

I'll quietly tuck it away and invest in my future...FIRE is that much closer.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12826 on: March 08, 2016, 06:44:50 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Sadly I don't know what a grinny is.  I'm from the eastern edge of Appalachia in PA, but I wouldn't say I'm actually near Pittsburgh since it's a few hours from here.  I think we have a good mix of PA Dutch slang in there.

And to make this post on-topic:

A coworker whom I've written about before has gone further into consumerism craziness.  He found a girlfriend and moved her in quickly so she could help share the utility bills*.  They got more tv's when she moved in with her two kids.  Now, in addition to that, she told him that go kart racing is really fun and he should do it.  So he's bought a go kart (two actually) and is building a trailer for it.  He asked us if the company would sponsor him...I told him I'd pay him money to not race go karts.  He didn't take me up on the offer.  I think this girlfriend is now costing him much much more money than the bachelor life would have been.

*he pays no rent or water and chops wood for heat...so she was sharing the $100 electricity bill?  maybe the tv bill?

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12827 on: March 08, 2016, 10:07:36 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.

If we are getting pedantic, buttons are usually subsets of switches.  I'm talking about the kind of button one would generally mash, not those on a shirt or a button nose.  There are probably some random exceptions like mechanical squeaker buttons

Roboturner

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12828 on: March 08, 2016, 04:18:56 PM »

Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html


Nailed It!

"I win again, just like always!"




MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12829 on: March 08, 2016, 05:19:01 PM »

Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html


Nailed It!

I managed to break it.

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12830 on: March 08, 2016, 06:58:58 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Sadly I don't know what a grinny is.  I'm from the eastern edge of Appalachia in PA, but I wouldn't say I'm actually near Pittsburgh since it's a few hours from here.  I think we have a good mix of PA Dutch slang in there.

And to make this post on-topic:

A coworker whom I've written about before has gone further into consumerism craziness.  He found a girlfriend and moved her in quickly so she could help share the utility bills*.  They got more tv's when she moved in with her two kids.  Now, in addition to that, she told him that go kart racing is really fun and he should do it.  So he's bought a go kart (two actually) and is building a trailer for it.  He asked us if the company would sponsor him...I told him I'd pay him money to not race go karts.  He didn't take me up on the offer.  I think this girlfriend is now costing him much much more money than the bachelor life would have been.

*he pays no rent or water and chops wood for heat...so she was sharing the $100 electricity bill?  maybe the tv bill?
A grinny is a chipmunk.  It's called that in like a 20 mile radius around me I think, both sides of the PA/OH border near the turnpike.  I grew up 40 miles north of here and had never heard the term until I moved down here.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12831 on: March 09, 2016, 06:53:40 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*

Eric222

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12832 on: March 09, 2016, 07:04:38 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*
But...but....part of advanced science training is learning how to run a lab....which includes dealing with money.... *head explodes*
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12833 on: March 09, 2016, 07:12:17 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*
I'm mostly annoyed that they don't know enough Excel to just remove their own damn dollar signs. =)

teadirt

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12834 on: March 09, 2016, 07:56:18 AM »
I've got one.

CW1 walks into the office (we are in Boston, btw)
CW2: How did you get home to New Hampshire last night?
CW1: Uber *chuckles*
CW2: How much did that cost you?
CW1: $70!

Apparently a group of them went out drinking last night... not only does this guy commute daily from NH (at least an hour away), he stayed out to get drunk in the city and then spent $70 on someone to drive him home!
A penny saved is a penny earned.

theotherelise

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12835 on: March 09, 2016, 08:44:14 AM »
Husband's coworker is just full of this stuff. She's a state receptionist making about 30k. Her husband makes around the same doing manual labor. She's in her late forties with one adult child that is married with her own kid (and her own basket full of money issues). She's requently on the (state) phone airing out her financial business to the office or crying about it at her desk later.

Couple months ago she was jazzed because she was going to get a new car. But then they didn't end up being able to do it. Turns out they were only going to be able to afford the car payments if they refinanced the house. But the house refinanced for $800 less than it needed to (or maybe they were $800 away from 80% equity? IDK). So no new car to match their recently purchased motorcycle. This is a car that she couldn't afford to replace the tires on a few months ago.

Yesterday she shared this:
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12836 on: March 09, 2016, 08:57:10 AM »
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.
Um, I don't think income taxes work the way she thinks they work.  The IRS doesn't care what state you live in (unless you deduct state income or sales tax).  TX and FL have zero *state* income tax, but that has nothing to do with the IRS...  Maybe she means that they tell their state Dept of Revenue that they live in TX?

theotherelise

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12837 on: March 09, 2016, 09:49:03 AM »
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.
Um, I don't think income taxes work the way she thinks they work.  The IRS doesn't care what state you live in (unless you deduct state income or sales tax).  TX and FL have zero *state* income tax, but that has nothing to do with the IRS...  Maybe she means that they tell their state Dept of Revenue that they live in TX?

Yeah that's why I said she doesn't realize her lies are impossible. They don't even own properties in TX/FL, so the whole story is bonkers. The only thing even close to that is I've known some people in MO who use relative's addresses in IL to register their vehicles so that they don't have to pay personal property taxes her in MO. But no, wherever you earn your income is where you have to pay taxes on it. Just ridiculous.

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12838 on: March 09, 2016, 10:45:42 AM »
Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket
Also the modern English word "pocket".
Also?
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mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12839 on: March 09, 2016, 11:12:51 AM »
I've done this before, but it's always fun.  They got pretty close!


TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12840 on: March 09, 2016, 11:50:38 AM »
Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket
Also the modern English word "pocket".
Also?

Oops: thought I was commenting on an earlier message. Sorry to be redundant. :)
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onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12841 on: March 09, 2016, 11:52:01 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12842 on: March 09, 2016, 12:43:16 PM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12843 on: March 10, 2016, 09:28:13 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12844 on: March 10, 2016, 09:30:13 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12845 on: March 10, 2016, 10:16:08 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

ringer707

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12846 on: March 10, 2016, 11:08:40 AM »
I rarely hear discussions of money at work, but did hear this the other day.

CW is looking to buy a house for him, his wife, 2 children, and 3rd on the way. Wife does not work, and CW has six figures of student loans. He's telling me and several other coworkers about putting an offer in on one house. He described it and sounds like a pretty good house, but then he adds in "the only problem is it doesn't have a garage, or a paved driveway, so we would have to take care of that once we moved in." All of my coworkers nodded in agreement. I felt like saying "or you could pay off your loans, or save for your new child... but clearly it's important that your Nissan doesn't sit in the rain or have to travel over gravel."

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12847 on: March 10, 2016, 11:09:20 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

Or, in the case of my last job, they've realized that 'a crisis' hits every day, without fail, at 4:30pm (and that it's your responsibility to fix it), and so they're always leaving at 7pm anyway... and therefore start coming in at 10am.

(Worked for me, pre-kids: I'm not a morning person, so I'd slept in until 9, have a cup of coffee and read a book, and then shower and leave at 9:45 to be at work for 10. And getting home at 7:30pm is fine if your friends are students and artists and you're gonna be out until 1am on a weeknight anyway, becuase that's still 8 hours of sleep!)

jordanread

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12848 on: March 10, 2016, 11:16:20 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

I don't know. I think in general your viewpoint is probably accurate. However, once I create the environment that allows that flexibility, I usually don't take lunches, come in late, and leave early. It's not the bare minimum, I'm just that freaking good.
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MudDuck

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12849 on: March 10, 2016, 11:18:11 AM »
That's "yinz", not "y'uns".

I regularly hear both "yinz" and "yunz" around here, most commonly as, "yinz-guys" or "yunz-guys." Good old Pixsburgh.