Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 4746840 times)

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11650 on: December 17, 2015, 01:26:13 PM »
Is that the F250 I read so much about here?

Just curious, do you live somewhere where heavy duty trucks are not available?
Eastern Germany.
As far as I know there are exactly 3 cars of this type, but not that big, in this 30000 city.

I do have seen a few Urals from the farmers, but not in the last years.

I've watched enough videos of cars flying down the Autobahn to have realized it's totally normal to tow campers/trailers in Germany with economy type vehicles. I'm not that surprised now that you say the location.

That's great you guys aren't getting sucked into the stupidly big trucks thing.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11651 on: December 17, 2015, 01:34:01 PM »
Is that the F250 I read so much about here?

Just curious, do you live somewhere where heavy duty trucks are not available?
Eastern Germany.
As far as I know there are exactly 3 cars of this type, but not that big, in this 30000 city.

I do have seen a few Urals from the farmers, but not in the last years.

I've watched enough videos of cars flying down the Autobahn to have realized it's totally normal to tow campers/trailers in Germany with economy type vehicles. I'm not that surprised now that you say the location.

That's great you guys aren't getting sucked into the stupidly big trucks thing.

Also, having driven in rural Italy, there is physically no way that most large pickups we see in the US would make it down those roads. Yet, somehow, Italian farmers and construction workers seem to manage just fine. Who knew.

Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11652 on: December 17, 2015, 02:55:59 PM »
Related financial tie-in: I don't have data so unless there's wifi, no internet for me. Both of these coworkers have big data plans through major carriers and constantly complain about the price. One pays for her daughter and son-in-law's phones (the daughter is older than I am) and the other has a smart phone for at least his 15 year old son, possibly the 9 year old daughter too. When I mention my $12/line phone bill they say "Must be nice" like I got lucky to get that deal. The woman says Sprint has messed up her phone bill every month for something like 6 months now and she has to call each time to get it fixed (extra crazy since Sprints coverage isn't that great here). PagePlus hasn't messed mine up once.

You might get shot down with this, but I like to play the phone game at a meal:

Everyone puts their phone at the center of the table.
The first person to retrieve their phone before the meal is over (define this clearly - whether it's when people are getting up to leave, when the check has arrived, etc.) loses.
Whoever loses pays the entire bill for everyone.
Otherwise, everyone wins and you each pay for what you ordered.
I've heard of that but since I'm rarely out to eat with anyone besides DH I usually don't need it. And it this meal the other two had already agreed to split the check to treat me so it would have ended up the same

There is also the added benefit of not having people check their smartphone every few minutes.

Yeah Maigahane you completely missed the takeaway point of the game. The point is to get people NOT to take out their phone. It isn't to try to get a free meal.
No, I got it, I was just saying it wouldn't apply in that particular situation

johnny847

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11653 on: December 17, 2015, 03:45:17 PM »
Related financial tie-in: I don't have data so unless there's wifi, no internet for me. Both of these coworkers have big data plans through major carriers and constantly complain about the price. One pays for her daughter and son-in-law's phones (the daughter is older than I am) and the other has a smart phone for at least his 15 year old son, possibly the 9 year old daughter too. When I mention my $12/line phone bill they say "Must be nice" like I got lucky to get that deal. The woman says Sprint has messed up her phone bill every month for something like 6 months now and she has to call each time to get it fixed (extra crazy since Sprints coverage isn't that great here). PagePlus hasn't messed mine up once.

You might get shot down with this, but I like to play the phone game at a meal:

Everyone puts their phone at the center of the table.
The first person to retrieve their phone before the meal is over (define this clearly - whether it's when people are getting up to leave, when the check has arrived, etc.) loses.
Whoever loses pays the entire bill for everyone.
Otherwise, everyone wins and you each pay for what you ordered.
I've heard of that but since I'm rarely out to eat with anyone besides DH I usually don't need it. And it this meal the other two had already agreed to split the check to treat me so it would have ended up the same

There is also the added benefit of not having people check their smartphone every few minutes.

Yeah Maigahane you completely missed the takeaway point of the game. The point is to get people NOT to take out their phone. It isn't to try to get a free meal.
No, I got it, I was just saying it wouldn't apply in that particular situation

Sure it could. Instead of the two others splitting the check, one of them would pay for all of it.

steviesterno

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11654 on: December 18, 2015, 05:54:05 AM »
I'm in Texas, the big truck capital of the world I think. I see more of these things than you can imagine, some with 20" lifts and mud tires. Ok, it looks cool if you're into that kind of thing, but that doesn't make it worth 6mpg. Especially here where people drive 40-50 miles each way for work, and everything is far apart.

I have a small SUV since I bought it pre-moustachian and it's cheaper to keep (actually Fj cruisers have been discontinued and mine has gone UP in value since buying it used 3 yeas ago) and I would be scared to drive a small car around here.

The best part about these giant trucks is they are all 2wd, so the four days a year w get snow, everybody thinks they are invincible. Then they slam into each other and the guard rails all day. I watch them on TV from home, even though my little suv is good in the snow and I'm from PA, so I know how to drive in it.

I almost feel bad when people brag about their new truck, or how they just rolled over the expense from the last one into the new one, or how they are upside-down on it in an accident and will be financially ruined. They ask how I'm able to work on investments, not have a second job, and have bought a house (totally re-did it ourselves, too) at my age. I usually say if I spent $900 a month in asshole payments commuting and trying to impress people I don't know or give a shit about, i wouldn't be able to live the way I do.

a good buddy visited and was happy to see we have a house, good area, big yard, blah blah blah. I come to find out his car payment for his and hers BMWs is more than we pay for mortgage, taxes, utilities, food, and our cars all combined. his car didn't seem so nice after that little conversation.

Anje

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11655 on: December 18, 2015, 06:34:28 AM »
Is that the F250 I read so much about here?

Just curious, do you live somewhere where heavy duty trucks are not available?
Eastern Germany.
As far as I know there are exactly 3 cars of this type, but not that big, in this 30000 city.

I do have seen a few Urals from the farmers, but not in the last years.

I've watched enough videos of cars flying down the Autobahn to have realized it's totally normal to tow campers/trailers in Germany with economy type vehicles. I'm not that surprised now that you say the location.

That's great you guys aren't getting sucked into the stupidly big trucks thing.

Also, having driven in rural Italy, there is physically no way that most large pickups we see in the US would make it down those roads. Yet, somehow, Italian farmers and construction workers seem to manage just fine. Who knew.
This goes for most of Europe. There was a brief flash of interest in the smaller types of these cars (which are commonly known as something rather rude and insulting) 3-4 years ago, but we don't have the roads or the parking lots to fit them. Here the electric car-business trampled them with marketing and now they are the sort of car 99 out of a houndred wouldn't be seen dead in. Heck: I'm in the construction business and even there you don't need a tanks like that.. (and you can't afford them even if you thought you did). But a Tesla, now. That's popular!

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11656 on: December 18, 2015, 06:36:48 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

Tjat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11657 on: December 18, 2015, 07:12:11 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

You can also back into a space

saving_dutchman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11658 on: December 18, 2015, 07:29:31 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

You can also back into a space

Several European companies have made reverse parking on the company parking lot obligatory. Research (that I can't find right now...) has shown that less accidents happen when reverse parking and I think it also decreases evacuation time in case of an emergency.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11659 on: December 18, 2015, 07:31:03 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

You can also back into a space

Several European companies have made reverse parking on the company parking lot obligatory. Research (that I can't find right now...) has shown that less accidents happen when reverse parking and I think it also decreases evacuation time in case of an emergency.

Common in the energy industry here as well in case everybody needs to get the hell out. It's just way easier in retail parking lots to pull through.

bloomability

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11660 on: December 18, 2015, 07:35:17 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

You can also back into a space

Several European companies have made reverse parking on the company parking lot obligatory. Research (that I can't find right now...) has shown that less accidents happen when reverse parking and I think it also decreases evacuation time in case of an emergency.

So do oil hq's in Houston. And so many people can't live without their trucks.

Related - new tactics to finance accessories on trucks are exciting a lot of people. "I can get $5,000 of accessories and just put it into my monthly payment! SO EASY!"

merula

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11661 on: December 18, 2015, 07:41:29 AM »
I work with this guy, and we both have the same job. He was complaining that he was interested in another job, but told that they were looking for someone with a different background.

Him: [Job complaints, been in current role 2.5 years, feels "stuck"]
Me: But you still have 2.5 years left until your self-imposed "3-5 years" time limit is up.
Him: And wife-imposed. You can't tell me you get no career pressure at home.
Me: Yeah, actually, none.
Him: Really? Must be nice. I get "I have a high need for financial security."

I'm floored that people actually say that to their spouse, but whatever. Not going to judge another person's marriage. Except that we had an office event at his house, and he had a slideshow of photos running on the TV. One of them was apparently a screenshot of the website where they bought a rug that was in their daughters' room. $1,300. Not only that, but it looks almost exactly like one that I bought at IKEA for $40 a few years back. Like, had I not seen the screenshot, I would have assumed they had the same rug as me.

I suppose you can blow through any income too fast if your tastes are expensive enough.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 07:44:45 AM by merula »

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11662 on: December 18, 2015, 07:47:20 AM »
I like to pull through when parking, or back in.  Oddly, I have seen in some parking lots signs that say "Head In Parking Only".  I always thought those rules were really stupid and whenever possible I try and park someplace else.

Squirrel away

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11663 on: December 18, 2015, 07:48:50 AM »

Except that we had an office event at his house, and he had a slideshow of photos running on the TV. One of them was apparently a screenshot of the website where they bought a rug that was in their daughters' room. $1,300. Not only that, but it looks almost exactly like one that I bought at IKEA for $40 a few years back. Like, had I not seen the screenshot, I would have assumed they had the same rug as me.


OMG, that would have been so awkward (and hilarious) if you had said that to him.:D

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11664 on: December 18, 2015, 07:59:46 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

I am now oddly tempted to start parking in the far end of parking lots, directly in front of someone else who parked a mile away from the entrance.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 10:13:30 AM by AlwaysLearningToSave »

steviesterno

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11665 on: December 18, 2015, 08:05:27 AM »
I am a fan of pull through spots as well. My dad calls them pull outs, and always yells that he loves pulling out, which is awkward to say the least.

I have a solution for door dings and idiots hitting me with their doors. My truck has side steps, so I'm welding up some of my own version that stick out a few inches past the body. they work to get stuff onto the roof rack *(yay for hauling more with a smaller vehicle!) and will instantly ruin the paint and dent a door that's thrown open into me. full times all around

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11666 on: December 18, 2015, 09:49:06 AM »
I like to pull through when parking, or back in.  Oddly, I have seen in some parking lots signs that say "Head In Parking Only".  I always thought those rules were really stupid and whenever possible I try and park someplace else.
Head in is to stop tail pipe staining the building - ruels finally introduced 30years after electronic emmision control mean you don't get clouds of black smoke every time a car starts.

Reverse in is safer - you are unlikely to run over somebody walking in a parking spot, compared to walking past one when reversing out

iowajes

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11667 on: December 18, 2015, 10:25:11 AM »
The best way to park safely in a small car, or any car really, is to park further away from the entrance so you can pull through and never back up. After a month of doing this you'll hate when it's not available.

I am now oddly tempted to start parking in the far end of parking lots, directly in front of someone else who parked a mile away from the entrance.

Just don't park next to them (assuming the lot is otherwise emptyish).  I've recently learned it is common for people in wheelchairs to park really far away when the handicapped spots are full- because having an empty space next to them is the only way they can get out of and then back into their car.

And if the lots are really full, they may park directly over the line to take up two spots- which makes me question whether I the cussing I've done in the past at "jerks" who have taken up two spaces was actually this situation; though I imagine there are more jerks out there than people in wheelchairs who needed the room, so I don't feel TOO bad about that.

Uturn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11668 on: December 18, 2015, 12:17:37 PM »
This just happened about 5 min ago.

CW:  Money stresses me out, so I don't pay attention to what things cost.
It's not about money, it's about mindset

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11669 on: December 18, 2015, 12:29:18 PM »
Our company was bought recently by a public company. That company offers an ESPP. The discussion came up and someone asked about the stock price and other things. One person said you could withhold as much as you wanted from your paycheck (realistically 15% of pay, max I assume). Another joked that you could put your whole paycheck in and then another said you'd have to be a multi-millionaire to do that.

I informed them that you'd only need enough money to float until you can sell your shares for a nice bump in salary. The conversation ended there.

shuffler

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11670 on: December 18, 2015, 02:16:10 PM »
One person said you could withhold as much as you wanted from your paycheck (realistically 15% of pay, max I assume).
There's an IRS-imposed $25k/year limit.  Or yeah, I'd be doing my whole paycheck too.

lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11671 on: December 18, 2015, 05:22:41 PM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 05:25:43 PM by lostamonkey »

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11672 on: December 18, 2015, 05:43:44 PM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

I've, honestly, never heard of this either; and would like more information.  But particularly, why can't you just file a W-2 as exempt?  Or is this not in the US?  I've been exempt on my W-2 for three years, and claimed married & 19 deductions for a decade before that.

EDIT:  Oh, I see.  This is Canada.  Ignore my US centric idiocy.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11673 on: December 18, 2015, 06:27:19 PM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

I've, honestly, never heard of this either; and would like more information.  But particularly, why can't you just file a W-2 as exempt?  Or is this not in the US?  I've been exempt on my W-2 for three years, and claimed married & 19 deductions for a decade before that.

EDIT:  Oh, I see.  This is Canada.  Ignore my US centric idiocy.

Afaik, filing a w2 as exempt is fraud or similar unless you have zero tax liability

Edit:perjury
"• Last year I had a right to a refund of all federal income tax withheld because I had no tax liability, and • This year I expect a refund of all federal income tax withheld because I expect to have no tax liability. If you meet both conditions, write “Exempt” here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ▶
Under penalties of perjury, I declare that I have examined this certificate and, to the best of my knowledge and belief, it is true, correct, and complete"

I'd be surprised if you met the requirements (are you the 47/%?)
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 06:31:04 PM by dragoncar »

MoonShadow

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11674 on: December 18, 2015, 07:00:15 PM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

I've, honestly, never heard of this either; and would like more information.  But particularly, why can't you just file a W-2 as exempt?  Or is this not in the US?  I've been exempt on my W-2 for three years, and claimed married & 19 deductions for a decade before that.

EDIT:  Oh, I see.  This is Canada.  Ignore my US centric idiocy.

Afaik, filing a w2 as exempt is fraud or similar unless you have zero tax liability

I'd be surprised if you met the requirements (are you the 47/%?)

Be surprised then.  I have zero income tax liability, and that has been the case for years, although my property taxes (and capital gains taxes) are considerable.  The last year that I claimed married & 19, I received a refund check of over $12K.  I have talked about my, somewhat unique, tax situation on this forum before.

EDIT:  Although some major tax credits that I can claim will be ending with my 2015 tax year, so I'm going back to a standard W2 withholding calculation for 2016.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2015, 07:03:53 PM by MoonShadow »

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11675 on: December 18, 2015, 08:07:08 PM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

I've, honestly, never heard of this either; and would like more information.  But particularly, why can't you just file a W-2 as exempt?  Or is this not in the US?  I've been exempt on my W-2 for three years, and claimed married & 19 deductions for a decade before that.

EDIT:  Oh, I see.  This is Canada.  Ignore my US centric idiocy.

Afaik, filing a w2 as exempt is fraud or similar unless you have zero tax liability

I'd be surprised if you met the requirements (are you the 47/%?)

Be surprised then.  I have zero income tax liability, and that has been the case for years, although my property taxes (and capital gains taxes) are considerable.  The last year that I claimed married & 19, I received a refund check of over $12K.  I have talked about my, somewhat unique, tax situation on this forum before.

EDIT:  Although some major tax credits that I can claim will be ending with my 2015 tax year, so I'm going back to a standard W2 withholding calculation for 2016.

OK, I'm surprised.  However, I don't think I would go around suggesting "tax exempt" to someone who merely wants to reduce their withholding (rather than eliminate them altogether)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11676 on: December 19, 2015, 02:16:25 PM »
I have always thought of them as the back-in cheat   ;-)

I hate being between two large vehicles, no matter which way my car is facing.  I can't see past them, and am backing out/pulling out blind.

I am a fan of pull through spots as well. My dad calls them pull outs, and always yells that he loves pulling out, which is awkward to say the least.

Arktinkerer

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11677 on: December 19, 2015, 04:19:31 PM »
Our company was bought recently by a public company. That company offers an ESPP. The discussion came up and someone asked about the stock price and other things. One person said you could withhold as much as you wanted from your paycheck (realistically 15% of pay, max I assume). Another joked that you could put your whole paycheck in and then another said you'd have to be a multi-millionaire to do that.

I informed them that you'd only need enough money to float until you can sell your shares for a nice bump in salary. The conversation ended there.

Use to work for a company that would let you contribute thru the year, changing the amount at will so long as you contributed at least $1 per pay period.  End of the plan year you could buy at the lower of the start or end price or cash out at any time.  I would contribute a small amount at the start and if the stock price went up substantially during the year, would take one of those 0% credit cards and live on it while contributing the max.  Nice bump in savings rate for doing that.  If stock price went down before then end I would cash out and pay down my mortgage.  First half of the next year was always for paying off the 0% credit card so we never had to pay interest.

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11678 on: December 20, 2015, 12:21:48 AM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

But isn't it a pain?  I did this one year, and by the time I finally received the letter, it was July, and then my withholdings dropped to very little, then spiked again in January the following year (as you need to reapply each year).

Edit to add -- I did not send in my CRA forms requesting it until March, when I knew how much I could contribute due to my bonus...   So it varies.  you need to send in proof of why the adjustment is valid, and I did not think I could do this until I could show my actual contribution made....   would be different for childcare, alimony, or just other annual amounts deducted.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2015, 12:26:55 AM by goldielocks »

lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11679 on: December 20, 2015, 01:22:20 AM »
I work for a fairly small company that has been around for many years but I haven't been there that long.  I submitted my T1213 for 2016 to the CRA in October. I gave the HR person/owners spouse my letter of authorization today to reduce my withholdings. I had to explain to her what it was, and she said I am the first person to ever give her one. This form allows an employer to reduce withholdings due to: RRSP contributions, alimoney, child care expenses, investment loan interest. This means in all the years of the company's operation, there hasn't been one other employee who has tried to reduce his withholdings for these reasons.

But isn't it a pain?  I did this one year, and by the time I finally received the letter, it was July, and then my withholdings dropped to very little, then spiked again in January the following year (as you need to reapply each year).

Edit to add -- I did not send in my CRA forms requesting it until March, when I knew how much I could contribute due to my bonus...   So it varies.  you need to send in proof of why the adjustment is valid, and I did not think I could do this until I could show my actual contribution made....   would be different for childcare, alimony, or just other annual amounts deducted.

For me if was pretty easy. I just set up a preauthorized monthly transfer starting Jan 2016 from my bank account to my self directed RRSP. I just used (base salary in 2015*18%)/12 to calculate my monthly contributions. I had the bank print off proof of this preauthorized transfer. I faxed in a filled out T1213, and the bank proof to the CRA in October 2015 and they sent me a letter of authorization in December 2015 which applies to the 2016 tax year.

I don't think the CRA will care if you contribute more than shown on your T1213, but they will probably care if you contribute less. So you don't have to wait till March to file this form.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2015, 01:26:31 AM by lostamonkey »

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11680 on: December 20, 2015, 07:40:24 PM »
I emailed my team some updated stats, with 'growth' in the subject line.

Got the following reply from one colleague:

"Does x growth require a beard trim, a comb or use of an electric razor ... or do you just let it grow out of control?"

That was his entire response. Nothing relevant, just bullshit to waste my time reading it after he wasted his own time crafting it.

Rage is a powerful motivator.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11681 on: December 21, 2015, 08:22:09 AM »
I emailed my team some updated stats, with 'growth' in the subject line.

Got the following reply from one colleague:

"Does x growth require a beard trim, a comb or use of an electric razor ... or do you just let it grow out of control?"

That was his entire response. Nothing relevant, just bullshit to waste my time reading it after he wasted his own time crafting it.

Rage is a powerful motivator.

He was getting paid while writing about mustaches. Sounds like he belongs on this site!

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11682 on: December 21, 2015, 08:59:38 AM »
CW1: I miss my truck (traded for a brand new one a month ago to pull the new fifth wheel he also bought).
Same guy who paid almost half a million for a house after moving here, hated it within a year, bought another place before selling, struggled for a year to find a buyer, and finally unloaded it at a huge loss.

CW2: We're almost done paying off this debt I've had since (early 2000s)

The rest of the conversation has been about Apple watches and how much money everyone spent over the weekend... I was, sadly, unable to contribute much.
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JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11683 on: December 21, 2015, 10:43:02 AM »
Even the top 2 networks (Verizon and AT&T) have $30 plans with data and all of that stuff. No excuses haha. I put together all my cell bills for the last 7 months that I've worked at my company, and it only totaled around $210. I get reimbursed for it, but it's just good practice!

T-Mobile is running a promo now - four lines for $120/mo (with 6GB for each line, and music/video doesn't count towards data use). Effectively unlimited data, coverage (free text/data, $0.20/min phone) in Canada and Mexico for $30/line.  : )

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11684 on: December 21, 2015, 10:50:20 AM »
Even the top 2 networks (Verizon and AT&T) have $30 plans with data and all of that stuff. No excuses haha. I put together all my cell bills for the last 7 months that I've worked at my company, and it only totaled around $210. I get reimbursed for it, but it's just good practice!

T-Mobile is running a promo now - four lines for $120/mo (with 6GB for each line, and music/video doesn't count towards data use). Effectively unlimited data, coverage (free text/data, $0.20/min phone) in Canada and Mexico for $30/line.  : )

The reason for my response was that in many areas, verizon or at&t are better for coverage than sprint or t-mobile. I know you can get cheaper from the other two networks, but the tradeoff is that you may not have service in places you need it. For example, I go to see my grandparents a few times a year, and I would not get service without verizon/at&t (mountainous area). That's worth $1.50 more per month to me in terms of safety alone.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11685 on: December 21, 2015, 11:45:06 AM »
Coworker told me about how her husband bought a black friday tv for $480 when it would normally be $1000. Sounds fine, and without further info, this probably wouldn't belong here buuuuuut: her friend was staying over in their 2-bedroom apartment and was upset that their guest bedroom didn't have a tv and that she'd have to sit in the living room if she wanted to watch tv and then going to bed. Coworker has a tv in her bedroom too (2 tvs total). She and her husband are buying a house next year, so they got it for the guest bedroom then. It's sitting at her parents' house while they wait to move.

I nodded my head and stuff, but holy shit. The logic was that she needs the tv so the discount was good, but she's totally missing the fact that she already has 2 tvs and can't possibly watch more! Plus, she even mentioned that netflix and whatever exist.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11686 on: December 21, 2015, 11:55:42 AM »
Coworker told me about how her husband bought a black friday tv for $480 when it would normally be $1000. Sounds fine, and without further info, this probably wouldn't belong here buuuuuut: her friend was staying over in their 2-bedroom apartment and was upset that their guest bedroom didn't have a tv and that she'd have to sit in the living room if she wanted to watch tv and then going to bed. Coworker has a tv in her bedroom too (2 tvs total). She and her husband are buying a house next year, so they got it for the guest bedroom then. It's sitting at her parents' house while they wait to move.

I nodded my head and stuff, but holy shit. The logic was that she needs the tv so the discount was good, but she's totally missing the fact that she already has 2 tvs and can't possibly watch more! Plus, she even mentioned that netflix and whatever exist.

The justifications when facing a "deal that you'll never see again" are pretty amazing. Equally amazing when the same deal and the same justifications show up time and again.

"It'll be on sale for like $800 when we move, so I got it now. It's a great deal!" Yep. A great deal on something you didn't need. I saved 100% to your 50% ;).

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11687 on: December 21, 2015, 12:29:35 PM »

The justifications when facing a "deal that you'll never see again" are pretty amazing. Equally amazing when the same deal and the same justifications show up time and again.

My spouse has that logic issue. Solution: we keep a household list of 'things we are looking for' (aka: things that, all things being equal, we will buy in the next 6-12 months, at full price, due to actual need) along with criteria (ex:'couch must be in this colour, be fully slipcovered due to kids+cats+desire for sanitation, and our preferred option is X at $$$ cost). Sales buys are ONLY acceptable in our house when the item is a) on our list, b) fulfills ALL the criteria (and usually is of that preferred brand), c) is a minimum of 15% less than what we were planning on spending, and d) we have the money in our bank account. And usually we keep a running search on Kijiji for what we're looking for as soon as the thing goes on the list, so less buying new at all since htings pop up used before we get around to going to the store anyway. Result: in the past 6 months, we've bought a couch and a dishwasher, and spent half of what we were planning on spending, total. We didn't go into ANY other 'because it's on sale' logic. Relief, both for my sanity and for our budget!

Rollin

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11688 on: December 21, 2015, 12:47:27 PM »
CW1: I miss my truck (traded for a brand new one a month ago to pull the new fifth wheel he also bought).
Same guy who paid almost half a million for a house after moving here, hated it within a year, bought another place before selling, struggled for a year to find a buyer, and finally unloaded it at a huge loss.

CW2: We're almost done paying off this debt I've had since (early 2000s)

The rest of the conversation has been about Apple watches and how much money everyone spent over the weekend... I was, sadly happily, unable to contribute much.

Fixed that fur ya!  :)
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zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11689 on: December 21, 2015, 01:49:35 PM »
happily
Fixed that fur ya!  :)
Hahahaha! Thanks.

Debt payoff CW is about to buy a new car. Impressed that this will be only his 4th car in his life, but not sure why it has to be new. There are so many slightly used ones with most of their warranties left for 25-50% off... I could never stomach that last climb up the depreciation curve.
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dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11690 on: December 22, 2015, 12:59:54 PM »
Was talking to a partner about a slowdown in work from one of our biggest clients.  He said something like "if wishes were trees, I'd be retired now".  Uh, dude makes close or more than 7 figures, is married to a dentist (they also make bank) and does not live in a Manhattan-level COL area.  He's mentioned early retirement before, but I'm not sure if I slipped up and he saw my browsing habits or if he really thinks he can't do it.

Megatron

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11691 on: December 22, 2015, 02:28:43 PM »
kind of a humble-brag but I got my bonus this week for the year (26% of a 6-figure salary) and I was talking to my boss who probably has a 30%+ bonus of his salary. dude said he already spent it on a new boat for next year. We are in Chicago. we have 2 seasons: summer, winter. He already has a boat but is upgrading to a bigger boat. Told me it cost over a thousand dollars to fill up a gas tank for the boat.

With This Herring

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11692 on: December 22, 2015, 03:26:56 PM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen.  They become accustomed to a constant influx of thousands of dollars each week.  As a result of this, they tend to save absolutely no money and finance all purchases.  One medical sole practitioner had financed two $100K SUVs (for himself and his wife, who worked in his same office), had mortgages on home and practice building, financed expensive jewelry for wife, paid kids' college tuition out of current earnings...  And they always had trouble paying taxes.  And the employer retirement contribution.  And they were DEEP in credit card debt.
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Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11693 on: December 22, 2015, 03:32:57 PM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen.  They become accustomed to a constant influx of thousands of dollars each week.  As a result of this, they tend to save absolutely no money and finance all purchases.  One medical sole practitioner had financed two $100K SUVs (for himself and his wife, who worked in his same office), had mortgages on home and practice building, financed expensive jewelry for wife, paid kids' college tuition out of current earnings...  And they always had trouble paying taxes.  And the employer retirement contribution.  And they were DEEP in credit card debt.

Yeah, especially the old school doctors I've heard.  They use the cash copays as their day's spending money (easily $1000 in cash/day) and are banking $10,000 in payments/day.  Those days are quickly fading though.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11694 on: December 22, 2015, 11:59:18 PM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen.  They become accustomed to a constant influx of thousands of dollars each week.  As a result of this, they tend to save absolutely no money and finance all purchases.  One medical sole practitioner had financed two $100K SUVs (for himself and his wife, who worked in his same office), had mortgages on home and practice building, financed expensive jewelry for wife, paid kids' college tuition out of current earnings...  And they always had trouble paying taxes.  And the employer retirement contribution.  And they were DEEP in credit card debt.

Yeah, especially the old school doctors I've heard.  They use the cash copays as their day's spending money (easily $1000 in cash/day) and are banking $10,000 in payments/day.  Those days are quickly fading though.

Doctors tend to be among the worst spenders. I suspect it's a combination of the accumulation of years of grinding and waiting (med school, residency, fellowship), high earnings that are consistent once they are in practice, and the ego/drive needed to be a doctor. I have many doctors in my family and they spend money faster than I can imagine. I think my cousins are a little smarter with their money though, so hopefully this is changing, though I have one cousin that's in his second year of residency and he's talking about buying a $100,000 car once he gets done. Another cousin bought a condo in the most expensive part of the Twin Cities so that he "can have fun." Not going to lie though, it is fun hanging out with him and I love the view from his condo.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11695 on: December 23, 2015, 01:50:31 AM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen. 

You just reminded me of an incident at the house of our friends a couple of years back. They're both doctors and had recently moved into this place and had their kitchen done. Part of this included new tiles and they'd bought them from a local (upmarket, expensive) department store. We were visiting about 3 months after this work had been done and there was a phone call to say that the store had been doing end of quarter accounts and realised that they'd worked out the tile area wrongly and that they'd charged £20 000 instead of £2 000 for the tiles and therefore they'd be refunding the difference. Friends hadn't noticed this, because "the total bill was within 20% of what we budgeted and there's always some cost over-run".

druth

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11696 on: December 23, 2015, 08:59:29 AM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen. 

You just reminded me of an incident at the house of our friends a couple of years back. They're both doctors and had recently moved into this place and had their kitchen done. Part of this included new tiles and they'd bought them from a local (upmarket, expensive) department store. We were visiting about 3 months after this work had been done and there was a phone call to say that the store had been doing end of quarter accounts and realised that they'd worked out the tile area wrongly and that they'd charged £20 000 instead of £2 000 for the tiles and therefore they'd be refunding the difference. Friends hadn't noticed this, because "the total bill was within 20% of what we budgeted and there's always some cost over-run".

So their kitchen re-do was at least 90k?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11697 on: December 23, 2015, 09:14:33 AM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen. 

Oh totally.  A medical office entered their health insurance figures incorrectly and wasn't taking enough from the employees to cover their portion - and didn't notice for over two years.  Which either means they just pay bills blindly without reconciliation, or have an incompetent bookkeeper.  And when they discovered the error, they wanted to take the $10k retroactively because "it's a lot of money and it should be ours". 
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MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11698 on: December 23, 2015, 09:45:10 AM »
realised that they'd worked out the tile area wrongly and that they'd charged £20 000 instead of £2 000 for the tiles and therefore they'd be refunding the difference. Friends hadn't noticed this, because "the total bill was within 20% of what we budgeted and there's always some cost over-run".

I'm appreciative that they refunded the difference. Too many companies would have pocketed it.

A friend of mine owns a kitchen remodeling company and he mentioned the average job is around $30,000 that they do. Of course, they specialize in complete remodeling, though they are willing to do simpler tasks like changing the countertops.

My house has a wall around the kitchen that's unnecessary and I would like to remove it and put in an island, but I want to see about doing it on my own before going to them. It's non-loading bearing, so taking it down won't be an issue, it's the electric and tiling work that makes me hesitant. I'm waiting for a few friends to finish up house projects before asking for their help.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #11699 on: December 23, 2015, 10:46:28 AM »
General knowledge from work:
Doctors who own their own practices have the worst financial habits of any category of professional I've seen.  They become accustomed to a constant influx of thousands of dollars each week.  As a result of this, they tend to save absolutely no money and finance all purchases.  One medical sole practitioner had financed two $100K SUVs (for himself and his wife, who worked in his same office), had mortgages on home and practice building, financed expensive jewelry for wife, paid kids' college tuition out of current earnings...  And they always had trouble paying taxes.  And the employer retirement contribution.  And they were DEEP in credit card debt.

Yeah, especially the old school doctors I've heard.  They use the cash copays as their day's spending money (easily $1000 in cash/day) and are banking $10,000 in payments/day.  Those days are quickly fading though.

Doctors tend to be among the worst spenders. I suspect it's a combination of the accumulation of years of grinding and waiting (med school, residency, fellowship), high earnings that are consistent once they are in practice, and the ego/drive needed to be a doctor. I have many doctors in my family and they spend money faster than I can imagine. I think my cousins are a little smarter with their money though, so hopefully this is changing, though I have one cousin that's in his second year of residency and he's talking about buying a $100,000 car once he gets done. Another cousin bought a condo in the most expensive part of the Twin Cities so that he "can have fun." Not going to lie though, it is fun hanging out with him and I love the view from his condo.
My doctor friend doesn't seem to be a big spender.  Granted, we live in coastal So Cal, so his house was expensive.  Over a million, but that's because he timed the purchase poorly (like we did) and has a slightly larger house than ours (his is 3 BR).  Most of his "extra" money goes to paying down his mortgage, and he still searches for good deals on airfare to visit family.