Author Topic: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition  (Read 294231 times)

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #650 on: May 21, 2016, 06:43:12 AM »
Heard this exchange just yesterday.

CW1: Those new Corvettes sure look nice
CW2: You should get one.  I bet you can afford the payments
CW1: I could afford to pay cash
CW2: (eyes wide) Really?!?  Why don't you get one?
CW1: Because I would rather not work into my 60's

That's awesome. I should have said that to the coworker who suggested I buy a new car on payments a year out of college... I was driving a junker so I did buy a new (to me) much nicer vehicle a year or so later. The same coworker asked what my payment was. His eyes got pretty wide when I told him I didn't have one...
I STILL get that.  We bought our last cars in 2006 and 2009, paid cash.  I mean, we were in our late 30s/ early 40s.

I think a large number of people assume that if you have a car that is less than 10 years old (or more) that you financed it to buy it.

I cannot recall a time when people talked about a paid off car at work that was not in this situation, particularly at my past employer (current immediate team is all super MMM like lol so I'd guess none of us have loans other than one guy with a mortgage).

annieme

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #651 on: May 21, 2016, 08:29:01 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after. 

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #652 on: May 21, 2016, 09:04:34 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

I told my husband recently that if he was ever looking for a mid-life crisis hobby in the future (we're 25 and 26), he had to pick something with a high resale value. He suggested rare books. I told him that was OK.

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #653 on: May 21, 2016, 02:07:19 PM »
I think a large number of people assume that if you have a car that is less than 10 years old (or more) that you financed it to buy it.

I cannot recall a time when people talked about a paid off car at work that was not in this situation, particularly at my past employer (current immediate team is all super MMM like lol so I'd guess none of us have loans other than one guy with a mortgage).
Presumably a MMM (if they were to buy a new car rather than the proscribed official bike+trailer) would get a loan rather than pay cash?
Car loans are <1% (according to the annoying radio ad) I can do a lot better with that $20k-30k than 1%

ambimammular

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #654 on: May 22, 2016, 07:16:43 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

I told my husband recently that if he was ever looking for a mid-life crisis hobby in the future (we're 25 and 26), he had to pick something with a high resale value. He suggested rare books. I told him that was OK.

I like this! What else would make mustachian (or even better, lucrative) mid-life crises? Marathon training, instrument learning, hmmm

My dad bought a single engine airplane, and that thing went up in value big time. But I know he spent many dollars on insurance and pilot licenses.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #655 on: May 22, 2016, 07:31:04 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

I told my husband recently that if he was ever looking for a mid-life crisis hobby in the future (we're 25 and 26), he had to pick something with a high resale value. He suggested rare books. I told him that was OK.

I like this! What else would make mustachian (or even better, lucrative) mid-life crises? Marathon training, instrument learning, hmmm

My dad bought a single engine airplane, and that thing went up in value big time. But I know he spent many dollars on insurance and pilot licenses.

I think several kinds of craft hobby that involve making little items that are easy to sell to cover your costs might go well, like crafting small leather goods or carving small wood items.

lemanfan

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #656 on: May 22, 2016, 10:25:50 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

A couple of years ago I got sort of a mid life crisis when a cousin roughly the same age as me died of a stroke on a monday morning.

I bought a convertible.

But in order to buy it i sold my regular car, and the purhcase price for the convertible and sale price for the regular car was roughly the same, so I don't think it was that bad from a financial standpoint.

Now, a few years later I'm still in love with the convertible.  To drive down a small country road on a nice summer afternoon with the top down is still magic and brings a smile to my face every time. :)

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #657 on: May 22, 2016, 11:33:26 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

I told my husband recently that if he was ever looking for a mid-life crisis hobby in the future (we're 25 and 26), he had to pick something with a high resale value. He suggested rare books. I told him that was OK.

I like this! What else would make mustachian (or even better, lucrative) mid-life crises? Marathon training, instrument learning, hmmm

My dad bought a single engine airplane, and that thing went up in value big time. But I know he spent many dollars on insurance and pilot licenses.

I think several kinds of craft hobby that involve making little items that are easy to sell to cover your costs might go well, like crafting small leather goods or carving small wood items.

Gardening. Baking.

Hell, I know a guy who took a few pastry-making classes in his early 30s. Seriously effective as a dating tactic: "oh, I was experimenting with millefeuilles - would you like to come try some?"

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #658 on: May 22, 2016, 03:15:25 PM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

I told my husband recently that if he was ever looking for a mid-life crisis hobby in the future (we're 25 and 26), he had to pick something with a high resale value. He suggested rare books. I told him that was OK.

I like this! What else would make mustachian (or even better, lucrative) mid-life crises? Marathon training, instrument learning, hmmm

My dad bought a single engine airplane, and that thing went up in value big time. But I know he spent many dollars on insurance and pilot licenses.

My dad built an airplane as a midlife crisis. Or something like that. Probably wasn't very much per hour in terms of cost :-)  Lots of hours makes a high cost cheap per hour!


Murse

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #659 on: May 22, 2016, 06:58:43 PM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

MrFrugalChicago

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #660 on: May 23, 2016, 06:56:50 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

Are you saying that is high or low?

500k is way way way above the US national average. So while not MMM levels, it is a pretty good stash. In 10 more years they may be able to retire.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #661 on: May 23, 2016, 07:38:25 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

Are you saying that is high or low?

500k is way way way above the US national average. So while not MMM levels, it is a pretty good stash. In 10 more years they may be able to retire.

Say WHAT? 4% of $500k is $20,000 a year. That is totally MMM levels of FIRE money.

Apples

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #662 on: May 23, 2016, 08:41:25 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

Are you saying that is high or low?

500k is way way way above the US national average. So while not MMM levels, it is a pretty good stash. In 10 more years they may be able to retire.

Say WHAT? 4% of $500k is $20,000 a year. That is totally MMM levels of FIRE money.

MMM levels would be much higher-after 20 years in a high paying field, a MMM person would have several million in retirement.

infogoon

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #663 on: May 23, 2016, 09:18:02 AM »
MMM levels would be much higher-after 20 years in a high paying field, a MMM person would have several million in retirement.

I think you're wildly overestimating how much a pharmacy technician job pays. My wife did that part-time in a supermarket pharmacy when she was an undergrad, and I don't think she made more than nine or ten dollars an hour.

RWD

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #664 on: May 23, 2016, 09:20:38 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

Are you saying that is high or low?

500k is way way way above the US national average. So while not MMM levels, it is a pretty good stash. In 10 more years they may be able to retire.

Say WHAT? 4% of $500k is $20,000 a year. That is totally MMM levels of FIRE money.

MMM levels would be much higher-after 20 years in a high paying field, a MMM person would have several million in retirement.

But not in a single 401k, due to contribution limits, unless you have an incredible employer match. In 1996 the 401k contribution limit was $9500. If you contributed the federal max to your 401k from 1996 to 2015 with no employer matching you would end up with around $468k (assuming 7% returns). I'd say $500k is quite an impressive number.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #665 on: May 23, 2016, 09:53:06 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.

Are you saying that is high or low?

500k is way way way above the US national average. So while not MMM levels, it is a pretty good stash. In 10 more years they may be able to retire.

Say WHAT? 4% of $500k is $20,000 a year. That is totally MMM levels of FIRE money.

MMM levels would be much higher-after 20 years in a high paying field, a MMM person would have several million in retirement.

But not in a single 401k, due to contribution limits, unless you have an incredible employer match. In 1996 the 401k contribution limit was $9500. If you contributed the federal max to your 401k from 1996 to 2015 with no employer matching you would end up with around $468k (assuming 7% returns). I'd say $500k is quite an impressive number.

Especially for a pharmacy tech, as opposed to a pharmacist. Very different jobs, those: it's like comparing a nursing tech (minimum wage) to a nurse ($50k+).
I squeak softly, but carry a big schtick.

iowajes

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #666 on: May 23, 2016, 09:57:07 AM »
MMM levels would be much higher-after 20 years in a high paying field, a MMM person would have several million in retirement.

I think you're wildly overestimating how much a pharmacy technician job pays. My wife did that part-time in a supermarket pharmacy when she was an undergrad, and I don't think she made more than nine or ten dollars an hour.

I think they are thinking of a pharmacist. Very different job. My local hospital has job openings for pharmacists around $100k, and pharm techs around $30k.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2016, 09:58:52 AM by iowajes »

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #667 on: May 23, 2016, 11:24:24 AM »
I'm at a new job and there has been a student nurse around. It was her last day and she was asking about wages. Somehow her previous career came up (pharmacy technician) and she mentioned she had worked at that pharmacy for 20 years. Then she told me she had 500k in her 401k. 500k from 20 years as a pharmacy tech.
That's fantastic

Lyngi

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #668 on: May 23, 2016, 09:24:13 PM »
I don't think pharmacy tech.  I'm a pharmacist, been one for 22 years.  I have 480K.  Now, I didn't invest the maximum in the early years, only enough to get the match--sigh.  My tech's start at $12 and max out at $17. 

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #669 on: May 23, 2016, 10:00:17 PM »
I don't think pharmacy tech.  I'm a pharmacist, been one for 22 years.  I have 480K.  Now, I didn't invest the maximum in the early years, only enough to get the match--sigh.  My tech's start at $12 and max out at $17.

True. But who's more likely to move into a job as a student nurse after 20 years of working: you, or one of your techs?
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NorCal

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #670 on: May 23, 2016, 10:23:57 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

MrDelane

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #671 on: May 23, 2016, 10:27:35 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Pretty sure you meant to post that in this thread: 
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/

(at least I hope so)
:)

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #672 on: May 24, 2016, 12:34:08 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #673 on: May 24, 2016, 12:45:14 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

jeromedawg

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #674 on: May 24, 2016, 01:41:11 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.


LOL, I've heard of this sushi place from some friends of mine who also waited in line for a long time... https://www.yelp.com/biz/%E5%AF%BF%E5%8F%B8%E5%A4%A7-%E4%B8%AD%E5%A4%AE%E5%8C%BA
I don't think there's ever a "good time" to go - if you go any later than that, you'll be waiting even longer most likely. Part of the problem is that they can only seat so many people at once (14 seats). Though one Yelper mentions going an hour before closing, because it's not nearly as busy. Kinda ridiculous but it is one of the most renown sushi joints in Japan and is located at the famous Tsukiji fish market, which apparently may close because they are planning to host Olympic events there. Considering it's probably a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity (well, for me it would be) while in Japan (and even more so because it would likely close down along with the market), I'd probably bite the bullet if I couldn't swing going there around when they close.... but on the flip-side, I'd probably make my plans around going to this place at 1pm if they really aren't as busy by then. As far as waiting in line, have you heard of Franklin's BBQ in Austin? lol...

I'm actually surprised the lawyer girl didn't talk about probable experiences with wagyu and kobe beef, and how she paid hundreds of dollars to eat 4 ounces of beef fat.

After you mentioned fishing and catching the fish fresh, you got me reminiscing - I actually went on a trip to Baja like that where we caught tons of firecracker yellowtail and the guide filleted one on the boat and we ate it just like that (one of his buddy came by and tossed us a bag of limes and soy sauce). Of course, they say fish is at it's prime (in terms of flavor and texture) typically days after it's caught. I wouldn't have known because I was too busy chowing down - fortunately nobody suffered from seasickness in that tiny panga as there were no swells; otherwise, it would have been a mess.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2016, 01:52:16 PM by jplee3 »

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #675 on: May 24, 2016, 01:54:30 PM »
[

LOL, I've heard of this sushi place from some friends of mine who also waited in line for a long time... https://www.yelp.com/biz/%E5%AF%BF%E5%8F%B8%E5%A4%A7-%E4%B8%AD%E5%A4%AE%E5%8C%BA


Yeah that's what I was thinking it was. While I likely would find other things to do with my time in Tokyo, I've heard great things about this place and don't think it's facepunch worthy to wait in line.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #676 on: May 24, 2016, 03:18:49 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

It makes complete mathematical sense to provide the meals.  Say the associate would otherwise be spending 15 minutes to pop downstairs and pick up the meal.  Well that's $100 (more or less) in lost revenue.  Delivery is much cheaper.

jeromedawg

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #677 on: May 24, 2016, 03:58:43 PM »
[

LOL, I've heard of this sushi place from some friends of mine who also waited in line for a long time... https://www.yelp.com/biz/%E5%AF%BF%E5%8F%B8%E5%A4%A7-%E4%B8%AD%E5%A4%AE%E5%8C%BA


Yeah that's what I was thinking it was. While I likely would find other things to do with my time in Tokyo, I've heard great things about this place and don't think it's facepunch worthy to wait in line.

I think it's worth it if you know you won't be back to Japan for a while. But yea, I'd of course try to figure out how to hack my way to a faster meal... even if it means eating on my own. My friends who went were a big group but they were fine with splitting up into 2s and 3s to get in faster - it worked in their favor as I'm pretty sure they didn't wait for more than a couple hours. The nice thing about this is that you're not spending a lot of money for super fresh sushi that's likely as good as the premiere places in the Bay Area and LA (think Sushi Shibucho in Costa Mesa and Yume in Alameda... I've been to both and it's not cheap - my brother treated us to Yume and my friend treated us to Shibucho. I've only been to Shibucho a few other times and it comes out to be anywhere from $80-$120 depending on how much you eat). Seems with Sushi Dai you can get away with a sushi meal on $20-40 which is really good. Only problem is that wait, of course :) And then of course, getting over there (sunk-cost though for most... though I'm sure some stupid rich execs don't mind hopping on their private jets to hit up Japan for the day)

This just reminded me of Din Tai Fung - they recently opened one up in the Bay Area and several have posted videos of the line, which weaves through the mall probably several hundreds of yards. I've heard of 4-5 hour lines just for stupid dumplings. I've been to DTF before (the one in Arcadia) but certainly didn't wait that long. It was probably a 30min wait max. The dumplings aren't worth waiting for 5 hours in line over, though there are many people (hipsters) who wouldn't mind at all... you know, gotta insta/vine/hashtag the experience yo. Word. #yolo

 
« Last Edit: May 24, 2016, 04:05:32 PM by jplee3 »

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #678 on: May 24, 2016, 09:33:45 PM »
I saw the DTF line last week and didn't understand what the big deal was! Now I know #yolo

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #679 on: May 24, 2016, 11:36:23 PM »
I saw the DTF line last week and didn't understand what the big deal was! Now I know #yolo

#yolo, it's worth the 5 hour wait in line. You might as well drive down to SoCal in that timeframe and eat at the Arcadia location where there's less of a wait if you go at the right time. I feel like xiao long bao is one of those things that's really difficult to screw up at most decent Chinese/Taiwanese restaurants... the big selling point, *I guess*, with DTF is that they're made "fresh" - most of the time I can't tell but maybe everyone else, especially the hipsters, can tell the difference.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #680 on: May 25, 2016, 02:56:37 AM »
just btw: Tokyo is the town with the most (Michelin) star-rated restaurants.
There is even one in an underground parking space with 7 seats and a soup-only "restaurant" not much bigger.
The Michelin guys had to redo their evaluation system because of the many "unusual" good restaurants in Japan. Service quality of the waiters? There are none!

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #681 on: May 25, 2016, 10:32:39 AM »
just btw: Tokyo is the town with the most (Michelin) star-rated restaurants.
There is even one in an underground parking space with 7 seats and a soup-only "restaurant" not much bigger.
The Michelin guys had to redo their evaluation system because of the many "unusual" good restaurants in Japan. Service quality of the waiters? There are none!

Yeah, though I haven't been to Tokyo, much less ate at any of these restaurants, I think the level of Michelin rated places in Japan is horshit. Just a way for the company to sell more tires.

aFrugalFather

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #682 on: May 25, 2016, 11:29:29 AM »
I saw the DTF line last week and didn't understand what the big deal was! Now I know #yolo

#yolo, it's worth the 5 hour wait in line. You might as well drive down to SoCal in that timeframe and eat at the Arcadia location where there's less of a wait if you go at the right time. I feel like xiao long bao is one of those things that's really difficult to screw up at most decent Chinese/Taiwanese restaurants... the big selling point, *I guess*, with DTF is that they're made "fresh" - most of the time I can't tell but maybe everyone else, especially the hipsters, can tell the difference.

In a pinch I satisfy my XLB cravings from the frozen section of Trader Joes, they are pretty good.  But I'm always on the lookout for bay area locales with the fresher stuff.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #683 on: May 25, 2016, 12:46:27 PM »
just btw: Tokyo is the town with the most (Michelin) star-rated restaurants.
There is even one in an underground parking space with 7 seats and a soup-only "restaurant" not much bigger.
The Michelin guys had to redo their evaluation system because of the many "unusual" good restaurants in Japan. Service quality of the waiters? There are none!

Yeah, though I haven't been to Tokyo, much less ate at any of these restaurants, I think the level of Michelin rated places in Japan is horshit. Just a way for the company to sell more tires.

Lol, thanks Kenm

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #684 on: May 25, 2016, 12:54:04 PM »
I saw the DTF line last week and didn't understand what the big deal was! Now I know #yolo

#yolo, it's worth the 5 hour wait in line. You might as well drive down to SoCal in that timeframe and eat at the Arcadia location where there's less of a wait if you go at the right time. I feel like xiao long bao is one of those things that's really difficult to screw up at most decent Chinese/Taiwanese restaurants... the big selling point, *I guess*, with DTF is that they're made "fresh" - most of the time I can't tell but maybe everyone else, especially the hipsters, can tell the difference.

In a pinch I satisfy my XLB cravings from the frozen section of Trader Joes, they are pretty good.  But I'm always on the lookout for bay area locales with the fresher stuff.

This reminds me, I need to find a good bamboo steamer - my wife has been wanting one. Maybe I should post in the DIY section to see if anyone has a tutorial hahahahha :D

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #685 on: May 26, 2016, 01:51:43 PM »
I've suspected for a while that my boss is pretty frugal. He almost always brings his lunch to work. He talks about planting his own trees and constructing his kids' backyard playground. And he rented a metal detector to find his wedding band which he lost in his garden (and found it!).

Today he was talking about how his French doors were being replaced. He said all of the quotes he got were in the 5-digit range. He managed to find a nice set of French doors on Craigslist for $900. I was pretty impressed. Then he was talking about getting a fancy new doorbell to go with the fancy new door. He stopped mid-sentence and said, "Actually, you know what? I'll just paint the old doorbell." Guy knows what's up.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #686 on: May 26, 2016, 07:00:11 PM »
My coworker told me she is maxing her 401k, including the 50+ catch-up contributions. I told her that some companies let you contribute after-tax up to $53k. She said adamantly that she would do it.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #687 on: May 27, 2016, 02:32:23 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

Umm you must be mistaken.  Google, Facebook etc do the free food for the exact same reasons that the banks/law firms do it: to keep the employees working longer.  Especially in the beginning when Google wasn't paying the highest salaries, the free food was a big money saver for them (~$3k food cost per employee vs perceived value raises of ~$10k)

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #688 on: May 27, 2016, 08:58:46 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

Umm you must be mistaken.  Google, Facebook etc do the free food for the exact same reasons that the banks/law firms do it: to keep the employees working longer.  Especially in the beginning when Google wasn't paying the highest salaries, the free food was a big money saver for them (~$3k food cost per employee vs perceived value raises of ~$10k)

To be clear, this lawyer wasn't talking about food provided by the firm.  This firm doesn't do that.  She was talking about paying for delivery to her house for literally every single meal.

lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #689 on: May 27, 2016, 10:05:39 PM »
I think employer paid lunches would be more expensive for me than my current lunches. Employer paid regular meals are taxable in Canada and cost of employer provided lunch x my tax rate is greater than the cost of a lunch I prepare myself.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #690 on: May 27, 2016, 11:57:45 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

Umm you must be mistaken.  Google, Facebook etc do the free food for the exact same reasons that the banks/law firms do it: to keep the employees working longer.  Especially in the beginning when Google wasn't paying the highest salaries, the free food was a big money saver for them (~$3k food cost per employee vs perceived value raises of ~$10k)

Do you have a source for the $3k food cost vs salary? I don't mistrust your numbers just curious to learn more.

Yeah for Google I saw it as a way or them to keep employees there longer. With young employees that are unmarried, I imagine it pays off well to feed them and have them access to most things they can need as this coupled with having many young people with similar interests around makes them more likely to stay and work, and it can help increase dialogue with people in different deparatments, creating new ideas.

My cousin (works at Google) told me that he heard that an ex-intern "lived" at Google for about a year after his internship before he was discovered and the people at Google weren't really mad at him, it sounded like they were impressed.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #691 on: June 02, 2016, 11:59:48 AM »
I posted about this colleague's plans last year on this thread, and yesterday she announced that she's doing it!

Frugal colleague in her early 30s is taking a 10 month sabbatical from work to travel with her boyfriend before they settle down and have kids.  They've been saving for a few years, have subletted their apartment, and are ready to hit the road in September.  I'm so happy for her! I'm also selfishly excited for me because now that the precedent of taking a sabbatical has been set (she's the first), I may see if I can take one myself when DH and I pay off our mortgage in 2020 and I contemplate being a SAHM.

This colleague and I are travelling together for 2 weeks next month and are staying at a very expensive hotel (not our choice).  We've already made plans to hit a grocery store on day 1 so we can stock our mini fridges with food and pocket our per diems instead of eating at the hotel restaurants.

Magilla

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #692 on: June 02, 2016, 03:25:43 PM »
Background:  My wife is a lawyer at a BigLaw firm.  Last weekend, we were invited to one of the Partner's houses along with a bunch of co-workers as a way to get to know everyone.  You couldn't ask for a more non-mustachian crowd.  Here's a few of my favorite comments:

[20-something brand new lawyer]  "My trip to Tokyo was amazing for the food.  We waited in line for over 5 hours starting at 3:30am to get into an amazing Sushi place at the fish market".  I refrained from asking whether they could have done a complete fishing charter and got their own fresh fish in that amount of time.

[50-something partner with her husband] "We went to an amazing restaurant last night.  The food is served from a fixed menu, and you have to buy the $250 tickets (per person, excluding drinks) a month in advance.  We don't trust UberX drivers, so we took an UberBlack (they live maybe 45 minutes away) for only $125 each way."

[same 20-something brand new lawyer] "I only really eat delivery.  One time I nearly panicked because there was a Giants game going on (she lives across the street from the stadium), and no one could deliver in a reasonable amount of time.  I wasn't sure how I was going to eat."  Discussion ensued.  The rest of the crowd was even a little shocked by this one.  Particularly since there is literally a Safeway on the ground floor of her building.

Lol pm me the firm.  It should be noted that most young big law lawyers eat mostly delivery because it's provided for free by the firm when they work late (which is usually).  And a 50-somethin partner spending $250 on dinner is probably equivalent to me eating at Taco Bell on an income percent basis (median profits per partner in big law being around $1.3 million per year, and likely much higher for that guy)

LOL!

Yeah, while they make a lot of money, I don't think there is an amount of money that would be worth the sacrifice and toil it takes to get to that level....considering that BLaw partners work just as hard as they did while they were associates (don't know if this includes hustling new clients or becoming a 'rainmaker.')

I know a few people that are I-bankers and they have all their meals provided while they are working. It isn't because the company values them like Google and other places do, it's because they expect them to be there working insane hours. They are given a list of restaurants that they can order from and have it delivered. A few tell me that after a while the novelty wears off and foods taste the same.

Umm you must be mistaken.  Google, Facebook etc do the free food for the exact same reasons that the banks/law firms do it: to keep the employees working longer.  Especially in the beginning when Google wasn't paying the highest salaries, the free food was a big money saver for them (~$3k food cost per employee vs perceived value raises of ~$10k)

Do you have a source for the $3k food cost vs salary? I don't mistrust your numbers just curious to learn more.

Yeah for Google I saw it as a way or them to keep employees there longer. With young employees that are unmarried, I imagine it pays off well to feed them and have them access to most things they can need as this coupled with having many young people with similar interests around makes them more likely to stay and work, and it can help increase dialogue with people in different deparatments, creating new ideas.

My cousin (works at Google) told me that he heard that an ex-intern "lived" at Google for about a year after his internship before he was discovered and the people at Google weren't really mad at him, it sounded like they were impressed.

Hehe, made me go google it :)  The number I remember (~$3750) came from a 2007 critique of Google culture by a former employee (he left MS to do a startup, was bought out by Google, worked at Google for a while then got sick of it and left). https://no2google.wordpress.com/2007/06/24/life-at-google-the-microsoftie-perspective/

This stuck with me because at the time I interviewed at Google and the culture seemed off to me (not wrong, just not right for me, too college after school special) and I couldn't put my finger on it until I read this and it all clicked.

More recent articles estimate food costs at Google now to be 5-8K per person.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #693 on: June 02, 2016, 05:33:19 PM »
I've only been at my current job for just shy of 10 months, but I can tell that I'm having a small, but not negligible effect on my early 50's co-worker. She's a single lady, and has never been married, has a paid off 13 year old Hyundai Tiburon, and paid 40% down on her house (inheritance) 13 years ago. She once went crazy with a HELOC and owes $40k on it. Between that, and her $80k mortgage, she has no other debt. She's shy in asking for help, but not helpless herself. Very reliable worker also.

In the past 6 months, her car has been "nickel and diming" her to death and she has started to suggest that she is on the verge of buying a new car to hold her out until her retirement age. I instantly go in to daydream mode, imagining with dread the thought of seeing her roll into the parking lot in a new 2016 Dodge Dart that she envies. ($20k+tax for the model she likes)

I tell her, "You know, buying a new car will cost you a MINIMUM of $350/mo, plus your full coverage insurance on a much more expensive car. Your latest car expense is only about 3 months of car payments. At this rate, if you can afford the new car payment, you can afford to repair this car 3 more times this year and still come out ahead."

Then she has a fender bender in the parking lot, and her $1000 deductible is used up, and she's moaning again. And I reminder, it's better than buying a new car and watching that $450/mo go out the window. You're the original owner of your current car, and it's still the cheaper option.

Gratefully, she excepts my advice with an open mind, so I feel free offering it.

Then, over the course of normal conversation, I learn that she's paying 5.5% on her home loan. I eagerly suggest that she contact her bank (along with others) and ask about refinancing, and I suggest that she roll in her HELOC into this new mortgage as long as the interest rate is lower (it will be) . In our area, 3.75% for a 15 year mortgage would cut 2 years off her loan, saving her over $22k in payments, and would save her an additional $200-$250/mo over the life of her loan, saving another $36k minimum.

I flat out told her, "Refinancing to 3.75% will save you over $50k depending on the refinancing costs your bank charges. I'll go with you to the bank if you make an appointment!"

Two months later, she say's, "Alex, I called my bank, and I have asked about refinancing. Is there anything I should know about it before going in there?"

I gave her some info, and offered again to go with her. She's not shy about her finances with me, so she told me if she's nervous when the time comes, she'll ask, but not to worry about it.

I'm stoked!

I spent the first 6 years of "real" life in a self imposed semi retirement, to secure a lifetime of stories. Now it's time to secure the next lifetime through the badassity of FI.

"I achieved such a high level of badassity I just don't realize how normal people miss the whole process." --Le Barbu

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #694 on: June 02, 2016, 07:54:24 PM »

I gave her some info, and offered again to go with her. She's not shy about her finances with me, so she told me if she's nervous when the time comes, she'll ask, but not to worry about it.

I'm stoked!

You're the man!

jinga nation

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #695 on: June 03, 2016, 07:28:28 AM »
My boss is very thrifty with his money. Doesn't go out for lunch, his wife packs him a cooler full of food. Only goes for a leaving lunch for a valuable co-worker.
If he hears that people are paying ridiculous interest rates on mortgages, he jumps on them to get refinancing. And he won't let up until it is done.
We have several VG funds in our 401k, including VINIX, VEMPX, and VBMPX, ER 0.04-0.05%, with a 4% match for your first 6%. He gets mad if employees don't contribute, lectures them about leaving free money on the table.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2016, 07:46:22 AM by jinga nation »
If I genuinely enjoy my profession and workplace, is there a reason to FIRE? Keep Calm and Carry On Milking.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #696 on: June 03, 2016, 07:29:27 AM »
Then, recently, someone complimented him on a new dress shirt.  He responded with,
"thanks, I got for last week for $4."

Dang, maybe I need to check out thrift shops. I try to make it a point to never spend more then $20-25 on my dress shirts, although sometimes I do. You can find really nice fitting stuff in that price range if you shop at the right places, sometimes name brand. Never thought of a thrift shop though

Thrift shop success might be regional though. We checked out our local Goodwill again the other day and what they carried were quite used and dated looking. There were a few things worth buying but we're in a small town. I wonder if the thrift shops are better stocked in bigger cities.

We rarely shop for clothes. I buy alot of duplicates - two or three of the same thing in different colors. I guess I can get away with that as a male. We just look for sales and then treat the clothes well enough to make them last several years. My job doesn't require a suit or a tie, just look neat and tidy.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #697 on: June 03, 2016, 07:45:33 AM »

I wonder if the thrift shops are better stocked in bigger cities.


They are. I used to live in a big city - found great stuff in thrift stores. Now I'm near a small town - used walmart clothing is what's there. At that price, I'll buy new Old Navy for the kid - costs the same as the thrift store and gets delivered to my door.

Caveat: if you live near a place that's one of those rich-people villages (you know - big houses, cute restaurants, near a river or lake, usually populated by people who subsist on outside/inherited money...), the thrift stores THERE Are 100% worth going to. If you're in Quebec, check out North Hatley, for example. Non-chain thrift stores in rich communities, basically.

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #698 on: June 03, 2016, 08:09:26 AM »
Really, I'm posting to follow, but I do remember a guy who bought a fancy new corvette and then resorted to saying "This is not a mid-life crisis car" every time someone admired it.  Ha!  Dude, that was totally a mid-life crisis car.  There was no way he could afford that car.  Had to sell it soon after.

Maybe this isn't a situation in other states but mine has sales tax on vehicles. Sort of precludes car hopping in my mind.

Joggernot

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #699 on: June 03, 2016, 09:20:05 AM »
For thrift stores, look at different areas.  We took a ride one weekend and ended up in "horse country".  Few houses, but lots of horses.  Found a thrift store run by a local church and hit a gold mine.  Lots of expensive clothes, etc. for next to nothing.  Bought two great sweaters that lasted us another 10 years.  Look for thrift stores outside your normal area, and you might find gold.