Author Topic: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition  (Read 294929 times)

Seppia

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #550 on: March 23, 2016, 04:45:11 PM »
This is awesome, congrats

Threshkin

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #551 on: March 23, 2016, 05:05:51 PM »
My wife is a high school math and science teacher. Last year she was appalled to discover a lot of the kids had not idea how money and credit really work. She asked me to speak to a couple of classes that are mostly seniors about money management and financial independence and I did. The students were really receptive but even more exciting one of the other math teachers started talking to younger kids about managing money. Now there are several posters hanging in the halls listing good wealth building habits!

This is great!  One of the biggest failings of our school systems is that they do not teach practical, applied math like this.  Make math something real and useful, not just abstract concepts.

Alternatepriorities

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #552 on: March 23, 2016, 06:43:52 PM »
My wife is a high school math and science teacher. Last year she was appalled to discover a lot of the kids had not idea how money and credit really work. She asked me to speak to a couple of classes that are mostly seniors about money management and financial independence and I did. The students were really receptive but even more exciting one of the other math teachers started talking to younger kids about managing money. Now there are several posters hanging in the halls listing good wealth building habits!

This is great!  One of the biggest failings of our school systems is that they do not teach practical, applied math like this.  Make math something real and useful, not just abstract concepts.

Yeah, I've always liked math. I took 5 years of it in 4 years of high school including calculus and consumer math and it has definitely made my life better. None of those or any other class I took suggested the approach of "buying what makes you happier" rather than what "how much can you possibly spend" though. Seeing it on a kids school poster made my day.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #553 on: March 24, 2016, 01:15:51 PM »
My wife is a high school math and science teacher. Last year she was appalled to discover a lot of the kids had not idea how money and credit really work. She asked me to speak to a couple of classes that are mostly seniors about money management and financial independence and I did. The students were really receptive but even more exciting one of the other math teachers started talking to younger kids about managing money. Now there are several posters hanging in the halls listing good wealth building habits!

This is great!  One of the biggest failings of our school systems is that they do not teach practical, applied math like this.  Make math something real and useful, not just abstract concepts.

Yeah, I've always liked math. I took 5 years of it in 4 years of high school including calculus and consumer math and it has definitely made my life better. None of those or any other class I took suggested the approach of "buying what makes you happier" rather than what "how much can you possibly spend" though. Seeing it on a kids school poster made my day.
You are a reminding me of a class in high school that talked about consumer saving.  The take-away for me was this: it's not what you SAVE, it's what you SPEND.  It doesn't MATTER if you save 50%.  If you spend $50 on something, you just spent $50. It's better to spend LESS.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #554 on: March 24, 2016, 02:03:57 PM »
My wife is a high school math and science teacher. Last year she was appalled to discover a lot of the kids had not idea how money and credit really work. She asked me to speak to a couple of classes that are mostly seniors about money management and financial independence and I did. The students were really receptive but even more exciting one of the other math teachers started talking to younger kids about managing money. Now there are several posters hanging in the halls listing good wealth building habits!

This is great!  One of the biggest failings of our school systems is that they do not teach practical, applied math like this.  Make math something real and useful, not just abstract concepts.

I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #555 on: March 24, 2016, 02:28:51 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #556 on: March 24, 2016, 02:37:58 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.
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shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #557 on: March 24, 2016, 03:21:55 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.

That sounds amazing, but I think foreign languages is undersold here: it's really "Espionage and swearing".

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #558 on: March 24, 2016, 03:29:11 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.
I feel like you could get a chemistry / food thing in there too.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #559 on: March 24, 2016, 03:32:35 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.
I feel like you could get a chemistry / food thing in there too.

fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #560 on: March 24, 2016, 04:20:07 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.
I feel like you could get a chemistry / food thing in there too.

fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

Bullshit and Legitimate Nudity?

(I speak as a career creative here...)

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #561 on: March 24, 2016, 04:30:56 PM »
I often wanted to re-name math class to "money and power" class. I think it would boost attendance.

That's a great idea.

English would become "Manipulation, Mind Control, and Stand Up Comedy". History would become "Sex and Violence", Physics would become "Ballistics", Biology would become "Living things and forensics", Chemistry would become "Explosions", Science would become "Adventure", any foreign language would become "Espionage", Phys Ed would be "Weaponry and martial arts", Civics would become "Global Domination", and the Fine Arts classes would stay as they are.

Everyone would want to come to my school. It would be a training ground for future superheros. But aside from adding a small amount of practical stuff and focusing the classes more on the new topic to make them less boring, the content wouldn't really change.
I feel like you could get a chemistry / food thing in there too.

fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

Bullshit and Legitimate Nudity?

(I speak as a career creative here...)

"Bullshit" is actually the title of a separate course formerly known as religious studies. It's because every religion out there thinks it's the right one, and the rest are bullshit. So if we're studying more than two religions, by definition it's going to be a majority-bullshit class.

The school would be called something awesome, like "TheGrimSqueaker's Academy of World Domination".

However, I refuse to separate geometry from algebra (in the Money and Power courses). It's an asinine way to try to teach math.
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shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #562 on: March 25, 2016, 03:19:28 AM »
I would prefer Religious Studies to be called something like "The Psychology of Hope".

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #563 on: March 25, 2016, 02:56:17 PM »
However, I refuse to separate geometry from algebra (in the Money and Power courses). It's an asinine way to try to teach math.

I feel that way about calculus and physics. Calculus made way more sense once I could see it applied in physics.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #564 on: March 25, 2016, 03:14:27 PM »
And Stats made way more sense once I saw it applied to Biology.
However, I refuse to separate geometry from algebra (in the Money and Power courses). It's an asinine way to try to teach math.

I feel that way about calculus and physics. Calculus made way more sense once I could see it applied in physics.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #565 on: March 25, 2016, 05:42:44 PM »
I finally have something for this thread! 
One of my co-workers recently came back from a trip to Las Vegas with some friends, and while she had a great time, she said that by the end her friends were annoying her.  When I asked why, she replied, "Because they can't budget and are horrible with their money!"  Turns out her friends gambled all their money away and on the last day there my co-worker had to borrow them money so they could make it through the rest of the trip.  Oh, and her friends took out a loan for this trip.  They took out a loan, just to gamble it all away.  Sad.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #566 on: March 25, 2016, 08:31:42 PM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
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ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #567 on: March 26, 2016, 07:53:26 AM »
Man, I'm never going to hit the other one.

We had a "home buying seminar" thing which was basically propaganda from realtors/bankers.  My immediate team of three were listening but all of us just gave up and were laughing about how horrible the advice was. Since it was standard banker/realtor stuff.


Later last week another of my coworkers and I spent all of lunch talking about 529s vs normal investment accounts for kids. He's... 30? maybe 32? So presumably he knows what's up. Or at least cares.

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #568 on: March 26, 2016, 11:06:40 AM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #569 on: March 26, 2016, 11:33:34 AM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

Yeah, but that one has an urn in it. That's how you know it's art.

nobodyspecial

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #570 on: March 26, 2016, 12:44:36 PM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

Yeah, but that one has an urn in it. That's how you know it's art.
I hoped somebody would get it ;-)

The people at work have caught on to all the Python and HitchHikers in-jokes in my projects, so I;m having to get more obscure.
 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 12:48:00 PM by nobodyspecial »

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #571 on: March 26, 2016, 12:58:23 PM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

Yeah, but that one has an urn in it. That's how you know it's art.
I hoped somebody would get it ;-)

The people at work have caught on to all the Python and HitchHikers in-jokes in my projects, so I;m having to get more obscure.
 

I only started Pratchett last year, even though I'm sure I would have loved them as a teen. I'm sure I get more of the jokes now than I would then, though. But I've had a pre-Easter lull and raided my husband's bookshelves and may have read three and a half Pratchetts in the last week...

If you're looking for obscure but rewarding private jokes to insert into conversation, may I suggest The Goodies? And now... A Walk in the Black Forest.

Primm

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #572 on: March 26, 2016, 06:07:29 PM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

Yeah, but that one has an urn in it. That's how you know it's art.
I hoped somebody would get it ;-)

The people at work have caught on to all the Python and HitchHikers in-jokes in my projects, so I;m having to get more obscure.
 

I only started Pratchett last year, even though I'm sure I would have loved them as a teen. I'm sure I get more of the jokes now than I would then, though. But I've had a pre-Easter lull and raided my husband's bookshelves and may have read three and a half Pratchetts in the last week...

If you're looking for obscure but rewarding private jokes to insert into conversation, may I suggest The Goodies? And now... A Walk in the Black Forest.

*swoon* You are now officially my new Most Favourite Mustachian. Ecky THOOOMP!

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #573 on: March 26, 2016, 11:59:34 PM »
My coworkers and I spent today fixing our cars together. The three of us probably saved ~$800 in labor costs and had fun doing it. Does that count?

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #574 on: March 28, 2016, 03:29:10 PM »
I would prefer Religious Studies to be called something like "The Psychology of Hope".

Swap the "o" in Hope for a "y", and it will be an easier sell.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #575 on: March 30, 2016, 10:47:30 AM »
Two months ago one of my subordinates announced he was buying a new truck and a house.  After a couple weeks of all of us in the office opening his eyes to the hidden costs he wasn't considering he's still buying a house, but budgeting better for it and getting a used vehicle now.  He's also sat down with me a couple times to talk about the finer points of the TSP and Vanguard.  He's going to max his TSP this year and opening a Vanguard account to start buying VTSMX.  I didn't tell him which fund to buy, he came to me with that name and asked if what he's doing makes sense.  It's great to hear he's done the math and is taking his retirement planning more seriously.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #576 on: April 01, 2016, 06:56:18 AM »
I had a twenty minute conversation with a sign vendor who wants to put up a sign in the county. We ended up discussing crummy jobs and I mentioned how essential it was to have a financial cushion. She agreed and said that while she and her husband had been through lean times, she never sacrificed her dignity for money.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #577 on: April 03, 2016, 09:53:43 PM »
My wife is a high school math and science teacher. Last year she was appalled to discover a lot of the kids had not idea how money and credit really work. She asked me to speak to a couple of classes that are mostly seniors about money management and financial independence and I did. The students were really receptive but even more exciting one of the other math teachers started talking to younger kids about managing money. Now there are several posters hanging in the halls listing good wealth building habits!

This is great!  One of the biggest failings of our school systems is that they do not teach practical, applied math like this.  Make math something real and useful, not just abstract concepts.

Currently writing the curriculum for a financial modeling class, for next year. I would love some input. I teach HS math. Designing it for Seniors. Here is the Google.doc link if people would like to give any input.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duEUYnocGgFdGUe_SA41oWBpDrSuXfa9sV6Lyi1dkPg/edit?usp=sharing

if I am not allowed to share the link let me know. I will remove it. I want to make this as extensive and useful as possible. Been pushing for this for the last 4 years. finally got the ok from district office.  It's only a rough outline so far.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 10:03:20 PM by bigbenreiss »

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #578 on: April 04, 2016, 07:46:55 AM »

Currently writing the curriculum for a financial modeling class, for next year. I would love some input. I teach HS math. Designing it for Seniors. Here is the Google.doc link if people would like to give any input.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duEUYnocGgFdGUe_SA41oWBpDrSuXfa9sV6Lyi1dkPg/edit?usp=sharing

if I am not allowed to share the link let me know. I will remove it. I want to make this as extensive and useful as possible. Been pushing for this for the last 4 years. finally got the ok from district office.  It's only a rough outline so far.
That's great to hear that your district is implementing it.  I heard from my parents that my alma mater is thinking about adding a personal finance-type class to the HS requirements. 

That's quite a list of topics you've got in that doc!  There are a couple topics I didn't see on the list that might be worth adding:
1) Spending and lifestyle
2) Property taxes (that's a big one for us--our property taxes are nearly as much as our principal+interest!)
3) Retirement planning--"how much will I need?" the 4% rule, Social Security, pensions, etc

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #579 on: April 04, 2016, 10:37:15 AM »
Currently writing the curriculum for a financial modeling class, for next year. I would love some input. I teach HS math. Designing it for Seniors. Here is the Google.doc link if people would like to give any input.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duEUYnocGgFdGUe_SA41oWBpDrSuXfa9sV6Lyi1dkPg/edit?usp=sharing


Lots of good material.

First - the order of the items is dead wrong.   Cover topics they can immediately see themselves having to know.  The paycheck  lessons and the car buying, for example. 

I would then add some stuff about people who have thought out of the box and accomplished things that others think are impossible (and therefore only whine about).   ARebelSpy, MMM, NoMoreHarvardDebt, etc.  Maybe some real people in your community if they present well.

Then, when you've got them with info that they know they can use and some real life examples to follow that show some exciting possibilities, then hit them with how to make it happen.






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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #580 on: April 04, 2016, 11:04:56 AM »
A guy at work and I were talking about his family situation with me. The guy was telling me that he grew up poor in Egypt and one of his life dreams has been to own a BMW. He told me that he had saved up the cash to buy one, but decided to use the money elsewhere - then he pulled up his student loan account and showed me that he had recently made a $33,xxx payment and no longer owed them money.

He said he realized the $255 a month he was sending, they were only applying $4 to the principal.

Very proud of him for making the choice.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #581 on: April 04, 2016, 12:24:23 PM »

Currently writing the curriculum for a financial modeling class, for next year. I would love some input. I teach HS math. Designing it for Seniors. Here is the Google.doc link if people would like to give any input.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duEUYnocGgFdGUe_SA41oWBpDrSuXfa9sV6Lyi1dkPg/edit?usp=sharing

if I am not allowed to share the link let me know. I will remove it. I want to make this as extensive and useful as possible. Been pushing for this for the last 4 years. finally got the ok from district office.  It's only a rough outline so far.
That's great to hear that your district is implementing it.  I heard from my parents that my alma mater is thinking about adding a personal finance-type class to the HS requirements. 

That's quite a list of topics you've got in that doc!  There are a couple topics I didn't see on the list that might be worth adding:
1) Spending and lifestyle
          Some of the class is being designed to fit the math curriculum. It's taken so long to get the class somewhat due to having to get the district to accept that I can add higher level math and not simply be a "consumer math" class that is balancing a checkbook as a senior. YES it is an extremely useful skill but the math would not be high level enough on that for a senior 4th year math class.

2) Property taxes (that's a big one for us--our property taxes are nearly as much as our principal+interest!)
         Property taxes would fit in with the home buying/mortgage project. I was thinking of having them have a few options on houses and loan choices. They may have one in a low cost of living state and one very close by in a high. Houses in PA 20 minutes form my house have RE taxes about 3-4 times higher on similarly priced homes. Going so talk about all the costs involved in a home. HOA and Condo Fees are going to be discussed. My brothers condo fees in Austin were about $620 on a $300k condo, included trash, water, basic cable, but still a huge hit to the monthly cost. 
3) Retirement planning--"how much will I need?" the 4% rule, Social Security, pensions, etc
          I think the order will change and the stock information will be pushed later on and Credit will be first. With this I think the stock unit will include retirement planning and the true cost of everything. Going into management fee's and safe withdrawal rates. Also along with value of pensions, healthcare in retirement from a career.


bigbenreiss

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #582 on: April 04, 2016, 12:33:52 PM »
Currently writing the curriculum for a financial modeling class, for next year. I would love some input. I teach HS math. Designing it for Seniors. Here is the Google.doc link if people would like to give any input.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duEUYnocGgFdGUe_SA41oWBpDrSuXfa9sV6Lyi1dkPg/edit?usp=sharing


Lots of good material.

First - the order of the items is dead wrong.   Cover topics they can immediately see themselves having to know.  The paycheck  lessons and the car buying, for example. 
        I think you are right, I am thinking moving things around and the market will be later on with retirement savings. I want to grab them with Credit and the usefulness of good credit. I am trying to design an excel spreadsheet or find an app that would allow me to have a running "credit" score for them as students. They would design a "student score" and they would get negative marks for not performing the necessary work. Students with a high score would be eligible for EC or something on tests so that other students would see the benefits in their day to day. I want this to be an ongoing system the whole semester so I need to do it early. It also connects to car buying and everything else as a consumer.

I would then add some stuff about people who have thought out of the box and accomplished things that others think are impossible (and therefore only whine about).   ARebelSpy, MMM, NoMoreHarvardDebt, etc.  Maybe some real people in your community if they present well.

That's a good idea but again I need to find ways to keep this math related if I want to be able to keep it going and also help the students understand the math behind it. I spoke with a few friends who are entrepreneurs, bankers, car saleswomen, ect who would be interested in speaking with the class during those units. I personally have saved up and bought rental properties on a teachers salary that now makes more then teaching. So I have some experience myself and will be looking to bring in others.

Then, when you've got them with info that they know they can use and some real life examples to follow that show some exciting possibilities, then hit them with how to make it happen.

 The class being a 4th year course in math needs to have a solid basis in mathematics. I have been fighting so long since the district doesn't want a "consumer math class" which would only have basic math functions and nothing higher level. I am looking to work in the system and deliver the information while still maintaining a high level of rigor in the math.


maco

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #583 on: April 04, 2016, 12:45:15 PM »

Some of the class is being designed to fit the math curriculum. It's taken so long to get the class somewhat due to having to get the district to accept that I can add higher level math and not simply be a "consumer math" class that is balancing a checkbook as a senior. YES it is an extremely useful skill but the math would not be high level enough on that for a senior 4th year math class.
For those of us who took university-level calculus during junior year and no math at all senior year... could you explain what is regarded as "4th year senior-level math"? Because my brain was going "huh? But how could you even work calculus into a finance class? This doesn't make sense at all as senior math!" until I realized that there are some people who don't reach algebra until college (like my mom).

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #584 on: April 04, 2016, 01:06:01 PM »

Some of the class is being designed to fit the math curriculum. It's taken so long to get the class somewhat due to having to get the district to accept that I can add higher level math and not simply be a "consumer math" class that is balancing a checkbook as a senior. YES it is an extremely useful skill but the math would not be high level enough on that for a senior 4th year math class.
For those of us who took university-level calculus during junior year and no math at all senior year... could you explain what is regarded as "4th year senior-level math"? Because my brain was going "huh? But how could you even work calculus into a finance class? This doesn't make sense at all as senior math!" until I realized that there are some people who don't reach algebra until college (like my mom).

Oh don't worry. You can use calculus in a finance class. http://www.amazon.com/Stochastic-Calculus-Finance-Binomial-Springer/dp/0387249680. But this isn't your run of the mill first year college calculus class. For a pdf including some of the actual math of stochastic calculus check out http://www.columbia.edu/~mh2078/stochastic_calculus.pdf

bigbenreiss

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #585 on: April 04, 2016, 01:54:32 PM »

Some of the class is being designed to fit the math curriculum. It's taken so long to get the class somewhat due to having to get the district to accept that I can add higher level math and not simply be a "consumer math" class that is balancing a checkbook as a senior. YES it is an extremely useful skill but the math would not be high level enough on that for a senior 4th year math class.
For those of us who took university-level calculus during junior year and no math at all senior year... could you explain what is regarded as "4th year senior-level math"? Because my brain was going "huh? But how could you even work calculus into a finance class? This doesn't make sense at all as senior math!" until I realized that there are some people who don't reach algebra until college (like my mom).

This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.

This class would not be moving into Calc. The class is more designed to give the students another option that they would be interested in. I am walking a tightrope of making it available and attainable for students of all abilities; while also pushing the students enough to be valuable as a math class beyond the Alg II level.

Hopefully that makes sense.

quick list of math involved would be:

Exponential functions (growth, depreciation)
Expected value and probability
Function operations, step functions, Compositions of functions, multi variable functions
linear programing
Modeling with linear, exponential, and other functions

much of the class will be logical thinking in finance using mathematics to back up your reasoning.

bigbenreiss

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #586 on: April 04, 2016, 01:59:25 PM »

Some of the class is being designed to fit the math curriculum. It's taken so long to get the class somewhat due to having to get the district to accept that I can add higher level math and not simply be a "consumer math" class that is balancing a checkbook as a senior. YES it is an extremely useful skill but the math would not be high level enough on that for a senior 4th year math class.
For those of us who took university-level calculus during junior year and no math at all senior year... could you explain what is regarded as "4th year senior-level math"? Because my brain was going "huh? But how could you even work calculus into a finance class? This doesn't make sense at all as senior math!" until I realized that there are some people who don't reach algebra until college (like my mom).

Oh don't worry. You can use calculus in a finance class. http://www.amazon.com/Stochastic-Calculus-Finance-Binomial-Springer/dp/0387249680. But this isn't your run of the mill first year college calculus class. For a pdf including some of the actual math of stochastic calculus check out http://www.columbia.edu/~mh2078/stochastic_calculus.pdf


The class is not directed so much for students who will be moving into calc in HS or college. Those students have a solid pathway into Honors Calc, AP Calc or AP stats.  This is more fitting into a non-stem pathway for seniors. It may not be the best way to deliver financial literacy but it's the best way I have right now so I'm using this option to fit it into the curriculum and course catalog.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #587 on: April 04, 2016, 01:59:28 PM »
fine arts (especially upper level) = Narcissism and Nudity

How about "Mostly Useless, Pretentious and Forgettable Shit"?
Even Caravaggio's - three fat women and one small piece of gauze ?

Yeah, but that one has an urn in it. That's how you know it's art.
I hoped somebody would get it ;-)
I was f******* ROFling :D

If you dont know, there is a twitter account with pratchett quotes. https://twitter.com/DailyPratchett


Regarding the school, I would rename history as "wars, intrigues and heroes, with blood" and home economics with "poisons and deadly microbes at home"

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #588 on: April 04, 2016, 02:07:00 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)


Quote
quick list of math involved would be:

Exponential functions (growth, depreciation)
Expected value and probability
Function operations, step functions, Compositions of functions, multi variable functions
linear programing
Modeling with linear, exponential, and other functions

much of the class will be logical thinking in finance using mathematics to back up your reasoning.
Thanks. Algebra I in 7th grade also means I was going "wait, but exponential growth and other stuff for finance are like...middle school math..."
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 02:09:57 PM by maco »

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #589 on: April 04, 2016, 02:19:31 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #590 on: April 04, 2016, 02:52:08 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.
AP Calculus II was offered, but I don't have a friendly relationship with math, so as soon as I could get out of it, I did.

And then I changed majors from Japanese to Computer Science and thus went from "6 credits of math and/or science" (of which I had 4 from Calc I) to "9 credits of lab science plus Calc I & II." >_> So I took Calc II 3 years after Calc I and flailed mightily. And calc-based physics a year later, with more flailing.  (Note: high school calc & physics taught me I'd way rather have calc-based physics than algebra-based, but it would've helped if I remembered calc)

Apples

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #591 on: April 04, 2016, 02:55:02 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.

Yeah, my area (state?) does a lot of College in the High School classes instead of AP classes.  High school teachers teach college subjects, somewhat following the curriculum of any nearby school.  I took Calc and Stats with a great teacher.  If there had been a big enough student population for advanced math (I had 12 students in calc and 16 in stats, soooo) I think my teach would have loved teaching higher level maths.  But he spent most of his time teaching precalc and trig to juniors who were only there to fulfill their 3 years of math requirement.

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #592 on: April 04, 2016, 03:05:12 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.

Yeah, my area (state?) does a lot of College in the High School classes instead of AP classes.  High school teachers teach college subjects, somewhat following the curriculum of any nearby school.  I took Calc and Stats with a great teacher.  If there had been a big enough student population for advanced math (I had 12 students in calc and 16 in stats, soooo) I think my teach would have loved teaching higher level maths.  But he spent most of his time teaching precalc and trig to juniors who were only there to fulfill their 3 years of math requirement.
Mine did both (and offered dual-enrollment at community college or vo-tech school). I couldn't make it into AP Calc I, but I could make it into Honors Calc I, which was college-in-hs. My college accepted transfer credits that were Cs but only AP 4&5 (B&A equivalents), so it was an easier class to get into, an easier class to take, and an easier system to get counted for credits. Sweet deal!

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #593 on: April 04, 2016, 03:19:57 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.
AP Calculus II was offered, but I don't have a friendly relationship with math, so as soon as I could get out of it, I did.

And then I changed majors from Japanese to Computer Science and thus went from "6 credits of math and/or science" (of which I had 4 from Calc I) to "9 credits of lab science plus Calc I & II." >_> So I took Calc II 3 years after Calc I and flailed mightily. And calc-based physics a year later, with more flailing.  (Note: high school calc & physics taught me I'd way rather have calc-based physics than algebra-based, but it would've helped if I remembered calc)

I believe you are mistaken on the AP part, as there's no AP math class beyond Calculus BC (which corresponds to a Calc I class in college). But that doesn't change the substance of your experience.

Haha do you enjoy CS now?

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #594 on: April 04, 2016, 03:31:07 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.
AP Calculus II was offered, but I don't have a friendly relationship with math, so as soon as I could get out of it, I did.

And then I changed majors from Japanese to Computer Science and thus went from "6 credits of math and/or science" (of which I had 4 from Calc I) to "9 credits of lab science plus Calc I & II." >_> So I took Calc II 3 years after Calc I and flailed mightily. And calc-based physics a year later, with more flailing.  (Note: high school calc & physics taught me I'd way rather have calc-based physics than algebra-based, but it would've helped if I remembered calc)

I believe you are mistaken on the AP part, as there's no AP math class beyond Calculus BC (which corresponds to a Calc I class in college). But that doesn't change the substance of your experience.

Haha do you enjoy CS now?

I graduated HS in 2008, so I may be mistaken...

Calc AB = Calc I
Calc BC = Calc II

I took AB in high school, and in college didn't cover anything in Calc II that was new to me until the last 3 weeks. And I was a Math major too.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #595 on: April 04, 2016, 03:46:22 PM »
This is more of a pathway for students not going into a STEM field. The district/state requires 4 credits in math. 1 of those must be taken during senior year. This class would be the equivalent of after Alg II or after Integrated III depending on when you went to school.  basically there are GLE's (grade level expectations) we have to meet to cover the common core for each grade.
Hey, I was aiming for a Japanese major when I was in high school :P It's just that if you take Algebra I in 7th grade and keep going one level up each year, you run out of things to take that aren't calculus! (I didn't want to take calculus. I just ran into that "you must take a math class your junior year" thing. I avoided math senior year by dual-enrolling in community college to get history and sociology out of the way before going to university.)

Depends on the high school. My senior year I took multivariable calculus and about  1/3 of a differential equations class (it was supposed to be one semester each, but our teacher took it slow). And yes, I said teacher. This wasn't taught at some community college. It was taught by a high school teacher.

But yes, my high school was definitely the exception, not the rule.
AP Calculus II was offered, but I don't have a friendly relationship with math, so as soon as I could get out of it, I did.

And then I changed majors from Japanese to Computer Science and thus went from "6 credits of math and/or science" (of which I had 4 from Calc I) to "9 credits of lab science plus Calc I & II." >_> So I took Calc II 3 years after Calc I and flailed mightily. And calc-based physics a year later, with more flailing.  (Note: high school calc & physics taught me I'd way rather have calc-based physics than algebra-based, but it would've helped if I remembered calc)

I believe you are mistaken on the AP part, as there's no AP math class beyond Calculus BC (which corresponds to a Calc I class in college). But that doesn't change the substance of your experience.

Haha do you enjoy CS now?

I graduated HS in 2008, so I may be mistaken...

Calc AB = Calc I
Calc BC = Calc II

I took AB in high school, and in college didn't cover anything in Calc II that was new to me until the last 3 weeks. And I was a Math major too.

So I will confess that I never used these numbers - Calc I, Calc II, etc. All my math classes were engineering math classes and weren't called Calc I, Calc II, etc. They were just called Calculus (which would correspond to Calc II), Multvariable Calculus, Differential Equations, and Linear Algebra (not that linear algebra would ever be called a calculus class).

So my mistake.

maco

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #596 on: April 04, 2016, 04:09:41 PM »

Haha do you enjoy CS now?
I got through one semester before my brain needed a break, so I took an algorithms class. (I took CS in high school for fun as well). I swapped majors sophomore year.

I dislike the industry enough to be on this board, but I like coding.

johnny847

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #597 on: April 04, 2016, 04:21:26 PM »

Haha do you enjoy CS now?
I got through one semester before my brain needed a break, so I took an algorithms class. (I took CS in high school for fun as well). I swapped majors sophomore year.

I dislike the industry enough to be on this board, but I like coding.

Nice.

I really like coding, but not when the end goal is the actual program or software (I do research and I write programs all the time to compute my research results). Which would probably mean that I wouldn't like the industry either (but I haven't tried it so I can't say for certain).


ETA: Back on topic, my friend who recently started working full time here said so I can contribute 6% to my 401a (it's actually mandatory) and while that's good for now (he's been low on cash for the past six months or so), I feel like that's a pretty low contribution rate for retirement (he can't change his contribution rate for the 401a).

And I told him oh don't worry, you can contribute $18k each to a 403b and a 457b. Which is probably more than you can afford. So don't worry, there's plenty of contribution space!

And I've looked at the available funds in the plans. There are some low cost Fidelity Spartan funds in there.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 04:30:13 PM by johnny847 »

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #598 on: April 04, 2016, 05:05:49 PM »
I have an anecdote about my coworker who re-reads his college Calculus textbook for fun. (Gotta stay on topic! This is the Calc thread, right?)

Last week he told us about a time in his thirties when he worked M-F in another state from his wife and home. He looked around for housing options, but everything seemed too expensive. He ended up buying a tent and camping out. He would sleep there during the week, then drive home on the weekends. He did this for months, and only stopped when the job ended.

He's an engineer who talks about money, so the perfect candidate for a stealth MMM'er. I've dropped a couple hints about early retirement and finance websites, but no dice.
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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #599 on: April 04, 2016, 08:39:15 PM »
So I will confess that I never used these numbers - Calc I, Calc II, etc. All my math classes were engineering math classes and weren't called Calc I, Calc II, etc.
Well in engineering you probably used that calculus with real numbers and infinitely small divisions. Roman numeral calculus with only integers, and no zero, is triciker