Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 6415538 times)

gimp

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2360
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12750 on: March 03, 2016, 04:53:07 PM »
I once roasted a chicken for supper, and then Mr. Tooth was very late getting home from work. I presented him with the now denuded chicken. I really like chicken skin. So does he. He was very, very disappointed.


zolotiyeruki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2316
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12751 on: March 03, 2016, 05:19:15 PM »
Reminds me of when I was in middle and high school. Between my older brother and I, we were playing some combination of hockey, football, baseball, or lacrosse, and we were caddying in the summer too. Mom and Dad bought another fridge for the basement just because they were tired of going to the grocery 3-4 times and didn't have room to buy more at a time. I know that between the two of us we were drinking 8 gallons of milk a week. I remember some friends that I ate lunch with my sophomore year of high school (so 15-16) calculated it out and figured out that I ate on average about 5,000 to 6,500 calories a day--large breakfast, mid-morning snack (which was the first lunch mom packed for the day), lunch (that mom packed), another "lunch" from the cafeteria, go home and snack, then eat dinner, then snack some more). Didnít start gaining weight until I turned 21 though. Iím not sure why. *mtn cracks open his favorite frosty beverage*
Same here.  I ran cross country and track and was on the swim team.  My mom packed me a sack lunch every day, and it was always full enough that you couldn't close it at the top.  Our 25-minute lunch period was barely enough time to finish lunch.  And then I had a bagel sometime during another class period, because I got hungry.  I estimate I was eating (and burning) 5-6k calories per day.

Ah, to be young again.

Kitsune

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1553
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12752 on: March 03, 2016, 06:43:26 PM »
Reminds me of when I was in middle and high school. Between my older brother and I, we were playing some combination of hockey, football, baseball, or lacrosse, and we were caddying in the summer too. Mom and Dad bought another fridge for the basement just because they were tired of going to the grocery 3-4 times and didn't have room to buy more at a time. I know that between the two of us we were drinking 8 gallons of milk a week. I remember some friends that I ate lunch with my sophomore year of high school (so 15-16) calculated it out and figured out that I ate on average about 5,000 to 6,500 calories a day--large breakfast, mid-morning snack (which was the first lunch mom packed for the day), lunch (that mom packed), another "lunch" from the cafeteria, go home and snack, then eat dinner, then snack some more). Didnít start gaining weight until I turned 21 though. Iím not sure why. *mtn cracks open his favorite frosty beverage*
Same here.  I ran cross country and track and was on the swim team.  My mom packed me a sack lunch every day, and it was always full enough that you couldn't close it at the top.  Our 25-minute lunch period was barely enough time to finish lunch.  And then I had a bagel sometime during another class period, because I got hungry.  I estimate I was eating (and burning) 5-6k calories per day.

Ah, to be young again.

Yeah, I remember having my (football, karate, swimmer) 15-year-old brother over for a weekend a few years back... His 4pm "pre-dinner" snack was an XL pizza and a sundae. And the. He ate about 3 times what I did for dinner 3 hours later. And you could see his ribs.

Primm

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1277
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Australia
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12753 on: March 03, 2016, 06:46:25 PM »
Reminds me of when I was in middle and high school. Between my older brother and I, we were playing some combination of hockey, football, baseball, or lacrosse, and we were caddying in the summer too. Mom and Dad bought another fridge for the basement just because they were tired of going to the grocery 3-4 times and didn't have room to buy more at a time. I know that between the two of us we were drinking 8 gallons of milk a week. I remember some friends that I ate lunch with my sophomore year of high school (so 15-16) calculated it out and figured out that I ate on average about 5,000 to 6,500 calories a day--large breakfast, mid-morning snack (which was the first lunch mom packed for the day), lunch (that mom packed), another "lunch" from the cafeteria, go home and snack, then eat dinner, then snack some more). Didnít start gaining weight until I turned 21 though. Iím not sure why. *mtn cracks open his favorite frosty beverage*
Same here.  I ran cross country and track and was on the swim team.  My mom packed me a sack lunch every day, and it was always full enough that you couldn't close it at the top.  Our 25-minute lunch period was barely enough time to finish lunch.  And then I had a bagel sometime during another class period, because I got hungry.  I estimate I was eating (and burning) 5-6k calories per day.

Ah, to be young again.

Yeah, I remember having my (football, karate, swimmer) 15-year-old brother over for a weekend a few years back... His 4pm "pre-dinner" snack was an XL pizza and a sundae. And the. He ate about 3 times what I did for dinner 3 hours later. And you could see his ribs.

When we had four teenage boys at home, we used to buy the 87c loaves of cheapy bread from the supermarket (along with the usual groceries).

The purchase requirement was one loaf per boy per day... None now bigger than normal (in fact two of them are bordering on the low end of weight for height), they just needed the extra calories a loaf of bread with peanut butter or cheese provided for normal functioning.

craiglepaige

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 819
  • Location: Ohio
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12754 on: March 03, 2016, 07:03:38 PM »
I don't know, but it reminds me of the psychopath who was keeping his victim at the bottom of a well in Silence of the Lambs.

You mean the police captain in Monk?


Noooo shit. That's the same acfor. Crazy part is that I absolutely love both Silence of the Lambs and Monk and have seen the movie numerous times and the series twice, and it never clicked.  That's kinda weird cause I'm extremely good with names/faces/actors.
-The conqueror will always become a slave to his conquest.

- Eres Un Esclavo Financiero
https://youtu.be/GO1Fsp4cUTQ

ambimammular

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 333
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Indiana
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12755 on: March 03, 2016, 07:05:18 PM »
I remember cooking a dinner with my now-husband back when we were both in college. I was shocked by the quantity he could eat. The vast amount was non-mustachian to say the least, but it did work out in the end!

Ralph2

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12756 on: March 03, 2016, 09:19:41 PM »
On a related note, although we consume less sugar than the American median (mainly because we don't eat processed food much), DH and I were trying to cut down a bit more and reading labels, and we realized that ONE tiny Yoplait yogurt container has nearly an ENTIRE recommended daily added sugar amount. Seriously crazy.

And depending on the flavour, many have more than the recommended daily amount.
Not bad for a supposed health food.
side note, I was eating two yogurts a day on deployment until I got bored one night and read the list of ingredients. Binned half a container of it and gave the rest of my stash to another guy who ate it 5 or 6 times every day. He was also drinking 6 cans of coke a day so wasn't bothered by the sugar.
Till then I could not work out why I was gaining weight, hardly ever ate yogurt before then and still avoid it now.

SpeedReader

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 117
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Lynnwood, WA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12757 on: March 03, 2016, 09:23:23 PM »

Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"

It's y'uns, not you'uns, and that's mostly limited to Appalachia rather than the state at large.

I lived in Tennessee twice, Middle & East, and never once heard "y'uns" there.  Where they do say it is in western Pennsylvania. 

grantmeaname

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4299
  • Age: 25
  • Location: London
  • This night has silence and very little fear
    • The MMM Blogger Community
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12758 on: March 04, 2016, 01:10:45 AM »
That's "yinz", not "y'uns".

Ralph2

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12759 on: March 04, 2016, 05:49:23 AM »
Willpower is truly a finite thing...
Oh yes, it is! Your willpower can get depleted by small things so that you dont have any left for gib things, too. That is why poor people often have no willpower - all that thinking about how to get work, to buy this little thing or not, how to get the kids to school... they use up half the willpower a company CEO has just by shopping.

But willpower also behaves like a muscle, you can train it.
I realized this on vacation staying with family.  Fridges full of soda, beer, sugary snacks, chips, candy.

I put as much stuff away as I could.

But seriously, I hadn't realized how much of my at home willpower is because I just don't have that stuff around.

I sometimes suffer, not from will power but a lack of won't power. I won't have a second donut/slice of cake etc.
Getting better as it seems the older it gets the harder it is to keep it off, doesn't help to be carrying injuries and now driving a desk most of the time.

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12760 on: March 04, 2016, 07:36:44 AM »
I remember cooking a dinner with my now-husband back when we were both in college. I was shocked by the quantity he could eat. The vast amount was non-mustachian to say the least, but it did work out in the end!

Is he a fast eater too? I get reprimanded for that by DW sometimes. ;)

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12761 on: March 04, 2016, 07:38:46 AM »

Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"

It's y'uns, not you'uns, and that's mostly limited to Appalachia rather than the state at large.

I lived in Tennessee twice, Middle & East, and never once heard "y'uns" there.  Where they do say it is in western Pennsylvania.

We have a friend from East TN (Tri-cities) that says y'uns alot to this day. Never heard it much in the parts of the state where I lived.

SweetTPie

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 98
  • Age: 33
  • Location: The South, USA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12762 on: March 04, 2016, 09:13:26 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.

Where I grew up, you would occasionally be asked to "Outen the lights."  Also, we go and get our "hairs cut", because we want all of them trimmed, not just one.

onlykelsey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1854
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12763 on: March 04, 2016, 09:15:39 AM »
Since we're already off-topic, does anyone else say "Paper poke" (or maybe "polk") for the brown product made of trees you put your groceries in?

Picked that up from my grandmother (appalachian upper south/PA roots) but have never heard it from other people.

maco

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12764 on: March 04, 2016, 09:18:32 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.

Where I grew up, you would occasionally be asked to "Outen the lights."  Also, we go and get our "hairs cut", because we want all of them trimmed, not just one.
My grandma would close the light.
Since we're already off-topic, does anyone else say "Paper poke" (or maybe "polk") for the brown product made of trees you put your groceries in?

Picked that up from my grandmother (appalachian upper south/PA roots) but have never heard it from other people.
I've heard "poke" for "bag" but never used it.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12765 on: March 04, 2016, 09:26:56 AM »
I've heard "poke" for "bag" but never used it.
Wait, is that where the expression "a pig in a poke" comes from?
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

onlykelsey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1854
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12766 on: March 04, 2016, 09:30:08 AM »
"poke 3  (pōk)
n. Chiefly Southern US
A sack; a bag.
[Middle English, probably from Old North French; see pocket.]

Word History: A pig in a poke is a colorful vernacular expression used to describe something offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value. Naturally, a buyer cannot inspect the pig if it is covered by a pokeóthat is, a bag or sack. The word poke meaning "bag" is not confined to just the American Southóin many parts of Scotland, poke bag is still used of a little paper bag for carrying purchases like candy. Poke first appears in English in the 1200s and probably comes from Old North French, the northern dialect of Old French. The Old North French word in turn is probably of Germanic origin and is related to words like Icelandic poki, "bag." Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket, meaning "pouch, small bag," which in turn comes from Anglo-Norman pokete, a diminutive of Old North French poke. Pouche, a variant form of Old North French poke, is the source of the English word pouch." (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/poke)

Old North French via Scotland via Scottish American south, fascinating.

plainjane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1271
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12767 on: March 04, 2016, 09:51:50 AM »
I've heard "poke" for "bag" but never used it.
Wait, is that where the expression "a pig in a poke" comes from?

Yes.  And "cat out of the bag" is the related saying :)

If you are buying a pig in a poke then anything might be in there and you wouldn't know - except if someone let the cat out of the bag. :)  Really only would work for piglets, but the pig in the poke couldn't be that big to start with.
Using procrastination to my advantage since 2001.

CM*TO Is a thing!! We're accepting names for the waitlist!!

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12768 on: March 04, 2016, 09:54:30 AM »
God, I love etymology. I could spend hours just reading about the evolution of languages (and have).
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3629
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12769 on: March 04, 2016, 10:15:14 AM »
Boss and a CW are talking about day-trading Apple... hehe
Semi-FIREd December 2017, part-time entrepreneur, lover of puppies and saltwater.

JordanOfGilead

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 429
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12770 on: March 04, 2016, 10:41:23 AM »
Boss handing out profit sharing bonuses today. After we talk about it, he says something like, "now some people adjust their tax withholding for this so they get as much as possible. If you want to do that, you need to talk to [human resouces] by [date]."

Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"
Really didn't want to have an in-depth financial discussion on a Friday afternoon...
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 11:46:54 AM by JordanOfGilead »

Dollar Slice

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2423
  • Age: 40
  • Location: New York City
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12771 on: March 04, 2016, 11:01:55 AM »
Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"

There is a widespread belief that bonuses are "taxed extra," probably because any extra amount added to your paycheck is getting taxed at your marginal rate. I had this conversation on Facebook a couple of years ago - my boss had offered me a choice between a bonus and a raise in the same amount. I ended up taking the bonus because I knew my boss well enough to know she would probably give me the raise anyway (she did, five months later, so I made out very well) and also I would save a little money in taxes if I took the money early because we were moving the business to a higher-tax locale and I would only pay ~30% on it as opposed to ~35% in the new place. But I posted on FB before I made the choice, asking (without giving dollar amounts because that's crass) what people would do or if I were missing something. I have a lot of smart friends who work in business and I figured they'd know more than me.

EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
Referrals for...
Prolific Academic: http://www.prolific.ac/rp?ref=3PJ4H43L (Earn money by taking academic surveys - way better than mturk, I average ~$9/hr)
Robinhood: http://bit.ly/2uGXBPG (Get a free stock!)

Paul der Krake

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3672
  • Age: 9
  • Warned Member
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12772 on: March 04, 2016, 11:46:15 AM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.

JordanOfGilead

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 429
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12773 on: March 04, 2016, 11:50:11 AM »
Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"

There is a widespread belief that bonuses are "taxed extra," probably because any extra amount added to your paycheck is getting taxed at your marginal rate. I had this conversation on Facebook a couple of years ago - my boss had offered me a choice between a bonus and a raise in the same amount. I ended up taking the bonus because I knew my boss well enough to know she would probably give me the raise anyway (she did, five months later, so I made out very well) and also I would save a little money in taxes if I took the money early because we were moving the business to a higher-tax locale and I would only pay ~30% on it as opposed to ~35% in the new place. But I posted on FB before I made the choice, asking (without giving dollar amounts because that's crass) what people would do or if I were missing something. I have a lot of smart friends who work in business and I figured they'd know more than me.

EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
It amazes me how many people don't realize that that extra tax withholding is where their big "refund" comes from at the beginning of each year. It's their money to begin with and even if you do take the lazy route of letting the government have an interest-free loan of your money for almost an entire year, it's still going to come back to you when your total taxable income is reported and how much you actually owe for the year is calculated.

runningthroughFIRE

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 314
  • Age: 24
  • Location: Northwest Indiana
  • Ask for broader shoulders.
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12774 on: March 04, 2016, 11:50:57 AM »
EVERYONE said "take the raise," not for the right answer ("then you'll have it forever and not just once") but because "bonuses are taxed at a higher rate, so you'll get more of the money if you take it as salary." I tried really hard to explain that you pay tax the same way on all your W2 income no matter if it is considered a salary, bonus, commission, whatever. They just. Did not. Get it. It was baffling.
A good litmus test for taxation literacy is to ask a person the difference between and deduction and a credit. Most can't explain that or the concept of marginal tax rates, but that doesn't stop them from speculating about what goes on in everybody else's paycheck. It's maddening to see so much misinformation among otherwise highly educated workers.
I've explained how tax brackets work to people more times than I can count and it still doesn't sink in with some of them.

Two of my coworkers were talking about their daytrading exploits, and somehow they ended up talking about pulling money out of their 401(k)s to fund an etrade account!  They were justifying it because you'd come out ahead despite the taxes and increase in taxable income due to the company match.

Apples

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12775 on: March 04, 2016, 01:01:21 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz

Taran Wanderer

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 479
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12776 on: March 04, 2016, 01:48:58 PM »
On the other hand, taking a raise increases your pay forever, while taking a bonus is only a one time payment.
"Incidentally, ten years ago I thought I wanted a Mercedes. Now I just want a nap and a cup of coffee."
  - Kashmani in Defining 'Rich'

myhotrs

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12777 on: March 04, 2016, 02:21:29 PM »
Not to mention bonuses are taxed more, as everyone knows
I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 846
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12778 on: March 04, 2016, 02:25:25 PM »
But money today is better than money tomorrow ;-)

AlwaysLearningToSave

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 437
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12779 on: March 04, 2016, 02:36:25 PM »
Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"

There is a widespread belief that bonuses are "taxed extra," probably because any extra amount added to your paycheck is getting taxed at your marginal rate.
. . .

The widespread belief probably comes from employers who elect to use the flat 25% federal income tax withholding rate for bonuses.  See https://www.irs.gov/publications/p15/ar02.html#en_US_2016_publink1000202352.  For many employees this results in greater-than-normal tax withholding.  If they said that "taxes on bonuses are withheld at a higher rate" they'd be correct. But most people don't understand taxes well enough to know the difference between "tax rate" and "tax withholding rate."  These are the people who sign a W-4 when they start a job and they only ever think about taxes once per year.

dycker1978

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 726
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12780 on: March 04, 2016, 02:54:28 PM »
Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"

There is a widespread belief that bonuses are "taxed extra," probably because any extra amount added to your paycheck is getting taxed at your marginal rate.
. . .

The widespread belief probably comes from employers who elect to use the flat 25% federal income tax withholding rate for bonuses.  See https://www.irs.gov/publications/p15/ar02.html#en_US_2016_publink1000202352.  For many employees this results in greater-than-normal tax withholding.  If they said that "taxes on bonuses are withheld at a higher rate" they'd be correct. But most people don't understand taxes well enough to know the difference between "tax rate" and "tax withholding rate."  These are the people who sign a W-4 when they start a job and they only ever think about taxes once per year.

Where I work, we get a largish bonus that is included on the first check of the year.  It makes it look like my yearly rate is going to be very large and changes the percentage withheld, so it looks like you are paying more taxes.  But this all evens out at tax time the next year, because it does not actually affect my tax rate, just the with holdings on one cheque...


runningthroughFIRE

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 314
  • Age: 24
  • Location: Northwest Indiana
  • Ask for broader shoulders.
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12781 on: March 04, 2016, 03:59:12 PM »
Why would you screw with your withholdings for one paycheck? Why not just jack up your 401k contribution for that pay period and not even let the tax man see your bonus? I know for a fact almost nobody in the office contributes more than the minimum to get the company match, so wouldn't that be a much more reasonable way to get to keep all of your money? I just shrugged and said "it all comes out in the wash anyway, right?"

There is a widespread belief that bonuses are "taxed extra," probably because any extra amount added to your paycheck is getting taxed at your marginal rate.
. . .

The widespread belief probably comes from employers who elect to use the flat 25% federal income tax withholding rate for bonuses.  See https://www.irs.gov/publications/p15/ar02.html#en_US_2016_publink1000202352.  For many employees this results in greater-than-normal tax withholding.  If they said that "taxes on bonuses are withheld at a higher rate" they'd be correct. But most people don't understand taxes well enough to know the difference between "tax rate" and "tax withholding rate."  These are the people who sign a W-4 when they start a job and they only ever think about taxes once per year.

Where I work, we get a largish bonus that is included on the first check of the year.  It makes it look like my yearly rate is going to be very large and changes the percentage withheld, so it looks like you are paying more taxes.  But this all evens out at tax time the next year, because it does not actually affect my tax rate, just the with holdings on one cheque...
This can throw a wrench into planning to not recieve a refund (or owe tax) though.  The payroll system at my job calculates withholdings in each period as if you were earning that much in every period all year.  When my signing bonus/relocation reimbursement came through on my first normal paycheck, the system thought I was making ~350K a year and withheld a ton of extra money.

Rural

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4291
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12782 on: March 04, 2016, 05:40:48 PM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.


You're right. Didn't think of that sort, but if any were around me I'd totally ask people to mash it (that's very much a part of my own dialect). As are several things mentioned here:


My floor currently needs swept.
While I don't outen the lights, I am ashamed to serve store boughten bread to guests.
I use y'all more frequently but y'uns sometimes, and my older relatives use it more than I do.
I often tote stuff in a poke, but I know better than to buy a pig in one (the idea is that it could be sickly or even be something else entirely; one should always inspect the pig).
I also will red up the place if company's coming.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 05:42:51 PM by Rural »

Pooperman

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2726
  • Age: 27
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12783 on: March 04, 2016, 06:00:27 PM »
Do your apples come out like 'alpples' instead?

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1445
  • Age: 37
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12784 on: March 04, 2016, 06:02:07 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Smokystache

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 240
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12785 on: March 04, 2016, 07:50:34 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

I used to spend a lot of time at/in the crik.  Catching bullfrogs and trying to catches grinnies ( ground squirrels).
« Last Edit: March 05, 2016, 08:08:51 PM by Smokystache »

Fi(re) on the Farm

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 127
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12786 on: March 05, 2016, 03:51:50 AM »
I work with a woman who is  retiring in January with a good sized pension.  She was discussing the amount of taxes she was going to have withheld from her pension check and stated "I need to get the same refund I get now otherwise I won't be able to pay my bills." 

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1699
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12787 on: March 05, 2016, 09:24:33 PM »
"poke 3  (pōk)
n. Chiefly Southern US
A sack; a bag.
[Middle English, probably from Old North French; see pocket.]

Word History: A pig in a poke is a colorful vernacular expression used to describe something offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value. Naturally, a buyer cannot inspect the pig if it is covered by a pokeóthat is, a bag or sack. The word poke meaning "bag" is not confined to just the American Southóin many parts of Scotland, poke bag is still used of a little paper bag for carrying purchases like candy. Poke first appears in English in the 1200s and probably comes from Old North French, the northern dialect of Old French. The Old North French word in turn is probably of Germanic origin and is related to words like Icelandic poki, "bag." Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket, meaning "pouch, small bag," which in turn comes from Anglo-Norman pokete, a diminutive of Old North French poke. Pouche, a variant form of Old North French poke, is the source of the English word pouch." (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/poke)

Old North French via Scotland via Scottish American south, fascinating.

Also the modern English word "pocket".
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

Making Cookies

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1652
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12788 on: March 05, 2016, 10:00:38 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

Astatine

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2763
  • Location: Australia
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12789 on: March 06, 2016, 02:27:35 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

shelivesthedream

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2517
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12790 on: March 06, 2016, 02:38:56 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7019
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12791 on: March 06, 2016, 05:58:45 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

Rural

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4291
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12792 on: March 06, 2016, 04:24:25 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

Pooperman

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2726
  • Age: 27
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12793 on: March 06, 2016, 07:07:53 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

I just used it and it nailed my (unaccented) NY/NJ dialect.

Vertical Mode

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 455
  • Age: 29
  • Location: Boston, MA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12794 on: March 06, 2016, 10:39:12 PM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?

Y'all might have fun with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html

I did it for funsies (being an Aussie). I broke it! "An error has occurred. Please save this link for later."

Me too! (English)
Me three! Canadian


 I think it's just plain broken. I'm both American and someone who used it successfully in the past, and it's giving me the same error.

I just used it and it nailed my (unaccented) NY/NJ dialect.

I would think if anyone would break it, it would've been someone from my neck of the woods...where wicked smaht guys go ta Hahvahd.

Really thick Boston accents can be quite harsh, sometimes even a lifelong Bostonian (me) can barely understand what is being said.
"That is why you will never be a good detective, Cato. It's so obvious, it cannot POSSIBLY be a trap..."

Link to my Journal: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/trending-vertical-vertical-modes-journal/

Ralph2

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12795 on: March 07, 2016, 04:47:38 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.

maco

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12796 on: March 07, 2016, 11:34:33 AM »
Adding to the language foam...where I live some common phrases are:

outen the lights (turn out the lights)
red up (tidy or clean up...red up a room)
yet (as in, are you there yet?  could be 1. are you there or are you still traveling there?  or 2. are you still there? works both ways)
all (the milk is all means we're out of milk)
crik
skip "to be" in sentences (the floor needs swept, the car needs washed)
yous's is popular, and some y'inz
About 2/3 of those are from my neck of the woods.  You must be near-ish Pittsburgh! 

Do you know what a grinny is?
I'm from Shaler (but if you're only "near-ish" Pittsburgh, then North Hills is a bigger target for me to name), and I do not know what a grinny is.

mm1970

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4816
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12797 on: March 07, 2016, 11:38:50 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2801
  • Location: Emmaus, PA
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12798 on: March 07, 2016, 11:45:30 AM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

Me neither, but I read it a second time and I'm pretty sure I understand the first story now. The second one still baffles me.

Ralph2

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12799 on: March 07, 2016, 01:32:00 PM »
Just finished reading the whole lot, wow. Two stories from trainees I used to control.

Had 5 or 6 appies who were starting to push parade timings, then one was late, next day two were late and then they were all late. The police had set up radar on the hill coming down to base and all had been caught, despite being told it was going to be in the area. The next day all were early as none had a license and all caught the bus.
After the first one got done the rest knew but had other things on their minds. No one to blame but themselves.
This caused multiple problems as they were all mechanics and most were going out to civilian placements which got cancelled.
Reason for the speeding, couldn't organise to leave any earlier, but now can leave an hour earlier to get the bus. Most learnt that lesson.

A few years later, different location and now a bunch of adult trainees (still mechanics). All wanted to move off base (some sort of noisy planes) but needed good reasons to do so. One wanted to go defacto as he wanted a house and yard and if single would end up with a unit. He went through all the lectures and briefs with info of what could happen if it went wrong.
Ended up not happy with her uni choice etc and started having issues. It ended up with the Admino and padre, it was close but we saved him 20 odd years of maintenance etc that he was not even thinking about. Good mechanic but pers skills were lacking.

Most of the others just bought new shiny off road utes or muscle cars etc, easy in comparison.

My own kids were adults by this time so I had some knowledge of the possible issues but some things are above pay grade.
I didn't understand much of this.

Me neither, but I read it a second time and I'm pretty sure I understand the first story now. The second one still baffles me.

Sorry, context more info, in Australia

1st gp, all red P platers, first of 3 steps to full license, all lived in same area and speeds were enough to lose them their licenses. Those who first lost their licenses got lifts with the others who then lost their licenses, all were booked in the same area in the one week. They then lost money from lost work opportunities as they couldn't drive for up to 6 months, no one wants a mechanic who can not drive. Several also delivered Pizza after hours, hard on a push bike.

2nd gp, main player was going to get his defacto pregnant and dump her, and did not realise the consequences, child support until end of education etc.
The others were just buying expensive vehicles, iPhones etc.