Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8911333 times)

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12600 on: February 29, 2016, 06:14:06 PM »
One of my favorite moments was at the loading zone of an Ikea a few years ago when we loaded up our 2003 Pontiac Vibe with a queen mattress and bed frame (the back seat folds down flat) and closed the hatchback with no difficulty. The guy on our left had an SUV, couldn't close his and was looking at our tiny car with disbelief and envy.

I had a Toyota Matrix (basically the same as the Vibe) and also will always remember shopping at Ikea with it. I shopped for my entire apartment at Ikea without even thinking about how it was all going to fit in my car to drive home. I got it all to the parking lot and thought "well, sh*t" lol. It was a puzzle, but I got it all in there ;-) I don't even remember all that I had, but it was a LOT of stuff! For my first apartment moving out of my parents...

I jammed a fullsize sofa into the back of my Focus wagon.

It hung out a bunch of the back but hey, it worked :)

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12601 on: February 29, 2016, 06:45:14 PM »
One of my favorite moments was at the loading zone of an Ikea a few years ago when we loaded up our 2003 Pontiac Vibe with a queen mattress and bed frame (the back seat folds down flat) and closed the hatchback with no difficulty. The guy on our left had an SUV, couldn't close his and was looking at our tiny car with disbelief and envy.

I had a Toyota Matrix (basically the same as the Vibe) and also will always remember shopping at Ikea with it. I shopped for my entire apartment at Ikea without even thinking about how it was all going to fit in my car to drive home. I got it all to the parking lot and thought "well, sh*t" lol. It was a puzzle, but I got it all in there ;-) I don't even remember all that I had, but it was a LOT of stuff! For my first apartment moving out of my parents...

I jammed a fullsize sofa into the back of my Focus wagon.

It hung out a bunch of the back but hey, it worked :)

Mr. FP put a dining room table and six chairs into a Honda Fit.

He had forgotten to remove the carseats.

gimp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12602 on: February 29, 2016, 09:27:09 PM »
Not to rain on your parades, as it's all awesome.  But I must be getting too old, because I was reading about mid-2000 cars and thinking that's pretty new.  My park avenue is a '97 model, I think; and my daughter about to turn 16 has laid claim to it.

Supercharged 3800? :D

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12603 on: March 01, 2016, 12:32:19 AM »
A friend at work was telling me how he plans on buying a new car, when I pointed out he got a new one only 6 months ago he said he needed this one was it was a bigger V8, more performance and the new car feeling again. Also his current one was already dropping value and this one is newer plated so it will hold more value.

The benefits of the bigger V8 that it would allow for safer overtaking and easier merging onto the freeway.....

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12604 on: March 01, 2016, 04:49:37 AM »
A friend at work was telling me how he plans on buying a new car, when I pointed out he got a new one only 6 months ago he said he needed this one was it was a bigger V8, more performance and the new car feeling again. Also his current one was already dropping value and this one is newer plated so it will hold more value.

The benefits of the bigger V8 that it would allow for safer overtaking and easier merging onto the freeway.....

Only 6 months ago? God damn.

I don't know anyone who can justify wanting a bigger v8 to allow for safer overtaking and easier merging. This isn't 1985 where a 6 liter v8 could put out only 200 horsepower. Since most normal cars are I4s or V6s, it's almost certain that any new v8 is most likely 400 crank... up to 700 these days. There are a lot of honest justifications for wanting a bigger v8: it sounds better, it's faster, it makes you erect. All reasonable. You get under 11 seconds bone stock in a quarter mile, or you can do 180mph top speed. Sure, it does that. Safer overtaking? Of what, the mom-mobiles everyone drives with 150-200 ponies and a slushbox auto, or worse, a CVT? Come on, I can safely overtake at >100mph on the wrong side of the road uphill - anywhere, anyone - in my car, and it only has the above-mentioned supercharged 3800, with half the output of a modern v8.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12605 on: March 01, 2016, 06:36:45 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12606 on: March 01, 2016, 06:53:56 AM »


So bisexual? Semi-sexual? Which one would you expect to get twice as much sex?

That should clear things up.

That's... not how sexuality works.
Made me laugh pretty hard though.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12607 on: March 01, 2016, 07:04:01 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12608 on: March 01, 2016, 07:18:21 AM »
One of my favorite moments was at the loading zone of an Ikea a few years ago when we loaded up our 2003 Pontiac Vibe with a queen mattress and bed frame (the back seat folds down flat) and closed the hatchback with no difficulty. The guy on our left had an SUV, couldn't close his and was looking at our tiny car with disbelief and envy.

I had a Toyota Matrix (basically the same as the Vibe) and also will always remember shopping at Ikea with it. I shopped for my entire apartment at Ikea without even thinking about how it was all going to fit in my car to drive home. I got it all to the parking lot and thought "well, sh*t" lol. It was a puzzle, but I got it all in there ;-) I don't even remember all that I had, but it was a LOT of stuff! For my first apartment moving out of my parents...

I jammed a fullsize sofa into the back of my Focus wagon.

It hung out a bunch of the back but hey, it worked :)

Mr. FP put a dining room table and six chairs into a Honda Fit.

He had forgotten to remove the carseats.
Ooh, ooh, I can jump in on this!  I put an entire bunk (that's somewhere in the region of 300) 2x4's in the back of our Honda Odyssey.  The guy next to us in the loading area said "if you fit that all in, I'm trading in my work truck!"  Another time, I put 1200lbs of tile and thinset in my '94 Civic.  Three times.  Once to bring it home, the second time to return it to the store because the finish didn't match the other tile we had previously bought, and a third time to get the right tile home.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12609 on: March 01, 2016, 08:28:29 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

Oops! I meant Toyota Solara.

JordanOfGilead

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12610 on: March 01, 2016, 10:57:16 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

Oops! I meant Toyota Solara.
That makes more sense. Absolutely terrible cars in my opinion :P
Welcome to the forum!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12611 on: March 01, 2016, 11:20:40 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

Oops! I meant Toyota Solara.
That makes more sense. Absolutely terrible cars in my opinion :P
Welcome to the forum!

Thanks! And to answer your previous question (missed it first time), I have 117k miles on the Cavalier. I've started to need work on it in the last 3 years, but nothing too major. I'll probably keep it only a couple more years.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12612 on: March 01, 2016, 01:59:08 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

This made me cringe. So much for getting a reality check and sizing down the budget. Seriously, why the lottery?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12613 on: March 01, 2016, 02:06:08 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

This made me cringe. So much for getting a reality check and sizing down the budget. Seriously, why the lottery?

Because it's a tax upon those who don't do math well.  Shush!  If these people didn't exist, we would likely have to pay our fair share, and none of really want that.  And remember to thank the next guy you see smoking, for his extra contribution to the state finances.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12614 on: March 01, 2016, 02:14:08 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

This made me cringe. So much for getting a reality check and sizing down the budget. Seriously, why the lottery?

Because it's a tax upon those who don't do math well.  Shush!  If these people didn't exist, we would likely have to pay our fair share, and none of really want that.  And remember to thank the next guy you see smoking, for his extra contribution to the state finances.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_broken_window

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12615 on: March 01, 2016, 02:16:04 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

This made me cringe. So much for getting a reality check and sizing down the budget. Seriously, why the lottery?

Because it's a tax upon those who don't do math well.  Shush!  If these people didn't exist, we would likely have to pay our fair share, and none of really want that.  And remember to thank the next guy you see smoking, for his extra contribution to the state finances.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_broken_window

The Parable of the Broken window was an illustration of the 'unseen' costs & effects of destruction.  I'm not sure how it applies here.

arebelspy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12616 on: March 01, 2016, 02:19:31 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.

This made me cringe. So much for getting a reality check and sizing down the budget. Seriously, why the lottery?

Because it's a tax upon those who don't do math well.  Shush!  If these people didn't exist, we would likely have to pay our fair share, and none of really want that.  And remember to thank the next guy you see smoking, for his extra contribution to the state finances.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_broken_window

The Parable of the Broken window was an illustration of the 'unseen' costs & effects of destruction.  I'm not sure how it applies here.

From the intro paragraph of that Wikipedia article: "illustrate why destruction, and the money spent to recover from destruction, is not actually a net benefit to society"

You can draw the lottery or smoking parallels yourself, I'm sure.
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MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12617 on: March 01, 2016, 02:21:32 PM »

The Parable of the Broken window was an illustration of the 'unseen' costs & effects of destruction.  I'm not sure how it applies here.

From the intro paragraph of that Wikipedia article: "illustrate why destruction, and the money spent to recover from destruction, is not actually a net benefit to society"

You can draw the lottery or smoking parallels yourself, I'm sure.

Ah, I see.  Well, I can agree with that, but since the prospects of ending these forms of self-destruction are nil, I'll take whatever silver lining I can conjure.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12618 on: March 01, 2016, 02:22:10 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

The administrative costs of the lottery are quite substantial on their own, not just negative effects from gambling.

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12619 on: March 01, 2016, 02:23:09 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

The administrative costs of the lottery are quite substantial on their own, not just negative effects from gambling.

Please!  Stop killing my hope!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12620 on: March 01, 2016, 02:31:33 PM »
I've done that sort of thing with my old aircooled VW Beetle. Seats come out in a snap. A used transmission will lay right where the passenger seat goes. An engine will lay on the folded back seat.
I think things have improved - on modern VWs you only have to carry a spare tire

I hope so!!!

My late 90s VW MKIII is a mess. Always needed a little this or that. Eats ignition switches every few years. Cheap and easy to replace but still. Would never recommend a VW to anyone as much as I've enjoyed mine. Definitely not a car for the mechanic dependent.

The old aircooled VWs just need alot of TLC aka frequent maintenance. Its myth that they last forever. The average consumer won't do what is really necessary to make them last forever - lube for everything, replace the perished rubber items, constant adjustments per maintenance schedule and component rebuilds. 3000 miles of daily driving would go by awfully fast... ;) I used my Beetle daily years ago. Always a little Sat or Sun tuning needed. 30 mins or 45 mins to tweak this or that. The aftermarket parts quality for aircooled VWs was abysmal back then. Don't know that it is much better now.  I had a set of rubber gaskets/seals that lasted one year before they dry rotted and required replacement.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 02:41:56 PM by Jethrosnose »

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12621 on: March 01, 2016, 02:37:56 PM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

Oops! I meant Toyota Solara.
That makes more sense. Absolutely terrible cars in my opinion :P
Welcome to the forum!

Maybe that Cavalier had plastic valve covers? I've seen some cars with plastic intake manifolds and plastic valve covers. My VW had a plastic water thermostat cover. yep - it cracked.

Guess it saves the factory $1.25 per car but some owner in the future will be replacing that component b/c it warps, cracks or otherwise leaks. A good reason to move on when car shopping in my mind - - - he says as he worries that everything after a certain year probably has these very parts on them...

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12622 on: March 01, 2016, 02:40:47 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

The administrative costs of the lottery are quite substantial on their own, not just negative effects from gambling.

Please!  Stop killing my hope!

They're actually smaller than I expected them to be, but unjustifiable when you consider that (a) the lottery is a horrible idea and (b) administrative costs of simply raising other taxes to make up for the revenue would likely be minimal.

It also appears that playing the lottery in West Virginia is a horrible, horrible deal.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12623 on: March 01, 2016, 03:07:56 PM »
A friend at work was telling me how he plans on buying a new car, when I pointed out he got a new one only 6 months ago he said he needed this one was it was a bigger V8, more performance and the new car feeling again. Also his current one was already dropping value and this one is newer plated so it will hold more value.

The benefits of the bigger V8 that it would allow for safer overtaking and easier merging onto the freeway.....

Only 6 months ago? God damn.

I don't know anyone who can justify wanting a bigger v8 to allow for safer overtaking and easier merging. This isn't 1985 where a 6 liter v8 could put out only 200 horsepower. Since most normal cars are I4s or V6s, it's almost certain that any new v8 is most likely 400 crank... up to 700 these days. There are a lot of honest justifications for wanting a bigger v8: it sounds better, it's faster, it makes you erect. All reasonable. You get under 11 seconds bone stock in a quarter mile, or you can do 180mph top speed. Sure, it does that. Safer overtaking? Of what, the mom-mobiles everyone drives with 150-200 ponies and a slushbox auto, or worse, a CVT? Come on, I can safely overtake at >100mph on the wrong side of the road uphill - anywhere, anyone - in my car, and it only has the above-mentioned supercharged 3800, with half the output of a modern v8.

the trade in will cover his outstanding loan and he will only need a $45k loan on this one so its a good deal apparently, and also this new one is the last one ever or something so it will grow in value....

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12624 on: March 01, 2016, 03:08:24 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

Some research suggest smokers are actually a great deal for the healthcare system. Most healthcare spending is on the end of life, and smokers have the good taste to die young. What you don't want are the "dying at 90 is dying young" genes that certain parts of my family have.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/05/health/05iht-obese.1.9748884.html

Obese people are a bargain too!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12625 on: March 01, 2016, 03:20:13 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

The administrative costs of the lottery are quite substantial on their own, not just negative effects from gambling.

Please!  Stop killing my hope!

They're actually smaller than I expected them to be, but unjustifiable when you consider that (a) the lottery is a horrible idea and (b) administrative costs of simply raising other taxes to make up for the revenue would likely be minimal.

It also appears that playing the lottery in West Virginia is a horrible, horrible deal.

But what about all the cash taken out of circulation when lottery winners salt away their millions and yet continue to live normal lives? All the lost productivity when they decide to live off the interest only?

That's not a thing.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12626 on: March 01, 2016, 05:31:45 PM »
Because the health costs of the smoker and the societal costs of gambling are more than their contribution to the tax coffers? Just a guess.

Some research suggest smokers are actually a great deal for the healthcare system. Most healthcare spending is on the end of life, and smokers have the good taste to die young. What you don't want are the "dying at 90 is dying young" genes that certain parts of my family have.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/05/health/05iht-obese.1.9748884.html

Obese people are a bargain too!

The argument I've heard against this theory is that yes, while they may cost the taxpayer less over their lifetimes, theres an economic cost. E.g. people taking time off work due to constant beside vigils and eventually bereavement, families having to use welfare after the loss of a parent, the smoker or obese person may be a high income earner so they won't pay any more taxes after they die, etc.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12627 on: March 01, 2016, 11:46:26 PM »
I have overheard 2 of my coworkers on another floor:
1)Taking out  3 4 or more credit union loans successively to travel with no count boyfriend.  Same coworker's mom was heavy into payday loans, a gambling habit plus supporting a drug using son and lazy adult grandchildren.
2)Another supporting 2 adult daughters one of whom has a child and may be pregnant with another.  Neither daughter graduated high school one dropped out one got a certificate stating she'd completed 12 years.  Older one has a $600 car note and job doesn't cover it.   Younger one doesn't work at all.
As for myself I used to be addicted to the vending machine daily for 2 honey buns $1.25 each at the time and a bottle of tea from the machine $1.75.  After casually calculating I was wasting $21.25 or more per week on that thieving machine, I facepunched myself then started buying my buns from the grocery store $1 apiece or donuts  $.66 apiece from Shoppers Food Warehouse ( Shoppers has huge donuts lol I am partial) and drinks also since sometimes they are $1 each or 3 for $5.  On occasion I do bake my own as well cutting it to almost free.

We won't discuss lunch out that was $10-15 per day which I have cut down to maybe twice monthly.

Went several pages after post, but did you mean 5 for $3?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12628 on: March 02, 2016, 12:02:58 AM »

Y'all is always plural; "all y'all" is reflexive or emphatic. :-)

Man how did I miss the y'all conversation?

I agree- y'all is NEVER singular. It is always plural.
All y'all is more plural.

Oh boy, now I'll have to try and sneak "all y'all" into daily conversation and see if anyone notices!

I would love to hear such a robust southernism pulled off in a British accent.

I had a coworker previously who was from rural NC but lived in London for 5+ years - fabulous accent!

And while I'm here, we also say y'all in Kansas, where I'm from though not all y'all, I've only heard that in NC. Another NC favorite of mine is "might could" as in:
You might could do that but instead maybe you should do this.

Love it.

Or else "fixin' to" - I'm fixin' to go to the store, can I borrow your credit card?

"Fixin' to" is a popular expression in Kentucky as well, followed shortly with the standard confirmation query, "Ya-un-to?"

And also widjadidja, as in " bring the barbie widjadidja?"

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12629 on: March 02, 2016, 06:22:26 AM »
I had a coworker who would continually surprise me with her bad decisions with money. She was 54 and had been through a divorce a few years prior that left her with nothing and she ended up filing for bankruptcy. She made around 45-50k. She had a 45+ minute commute each way and paid over $1100/month for rent in a nice suburb. There were much cheaper places to live near work but she was convinced that the entire city that our workplace was located in was a ghetto and she'd get shot if she lived here (this is nowhere near the truth). When she found out that HR automatically enrolls you in the 6% 401k + 6% match, she immediately had it switched to zero contribution because she needed that money in her paycheck. She was living paycheck to paycheck and would say "I need to start playing the lotto more" when things got scary. She didn't get all of her points for the work wellness plan her first year, so her insurance premiums went up $1,000 annually for the next year. She drove a Toyota Sonata that she was making high payments on, but would constantly wish she could drive a Lexus again. A couple of months before her car was paid off, she was in a car accident that totaled her car. What kind of car do you think she got next? A Lexus SUV, of course! (Used, at least.) Even though neither of us work at that place anymore, we occasionally meet up for lunch. First thing she asks me is if I've gotten a new car yet. Nope. I drive a 2002 Chevy Cavalier that is looking rather shabby these days, but it's saving me too much money right now to consider upgrading quite yet.
What's a Toyota Sonata?
There's a Toyota Solara (but these went out of production a while back) and a Hyundai Sonata ...
I also used to drive an 02 cavalier. I traded up when It started to have problems with the motor (somehow I managed to crack the valve cover? among several other problems with transmission and abs systems) and didn't want to bother paying someone to put a new one in (I didn't know how to do it myself at the time). That was at about 150k miles. How many miles do you have on yours?

Oops! I meant Toyota Solara.
That makes more sense. Absolutely terrible cars in my opinion :P
Welcome to the forum!

Maybe that Cavalier had plastic valve covers? I've seen some cars with plastic intake manifolds and plastic valve covers. My VW had a plastic water thermostat cover. yep - it cracked.

Guess it saves the factory $1.25 per car but some owner in the future will be replacing that component b/c it warps, cracks or otherwise leaks. A good reason to move on when car shopping in my mind - - - he says as he worries that everything after a certain year probably has these very parts on them...
It appeared to be cast aluminum, same as the head. Could have been a ferrous compound, but it was definitely cast metal and not plastic.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12630 on: March 02, 2016, 07:34:30 AM »

Y'all is always plural; "all y'all" is reflexive or emphatic. :-)

Man how did I miss the y'all conversation?

I agree- y'all is NEVER singular. It is always plural.
All y'all is more plural.

Oh boy, now I'll have to try and sneak "all y'all" into daily conversation and see if anyone notices!

I would love to hear such a robust southernism pulled off in a British accent.

I had a coworker previously who was from rural NC but lived in London for 5+ years - fabulous accent!

And while I'm here, we also say y'all in Kansas, where I'm from though not all y'all, I've only heard that in NC. Another NC favorite of mine is "might could" as in:
You might could do that but instead maybe you should do this.

Love it.

Or else "fixin' to" - I'm fixin' to go to the store, can I borrow your credit card?

"Fixin' to" is a popular expression in Kentucky as well, followed shortly with the standard confirmation query, "Ya-un-to?"

And also widjadidja, as in " bring the barbie widjadidja?"
A friend from NC congratulated me once on my correct use of "rightly know" in a sentence >_> Oh come on, it's just Southern for "grok"!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12631 on: March 02, 2016, 08:52:59 AM »
I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.

If you did, you'd probably get your heart blessed. "Bless your heart" is Southern for "you fucked up".

Other refinements of the Southern dialogue include the distinction between a conniption fit and a hissy fit. A conniption fit is a justified response to extreme provocation, whereas a hissy fit lacks reasonable cause.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12632 on: March 02, 2016, 01:29:41 PM »
I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.

If you did, you'd probably get your heart blessed. "Bless your heart" is Southern for "you fucked up".

Other refinements of the Southern dialogue include the distinction between a conniption fit and a hissy fit. A conniption fit is a justified response to extreme provocation, whereas a hissy fit lacks reasonable cause.

I never thought about this before, but it's true!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12633 on: March 02, 2016, 02:22:10 PM »
One of my coworkers is a single mom with a 4 year old daughter.  Dad is totally out of the picture, I think he may have passed away, but she definitely does not get child support.

She lives in a condo with the girl and was complaining how she has no money until next week because of all the food her daughter eats and then proceeded to list out a large meal the girl ate.

The cw probably makes $60K/year.

1) I'm sure there are things I don't know about the situation - but how the heck can you have difficulty paying bills for 1 kid and 1 adult on $60K/year?

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like. 

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12634 on: March 02, 2016, 04:55:35 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.

RurallyFrugal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12635 on: March 02, 2016, 06:47:46 PM »

Y'all is always plural; "all y'all" is reflexive or emphatic. :-)

Man how did I miss the y'all conversation?

I agree- y'all is NEVER singular. It is always plural.
All y'all is more plural.

Oh boy, now I'll have to try and sneak "all y'all" into daily conversation and see if anyone notices!

I would love to hear such a robust southernism pulled off in a British accent.

I had a coworker previously who was from rural NC but lived in London for 5+ years - fabulous accent!

And while I'm here, we also say y'all in Kansas, where I'm from though not all y'all, I've only heard that in NC. Another NC favorite of mine is "might could" as in:
You might could do that but instead maybe you should do this.

Love it.

Or else "fixin' to" - I'm fixin' to go to the store, can I borrow your credit card?

"Fixin' to" is a popular expression in Kentucky as well, followed shortly with the standard confirmation query, "Ya-un-to?"

And also widjadidja, as in " bring the barbie widjadidja?"
A friend from NC congratulated me once on my correct use of "rightly know" in a sentence >_> Oh come on, it's just Southern for "grok"!

Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?" 

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12636 on: March 02, 2016, 06:54:03 PM »

Y'all is always plural; "all y'all" is reflexive or emphatic. :-)

Man how did I miss the y'all conversation?

I agree- y'all is NEVER singular. It is always plural.
All y'all is more plural.

Oh boy, now I'll have to try and sneak "all y'all" into daily conversation and see if anyone notices!

I would love to hear such a robust southernism pulled off in a British accent.

I had a coworker previously who was from rural NC but lived in London for 5+ years - fabulous accent!

And while I'm here, we also say y'all in Kansas, where I'm from though not all y'all, I've only heard that in NC. Another NC favorite of mine is "might could" as in:
You might could do that but instead maybe you should do this.

Love it.

Or else "fixin' to" - I'm fixin' to go to the store, can I borrow your credit card?

"Fixin' to" is a popular expression in Kentucky as well, followed shortly with the standard confirmation query, "Ya-un-to?"

And also widjadidja, as in " bring the barbie widjadidja?"
A friend from NC congratulated me once on my correct use of "rightly know" in a sentence >_> Oh come on, it's just Southern for "grok"!

Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"

And if you are saying these things out loud, to get the feel of them, hold your nose.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12637 on: March 02, 2016, 06:59:37 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.

I hear ya!  We have recently resorted to ordering sheet pizzas for our family of 4.  That is 36 slices, 9 per person.  I may have 3.  The eating machines and my husband eat most of it and we usually have about 8 pieces left for lunch the next day (enough for the eating machines only.)

serpentstooth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12638 on: March 02, 2016, 07:13:43 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.

I hear ya!  We have recently resorted to ordering sheet pizzas for our family of 4.  That is 36 slices, 9 per person.  I may have 3.  The eating machines and my husband eat most of it and we usually have about 8 pieces left for lunch the next day (enough for the eating machines only.)

My brother used to make peanut butter sandwiches with an inch of filling. He'd slice half in thick slabs off the Costco cheddar. Even with cheap food, feeding him was very, very expensive for a few years.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12639 on: March 02, 2016, 07:51:59 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.


I hear ya!  We have recently resorted to ordering sheet pizzas for our family of 4.  That is 36 slices, 9 per person.  I may have 3.  The eating machines and my husband eat most of it and we usually have about 8 pieces left for lunch the next day (enough for the eating machines only.)

My brother used to make peanut butter sandwiches with an inch of filling. He'd slice half in thick slabs off the Costco cheddar. Even with cheap food, feeding him was very, very expensive for a few years.

That's like what one of my friends did when he took a job in SF out of college. It didn't pay well for the first year, but after that his income went up and he's happy (though he did later transfer to save up money).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12640 on: March 02, 2016, 11:52:31 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.
I was the same with eating at that age (13). But it seems to be necessary. According to my parents, I managed to grow 13cm in the one year between 13 and 14. That added biomass must come from somewhere...

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12641 on: March 02, 2016, 11:55:00 PM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.
I was the same with eating at that age (13). But it seems to be necessary. According to my parents, I managed to grow 13cm in the one year between 13 and 14. That added biomass must come from somewhere...

My daughter turned into an absolute terror at one point in early infancy. Absolute infant fury if you did not produce a bottle INSTANTLY when she wanted one, and she wanted about twice as many as usual, straight through the night. She'd been having medical problems, so we were at the pediatrician a lot, and she grew an inch and gained a pound in a week. The doctor was so surprised she redid all the measurements because that allegedly was impossible.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12642 on: March 03, 2016, 02:32:50 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.


Source: just had to mash the mute on the alarm twice (perhaps because I got it in 2003) before stumbling over and flipping on the lights so I could see to make coffee,

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12643 on: March 03, 2016, 02:38:22 AM »

I loved it when southerners asked me to "Mash the switch"

Like I was going to get out a sledge hammer to turn on the lights.



Sorry to interfere with your mashing, but one mashes a button, not a switch, so unless you have very old-style two button lights, you're flipping those.

I pictured this:


That's a switch, seems like you could mash that.
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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12644 on: March 03, 2016, 08:06:20 AM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.

I hear ya!  We have recently resorted to ordering sheet pizzas for our family of 4.  That is 36 slices, 9 per person.  I may have 3.  The eating machines and my husband eat most of it and we usually have about 8 pieces left for lunch the next day (enough for the eating machines only.)

Don't get between them and the food - it could be dangerous. I feel safer getting between the dog and her food than getting between our kids and their food these days. Its all teeth and chewing. ;)

One teen, one on the cusp of being a tween. Both boys.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12645 on: March 03, 2016, 08:09:43 AM »
I would eat chicken skin in high school. I can't comprehend that being appealing now.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12646 on: March 03, 2016, 08:11:51 AM »

Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"

It's y'uns, not you'uns, and that's mostly limited to Appalachia rather than the state at large.

merula

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12647 on: March 03, 2016, 08:29:14 AM »

2) As a mom to teen and pre-teen boys, I had to giggle to myself about food bills for a 4 year old girl.  She has no idea what kids eating a lot of food looks like.

No kidding.  My 3 year old seems to live on air.  But my 13 year old son recently complained that he wasn't hungry when called, and proceeded to only eat one whole 14 inch pizza by himself.  I'm just glad he wasn't hungry.

It could work out cheaper to feed a teenage boy, if you were talking about an extremely picky 4-year-old. Yeah, they only eat yogurt and snack packs, but they HAVE TO HAVE the yogurt that's $4 for a 2 oz container and the organic all-natural handmade by chimpanzees snacks that are $15 for 4.

Teenage boys, meanwhile, are not known for their discerning palates.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12648 on: March 03, 2016, 08:35:27 AM »
You are correct there. Would not be that surprised to see teeth marks on the exterior brick were they to get locked out of the house some afternoon. ;) Both active, normal weight, etc. Older one clearly going through a growth spurt. Same height as me. Don't know if I'll be looking up at him soon or not. Younger one is part monkey. Flips, climbing, etc.

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #12649 on: March 03, 2016, 08:36:41 AM »
Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"
Agreed with below, but I'd spell the later "in'ere" on account of I'm pretty sure that's a contraction of "in there."


Rural Kentucky has "y'all" and "all y'all" but we make fun of the folks just south in Tennessee who use "you'uns". Another of my favorites around here is "in-nair" to denote someone who is in good favor with the boss, as in "Boy, you in-nair, ain'tcha?"

It's y'uns, not you'uns, and that's mostly limited to Appalachia rather than the state at large.
And a note that that's ALL of Appalachia, not just the Tennessee portion. (says the Yinzer, I mean...Pittsburgher).