Author Topic: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition  (Read 271763 times)

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #350 on: August 10, 2015, 02:26:44 PM »
Eh, people used to die from exposure in the winter too.
Poor people without the means or materials to protect themselves, generally.
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iowajes

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #351 on: August 10, 2015, 02:29:19 PM »
Eh, people used to die from exposure in the winter too.
Poor people without the means or materials to protect themselves, generally.

Like a car? So I don't have to walk when it is -40F?

:)

Historically, people did not go outside in these extreme temperatures where I live. School was often canceled during the extremes of winter. They would go to the barn, very near the house- specifically due to the weather, to take care of the animals, and back to the house.  Once there was sufficient snow, they would often build tunnels so they weren't exposed while doing that walk.   Walking into town did not happen in these extreme temperatures. If you had to travel, you might take a sled, covered in blankets with heated rocks (or potatoes if you were lucky!) in your pocket; but still you traveled faster than walking.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2015, 02:31:43 PM by iowajes »

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #352 on: August 11, 2015, 05:54:14 AM »
Consultant employee purchased brand new F150 crewcab 4x4. Commutes to work with it 5x weekly and tows camper 2x / month in summer.

I camp at a $8 campsite with my $300 mountaineering tent. Best part is I don't have to empty the waste tank on an RV.
Helped to inspire another guy to fix his own truck. $550 quote from mechanic to change alternator. I watched a YouTube video on how to do it, and told him I would do it for $250 and a case of beer. He looked it up himself and then did it that weekend. Cost him $120 in parts.

I love this story. This can be SUCH a money saver.

Researched and bought a/c compressor tools this weekend for ~$35 to change my car's a/c compressor clutch. Clutch is $60. Once upon a time I paid $175 to get this same job done (noisy bearing behind the clutch). After this I'll have the tool kit to use again, loan out to friends (brownie points for when I need a helping hand in return) or to sell.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #353 on: August 11, 2015, 06:16:54 AM »
Manager noted today that winning lotto usually doesn't help anyone because if you don't already know how to manage money, more money will just get wasted.

I agreed with her enthusiastically :D

MissStache

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #354 on: August 11, 2015, 07:31:25 AM »
Our CEO (CEO!) who makes literal millions drives an early-model Ford Explorer to work.  I think it is a 2001. 

Also, every year when we have profit sharing, he implores all of our employees to use the money to pay of debt (especially credit card debt) or invest it if you are debt-free.  He is a genuinely great role model.

He's also in his 70s, so not a proponent of Early Retirement, but I still like him!

Friar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #355 on: August 11, 2015, 07:39:38 AM »
I can attest to this alleged problem. During the winter, if I turn my car off after 2 minutes of driving to run into the grocery store, I have a difficult time turning it back on. i don't like to leave my car running while I run into a store, but I almost feel like I should bc of this issue. Instead, I've tried to let my car warm up longer before turning it off.

This is likely to be down to the fact that car batteries, which are typically lead acid based technology, don't like cold temperatures. They can't provide as much current to start the car and struggle to recharge even though the car's alternator is providing enough current to do so. Coupled with the short journey time and the fact that cold engines need a higher current pulse to overcome the friction than warm engines explains why you're having a hard time starting it the second time around!

Leaving your car to warm up helps because it allows the battery more time to recover from it's high energy output, the alternator to give it more energy to recharge and the engine to reduce the amount of friction it needs to get going!

This might all be true, but I think a better solution would be to walk to the grocery store that is apparently only a 2 minute drive away...

Of course! I was just explaining the why :)

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #356 on: August 11, 2015, 07:45:49 AM »
There's a guy at work who's replacing his own timing belt.  In the meantime, he's riding his bike to work (3.5 miles).  Does that count as a double win?

He jokes that maybe he'll leave the job half-done (the car's 20 years old anyways) so that he *has* to keep riding his bike...

Serious double win.  I think a guy like that would appreciate the MMM lifestyle.

Allegedly short drives are bad for your car because it doesn't properly warm up (and maybe other reasons too, I forget). So he "shouldn't" be using his car for such a short drive anyway!

There are several reasons - expansion and contraction of the engine metals wearing out gaskets and seals. The oil can collect condensation and without getting it HOT enough to cook off the moisture your oil gets dirty and turns to a sludge inside the engine (change the oil more frequently then). Another is moisture/combustion by-products wind up in the exhaust system and the exhaust never gets hot enough to really dry itself out. Rust in the exhaust (just need to replace it more often). Then there is the wear and tear of the starter motor being used so often or the door hinges getting loose from the door opening and closing more frequently.

You start it once and drive five hundred miles or you start it fifty times, open and close the doors fifty times, etc and drive ten miles at a time. 
« Last Edit: August 11, 2015, 07:52:54 AM by Joe Average »

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #357 on: August 11, 2015, 07:46:59 AM »

Allegedly short drives are bad for your car because it doesn't properly warm up (and maybe other reasons too, I forget). So he "shouldn't" be using his car for such a short drive anyway!
He's also said that he's hoping this car will be the one his kids will use when they get old enough to drive.  His oldest is 10.  That means it'll technically be a classic when his oldest starts learning, right?

Why not? My eldest child will be occasionally driving the car that brought him home from the hospital. Its still our daily driver. ;)

Making Cookies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #358 on: August 11, 2015, 07:50:03 AM »
I had a small win at work today. We have a fairly new receptionist who I think has the potential for mustachianism but has been raised in an un-mustachian world and doesn't know better. She drives a 90's car that for the most part runs fine but has a weird glitch that occasionally keeps it from starting for 10 minutes. This morning though it wouldn't start at all she's not sure why. By the time she got a ride to work she was very ticked off and ready to go buy a "new" car tonight because she needs a reliable car. She was looking at early 2000's under $10k. I said why not rent a car for a few days while finding a good deal? A little while later I walked by and she thanked me for talking some sense into her. She's going to pick up a rental after work and do some research before buying a car so she doesn't rush into purchase and get ripped off

Depending on the car it could be a cracked coil or bad ignition module. Both are susceptible to moisture and temperatures. I'd tell her to get it looked at. No reason to ditch a car over a $50 part (or less).

Would be glad to play 20+ questions to lead her to an affordable answer.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2015, 07:53:46 AM by Joe Average »

CabinetGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #359 on: August 11, 2015, 08:04:34 AM »
I'm working on-site in a million-plus home installing cabinets.  Homeowner pops in and starts telling the builder he was up all night working on a 100 million purchase of another company.  It sounds like he may be in legal for the company he works for, I'm not sure.

So at the end of the day, he pops in later to check the progress.  As we both leave for the day, I see him getting into a 2005 Honda Accord.  It's a little beat up, but not too bad for an 05.  I tell him I like the car.  He says "Yeah, I'm trying to get it to 200k, and I'm at 144k right now.  It gets me from point A to point B.  I don't need anything flashy."




dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #360 on: August 11, 2015, 01:25:19 PM »
I'm working on-site in a million-plus home installing cabinets.  Homeowner pops in and starts telling the builder he was up all night working on a 100 million purchase of another company.  It sounds like he may be in legal for the company he works for, I'm not sure.

So at the end of the day, he pops in later to check the progress.  As we both leave for the day, I see him getting into a 2005 Honda Accord.  It's a little beat up, but not too bad for an 05.  I tell him I like the car.  He says "Yeah, I'm trying to get it to 200k, and I'm at 144k right now.  It gets me from point A to point B.  I don't need anything flashy."

We're the cabinets nice?

gaja

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #361 on: August 11, 2015, 02:10:43 PM »
(And yes- I have walk-commuted in the winter, about 2 miles. Once it gets below -30, I had someone drive me. I could not figure out a way to keep my feet fully warm, no matter the wool socks, plastic bags, and snow boots. The fact that my glasses froze to my nose so painfully I had to walk without them, thus not being able to see, also really sucked.)
-30? We'll allow it, temporarily. ;)

From the other side of the globe:
School buses can't handle temperatures below 38C, so then kids have to walk to school. If it drops below -50C, attendance is voluntary.
http://www.nrk.no/sapmi/blir-det-kaldere-enn---50_-kan-elevene-holde-seg-hjemme-1.12145152

This is, by the way, a great argument for electric vehicles. I have talked to several EV drivers from the north who tell stories about the benefits of using electricity when it gets so cold that diesel freezes ("and then I just slid silently down the street, while that cocky bmw-owner stayed in the parking lot, unable to start his car due to the cold").

No, honestly, all respect for walking most of the year. No need to get extreme. It is possible, but there is no point.

Travelling southern Norway, Iceland and the Faroes in an electric car: http://travelelectric.blogspot.no/

Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #362 on: August 11, 2015, 03:10:08 PM »
I had a small win at work today. We have a fairly new receptionist who I think has the potential for mustachianism but has been raised in an un-mustachian world and doesn't know better. She drives a 90's car that for the most part runs fine but has a weird glitch that occasionally keeps it from starting for 10 minutes. This morning though it wouldn't start at all she's not sure why. By the time she got a ride to work she was very ticked off and ready to go buy a "new" car tonight because she needs a reliable car. She was looking at early 2000's under $10k. I said why not rent a car for a few days while finding a good deal? A little while later I walked by and she thanked me for talking some sense into her. She's going to pick up a rental after work and do some research before buying a car so she doesn't rush into purchase and get ripped off

Depending on the car it could be a cracked coil or bad ignition module. Both are susceptible to moisture and temperatures. I'd tell her to get it looked at. No reason to ditch a car over a $50 part (or less).

Would be glad to play 20+ questions to lead her to an affordable answer.
She's had it looked at before and they can't figure out why it does it, though apparently it's a known problem for that car. I agree that getting it fixed is better than replacing it but at least she's renting a car for a week while finding a used car instead of jumping into something while panicked and/or buying a brand new car

CabinetGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #363 on: August 12, 2015, 04:26:45 AM »
I'm working on-site in a million-plus home installing cabinets.  Homeowner pops in and starts telling the builder he was up all night working on a 100 million purchase of another company.  It sounds like he may be in legal for the company he works for, I'm not sure.

So at the end of the day, he pops in later to check the progress.  As we both leave for the day, I see him getting into a 2005 Honda Accord.  It's a little beat up, but not too bad for an 05.  I tell him I like the car.  He says "Yeah, I'm trying to get it to 200k, and I'm at 144k right now.  It gets me from point A to point B.  I don't need anything flashy."

We're the cabinets nice?

Meh, not IMHO.  Nicer than most, but poor build quality.

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #364 on: August 12, 2015, 09:40:09 AM »
Like a car? So I don't have to walk when it is -40F?

:)
Your dispensation was granted several posts up this thread. ;)
Quote
Historically, people did not go outside in these extreme temperatures where I live. School was often canceled during the extremes of winter. They would go to the barn, very near the house- specifically due to the weather, to take care of the animals, and back to the house.  Once there was sufficient snow, they would often build tunnels so they weren't exposed while doing that walk.   Walking into town did not happen in these extreme temperatures. If you had to travel, you might take a sled, covered in blankets with heated rocks (or potatoes if you were lucky!) in your pocket; but still you traveled faster than walking.

Coincidentally, my wife and I are working through the second book of the Little House series. Last night's final chapter was about Almanzo and his family having to get up before dawn to try to save their upstate NY corn field from an unexpected frost... on the morning of July 2nd.

I find some of the things they did to stay warm in the winter downright comical, and of course there were times when it was just so bad that nobody went out at all.

It's pretty great being us, here and now.
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RidinTheAsama

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #365 on: August 12, 2015, 10:47:06 AM »

I know how to dress appropriately for the weather (I really appreciate the implication that I don't) and when I was commuting on foot during the last two winters, my entire body would ache from the cold. It was intensely unpleasant.
My apologies if any of that came across as offensive, definitely wasn't my intention.  I'm just a strong supporter of doing everything reasonably in your power to avoid short car trips, which it sounds like you do lots of the time.

Quote
Of course! I was just explaining the why :)
And I greatly appreciate learning the why! Just didn't want people in less extreme climates getting the idea that letting the car idle for a while was preferable to walking... I don't doubt that understanding how the cold affects our vehicles will likely be very useful to some of us in the future.

Quote
It's pretty great being us, here and now.
Hell ya!

Sorry for sending this thread so far off topic!  Looking forward to more anti-antimustachian stories.  Here's one:

A conversation about suburbs vs. in-town living was going on and I sent out MMM's article on the true cost of commuting (where he arrives at the logical conclusion that it's worth ~$15k to shorten your commute by 1 mile) just as food for thought for a few people.  Mostly got no responses from anyone... but the one other guy in my office who bikes to work all the time said "Oh, MMM.  Ya my wife loves this website".

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #366 on: August 12, 2015, 01:44:51 PM »
And I greatly appreciate learning the why! Just didn't want people in less extreme climates getting the idea that letting the car idle for a while was preferable to walking... I don't doubt that understanding how the cold affects our vehicles will likely be very useful to some of us in the future.
Drive electric, never worry about such things again. :D
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 02:36:41 PM by zephyr911 »
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Rufus.T.Firefly

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #367 on: August 12, 2015, 02:08:16 PM »
Quote
Coincidentally, my wife and I are working through the second book of the Little House series. Last night's final chapter was about Almanzo and his family having to get up before dawn to try to save their upstate NY corn field from an unexpected frost... on the morning of July 2nd.

I find some of the things they did to stay warm in the winter downright comical, and of course there were times when it was just so bad that nobody went out at all.

It's pretty great being us, here and now.

Yeah the Little House series is pretty great - even for adult reading. My wife and I are going back through this series as well. It makes you realize how much this country has changed in 150 years. Pretty eye-opening.

Also, its amazing how much more equal gender roles seemed to be in those times. Sure men and women both had their designated tasks. But when its about survival, everyone pitches in for whatever is needed. Almonzo's father makes $200 for 2, three-year-old colts. Almonzo's mother makes $200 every year on her butter production alone. And she has a variety of side hustles that pull in and save money. These are EXTREME MMM families. Far beyond what we currently would ever have to suffer to achieve retirement. And they did it just to survive.

The idea that the 1950's era gender roles represent "traditional American values" is total bullcrap. The true equal partnership is evident in the marriages in those books and is what it seems we're returning to (albeit, very slowly) after a long hiatus.
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solon

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #368 on: August 13, 2015, 09:32:35 AM »
The idea that the 1950's era gender roles represent "traditional American values" is total bullcrap.

I don't think anybody thinks 1950s era gender roles represent "traditional American values". I hear people talking smack about the 1950s all the time. But I've never heard anybody take the opposite view - that is, I've never heard anybody say the 1950s represented the pinnacle of marriage values. Mostly, I think people are beating at strawmen.

Rural

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #369 on: August 13, 2015, 07:01:01 PM »
Overheard at a faculty meeting today: "but of course I don't carry any balances on my credit cards..."

Rufus.T.Firefly

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #370 on: August 13, 2015, 07:03:27 PM »
The idea that the 1950's era gender roles represent "traditional American values" is total bullcrap.

I don't think anybody thinks 1950s era gender roles represent "traditional American values". I hear people talking smack about the 1950s all the time. But I've never heard anybody take the opposite view - that is, I've never heard anybody say the 1950s represented the pinnacle of marriage values. Mostly, I think people are beating at strawmen.

I don't think the collective society thinks the 1950s are the pinnacle. Rather, I think that the collective society sees the 1950s as typical - the way it has "always been." Not good, but standard.

I should have re-phrased my original sentence: "the idea that 1950s are representative of the traditional American marriage work/relationship structure is total bull crap." These books show a different way that marriages were structured in the 1800s as it related to work and income.

As an aside, I'm not trying to say the 1800s were the golden era for women's rights or anything like that. That would be preposterous. My reflections only relate to how married couples made income and related to each other through their work. I found the stories in the Little House books are surprising for their time and inspiring in their portrayal of the equally shared burden of both Almonzo's and Laura's parents.
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LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #371 on: August 14, 2015, 02:55:35 AM »
The three post war decades were probably the peak for mass prosperity and social cohesion in the United States, but I'm not sure the marriages were anything special. It was pretty prosperous in a lot of the world then. In France they're called "Les trentes glorieuses," the thirty glorious years.
Yes, and then neoliberalism took over and we started to hurray the elbow.
In Germany its called "Wirtschaftswunder". (shorter then 30 years, but the same: extensive growing because everything had to be rebuild, it was the time where people where happy about workers from italy or Greece coming to Germany)

pom

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #372 on: August 14, 2015, 08:08:19 AM »
Back to the subject.

My 22 years old jedi apprentice comes from our Canadian office and will work with me in Paris for the next 24 months. We pay her a decent amout of around 2500€ a month after taxes and on top of that 1200€ a month for lodging (which would be enough in Paris for a 400 sqf apartment).

What is a young jedi to do:  she pockets the 1200€ a month and rents a tiny 150 sqf apartment for 500€.

She gets 150€ a month lunch allowance: she brings lunch to work most days and spends the 150€ on groceries.

I frankly doubt that she spends more than 1000€ a month on living expenses.

She travels quite a bit, which makes sense since she might as well take advantage of being in Europe, but I suspect her saving rate is above 50%. Not bad for a 22 years old.

Rufus.T.Firefly

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #373 on: August 14, 2015, 09:33:30 AM »
Back to the subject.

My 22 years old jedi apprentice comes from our Canadian office and will work with me in Paris for the next 24 months. We pay her a decent amout of around 2500€ a month after taxes and on top of that 1200€ a month for lodging (which would be enough in Paris for a 400 sqf apartment).

What is a young jedi to do:  she pockets the 1200€ a month and rents a tiny 150 sqf apartment for 500€.

She gets 150€ a month lunch allowance: she brings lunch to work most days and spends the 150€ on groceries.

I frankly doubt that she spends more than 1000€ a month on living expenses.

She travels quite a bit, which makes sense since she might as well take advantage of being in Europe, but I suspect her saving rate is above 50%. Not bad for a 22 years old.

This is awesome! Pretty savvy decisions...sounds like she's going to have an awesome abroad experience and walk away with as much as 35-40K in the bank.
"I have worked my way up from nothing to a state of extreme poverty"

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hernandz

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #374 on: August 16, 2015, 12:07:41 AM »
Also, I feel cheated as a German American. Nobody gave US an ox and sword for our wedding. Apparently my ancestors got a better deal.

6th anniversary theme is iron and 11th anniversary theme is steel, so depending on your weapon of choice...
14th anniversary theme was ivory -- could substitute "horn" or "bone" for ivory to get your oxen

Or you could choose the GoFundMe option. 

Maigahane

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #375 on: August 17, 2015, 07:28:28 AM »
I had a small win at work today. We have a fairly new receptionist who I think has the potential for mustachianism but has been raised in an un-mustachian world and doesn't know better. She drives a 90's car that for the most part runs fine but has a weird glitch that occasionally keeps it from starting for 10 minutes. This morning though it wouldn't start at all she's not sure why. By the time she got a ride to work she was very ticked off and ready to go buy a "new" car tonight because she needs a reliable car. She was looking at early 2000's under $10k. I said why not rent a car for a few days while finding a good deal? A little while later I walked by and she thanked me for talking some sense into her. She's going to pick up a rental after work and do some research before buying a car so she doesn't rush into purchase and get ripped off

Depending on the car it could be a cracked coil or bad ignition module. Both are susceptible to moisture and temperatures. I'd tell her to get it looked at. No reason to ditch a car over a $50 part (or less).

Would be glad to play 20+ questions to lead her to an affordable answer.
She's had it looked at before and they can't figure out why it does it, though apparently it's a known problem for that car. I agree that getting it fixed is better than replacing it but at least she's renting a car for a week while finding a used car instead of jumping into something while panicked and/or buying a brand new car
Just talked to her this morning and instead of getting a "new" car she did get the old one looked at again by a different mechanic and he found the problem. Two wires were rubbing together and sparking causing the car to think it was being tampered with and going into lockdown mode. He's only charging her $60 for the fix (mostly for the tow). So $60 fix + ~$130 car rental for a week instead of buying a "new" car = big win :)

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #376 on: August 17, 2015, 09:05:16 AM »
Stepped over to a CW's cube just now to partake in a conference call.

Happened to glance at browser tabs on screen.

"Mr. Money Mustache - Earl..."

Squeed a little inside.
I am not a cog. I am an organizational lubricant.

Pooperman

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #377 on: August 17, 2015, 09:08:15 AM »
Stepped over to a CW's cube just now to partake in a conference call.

Happened to glance at browser tabs on screen.

"Mr. Money Mustache - Earl..."

Squeed a little inside.

Time to have lunch with that co-worker?

zephyr911

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #378 on: August 17, 2015, 09:24:01 AM »


Stepped over to a CW's cube just now to partake in a conference call.

Happened to glance at browser tabs on screen.

"Mr. Money Mustache - Earl..."

Squeed a little inside.

Time to have lunch with that co-worker?


Yeah, leftovers at our desks. ;)

We already have occasional dialogue on financials, and he's interested in streamlining things a bit. I'm pretty sure my occasional FB posts of MMM articles led to this ;)
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seanc0x0

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #379 on: August 17, 2015, 03:01:35 PM »
(And yes- I have walk-commuted in the winter, about 2 miles. Once it gets below -30, I had someone drive me. I could not figure out a way to keep my feet fully warm, no matter the wool socks, plastic bags, and snow boots. The fact that my glasses froze to my nose so painfully I had to walk without them, thus not being able to see, also really sucked.)
-30? We'll allow it, temporarily. ;)

From the other side of the globe:
School buses can't handle temperatures below 38C, so then kids have to walk to school. If it drops below -50C, attendance is voluntary.
http://www.nrk.no/sapmi/blir-det-kaldere-enn---50_-kan-elevene-holde-seg-hjemme-1.12145152

This is, by the way, a great argument for electric vehicles. I have talked to several EV drivers from the north who tell stories about the benefits of using electricity when it gets so cold that diesel freezes ("and then I just slid silently down the street, while that cocky bmw-owner stayed in the parking lot, unable to start his car due to the cold").

No, honestly, all respect for walking most of the year. No need to get extreme. It is possible, but there is no point.

I live in Saskatchewan, Canada. It routinely goes below -40 in the winter (and up to 35C in the summer). They do cancel busses when it gets really cold, but I can't remember ever having schools closed due to cold.

Until had to put out daughter in daycare (I get cheap parking at work, so I ended up doing the driving on that *sadface* ), I walked to work every single day, rain or shine, extreme heat or extreme cold. The distance was about 3km.

I collected a decent array of clothing from base-layers/wind masks to rain suits, to extremely light weight t-shirts for the hot days.

I actually really like walking in -40 with a stiff wind, it makes me feel like a real badass. ;)

choppingwood

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #380 on: August 17, 2015, 06:18:29 PM »
I actually really like walking in -40 with a stiff wind, it makes me feel like a real badass. ;)

The thing I used to like about walking on really cold days was that I was warm the whole time. I didn't have to wait for a cold car to warm up.

But a parka-type hood that keeps wind off your face makes all the difference.

seanc0x0

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #381 on: August 19, 2015, 10:27:42 AM »
I actually really like walking in -40 with a stiff wind, it makes me feel like a real badass. ;)

The thing I used to like about walking on really cold days was that I was warm the whole time. I didn't have to wait for a cold car to warm up.

But a parka-type hood that keeps wind off your face makes all the difference.

Properly attired, it's lovely. If you are missing proper clothing in some area (face, pants, etc), it can be a really unpleasant experience. It's not even that hard to gear up properly. I think I paid less for all my bad weather gear than I would have had to pay in gas/insurance/maintenance on a car to ferry me the same distance for a month or two.

The best thing about walking in extreme weather (cold, snow storms, rain) is the way everything seems different. If you only get out walking when it's warm and sunny, you miss the ways the world changes when conditions are different.  It's really hard to explain, but worth it to experience!

RidinTheAsama

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #382 on: August 19, 2015, 03:46:11 PM »
Properly attired, it's lovely.

One of my favourite quotes from a friend of mine is:
"There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong gear."

luna

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #383 on: August 19, 2015, 08:31:54 PM »
Properly attired, it's lovely.

One of my favourite quotes from a friend of mine is:
"There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong gear."

There's a Swedish expression that goes "det finns inga dåliga väder, bara dåliga kläder", which pretty much translates to the above. Was your friend Swedish by any chance?

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #384 on: August 20, 2015, 12:24:15 AM »
Properly attired, it's lovely.

One of my favourite quotes from a friend of mine is:
"There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong gear."

There's a Swedish expression that goes "det finns inga dåliga väder, bara dåliga kläder", which pretty much translates to the above. Was your friend Swedish by any chance?

There is a similar sentence in german "Es gibt kein schlechtes Wetter, nur unangepasste Kleidung", with unangepasst has the nice implication of not meaning bad but just the wrong type.

meg_shannon

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #385 on: August 20, 2015, 05:04:46 AM »
Off topic, but this phrase is what drew me to my child's previous (we moved) school. Their slogan is, "There's no bad weather, just bad clothing." They spend most of the day outside, unless there is lightning. There's a school here, in Germany, that takes it a bit further and they have hammocks for the kids to nap in and they make a communal lunch over a fire pit. I wish it weren't so far away, but I can't drive her 20 minutes when we have bikes.

On topic, when I waited tables, myself and another worker used to lauder and press our coworkers' work shirts for 2$ each (most of these were summer employees living in dry - no running water - cabins). It was cheaper than the dry cleaners, they met dress code (our boss was super picky about a starched shirt), and we both made a bit of extra money.


music lover

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #386 on: August 20, 2015, 08:09:43 PM »
I actually really like walking in -40 with a stiff wind, it makes me feel like a real badass. ;)

The thing I used to like about walking on really cold days was that I was warm the whole time. I didn't have to wait for a cold car to warm up.

But a parka-type hood that keeps wind off your face makes all the difference.

Properly attired, it's lovely. If you are missing proper clothing in some area (face, pants, etc), it can be a really unpleasant experience. It's not even that hard to gear up properly. I think I paid less for all my bad weather gear than I would have had to pay in gas/insurance/maintenance on a car to ferry me the same distance for a month or two.

The best thing about walking in extreme weather (cold, snow storms, rain) is the way everything seems different. If you only get out walking when it's warm and sunny, you miss the ways the world changes when conditions are different.  It's really hard to explain, but worth it to experience!

I've "experienced" enough cold to last several lifetimes and the thrill is gone. When the choice is walking an hour in -45 windchill or an 8-minute drive, I'll take the car and spend the $2 it costs.

Tabitha

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #387 on: August 20, 2015, 08:58:38 PM »
would gladly get pd $800 to skip a flight.
sadly never been offered.
Most i was offered was a voucher for flight (like miles... with blackout dates and limited value).
Passed.

I was on a trip with my Mother this summer. I sadly could not convince her to take the $500 each to take the 3 hour flight delay. Bird in the hand I guess. I've happily taken lesser bonuses ($200) when it was just me or me and my spouse.

lostamonkey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #388 on: August 20, 2015, 09:05:54 PM »
would gladly get pd $800 to skip a flight.
sadly never been offered.
Most i was offered was a voucher for flight (like miles... with blackout dates and limited value).
Passed.


I was on a trip with my Mother this summer. I sadly could not convince her to take the $500 each to take the 3 hour flight delay. Bird in the hand I guess. I've happily taken lesser bonuses ($200) when it was just me or me and my spouse.

I don't know how people can turn down $167 tax-free risk-free dollars per hour. That's insane. Even if I was a millionaire and FIREd I would not turn the money down.

RidinTheAsama

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #389 on: August 21, 2015, 11:29:11 AM »
Was your friend Swedish by any chance?

No, he was an ex US Army Ranger who spent a lot of time living in Alaska.

I wish I had some Swedish friends to help me get the pronunciation of that version right... I might be able to get close with the German one thanks to some Dutch relatives though.

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #390 on: August 21, 2015, 11:41:05 AM »
would gladly get pd $800 to skip a flight.
sadly never been offered.
Most i was offered was a voucher for flight (like miles... with blackout dates and limited value).
Passed.


I was on a trip with my Mother this summer. I sadly could not convince her to take the $500 each to take the 3 hour flight delay. Bird in the hand I guess. I've happily taken lesser bonuses ($200) when it was just me or me and my spouse.

I don't know how people can turn down $167 tax-free risk-free dollars per hour. That's insane. Even if I was a millionaire and FIREd I would not turn the money down.

The most I was ever offered was $400 but since it was a small regional airport to a big one like Atlanta the flights weren't few hours. I usually took the mid day flight, which meant that to get bumped I'd have to fly out the next day. Not really worth it when I'd loose a day of PTO and have to drive back a hour home.

On the same note, I used to pray I'd get overbooked from my Atl to "home" flight. I would have gotten bumped for $1. :-P

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #391 on: August 24, 2015, 08:53:26 AM »
Overhead In Canada.

While visiting some relatives in the Toronto area - Brampton - I noticed that on trash day they could only put 2 bags.

I asked my cousin about it and he said they are only allowed to put 2 trash bags. At first, I was like wtf that sucks, but then I realized that all the neighbors had various bins for recycling.

So they are allowed only 2 bags of trash (not sure what size but the larger type of trash bags) but unlimited recycling. I thought that was actually pretty cool as it seems like a good way to encourage recycling over being wasteful.

Anyone familiar with the actual rules or laws, feel free to correct any of my "facts".

arpies

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #392 on: August 24, 2015, 09:37:17 AM »
Don't know about Brampton, but in nearby Milton it was the same at two bags but garbage pickup was every second week, while recycling and compost were weekly.

Whereas in rural Nova Scotia it was weekly and you could put out as much as you like but you had to use government issued clear bags and would be fined $x/item that could've been recycled/composted.
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choppingwood

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #393 on: August 24, 2015, 10:01:33 AM »
My sister has lived in two different cities in Ontario. Both required people to recycle -- nothing could go in the "garbage" that could be re-cycled, and there are lots of categories of things that have to be packed up separately. So there is a lot of sorting, but great re-cycling.

I've lived in a couple of places in Alberta. One provided a great big bin for garbage and one for re-cycling and you could put extra clear blue bags out for extra re-cycling. They had set pretty high goals for recycling and found that the goals were easily being exceeded, by making it easy for people. Where I live permanently now supplies a big bin for garbage. You are allowed to put four bags in it each week, though I'd never get anywhere near that. Recycling gets picked up every two weeks and grass clippings are picked up separately every week. Recycling is billed on your village bill, which includes water, sewer and natural gas for heating, so you are paying for it whether or not you use it. Bottles, milk cartons and tetrapaks have a deposit and you take them back to a bottle depot.

In Saskatchewan you had to pay a recycling company to come pick up your recycle boxes.

Cookie78

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #394 on: August 24, 2015, 10:15:40 AM »
Whereas in rural Nova Scotia it was weekly and you could put out as much as you like but you had to use government issued clear bags and would be fined $x/item that could've been recycled/composted.

I remember this!! I lived in rural Nova Scotia for a year. It was my first experience with recycling and composting being part of the regular garbage pickup. Luckily my roommate, from Ontario, was very knowledgeable about what could be recycled and showed me the way. We had VERY little garbage each week.

Now, in Calgary, we have a black bin for garbage (as far as I know, no bag limit. I rarely have more than half a bag) and a blue bin for recycling. I hear they are doing trial runs in some areas for a green bin for composting now, but I compost everything for my own garden anyway.

BackNColo

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #395 on: August 24, 2015, 12:17:45 PM »
When I was 19 and in the Navy, one of my electronic instructors stopped the class and said, " I love the Navy and I want to stay as long as I can, but if you don't like it, don't let money keep you in. Save your money."

That man was wise. I was always cheap, but once I decided I wanted to leave after my enlistment, it wasn't a problem. So many friends and coworkers should have listened.

FrugalWad

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #396 on: August 27, 2015, 08:10:11 AM »
When I was 19 and in the Navy, one of my electronic instructors stopped the class and said, " I love the Navy and I want to stay as long as I can, but if you don't like it, don't let money keep you in. Save your money."

That man was wise. I was always cheap, but once I decided I wanted to leave after my enlistment, it wasn't a problem. So many friends and coworkers should have listened.

It must run in the rate. My electronic instructor and I wound up talking about our sign-up bonuses. He said when he enlisted, while everyone else wound up buying cars or huge TVs or whatever, he put his in the bank.

In part of one of our indoc classes, there were instructors coming in waves who talked about everything from TSP to investments to not being an idiot and living paycheck to paycheck, never going into debt, all that good stuff. Pushing for financial responsibility was a big thing in the Navy then as now; losing a top secret clearance because of debt was a big issue. During one of the classes, a seaman said how he was spending more than half his paycheck on a new car and insurance to the tune of about $900 a month. I felt like I was in good company when just about everyone looked at him and asked if he was nucking futz.

In the same class, a guy was putting 100% of his pay into savings or investments. When room and board are paid for and there are a ton of free things to do on base and through MWR, why not?
Just a big nerd on a little budget over at http://www.frugalwad.com

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #397 on: August 27, 2015, 08:25:29 AM »

In the same class, a guy was putting 100% of his pay into savings or investments. When room and board are paid for and there are a ton of free things to do on base and through MWR, why not?

That's awesome! A  buddy of mine from college that was in ROTC told me something similar. He's also taking advantage of programs that the military offers for Rosetta Stone and other things.

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #398 on: August 27, 2015, 08:27:54 AM »

In the same class, a guy was putting 100% of his pay into savings or investments. When room and board are paid for and there are a ton of free things to do on base and through MWR, why not?

Wow, that's impressive.

Thanks to all the Canadians above who elaborated on what I mentioned. I truly think that is an awesome system.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2015, 06:12:31 AM by HairyUpperLip »

Joggernot

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #399 on: August 29, 2015, 06:04:00 AM »
I'm proud of my son.  The girlfriend of his oldest son was looking for a car.  He told her to not buy anything the first day.  She goes to the ex-boyfriend of her mother and gets pricing for a car at $10k, at 6%, with extended warranty and GAP insurance.  All for only $250/mo for 6 years.  At least she didn't buy it!

So my son goes down with her to actually buy the car, but FIRST they went to the credit union and got some 2.9% financing for the car.  Then, at the dealer, he crossed out the warranty and the GAP insurance and talked the cost down to $8k based on the car itself.  This was about $200/mo for 6 years.

She was very pleased with having my son help her on her first car.  Guess he has learned and is no longer a grasshopper... :)