Author Topic: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition  (Read 271782 times)

Nederstash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #700 on: June 03, 2016, 03:35:53 PM »
Met a true badass at work! He is retired, but he came back to do a part time project he really likes. And he bikes to work... 14 miles one way, so 28 miles a day.

Not bad for a 75 year old!

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #701 on: June 03, 2016, 04:32:22 PM »
That is a super bike commute. Is the earth flat where you live?

14 miles here would be quite the commute b/c of the hills. I've done it but I am far from presentable afterwards.

When I travel through flat states I actually have daydreams of riding distances like that casually for work and fun.

MrDelane

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #702 on: June 03, 2016, 07:02:13 PM »
A woman I work with started biking to work recently.  I casually asked her about it and she said she figured that way she wouldn't have to find time to go to the gym, so she's saving money on both gym fees and gas.  I told her I'd been thinking about biking to work myself since I live pretty close....

...that's when she told me she lives about 15 miles away.

And I suddenly felt like the least mustachian person on earth.

:)

Nederstash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #703 on: June 04, 2016, 12:47:56 AM »
That is a super bike commute. Is the earth flat where you live?

14 miles here would be quite the commute b/c of the hills. I've done it but I am far from presentable afterwards.

When I travel through flat states I actually have daydreams of riding distances like that casually for work and fun.

The Netherlands: flat as a pancake and very bike friendly. I do have a friend that has a 16 mile commute she bikes. Every. Single. Day. Rain or shine. She is incredibly badass.

I was just starting to type all the reasons why I can't/won't do it but I realize I'm being a complainypants. I have done the bike commute (13 miles one way) a few times before and I did enjoy it. I stopped because it was just a bit too much for me.

So let's see if I can't talk myself into this...
- It would take a long time: yep. It's not a workout, it's a commute. It's okay not to race to get there fast and gushing sweat out of every pore. Enjoy the ride, take it easy.
- I don't like being sweaty and then meeting clients: if I leave early and bring a change of clothes, I can wash up a bit and be fresh as a daisy before my coworkers arrive, let alone clients.
- I would have to leave home at 6AM: that's not bad, lay out everything the night before and just get up at 5.55. Munch on a banana whilst biking. It's already light at that time (at least during summer), so it shouldn't feel like the dead of night. And biking will wake you up gradually, so my brain can remain in zombie mode easily.
- It's too tiring: that's because I am in terrible shape. Biking is really the solution.
- Morning commute might be okay, but I don't want to lose too much of my evening time: well, that's true... I enjoy having friends over for dinner, I have a little sidegig right after work one night a week and also need to have some downtime. When evenings are short, every hour counts. I suppose this'll take a bit of planning. I should realize I am swapping my time for something I really need to care about: my health.
- It might rain: it might well rain, it's the Netherlands after all. That's why we have rain coats and rain pants. I'm not made out of sugar.
- My butt will hurt: that's because it's soft and flabby.

Maybe it's all about balance. Biking every single day is not in the cards right now, as I have planned meetings/dinners/sidegigs for 2-3 nights a week for the coming 2 months. So maybe I'll start biking 1 day a week. That leaves me with some downtime as well.

So that 75 year old bad ass geezer made me feel like a total wuss. See if I can up my badassity.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #704 on: June 04, 2016, 01:29:23 AM »
Ah ja, the Netherlands! Was there in march and april. Lighted bike roads! Hundreds of bikes parked at the train station but only a few cars. Also lots of bumpers which is not good if you are sitting at the end in a mini bus with a driver that is used to a jeep like car. ouch! ouch! ouch!
Also liked Jumbo.

It was really depressing though when I was constantly overtaken on my bike by 70+ year old woman. Granted, some had electric bikes but not all. Hell, I was driving 20kmh against a strong wind. Sweating. And they sit there erect on the bike and swiiisch overtake me :(
And once on my way to Jumbo all I could do was to keep up with that 1-gear riding 85 year old looking thin man.


What I really wanted to say to Nederstash was just: Have you tried electric bike? For this long commute I would consider it an investment ;)

Nederstash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #705 on: June 04, 2016, 01:33:57 AM »
Ah ja, the Netherlands! Was there in march and april. Lighted bike roads! Hundreds of bikes parked at the train station but only a few cars. Also lots of bumpers which is not good if you are sitting at the end in a mini bus with a driver that is used to a jeep like car. ouch! ouch! ouch!
Also liked Jumbo.

It was really depressing though when I was constantly overtaken on my bike by 70+ year old woman. Granted, some had electric bikes but not all. Hell, I was driving 20kmh against a strong wind. Sweating. And they sit there erect on the bike and swiiisch overtake me :(
And once on my way to Jumbo all I could do was to keep up with that 1-gear riding 85 year old looking thin man.


What I really wanted to say to Nederstash was just: Have you tried electric bike? For this long commute I would consider it an investment ;)

Noooo way man. That's like side wheels or helmets. The true Dutch bike. On a ratty rambling carcass of a bike covered in rust, bought for 30 bucks off Marktplaats (our craigslist) that squeaks when you brake.

I would get ostracized like a Viking wearing a life vest.

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #706 on: June 04, 2016, 04:59:39 AM »
Noooo way man. That's like side wheels or helmets. The true Dutch bike. On a ratty rambling carcass of a bike covered in rust, bought for 30 bucks off Marktplaats (our craigslist) that squeaks when you brake.

I would get ostracized like a Viking wearing a life vest.

I am loving this Netherlands bike conversation. Viking in a life vest! I want someone to illustrate this for me. Maybe make a stop-animation short about the poor ostracized Viking who never learned to swim.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #707 on: June 04, 2016, 11:30:18 AM »
I don't think pharmacy tech.  I'm a pharmacist, been one for 22 years.  I have 480K.  Now, I didn't invest the maximum in the early years, only enough to get the match--sigh.  My tech's start at $12 and max out at $17.

She said she is a pharmacy tech. And to answer the other question I am suggesting this is very impressive given her circumstances.

Ceridwen

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #708 on: June 07, 2016, 06:33:04 AM »
I don't get to contribute to this thread often, so when I overhear something like this at work I get excited!

CW1: Damn, I forgot my banana at home today.  I hate not having a banana for breakfast.
CW2: Why don't you go buy one from the sandwich shop downstairs?
CW1: I ain't paying $0.75 for one damn banana!

MrDelane

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #709 on: June 07, 2016, 07:30:35 AM »
I don't get to contribute to this thread often, so when I overhear something like this at work I get excited!

CW1: Damn, I forgot my banana at home today.  I hate not having a banana for breakfast.
CW2: Why don't you go buy one from the sandwich shop downstairs?
CW1: I ain't paying $0.75 for one damn banana!

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #710 on: June 07, 2016, 09:08:35 AM »
I don't get to contribute to this thread often, so when I overhear something like this at work I get excited!

CW1: Damn, I forgot my banana at home today.  I hate not having a banana for breakfast.
CW2: Why don't you go buy one from the sandwich shop downstairs?
CW1: I ain't paying $0.75 for one damn banana!
Ah, I miss that show

Basenji

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #711 on: June 07, 2016, 10:25:56 AM »
A friend/co-worker and I are racing each other to be able to FIRE quit.

Inaya

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #712 on: June 09, 2016, 08:57:27 AM »
Not at work, but overheard on the shuttle to work, so I'm counting it.
Quote
I live between two train stations. I looked them up online, and they're in different zones. So I was able to get the tickets for the cheaper zone

Assuming he takes the train 5 days a week, twice a day, that'll save him ~$5 per week.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #713 on: June 20, 2016, 10:22:53 AM »
I sent one of my co-workers the JL Collins Stock Series last week (we'd chatted a bit about finance before, she knows our FIRE plans), and this morning she told me she switched her 403b allocation to the index fund from the managed one!

Prairie Gal

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #714 on: June 26, 2016, 06:23:38 AM »
Two co-workers discussing why we were going through more coffee at the office:

D: I quit buying coffee on the way to work.
A: Me too, it adds up.
Me: (Silent high five.)

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #715 on: June 27, 2016, 08:10:50 AM »
Not at work, but overheard on the shuttle to work, so I'm counting it.
Quote
I live between two train stations. I looked them up online, and they're in different zones. So I was able to get the tickets for the cheaper zone

Assuming he takes the train 5 days a week, twice a day, that'll save him ~$5 per week.

I was dog watching for a week out in the burbs and taking the train in. Same deal. I took the more expensive one because it was between 10 and 20 minutes to get out of the parking lot at the cheaper option.

RelaxedGal

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #716 on: June 27, 2016, 08:19:35 AM »
Not my work, but my husband's:

Coworker is biking 20 miles each way to work while he waits for his new car to come in at the dealership.  He figures this saves him $2000 because is old car is making a burning smell, and not driving it is preserving the $2000 trade in value.  He plans to drive it exactly one more time, to the dealership as trade-in when the new car arrives.

I know, I know, new car isn't generally Mustachian but 20 miles really impressed me and I had to share.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #717 on: June 27, 2016, 08:24:36 AM »
Not my work, but my husband's:

Coworker is biking 20 miles each way to work while he waits for his new car to come in at the dealership.  He figures this saves him $2000 because is old car is making a burning smell, and not driving it is preserving the $2000 trade in value.  He plans to drive it exactly one more time, to the dealership as trade-in when the new car arrives.

I know, I know, new car isn't generally Mustachian but 20 miles really impressed me and I had to share.

Sounds like the kind of guy who buys a new car every 20 years. I'd allow it as Mustachian.

TomTX

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #718 on: June 28, 2016, 08:45:37 PM »
Then, recently, someone complimented him on a new dress shirt.  He responded with,
"thanks, I got for last week for $4."

Dang, maybe I need to check out thrift shops. I try to make it a point to never spend more then $20-25 on my dress shirts, although sometimes I do. You can find really nice fitting stuff in that price range if you shop at the right places, sometimes name brand. Never thought of a thrift shop though

I wish the Goodwill locations around here were like that. They want like $18 for a used dress shirt. I get them for half that at the department store at the semi-annual deep clearance racks.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #719 on: June 29, 2016, 07:52:41 AM »
Then, recently, someone complimented him on a new dress shirt.  He responded with,
"thanks, I got for last week for $4."

Dang, maybe I need to check out thrift shops. I try to make it a point to never spend more then $20-25 on my dress shirts, although sometimes I do. You can find really nice fitting stuff in that price range if you shop at the right places, sometimes name brand. Never thought of a thrift shop though

I wish the Goodwill locations around here were like that. They want like $18 for a used dress shirt. I get them for half that at the department store at the semi-annual deep clearance racks.

Yeah, the local thrift stores sells used Old Navy and Walmart kid clothing for about the same price as the store sale price, new. Like, if I'm gonna pay 5$ for toddler shorts, at least old navy delivers them to my door...

10dollarsatatime

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #720 on: June 29, 2016, 07:08:44 PM »
Exit interview for one of my employees turned into a 3 hour chat about whatever came up.

Emp: "Yeah, so (General Manager) came down yesterday and we chatted between shows.  He randomly started giving me financial advice."
Me: "The only financial advice he's ever given me is 'don't invest in stocks'".
Emp: "Really?  That's odd.  I just dumped about $5000 into a Vanguard ETF."
Me:  "Right? Vanguard has all my investments, too."

Employee/Friend was a $10/hour part timer.  He's going into statistics.  He'll be fine. :)

dcamnc

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #721 on: July 02, 2016, 02:05:42 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

Umm you must be mistaken.  Google, Facebook etc do the free food for the exact same reasons that the banks/law firms do it: to keep the employees working longer.  Especially in the beginning when Google wasn't paying the highest salaries, the free food was a big money saver for them (~$3k food cost per employee vs perceived value raises of ~$10k)

Do you have a source for the $3k food cost vs salary? I don't mistrust your numbers just curious to learn more.

Yeah for Google I saw it as a way or them to keep employees there longer. With young employees that are unmarried, I imagine it pays off well to feed them and have them access to most things they can need as this coupled with having many young people with similar interests around makes them more likely to stay and work, and it can help increase dialogue with people in different deparatments, creating new ideas.

My cousin (works at Google) told me that he heard that an ex-intern "lived" at Google for about a year after his internship before he was discovered and the people at Google weren't really mad at him, it sounded like they were impressed.

We currently have an intern "living" in our building m-f. He goes to school during the day, does his office job with us at night, and then sleeps in his office. He's not supposed to, but we've turned a blind eye because he's a nice guy.

sidestache

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #722 on: July 04, 2016, 08:58:21 PM »
Work at a large tech company (100k+) employees, with our site being ~2500 employees.

Our site manager who probably pulls in 500k a year drove a rusted 1998 Ford F150 to work every day. Really cool guy who loved to chat about beer and physics while in worn jeans and a t-shirt. He left our site to move even higher up the corporate ladder to report to the CEO.

Found out that he just told them to f-off and that he was done with the corporate BS. Hes retired now at 45, fishing every day.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #723 on: July 05, 2016, 08:32:53 AM »
Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

Threshkin

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #724 on: July 05, 2016, 08:48:16 AM »
I certainly do not advocate putting all of your money in company stock (Enron?) but I do like to keep part of my money there. 

I just did my mid-year NW review and I have about 9% in company stock.  Most of that is in options that I cash out slowly due to the tax consequences.

How much of your portfolio should be in company stock?  That is a personal decision driven by your financial situation and your opinion on the health of the company.  In my case if it gets over 10% I reallocate.

Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #725 on: July 05, 2016, 08:53:56 AM »
I certainly do not advocate putting all of your money in company stock (Enron?) but I do like to keep part of my money there. 

I just did my mid-year NW review and I have about 9% in company stock.  Most of that is in options that I cash out slowly due to the tax consequences.

How much of your portfolio should be in company stock?  That is a personal decision driven by your financial situation and your opinion on the health of the company.  In my case if it gets over 10% I reallocate.

Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

I think everyone agrees. 10% seems high to me, but not overly high--I think most people were between 3 and 7%. I was at around 10% myself (all dividends and I think company matches go into company stock); after the announcement it was quite a bit higher. I just reallocated to 0% though, the price is basically where it is for the next year or so until the deal is executed or the deal falls through (in which case I don't want to be in company stock anyways).

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #726 on: July 05, 2016, 10:29:54 AM »
I certainly do not advocate putting all of your money in company stock (Enron?) but I do like to keep part of my money there. 

I just did my mid-year NW review and I have about 9% in company stock.  Most of that is in options that I cash out slowly due to the tax consequences.

How much of your portfolio should be in company stock?  That is a personal decision driven by your financial situation and your opinion on the health of the company.  In my case if it gets over 10% I reallocate.

Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

I have 0 in stock, but then I work for a startup company.  My policy is "same day sale".

So, if we go public or get bought "some day", I'll make a little money.
If we go belly up, then, well, I'm not losing money.

My prior start-up got bought before I was vested.  I had the same philosophy then. For the options, same day sale.  For the ESPP, sell within a week of getting the shares.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #727 on: July 05, 2016, 02:20:43 PM »
I certainly do not advocate putting all of your money in company stock (Enron?) but I do like to keep part of my money there. 

I just did my mid-year NW review and I have about 9% in company stock.  Most of that is in options that I cash out slowly due to the tax consequences.

How much of your portfolio should be in company stock?  That is a personal decision driven by your financial situation and your opinion on the health of the company.  In my case if it gets over 10% I reallocate.

Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

I have 0 in stock, but then I work for a startup company.  My policy is "same day sale".

So, if we go public or get bought "some day", I'll make a little money.
If we go belly up, then, well, I'm not losing money.

My prior start-up got bought before I was vested.  I had the same philosophy then. For the options, same day sale.  For the ESPP, sell within a week of getting the shares.

How do you sell if it's not public?  You use a secondary market?

Nederstash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #728 on: July 12, 2016, 02:00:10 PM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #729 on: July 12, 2016, 02:09:44 PM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

My wife declined a job in part because there was no 401k. Don't think she would have done that without me, but still. (She was 26 at the time)

dandarc

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #730 on: July 21, 2016, 01:40:38 PM »
CW1: "I'm retiring August 1st"
CW2: "What are doing after that"
CW1: "Will still be here - going to DROP"
CW2: "Nice!"
CW1: "Also saving the 3% retirement contribution that I won't have to make any more into deferred comp (457) as well."

Me (silently): "WOOOOO!"
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mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #731 on: July 22, 2016, 10:53:55 AM »
I certainly do not advocate putting all of your money in company stock (Enron?) but I do like to keep part of my money there. 

I just did my mid-year NW review and I have about 9% in company stock.  Most of that is in options that I cash out slowly due to the tax consequences.

How much of your portfolio should be in company stock?  That is a personal decision driven by your financial situation and your opinion on the health of the company.  In my case if it gets over 10% I reallocate.

Our company was just bought out, and the stock price took quite the jump. All around the water cooler people were somewhat lamenting that they didn't have more company stock in their 401k's. The overall theme was "Damnit, I had to go and put it in the low cost index fund, hahahah!"--with the general tone of knowing that it wouldn't have been a good idea, it just would have been a nice bump.

I have 0 in stock, but then I work for a startup company.  My policy is "same day sale".

So, if we go public or get bought "some day", I'll make a little money.
If we go belly up, then, well, I'm not losing money.

My prior start-up got bought before I was vested.  I had the same philosophy then. For the options, same day sale.  For the ESPP, sell within a week of getting the shares.

How do you sell if it's not public?  You use a secondary market?
Well I never sold except after we were public.  So the prior company, we got bought and my options were transferred to the public entity.  But with same vesting schedule (and a reduced # of shares).  I sold the public shares when vested.

With the current company, they are just options.  I won't exercise them unless we are public some day.

But yes, you can sell shares in a non-public company.  One of my former coworkers was an early employee and left.  He decided to buy some of his shares, but had to pay taxes on the "earnings" at that point.  In order to afford the taxes, he would have to sell some shares.  In this case, the company gets right of first refusal.  So they could choose to buy his shares or say yay or nay to the sale.  In the end, another coworker bought some of his shares from him.

iowajes

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #732 on: July 22, 2016, 11:22:02 AM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

You've interviewed people who DIDN'T ask about this?

Nederstash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #733 on: July 22, 2016, 11:48:01 AM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

You've interviewed people who DIDN'T ask about this?

She was the first one who actually asked. Not sure why no one asks... Maybe it's a Dutch thing?

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #734 on: July 22, 2016, 11:48:22 AM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

You've interviewed people who DIDN'T ask about this?


I don't typically ask about it in the interview. If I get an offer, I'll always ask and investigate.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #735 on: July 22, 2016, 12:44:55 PM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

You've interviewed people who DIDN'T ask about this?


I don't typically ask about it in the interview. If I get an offer, I'll always ask and investigate.

Yeah,it's part of the benefits package so a bit premature to ask about in the interview.  Kinda like asking about the salary.  Plus, most job listings will already advertise if there is a 401k, etc

frugalparagon

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #736 on: July 22, 2016, 09:59:58 PM »
Was interviewing a potential new employee, she asked after our retirement provisions.

She's 22. And I hired her, of course.

You've interviewed people who DIDN'T ask about this?


I don't typically ask about it in the interview. If I get an offer, I'll always ask and investigate.

Yeah,it's part of the benefits package so a bit premature to ask about in the interview.  Kinda like asking about the salary.  Plus, most job listings will already advertise if there is a 401k, etc

Yeah, but she's 22. Pretty new in the workforce. Bound to make missteps. I have interviewed 22-year-olds who were inappropriately dressed or gave me references that turned out to have issued formal reprimands against the interviewee. In contrast, asking about the 401(k) is a really good mistake to make.
I blog about Mustachianism during the child-raising years at frugalparagon.com.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #737 on: July 22, 2016, 11:22:27 PM »
or gave me references that turned out to have issued formal reprimands against the interviewee. In contrast, asking about the 401(k) is a really good mistake to make.

One time, a list of references included a colleague.
Asked about the potential hire, the reference said "I wouldn't touch [the potential hire] with a ten foot pole"

I thought that was a bit harsh, but if you can't choose good references, it is a bad sign.

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #738 on: July 23, 2016, 09:32:18 AM »
or gave me references that turned out to have issued formal reprimands against the interviewee. In contrast, asking about the 401(k) is a really good mistake to make.

One time, a list of references included a colleague.
Asked about the potential hire, the reference said "I wouldn't touch [the potential hire] with a ten foot pole"

I thought that was a bit harsh, but if you can't choose good references, it is a bad sign.

Alternatively, that reference wanted to keep [the potential hire] on their team and the easiest way to do so is giving a bad reference?

markbike528CBX

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #739 on: July 23, 2016, 10:56:01 AM »
Ender ,
The potential hire had not been with the company for some years, no conflict of interest on the references part.  The previous job was pretty demanding physical labor, low skill, while the hiring position was very fast paced technical lab work.

financialfreedomsloth

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #740 on: July 29, 2016, 05:11:30 AM »
Ah ja, the Netherlands! Was there in march and april. Lighted bike roads! Hundreds of bikes parked at the train station but only a few cars. Also lots of bumpers which is not good if you are sitting at the end in a mini bus with a driver that is used to a jeep like car. ouch! ouch! ouch!
Also liked Jumbo.

It was really depressing though when I was constantly overtaken on my bike by 70+ year old woman. Granted, some had electric bikes but not all. Hell, I was driving 20kmh against a strong wind. Sweating. And they sit there erect on the bike and swiiisch overtake me :(
And once on my way to Jumbo all I could do was to keep up with that 1-gear riding 85 year old looking thin man.


What I really wanted to say to Nederstash was just: Have you tried electric bike? For this long commute I would consider it an investment ;)

Noooo way man. That's like side wheels or helmets. The true Dutch bike. On a ratty rambling carcass of a bike covered in rust, bought for 30 bucks off Marktplaats (our craigslist) that squeaks when you brake.

I would get ostracized like a Viking wearing a life vest.

Nederstash, you should really look into the electric bicycles! I have a 18 km commute and it is a bit hilly here in Flanders where I live. Since discovering the money moustache site and deciding I needed to step up my badassity I am now using my girlfriends (yes a womens electric bike) to go to work about 4 times a week. It's faster, you are not sweaty when getting to work and you still get a decent exercise + in Belgium we have decent compensation for using a bicycle as a commute = 160 euro extra a month!! Isn't it mustachian to not give a flying F**** about what other people think of you?
http://financialfreedomsloth.com/

achieving financial freedom one lazy step at a time

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #741 on: July 29, 2016, 09:58:54 AM »
or gave me references that turned out to have issued formal reprimands against the interviewee. In contrast, asking about the 401(k) is a really good mistake to make.

One time, a list of references included a colleague.
Asked about the potential hire, the reference said "I wouldn't touch [the potential hire] with a ten foot pole"

I thought that was a bit harsh, but if you can't choose good references, it is a bad sign.

Alternatively, that reference wanted to keep [the potential hire] on their team and the easiest way to do so is giving a bad reference?

Yup, that can happen.

In business a lot of customers (these are businesses) want Net 30 terms, which is fine if they go through our credit check. Part of this consists of supplying references from other companies in which they have terms. A few times we've heard back from these references that they owe money or other problems, and sometimes it's very obvious that they simply just don't want us to sell to them and so are lying.

I remember one time this happened, the company that was lying wanted to place a good size order with us and we insist on cash payment (no terms) and the owner refused and said that he would pay. I showed him a copy of his reference response and he wired payment before we shipped.

bebegirl

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #742 on: July 29, 2016, 05:23:06 PM »
At the job we have two huge fridges to store people's lunches. Our own department has little fridge for the same exact reason. Lunchroom is busy around noon as well. Top managers are not shy to bring their own lunch and take public transportation every day.

flan

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #743 on: August 06, 2016, 09:13:38 PM »
Wasn't work, but saw at a public park:



"COMPOUND INTEREST - INVEST EARLY, RETIRE EARLY" and "DIVERSIFY YOUR BONDS".

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #744 on: August 07, 2016, 01:19:56 PM »
"COMPOUND INTEREST - INVEST EARLY, RETIRE EARLY" and "DIVERSIFY YOUR BONDS".

You need to diversify [yo bonds nigga]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8Z6qWRugCY

The full clip of wu tang financial here:

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/tw2ltp/chappelle-s-show-wu-tang-financial---uncensored

[MOD EDIT:  No.]
« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 12:10:38 PM by FrugalToque »

Sofa King

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #745 on: August 07, 2016, 04:46:34 PM »
I've only been at my current job for just shy of 10 months, but I can tell that I'm having a small, but not negligible effect on my early 50's co-worker. She's a single lady, and has never been married, has a paid off 13 year old Hyundai Tiburon, and paid 40% down on her house (inheritance) 13 years ago. She once went crazy with a HELOC and owes $40k on it. Between that, and her $80k mortgage, she has no other debt. She's shy in asking for help, but not helpless herself. Very reliable worker also.

In the past 6 months, her car has been "nickel and diming" her to death and she has started to suggest that she is on the verge of buying a new car to hold her out until her retirement age. I instantly go in to daydream mode, imagining with dread the thought of seeing her roll into the parking lot in a new 2016 Dodge Dart that she envies. ($20k+tax for the model she likes)

I tell her, "You know, buying a new car will cost you a MINIMUM of $350/mo, plus your full coverage insurance on a much more expensive car. Your latest car expense is only about 3 months of car payments. At this rate, if you can afford the new car payment, you can afford to repair this car 3 more times this year and still come out ahead."

Then she has a fender bender in the parking lot, and her $1000 deductible is used up, and she's moaning again. And I reminder, it's better than buying a new car and watching that $450/mo go out the window. You're the original owner of your current car, and it's still the cheaper option.

Gratefully, she excepts my advice with an open mind, so I feel free offering it.

Then, over the course of normal conversation, I learn that she's paying 5.5% on her home loan. I eagerly suggest that she contact her bank (along with others) and ask about refinancing, and I suggest that she roll in her HELOC into this new mortgage as long as the interest rate is lower (it will be) . In our area, 3.75% for a 15 year mortgage would cut 2 years off her loan, saving her over $22k in payments, and would save her an additional $200-$250/mo over the life of her loan, saving another $36k minimum.

I flat out told her, "Refinancing to 3.75% will save you over $50k depending on the refinancing costs your bank charges. I'll go with you to the bank if you make an appointment!"

Two months later, she say's, "Alex, I called my bank, and I have asked about refinancing. Is there anything I should know about it before going in there?"

I gave her some info, and offered again to go with her. She's not shy about her finances with me, so she told me if she's nervous when the time comes, she'll ask, but not to worry about it.

I'm stoked!

EXCELLENT!!!!  :  )

bigalsmith101

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #746 on: August 08, 2016, 10:56:17 PM »
I've only been at my current job for just shy of 10 months, but I can tell that I'm having a small, but not negligible effect on my early 50's co-worker. She's a single lady, and has never been married, has a paid off 13 year old Hyundai Tiburon, and paid 40% down on her house (inheritance) 13 years ago. She once went crazy with a HELOC and owes $40k on it. Between that, and her $80k mortgage, she has no other debt. She's shy in asking for help, but not helpless herself. Very reliable worker also.

In the past 6 months, her car has been "nickel and diming" her to death and she has started to suggest that she is on the verge of buying a new car to hold her out until her retirement age. I instantly go in to daydream mode, imagining with dread the thought of seeing her roll into the parking lot in a new 2016 Dodge Dart that she envies. ($20k+tax for the model she likes)

I tell her, "You know, buying a new car will cost you a MINIMUM of $350/mo, plus your full coverage insurance on a much more expensive car. Your latest car expense is only about 3 months of car payments. At this rate, if you can afford the new car payment, you can afford to repair this car 3 more times this year and still come out ahead."

Then she has a fender bender in the parking lot, and her $1000 deductible is used up, and she's moaning again. And I reminder, it's better than buying a new car and watching that $450/mo go out the window. You're the original owner of your current car, and it's still the cheaper option.

Gratefully, she excepts my advice with an open mind, so I feel free offering it.

Then, over the course of normal conversation, I learn that she's paying 5.5% on her home loan. I eagerly suggest that she contact her bank (along with others) and ask about refinancing, and I suggest that she roll in her HELOC into this new mortgage as long as the interest rate is lower (it will be) . In our area, 3.75% for a 15 year mortgage would cut 2 years off her loan, saving her over $22k in payments, and would save her an additional $200-$250/mo over the life of her loan, saving another $36k minimum.

I flat out told her, "Refinancing to 3.75% will save you over $50k depending on the refinancing costs your bank charges. I'll go with you to the bank if you make an appointment!"

Two months later, she say's, "Alex, I called my bank, and I have asked about refinancing. Is there anything I should know about it before going in there?"

I gave her some info, and offered again to go with her. She's not shy about her finances with me, so she told me if she's nervous when the time comes, she'll ask, but not to worry about it.

I'm stoked!

EXCELLENT!!!!  :  )

Update...

She has had her house appraised, and the new financing rate will be roughly 3.5%. The down side? She's refinancing, but throwing $10k on top of her refinance to buy a new car. I'm trying to talk her into buying a certified pre-owned (the closest thing to new that I have any chance of convincing her on), but I'm nearly certain she's set to buy a small SUV for $25k'ish. She's negating about half of the total cost savings she'll net in terms of the refi, so she's still coming out ahead, but damnit, her car is STILL getting her to work everyday without a problem at all!
I spent the first 6 years of "real" life in a self imposed semi retirement, to secure a lifetime of stories. Now it's time to secure the next lifetime through the badassity of FI.

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infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #747 on: August 09, 2016, 10:46:20 AM »
I was talking with one of my coworkers about house projects, and he said "Now that I'm older and making more money I can afford to have this stuff done -- but I try to resist temptation and do as many projects myself as I can."

PencilThinStash

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #748 on: August 10, 2016, 03:41:25 PM »
I was talking to the new guy at work today during my lunch break, and out of the blue he mentioned that he was thinking about biking in to work since he only lives a mile away. Mainly for the purpose of Pokemon Go-ing, but did bring up exercise and saving gas money as side benefits.

ONE MORE PERSON OUT THERE WHO ISN'T A TOTAL IDIOT!

slugline

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #749 on: August 11, 2016, 07:22:56 AM »
I was talking to the new guy at work today during my lunch break, and out of the blue he mentioned that he was thinking about biking in to work since he only lives a mile away. Mainly for the purpose of Pokemon Go-ing, but did bring up exercise and saving gas money as side benefits.

ONE MORE PERSON OUT THERE WHO ISN'T A TOTAL IDIOT!

LOL -- one mile away . . . so of course my first thought is that he is switching from walking to biking . . . until I read the part about "gas." One mile doesn't even give a engine enough time to reach proper operating temperature, does it? :)