Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 6409533 times)

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12800 on: March 07, 2016, 01:52:30 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

dsmexpat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12801 on: March 07, 2016, 01:57:41 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12802 on: March 07, 2016, 02:00:39 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

Also a nice metaphor for the inevitability of taxes. ;-)
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MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12803 on: March 07, 2016, 03:30:11 PM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Tax brackets must be confusing. I have explained them several times to my otherwise-intelligent husband and he just can't grasp and retain the concepts. He bases some of his political opinions and votes on his misunderstanding of tax brackets...most others must do this too. Scary!
I like to explain it as a bucket with several leaks. One 10% leak at the bottom. Another 5% leak (in addition to the 10% leak) slightly further up. Another 10% leak even higher than that and so forth. As you fill the bucket up with income first only the bottom leak leaks. Then the water level reaches the second leak and additional water poured in is subject to both leaks. If you keep filling it up you get to more and more leaks but never to a point that adding more water doesn't increase the level.

Also a nice metaphor for the inevitability of taxes. ;-)

Except for my bucket doesn't leak, and hasn't for several years.

nnls

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12804 on: March 07, 2016, 03:42:34 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain
« Last Edit: March 07, 2016, 03:45:18 PM by nnls »

Basenji

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12805 on: March 07, 2016, 05:06:20 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Ralph2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12806 on: March 07, 2016, 09:07:22 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Yeah sorry, Admino is the unit admin officer (Air force)and Padre is the chaplain, both locations were military.

Don't do a lot of writing on line and when I do I forget the wider audience sometimes.
Will do better next time.

nnls

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12807 on: March 07, 2016, 09:13:54 PM »
Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.
So defacto is Aussie slang for girlfriend? What was the "Admino and padre" part of that story?

Defacto is live in partner, so pretty much a married like scenario without the bit of paper. So if you are in a defacto relationship with someone and it goes wrong you can go through family court similar to if you were married.

I assume the OP is in the armed services with his talk of parade times? So Admino and Padre might be slang for for some sort of squadron leaders or administrators. Padre from memory is the Chaplain

Oh good, it wasn't just me having a stroke.

Yeah sorry, Admino is the unit admin officer (Air force)and Padre is the chaplain, both locations were military.

Don't do a lot of writing on line and when I do I forget the wider audience sometimes.
Will do better next time.

I am glad I got Padre right and admino for admin officer makes a lot of sense :)

Mattzlaff

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12808 on: March 08, 2016, 02:14:19 AM »
We just got bonuses at work that exceeded the previous bonuses by double. 16.3% of our salary.

There's one guy at work who had it spent THAT DAY on parts for his brand quad and used snow mobile. Other guys are spending it on new vehicles "once momma has her new car paid off I'm scrapping my 07 chevy and buying a new Denali"

I'll quietly tuck it away and invest in my future...FIRE is that much closer.

Apples

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12809 on: March 08, 2016, 06:44:50 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Sadly I don't know what a grinny is.  I'm from the eastern edge of Appalachia in PA, but I wouldn't say I'm actually near Pittsburgh since it's a few hours from here.  I think we have a good mix of PA Dutch slang in there.

And to make this post on-topic:

A coworker whom I've written about before has gone further into consumerism craziness.  He found a girlfriend and moved her in quickly so she could help share the utility bills*.  They got more tv's when she moved in with her two kids.  Now, in addition to that, she told him that go kart racing is really fun and he should do it.  So he's bought a go kart (two actually) and is building a trailer for it.  He asked us if the company would sponsor him...I told him I'd pay him money to not race go karts.  He didn't take me up on the offer.  I think this girlfriend is now costing him much much more money than the bachelor life would have been.

*he pays no rent or water and chops wood for heat...so she was sharing the $100 electricity bill?  maybe the tv bill?

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12810 on: March 08, 2016, 10:07:36 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.

If we are getting pedantic, buttons are usually subsets of switches.  I'm talking about the kind of button one would generally mash, not those on a shirt or a button nose.  There are probably some random exceptions like mechanical squeaker buttons

Roboturner

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12811 on: March 08, 2016, 04:18:56 PM »

Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html


Nailed It!

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MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12812 on: March 08, 2016, 05:19:01 PM »

Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html


Nailed It!

I managed to break it.

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12813 on: March 08, 2016, 06:58:58 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Sadly I don't know what a grinny is.  I'm from the eastern edge of Appalachia in PA, but I wouldn't say I'm actually near Pittsburgh since it's a few hours from here.  I think we have a good mix of PA Dutch slang in there.

And to make this post on-topic:

A coworker whom I've written about before has gone further into consumerism craziness.  He found a girlfriend and moved her in quickly so she could help share the utility bills*.  They got more tv's when she moved in with her two kids.  Now, in addition to that, she told him that go kart racing is really fun and he should do it.  So he's bought a go kart (two actually) and is building a trailer for it.  He asked us if the company would sponsor him...I told him I'd pay him money to not race go karts.  He didn't take me up on the offer.  I think this girlfriend is now costing him much much more money than the bachelor life would have been.

*he pays no rent or water and chops wood for heat...so she was sharing the $100 electricity bill?  maybe the tv bill?
A grinny is a chipmunk.  It's called that in like a 20 mile radius around me I think, both sides of the PA/OH border near the turnpike.  I grew up 40 miles north of here and had never heard the term until I moved down here.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12814 on: March 09, 2016, 06:53:40 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*

Eric222

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12815 on: March 09, 2016, 07:04:38 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*
But...but....part of advanced science training is learning how to run a lab....which includes dealing with money.... *head explodes*
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12816 on: March 09, 2016, 07:12:17 AM »
Overheard at work: "Can you take the dollar signs out of that spreadsheet? I can't do math if there's money, I just don't understand money."

This person has advanced science training and is in charge of RUNNING A BUSINESS.

*screams*
I'm mostly annoyed that they don't know enough Excel to just remove their own damn dollar signs. =)
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12817 on: March 09, 2016, 07:56:18 AM »
I've got one.

CW1 walks into the office (we are in Boston, btw)
CW2: How did you get home to New Hampshire last night?
CW1: Uber *chuckles*
CW2: How much did that cost you?
CW1: $70!

Apparently a group of them went out drinking last night... not only does this guy commute daily from NH (at least an hour away), he stayed out to get drunk in the city and then spent $70 on someone to drive him home!
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theotherelise

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12818 on: March 09, 2016, 08:44:14 AM »
Husband's coworker is just full of this stuff. She's a state receptionist making about 30k. Her husband makes around the same doing manual labor. She's in her late forties with one adult child that is married with her own kid (and her own basket full of money issues). She's requently on the (state) phone airing out her financial business to the office or crying about it at her desk later.

Couple months ago she was jazzed because she was going to get a new car. But then they didn't end up being able to do it. Turns out they were only going to be able to afford the car payments if they refinanced the house. But the house refinanced for $800 less than it needed to (or maybe they were $800 away from 80% equity? IDK). So no new car to match their recently purchased motorcycle. This is a car that she couldn't afford to replace the tires on a few months ago.

Yesterday she shared this:
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12819 on: March 09, 2016, 08:57:10 AM »
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.
Um, I don't think income taxes work the way she thinks they work.  The IRS doesn't care what state you live in (unless you deduct state income or sales tax).  TX and FL have zero *state* income tax, but that has nothing to do with the IRS...  Maybe she means that they tell their state Dept of Revenue that they live in TX?

theotherelise

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12820 on: March 09, 2016, 09:49:03 AM »
CW: My brother and sister have never lived in TX or FL, but they use addresses from there with the IRS so they don't have to pay income taxes.

They live and work in Missouri. It's pretty clear she's lying, but the fact that she doesn't realize her lies are impossible is scary.
Um, I don't think income taxes work the way she thinks they work.  The IRS doesn't care what state you live in (unless you deduct state income or sales tax).  TX and FL have zero *state* income tax, but that has nothing to do with the IRS...  Maybe she means that they tell their state Dept of Revenue that they live in TX?

Yeah that's why I said she doesn't realize her lies are impossible. They don't even own properties in TX/FL, so the whole story is bonkers. The only thing even close to that is I've known some people in MO who use relative's addresses in IL to register their vehicles so that they don't have to pay personal property taxes her in MO. But no, wherever you earn your income is where you have to pay taxes on it. Just ridiculous.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12821 on: March 09, 2016, 10:45:42 AM »
Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket
Also the modern English word "pocket".
Also?
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mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12822 on: March 09, 2016, 11:12:51 AM »
I've done this before, but it's always fun.  They got pretty close!


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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12823 on: March 09, 2016, 11:50:38 AM »
Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket
Also the modern English word "pocket".
Also?

Oops: thought I was commenting on an earlier message. Sorry to be redundant. :)
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onlykelsey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12824 on: March 09, 2016, 11:52:01 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12825 on: March 09, 2016, 12:43:16 PM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12826 on: March 10, 2016, 09:28:13 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12827 on: March 10, 2016, 09:30:13 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12828 on: March 10, 2016, 10:16:08 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12829 on: March 10, 2016, 11:08:40 AM »
I rarely hear discussions of money at work, but did hear this the other day.

CW is looking to buy a house for him, his wife, 2 children, and 3rd on the way. Wife does not work, and CW has six figures of student loans. He's telling me and several other coworkers about putting an offer in on one house. He described it and sounds like a pretty good house, but then he adds in "the only problem is it doesn't have a garage, or a paved driveway, so we would have to take care of that once we moved in." All of my coworkers nodded in agreement. I felt like saying "or you could pay off your loans, or save for your new child... but clearly it's important that your Nissan doesn't sit in the rain or have to travel over gravel."

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12830 on: March 10, 2016, 11:09:20 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

Or, in the case of my last job, they've realized that 'a crisis' hits every day, without fail, at 4:30pm (and that it's your responsibility to fix it), and so they're always leaving at 7pm anyway... and therefore start coming in at 10am.

(Worked for me, pre-kids: I'm not a morning person, so I'd slept in until 9, have a cup of coffee and read a book, and then shower and leave at 9:45 to be at work for 10. And getting home at 7:30pm is fine if your friends are students and artists and you're gonna be out until 1am on a weeknight anyway, becuase that's still 8 hours of sleep!)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12831 on: March 10, 2016, 11:16:20 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

I don't know. I think in general your viewpoint is probably accurate. However, once I create the environment that allows that flexibility, I usually don't take lunches, come in late, and leave early. It's not the bare minimum, I'm just that freaking good.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12832 on: March 10, 2016, 11:18:11 AM »
That's "yinz", not "y'uns".

I regularly hear both "yinz" and "yunz" around here, most commonly as, "yinz-guys" or "yunz-guys." Good old Pixsburgh.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12833 on: March 10, 2016, 11:21:51 AM »
haha, no problem thegrimsqueaker.

Not quite a mustachian problem, but the guy across the hall from me said to me (at 9:34 AM when he arrived): wow! I can't believe you're here this early every day!
When you leave, you should comment, "wow, I can't believe you're here this late every day!"
Eh...that really depends on the industry, work environment, etc.  Our parking lot is half empty at 9am, but plenty of people work past midnight.

I'm in at 8am because I get to go home in time for dinner. 9:30 isn't early, nor is 8am, really.
We have people in my office that get in as early as 6 or as late as 930. The people that get in super early do it so that they can take lunch at 1030 and leave by 3. The people that get in at 930 have a reputation for taking hour lunches (lunch times aren't really enforced, but we are "permitted" 30-60 minutes) and leaving before 5. If you know math, that does not add up to a full work day. I tend to get in around 730 so that I can have some time to myself before the rest of the people around me come in (8-830) and so that I can take a short lunch and leave by 4, getting home just as rush hour starts to hit on the roads. I prefer to have time to get something done around the house before dinner, but that's just me.

TL;DR - people that don't get in until 930 in the same office where others are getting in at 8 or earlier are generally the type of employee that is either 1) doing the bare minimum not to get fired or 2) "stays late" to try and impress the bosses without doing any extra work.

Or, in the case of my last job, they've realized that 'a crisis' hits every day, without fail, at 4:30pm (and that it's your responsibility to fix it), and so they're always leaving at 7pm anyway... and therefore start coming in at 10am.

(Worked for me, pre-kids: I'm not a morning person, so I'd slept in until 9, have a cup of coffee and read a book, and then shower and leave at 9:45 to be at work for 10. And getting home at 7:30pm is fine if your friends are students and artists and you're gonna be out until 1am on a weeknight anyway, becuase that's still 8 hours of sleep!)
Also a good point.

I tend to work 7:30 to 4:30, short or no lunch break.  Traffic is decent at these times.  And I have to pick up 2 kids, 2 locations, before 5:30 pm.  Husband does the morning drop-off, so works 9 to 5:45 pm, or thereabouts.  He also works at home at night during busy times.

Our office has a huge variety.  My boss generally doesn't come in until after 10, sometimes after lunch.  But he works later (we have afternoon conf calls with Asia daily), and he works till midnight many nights (from home after kids are asleep).  Several of my friends would come in late and work late because of "emergencies" (our fab shut down, we don't have these anymore).

After many years of being jerked around in bosses, job, salary (no raises) - some days I come in early and leave early.  Some days I come in late and leave late because of the conf call.  Some days I come in late and leave early (baseball practice, PTA meetings). I really don't stress it anymore.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12834 on: March 10, 2016, 11:52:20 AM »
Or, in the case of my last job, they've realized that 'a crisis' hits every day, without fail, at 4:30pm (and that it's your responsibility to fix it), and so they're always leaving at 7pm anyway... and therefore start coming in at 10am.

(Worked for me, pre-kids: I'm not a morning person, so I'd slept in until 9, have a cup of coffee and read a book, and then shower and leave at 9:45 to be at work for 10. And getting home at 7:30pm is fine if your friends are students and artists and you're gonna be out until 1am on a weeknight anyway, becuase that's still 8 hours of sleep!)

Exactly. I recently switched to an earlier shift and it's not good for the above reason. It is SO difficult to actually leave the office before 5, since something always comes up. I prefer to come in later and leave after the rush has left already.

In addition, for people who haven't, read the books Why Work Sucks and the Four Hour Work Week. Just because someone doesn't work a full work day doesn't mean they're not getting a full day's worth of work in. My specialty is process efficiency and over the years have gotten all my work down significantly in the time it takes to complete. So don't judge ;-)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12835 on: March 10, 2016, 11:59:34 AM »
Anecdotal evidence: On Fridays/Thursdays when I have a 3 day weekend as soon as I leave the building, my team is often let out around 1 or 2. We usually leave around 1:30 to 3:30 (normally it is 5; some of this is dictated by the train schedules and area happy hours). I think we get more done on those short days than we do on a full day.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12836 on: March 10, 2016, 02:10:29 PM »
Anecdotal evidence: On Fridays/Thursdays when I have a 3 day weekend as soon as I leave the building, my team is often let out around 1 or 2. We usually leave around 1:30 to 3:30 (normally it is 5; some of this is dictated by the train schedules and area happy hours). I think we get more done on those short days than we do on a full day.

I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12837 on: March 10, 2016, 05:53:18 PM »
Anecdotal evidence: On Fridays/Thursdays when I have a 3 day weekend as soon as I leave the building, my team is often let out around 1 or 2. We usually leave around 1:30 to 3:30 (normally it is 5; some of this is dictated by the train schedules and area happy hours). I think we get more done on those short days than we do on a full day.

I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

Why I love working from home: no one bugs me or interrupts me, so I can do 2 office-days worth of work in about 5 hours... So I do a 4-5 hours of work at home, and then my boss thinks I'm super productive, I accomplish more work, AND I get free time. Win/win?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12838 on: March 10, 2016, 09:10:17 PM »
I get too easily distracted at home, I work in export sales so I'm often abroad and more efficient when I'm away on my own, so it's not a "need to be in the office" thing.
It's just that my brain associates
Home = free time
And I have a very hard time concentrating.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12839 on: March 10, 2016, 09:16:50 PM »
Anecdotal evidence: On Fridays/Thursdays when I have a 3 day weekend as soon as I leave the building, my team is often let out around 1 or 2. We usually leave around 1:30 to 3:30 (normally it is 5; some of this is dictated by the train schedules and area happy hours). I think we get more done on those short days than we do on a full day.

I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

Why I love working from home: no one bugs me or interrupts me, so I can do 2 office-days worth of work in about 5 hours... So I do a 4-5 hours of work at home, and then my boss thinks I'm super productive, I accomplish more work, AND I get free time. Win/win?

My most productive part of the day is lunch. I bag my own so everyone leaves and I can focus.  The problem is that is when all my "eureka!" moments happen, but nobody else is around to get answers or follow up from their earlier emails to me.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12840 on: March 10, 2016, 10:20:17 PM »
I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

I work at hyper efficiency (the way my personality works, I can't take twice as long to do something that should take less time), so personally, I cannot "work" a full day. My brain would explode and I would get burned out exceptionally fast. I think more people are like this than care to admit, since in our society we are only deemed valuable if we act busy ALL the time, come in early, and leave late =P

But in more direct response to your comment, I think it's completely true for a lot of people. 4-5 hours of 100% focus is often greater than 8+ hours of more diluted focus. But everyone is different and works best in different environments and with different schedules, which is the greatest fault of typical corporate America, trying to put everyone in the same box =P

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12841 on: March 11, 2016, 05:52:46 AM »
My most productive part of the day is lunch. I bag my own so everyone leaves and I can focus.  The problem is that is when all my "eureka!" moments happen, but nobody else is around to get answers or follow up from their earlier emails to me.

Isn't that why we have writing in the first place? And it's not like emails expire....
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ender

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12842 on: March 11, 2016, 06:47:32 AM »
My most productive part of the day is lunch. I bag my own so everyone leaves and I can focus.  The problem is that is when all my "eureka!" moments happen, but nobody else is around to get answers or follow up from their earlier emails to me.

Isn't that why we have writing in the first place? And it's not like emails expire....

Email is horribly inefficient, though.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12843 on: March 11, 2016, 08:27:14 AM »
Or, in the case of my last job, they've realized that 'a crisis' hits every day, without fail, at 4:30pm (and that it's your responsibility to fix it), and so they're always leaving at 7pm anyway... and therefore start coming in at 10am.

(Worked for me, pre-kids: I'm not a morning person, so I'd slept in until 9, have a cup of coffee and read a book, and then shower and leave at 9:45 to be at work for 10. And getting home at 7:30pm is fine if your friends are students and artists and you're gonna be out until 1am on a weeknight anyway, becuase that's still 8 hours of sleep!)

This was my first job.  I started out getting in at 6:30, then quite often having to stay until 7 or 8.  Then, over time, I started getting in at 10, and still having to stay until 7 or 8. 

Crazy how some people couldn't figure out something is due Friday until Thursday afternoon.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12844 on: March 11, 2016, 08:43:25 AM »
I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

I work at hyper efficiency (the way my personality works, I can't take twice as long to do something that should take less time), so personally, I cannot "work" a full day. My brain would explode and I would get burned out exceptionally fast. I think more people are like this than care to admit, since in our society we are only deemed valuable if we act busy ALL the time, come in early, and leave late =P

But in more direct response to your comment, I think it's completely true for a lot of people. 4-5 hours of 100% focus is often greater than 8+ hours of more diluted focus. But everyone is different and works best in different environments and with different schedules, which is the greatest fault of typical corporate America, trying to put everyone in the same box =P

So true!

I had a boss once who chastised me for leaving after something like a ten hour day. I was just so mentally drained that staying longer would produce nothing of value. Of course, it's easier to work twelve hour days when it's almost exclusively meetings instead of highly technical, mentally tasking work...
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12845 on: March 11, 2016, 09:07:45 AM »
Email is horribly inefficient, though.
By what standard? I think it's perfect for holding a thought until the person who needs to receive it is disposed to do so. Unless you want everyone's desk to look like this:




Of course, it's easier to work twelve hour days when it's almost exclusively meetings instead of highly technical, mentally tasking work...

I actually find meetings to be the most mentally taxing aspect of my job. I've always hated them. There are exceptions: when a few skilled worker bees get together to really get shit done, it's great. But most of our meetings are bloated pieces of shit, loaded up with irrelevant tangents and unproductive time, and overpaid people talking for way too long about theoretically simple problems that could be solved outside the conference room. I usually want to stab myself in the face by the time it ends. I stay sane by crunching numbers on investment scenarios or near-term cash flow issues.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12846 on: March 11, 2016, 10:10:42 AM »
I often feel I'd be more productive working 4-5 hours than I am during a full day.

I work at hyper efficiency (the way my personality works, I can't take twice as long to do something that should take less time), so personally, I cannot "work" a full day. My brain would explode and I would get burned out exceptionally fast. I think more people are like this than care to admit, since in our society we are only deemed valuable if we act busy ALL the time, come in early, and leave late =P

But in more direct response to your comment, I think it's completely true for a lot of people. 4-5 hours of 100% focus is often greater than 8+ hours of more diluted focus. But everyone is different and works best in different environments and with different schedules, which is the greatest fault of typical corporate America, trying to put everyone in the same box =P
This is an interesting conversation.  When people talk about how efficient they are, I sort of giggled and thought "of course, if you finish your job in 4-5 hours, we'll give you more work to fill your day!"  That's corporate America for you.  One of my bosses was famous for the min 45 hour work week because you KNOW that extra 5 hours they are working!!

I too felt like I was more efficient working part time - got the same amount of work done, no BS, just come in and do it!!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12847 on: March 11, 2016, 10:42:38 AM »

This is an interesting conversation.  When people talk about how efficient they are, I sort of giggled and thought "of course, if you finish your job in 4-5 hours, we'll give you more work to fill your day!"  That's corporate America for you.  One of my bosses was famous for the min 45 hour work week because you KNOW that extra 5 hours they are working!!

Idiots like that are the poster children for the MacLeod hierarchy, which posits that the least competent employees (Clueless) are promoted to middle management to serve as buffers between the Sociopaths at the top and the Losers at the bottom, who are actually more self-aware than the management but unwilling to work substantially harder for perceived marginal gains in status and compensation.
Not only is that kind of idea totally contrary to facts, you have to be kind of inhuman to espouse it regardless of your level of knowledge.

Quote
I too felt like I was more efficient working part time - got the same amount of work done, no BS, just come in and do it!!
Yep!
I'll be honest, I rarely work more than half the day. But I kick out some top-notch shit when I'm in a groove.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12848 on: March 11, 2016, 11:05:38 AM »
I work at hyper efficiency (the way my personality works, I can't take twice as long to do something that should take less time), so personally, I cannot "work" a full day. My brain would explode and I would get burned out exceptionally fast. I think more people are like this than care to admit, since in our society we are only deemed valuable if we act busy ALL the time, come in early, and leave late =P

This is me, too.  I used to feel guilty about it, because I feel like I'm slacking off for a good part of the work day.  But I started to notice just how fast I get shit done when I hunker down to do something, compared to some others doing the same task, so I guess it's just how I work.  If two people get the work done on time it doesn't matter how they went about it, but it is frustrating being expected to look/be busy for 8 hours a day.  Sometimes I try to force myself to do a task slowly, but it's just not enjoyable.

I actually find meetings to be the most mentally taxing aspect of my job. I've always hated them. There are exceptions: when a few skilled worker bees get together to really get shit done, it's great. But most of our meetings are bloated pieces of shit, loaded up with irrelevant tangents and unproductive time, and overpaid people talking for way too long about theoretically simple problems that could be solved outside the conference room. I usually want to stab myself in the face by the time it ends. I stay sane by crunching numbers on investment scenarios or near-term cash flow issues.

"most of our meetings are bloated pieces of shit" made me lol.  That's how I see meetings too.  Sometimes the tech team will get together in the meeting room and rock some shit out, but for the most part it's a lot of nothing getting accomplished and taking a long time to do it.  I'm constantly fighting my company wanting to promote me into a management position, mostly because I would gouge my own eyes out if I had to deal with meetings all day.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12849 on: March 11, 2016, 11:30:55 AM »
"most of our meetings are bloated pieces of shit" made me lol.  That's how I see meetings too.  Sometimes the tech team will get together in the meeting room and rock some shit out, but for the most part it's a lot of nothing getting accomplished and taking a long time to do it.  I'm constantly fighting my company wanting to promote me into a management position, mostly because I would gouge my own eyes out if I had to deal with meetings all day.
The worst part for me is, I'm just a facilitator type for most meetings. I publish an agenda, collect inputs, produce a slide deck, get everyone there on time, and then I'm expected to say nothing from start to finish. Sometimes I witness conflict based on complete misunderstandings, and it's not my place to set it right. Sometimes I know for a fact the discussion we're having isn't what we're supposed to be there for... doesn't matter. And when one guy in particular takes every meeting into overtime by blathering on about dumb shit, and then makes a show of apologizing at the end, I can't stand up and say "fuck off, if you really care then don't do it EVERY TIME!" hehe...

If I moved up the chain, at least I'd have a voice, but the bullshit would get exponentially worse, and at this point even the financial motive for advancement is marginal. I just won't be there long enough for it to add up to real money... so I spend my free time and mental energy on investment strategies and other outside stuff. I keep my boss happy, which isn't hard, and he takes care of me... my teammates are great and most of my peers across the other shops are cool when we collaborate... the rest of it, I just do my best to tune out and ignore.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 11:33:29 AM by zephyr911 »
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