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Around the Internet => Antimustachian Wall of Shame and Comedy => Topic started by: sherr on December 19, 2018, 12:49:51 PM

Title: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: sherr on December 19, 2018, 12:49:51 PM
This is a continuation of the "Overheard at Work" thread that was getting unwieldy because it was over 400 pages long. If you want to read the archive of the old thread you can find it here:

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/

So, what crazy things have you heard at work?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on December 19, 2018, 12:55:10 PM
Nothing today. I just want to be the second to post in the new thread. :)

Happy hump day!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on December 19, 2018, 01:12:22 PM
Ptf
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: merula on December 19, 2018, 02:39:08 PM
My department has undergone a lot of reorganization recently, and today there was a meeting with some brand-new leaders and the ~200 people under them, so the new leaders could introduce themselves.

One of them was talking about how his kids were older, college age, and that made Christmas a lot less fun because they get the same number of gifts as when they were little, but every gift is so expensive so he's shelling out thousands on his kids at Christmas.

Now, this was slightly tone-deaf because we all obviously make less than these guys, but we're all well-paid professionals. So it could've been worse, but like, your kids are adults! Set limits!

At least the other guy, the first guy's peer, followed up with "my kids are young, $20 goes a long way".
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on December 19, 2018, 02:59:39 PM
Coworker has complained on a couple of occasions recently about how much money he is dropping on Christmas. His family is coming to visit and he has to buy gifts for aunts, uncles, their kids, etc., and take them all out to dinner. While purchasing all these gifts he bought a 75" flat screen to treat himself and he found a "great deal" on a pool table. Also, he just got back from Disneyland a couple weeks ago. I have no clue how much money he makes but that is an alarming spending rate.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: nnls on December 19, 2018, 03:11:51 PM
Coworker has complained on a couple of occasions recently about how much money he is dropping on Christmas. His family is coming to visit and he has to buy gifts for aunts, uncles, their kids, etc., and take them all out to dinner. While purchasing all these gifts he bought a 75" flat screen to treat himself and he found a "great deal" on a pool table. Also, he just got back from Disneyland a couple weeks ago. I have no clue how much money he makes but that is an alarming spending rate.

Cant you just give adults nothing or something small like a bottle of wine
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: YHD on December 19, 2018, 05:06:44 PM
Geez, I'm getting my nieces, who are actual young children, pens and pencils for christmas.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: shadowmoss on December 19, 2018, 05:49:02 PM
Posting to Follow.  No stories since I'm retired.  I do enjoy reading here and being glad I am retired.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Rural on December 19, 2018, 09:08:02 PM
I don't have any really good stories since the one guy filed for bankruptcy and the hoarder retired. They cleared his office with a shovel, though.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dee on December 19, 2018, 09:12:33 PM
We recently had a long service awards ceremony at work. They celebrate 15 years and, I think, every 5 year increment after that. I couple people had been working there for 30 years. But one guy took the cake with 40 years of employment!!!! Strangely enough, he looks like he's in his 40s. Now, based on basic logic, he has to be at least pushing 60 but he looks quite young. I suspect he started at age 16 or so. I don't know him so I have no insight as to whether he is planning to pack it in anytime soon. We have a defined benefit pension plan and once you hit 30 years of service (I think) you max you. He could be getting 70% of his salary in the form of a pension if he stopped working.

I'm posting this here to mark the new thread but I'm not sure it's actually anti-mustachian. Some of the long-service people genuinely seem to enjoy being at work and very well may be SWAMIs or something akin to that.

But, geez, I sure plan to get out well before I hit the 30 year mark, let alone the 40 year mark!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on December 20, 2018, 12:24:43 AM
Shut it down
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on December 20, 2018, 02:11:36 AM
DH got in a bit trouble at work for his  gift exchange because the limit was $30 per gift and he only spent around $5 getting someone a thoughtful gift that he knew they would like...but still...it wasn’t “expensive” enough.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dogastrophe on December 20, 2018, 05:20:38 AM
DH got in a bit trouble at work for his  gift exchange because the limit was $30 per gift and he only spent around $5 getting someone a thoughtful gift that he knew they would like...but still...it wasn’t “expensive” enough.

I did slightly the opposite this year.  We had a Secret Santa with a $15 limit; I spent $23.  The gift was the book "Wealthing Like Rabbits (Robert R Brown) - he figured out quickly who his Santa was.  Told him he needed to read it but more importantly, get his teenage kids to read it.  :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SquirrelStache on December 20, 2018, 08:15:07 AM
PTF. I work from home most of the time, so I don't get to hear "funny" stories at work. I'll live vicariously through you guys instead!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ShoulderThingThatGoesUp on December 20, 2018, 09:39:31 AM
Switching 401k providers means I’m hearing lots about people’s contribution percentages.

What the heck are these people doing? Gah.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on December 20, 2018, 09:49:10 AM
I don't have any really good stories since the one guy filed for bankruptcy and the hoarder retired. They cleared his office with a shovel, though.
I really need to hear more about this hoarder ex-coworker
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Rural on December 20, 2018, 10:22:01 AM
I don't have any really good stories since the one guy filed for bankruptcy and the hoarder retired. They cleared his office with a shovel, though.
I really need to hear more about this hoarder ex-coworker


College professor. I actually feel very sorry for him, then and now. The hoarding was almost 100% paper,  enough they got an engineer in to be sure the weight in his second floor office hadn't done structural damage. He did virtually the same with his car, papers and garbage piled to the windows everywhere but the driver's seat, to the point it was wearing the tires from scraping the wheel wells on bumps. There really wasn't any comedy to it, nor shame since it was clearly illness. But he really doesn't have relatives so no one could do much to help. I've seen him a few times since and I think maybe the change and travelling some have helped. He seems a little happier and personal hygiene has improved. At least he saved enough to retire, though it is likely mostly due to our pension.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JLee on December 20, 2018, 10:28:30 AM
My dept director told me today he pulled his entire 401k into cash/bonds in October, and moved all of his other investments into cash yesterday...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LPG on December 20, 2018, 10:37:43 AM
I don't have any really good stories since the one guy filed for bankruptcy and the hoarder retired. They cleared his office with a shovel, though.

The hoarder actually makes me think of my office (Exaggeration of course, we aren't talking full on hoarder-level amounts of crap. But I like things neat and tidy, so that's how it felt to me). The office that I currently work in probably hadn't been purged in ~30 years. Yeah, the carpets got vacuumed and the surfaces got cleaned. But nobody ever got rid of old files, or old hardware. I was told what office I'd be working in, and instantly starting looking around at IT hardware from the 90s, textbooks from the 80s teaching people to code in FORTRAN, etc. One of the cabinets even had old HR paperwork from somebody who left the company over a decade ago, yet none of the previous occupants of this office noticed/cared enough to throw it out.

The first thing I did upon moving into the office was send out a company-wide e-mail saying that people had until the end of the week to remove anything they wanted, or it would all end up in a dumpster. And I mean first; I didn't even connect my laptop to the docking station first. Not surprisingly, the vast majority of the stuff ended up in the dumpster (Or recycled, as appropriate).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: accountingteacher on December 20, 2018, 10:47:20 AM
PTF

Also, we usually get paid on the 25th of the month.  However, since we are closed for 2 weeks for the holidays, we're getting paid tomorrow, the 21st.  My coworker is furious as he now needs to make this month's pay last 4 days longer than usual. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on December 20, 2018, 10:51:21 AM
PTF

Also, we usually get paid on the 25th of the month.  However, since we are closed for 2 weeks for the holidays, we're getting paid tomorrow, the 21st.  My coworker is furious as he now needs to make this month's pay last 4 days longer than usual.
I wouldn't be able to stop myself from asking them 'why?  did we add 4 days to the month'?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: fattest_foot on December 20, 2018, 11:14:26 AM
My dept director told me today he pulled his entire 401k into cash/bonds in October, and moved all of his other investments into cash yesterday...

He got lucky in timing the top, let's see if he can call the bottom.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: By the River on December 20, 2018, 11:41:21 AM
Switching 401k providers means I’m hearing lots about people’s contribution percentages.

What the heck are these people doing? Gah.

I hear you, I'm on a project team changing our payroll provider.  In reviewing our parallel biweekly pay results, I'm amazed at the number of 401K deductions of 10.  [That's 10 dollars($) not 10 percent (%)]
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kahooli on December 20, 2018, 01:00:09 PM
My dept director told me today he pulled his entire 401k into cash/bonds in October, and moved all of his other investments into cash yesterday...

He got lucky in timing the top, let's see if he can call the bottom.

I'd advise a nice even reinvestment along the way down for him. Lightning doesn't strike twice, and USD denominated bonds and cash are about to be the worst things you could have.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Threshkin on December 20, 2018, 01:13:26 PM
My dept director told me today he pulled his entire 401k into cash/bonds in October, and moved all of his other investments into cash yesterday...

He got lucky in timing the top, let's see if he can call the bottom.

Bonds are bad when interest rates are rising.  Since stocks are falling, cash may be a good short term option.  Of course, calling the bottom is the trick.

I'd advise a nice even reinvestment along the way down for him. Lightning doesn't strike twice, and USD denominated bonds and cash are about to be the worst things you could have.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Feivel2000 on December 20, 2018, 02:43:02 PM
PTF

Starting a job in January, maybe I can add some stories then.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dave1442397 on December 20, 2018, 02:52:18 PM
textbooks from the 80s teaching people to code in FORTRAN

Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: M5 on December 20, 2018, 03:27:28 PM
My new supervisor and his wife moved to the area in July, been renting on a 1 year lease since then. They recently decided they don't like their landlord and just can't stand not having their own place. Wife only works part time and household income is somewhere between $130-150k. So in true anti-mustachian style they are now under contract on a $500k house using a VA loan and only putting down the required 20% of the amount above $484k. Not only will his payments be somewhere around $3500/mo, they have to continue paying their rent of $2000/mo until the landlord finds a new renter!!

The icing on the cake? He's less than a year away from being eligible for his pension and roughly 3-5 years from his "planned" retirement........

And they want to move away after retirement. That's putting a lot of faith in this bull housing market.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: happy on December 20, 2018, 03:32:09 PM
ptf
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on December 20, 2018, 07:24:33 PM
M5, that’s totally crazy.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: lemanfan on December 21, 2018, 06:01:28 AM
Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Perhaps I should learn FORTRAN now that I'm considering FIREing.  Having enough knowlege to charge a high consultancy fee could be a good way to put a little gold in my pocket in the future? 

FORTRAN-FIRE?

(also, PTF).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dave1442397 on December 21, 2018, 09:04:26 AM
Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Perhaps I should learn FORTRAN now that I'm considering FIREing.  Having enough knowlege to charge a high consultancy fee could be a good way to put a little gold in my pocket in the future? 

FORTRAN-FIRE?

(also, PTF).

You never know. They're trying to outsource it to India, but those people are all young, just out of school, and have no interest in FORTRAN. They had a 40% quit rate until this year, when they managed to bring it down to 20%.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AMandM on December 21, 2018, 10:50:10 AM
Not only will his payments be somewhere around $3500/mo,

Just this morning my father mentioned that his first teaching job paid $3500 per year. I said, "Nowadays some people have monthly mortgage payments that size" and immediately thought, "Well, probably not many people do."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kahooli on December 21, 2018, 03:00:27 PM
Not only will his payments be somewhere around $3500/mo,

Just this morning my father mentioned that his first teaching job paid $3500 per year. I said, "Nowadays some people have monthly mortgage payments that size" and immediately thought, "Well, probably not many people do."

Thank the fed and the policy of monetary base inflation for that.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on December 22, 2018, 05:48:42 PM
Coworker has complained on a couple of occasions recently about how much money he is dropping on Christmas. His family is coming to visit and he has to buy gifts for aunts, uncles, their kids, etc., and take them all out to dinner. While purchasing all these gifts he bought a 75" flat screen to treat himself and he found a "great deal" on a pool table. Also, he just got back from Disneyland a couple weeks ago. I have no clue how much money he makes but that is an alarming spending rate.

Cant you just give adults nothing or something small like a bottle of wine

Other than my parents and one cousin, we've managed a "no gifts for adults" agreement.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BeautifulDay on December 23, 2018, 12:02:49 AM
Co-worker is a single mom (1 kid) and no siblings who lives with her boyfriend. Her father remarried and now has several step kids. Her dad told her this year he would only be buying a gift for her family instead of one for her, daughter and her boyfriend. This is because he has to buy gifts for all the step-kids/step-families. She is mad because she, boyfriend and daughter always buy individual gifts for him. She said they shouldn’t be penalized because the step family is bigger.

I said well maybe he really can’t afford it and isn’t it good if he sticks to a budget? She replied that if he really can’t afford it she would be ok with it. But that he could afford it because he just cashed out his retirement accounts. (I’m guessing her dad is about 60). And to further demonstrate that he could ‘afford it’ she said her dad just bought the step mom $500 diamond earrings. She already has a pair just like them. But those were bought by the step mom’s ex. So dad wants her to have new ones.

I wanted to say “your dad can’t afford any of this!”
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on December 23, 2018, 09:27:48 AM
Posting to Follow.  No stories since I'm retired.  I do enjoy reading here and being glad I am retired.
Me, too.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Luckystepho on December 24, 2018, 01:23:27 AM
A colleague is about to have some pretty major work done on her home... walls knocked through to make all the downstairs rooms open plan, with folding doors. This will cost several thousand, particularly as some of the walls are load-bearing so will need joists (although a family member can do some of the work).

The kicker- she lives in social housing... it's not her house and she'll never own it...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on December 24, 2018, 07:34:09 AM
A colleague is about to have some pretty major work done on her home... walls knocked through to make all the downstairs rooms open plan, with folding doors. This will cost several thousand, particularly as some of the walls are load-bearing so will need joists (although a family member can do some of the work).

The kicker- she lives in social housing... it's not her house and she'll never own it...

Damn.   If she's unlucky she could be paying to put it back in the original condition, too.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: sapphail on December 25, 2018, 01:51:57 AM
A colleague is about to have some pretty major work done on her home... walls knocked through to make all the downstairs rooms open plan, with folding doors. This will cost several thousand, particularly as some of the walls are load-bearing so will need joists (although a family member can do some of the work).

The kicker- she lives in social housing... it's not her house and she'll never own it...

Damn.   If she's unlucky she could be paying to put it back in the original condition, too.

That, and the housing authority might decide that if she has money for expensive renovations, maybe she shouldn't be getting social housing at all.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Inaya on December 25, 2018, 02:38:02 AM
Ptf
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tom Bri on December 25, 2018, 07:52:45 AM
Ptf
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: DaMa on December 25, 2018, 11:16:49 AM
We were chatting at work about 401k, and I said I was maxing out every year.  My coworker said, "like 10%?"  I said, no the full amount, $18000.  Coworker looked utterly confused, like he had no idea what I was talking about.  Luckily, I got called away at that moment.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on December 25, 2018, 11:41:49 AM
We were chatting at work about 401k, and I said I was maxing out every year.  My coworker said, "like 10%?"  I said, no the full amount, $18000.  Coworker looked utterly confused, like he had no idea what I was talking about.  Luckily, I got called away at that moment.

FYI, it was $18,500 in 2018 and will be $19,000 in 2019.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: RecoveringCarClown on December 26, 2018, 12:20:43 AM
TomTX beat me to it, still wish it was more.  I know some gov workers can do a lot more, never really looked into why as I never expect to be one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on December 26, 2018, 04:48:34 AM
TomTX beat me to it, still wish it was more.  I know some gov workers can do a lot more, never really looked into why as I never expect to be one.

So, while most employer plans (401k, 403b, SIMPLE IRA, etc) "count" against the same per-person $19k limit, the 457 plan has its own separate $19k limit. Only government entities and nonprofits can offer the 457. Some of them will offer both types of plan, effectively allowing $38k in contributions.

The flip side is that salaries tend to be notably lower than private sector, so it's more difficult to take advantage of the extra space.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MarciaB on December 26, 2018, 11:55:21 AM
We were chatting at work about 401k, and I said I was maxing out every year.  My coworker said, "like 10%?"  I said, no the full amount, $18000.  Coworker looked utterly confused, like he had no idea what I was talking about.  Luckily, I got called away at that moment.

FYI, it was $18,500 in 2018 and will be $19,000 in 2019.


When I was working I contributed the max (which was $24,000 because I was over 50) and unwisely mentioned it at one point...to which the confused looks on a few colleagues faces (who made 6 figures, which I didn't) was comical. They had never considered that anyone could actually contribute $2000 a month...where on earth would you find that huge amount in a paycheck? And who even knew that was legal? Humanly possible?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: auntie_betty on December 26, 2018, 01:28:33 PM
PTF. Nothing to add as FIRE'd ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on December 26, 2018, 05:44:26 PM
Not a coworker but talking to someone I know about work. Friend quit his job to start a business. A year later, business is not started, no profit made yet. I hoping he is a closet MMM adherent. Last time we talked I completely blanked on the secret hand shakes, theme songs or moustache signals. Need more studying...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: partdopy on December 27, 2018, 10:35:02 AM
TomTX beat me to it, still wish it was more.  I know some gov workers can do a lot more, never really looked into why as I never expect to be one.

So, while most employer plans (401k, 403b, SIMPLE IRA, etc) "count" against the same per-person $19k limit, the 457 plan has its own separate $19k limit. Only government entities and nonprofits can offer the 457. Some of them will offer both types of plan, effectively allowing $38k in contributions.

The flip side is that salaries tend to be notably lower than private sector, so it's more difficult to take advantage of the extra space.

In some cases you can do even more.  I get a 403b and 457 that I can contribute to unmatched, and a 401a that my employer automatically deducts 5% of my pay and deposits a 2 for 1 match of 10% into, but I cannot increase or decrease the 401a contributions, nor roll any other funds into it.  So 38k plus 5% of my pay.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SheWhoWalksAtLunch on December 27, 2018, 12:16:29 PM
PTF
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Channel-Z on December 27, 2018, 05:07:18 PM
The Fortran and hoarding references remind me of the Fortran class I took in college in 1996. The professor was a hoarder whose office was filled to the ceiling with stacks of papers and binders. He carved a small path from the door to the desk. Anyone visiting during office hours had to stand next to the seven-foot stacks of papers. By the way, it turns out while I'm really good at following instructions, I'm awful at writing instructions for a computer.

At work, the walls, which have been gray or off-white for a long time, are now being painted random colors. Some are now yellow, some are green, some are various shades of blue and red. One conference room is red and black, and it looks like the Twin Peaks dream sequences. It's as if the bosses looked at a color wheel and said "We'll take one of each."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on December 27, 2018, 05:41:26 PM
TomTX beat me to it, still wish it was more.  I know some gov workers can do a lot more, never really looked into why as I never expect to be one.

So, while most employer plans (401k, 403b, SIMPLE IRA, etc) "count" against the same per-person $19k limit, the 457 plan has its own separate $19k limit. Only government entities and nonprofits can offer the 457. Some of them will offer both types of plan, effectively allowing $38k in contributions.

The flip side is that salaries tend to be notably lower than private sector, so it's more difficult to take advantage of the extra space.

In some cases you can do even more.  I get a 403b and 457 that I can contribute to unmatched, and a 401a that my employer automatically deducts 5% of my pay and deposits a 2 for 1 match of 10% into, but I cannot increase or decrease the 401a contributions, nor roll any other funds into it.  So 38k plus 5% of my pay.

Yes, for me it's ~10% of nominal salary going into the mandatory pension (matched, but only if I qualify for the pension and draw it, not if liquidated) - plus $38k of capacity between 401k and 457, unmatched.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Luckystepho on December 28, 2018, 12:27:22 AM
A colleague is about to have some pretty major work done on her home... walls knocked through to make all the downstairs rooms open plan, with folding doors. This will cost several thousand, particularly as some of the walls are load-bearing so will need joists (although a family member can do some of the work).

The kicker- she lives in social housing... it's not her house and she'll never own it...

Damn.   If she's unlucky she could be paying to put it back in the original condition, too.

That, and the housing authority might decide that if she has money for expensive renovations, maybe she shouldn't be getting social housing at all.

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing... she did get permission to do the work but insists she 'needs' a large three bedroom house with a huge garden for just her and her husband...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gail2000 on December 28, 2018, 02:47:13 AM
I work with a lady who picks up coffee from Starbucks everyday. She has more than 10k on her credit card as she recently inherited that amount and paid her credit card with it. I am not saying stoping the Starbucks habit would make the differennce but she might come in happier. I’m scratching my head.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: fell-like-rain on December 28, 2018, 09:07:25 AM
Was talking to one of my coworkers and found out his commute is more than an hour and a half (one way)! I said that sounds awful, and he replied that it wasn't so bad, because he spends most of it on the train and can "get some extra work done" (in addition to the 8-9 hours he spends in the office). Someone's institutionalized...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on December 28, 2018, 09:29:58 AM
Train commute is not as bad as a driving commute.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on December 28, 2018, 09:38:38 AM
I work with a lady who picks up coffee from Starbucks everyday. She has more than 10k on her credit card as she recently inherited that amount and paid her credit card with it. I am not saying stoping the Starbucks habit would make the differennce but she might come in happier. I’m scratching my head.

Get back with us on a year or so and tell us if she is right back in debt.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LPG on December 28, 2018, 10:03:05 AM
textbooks from the 80s teaching people to code in FORTRAN

Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Yeah, fair enough. FORTRAN is a useful skill in some contexts. All depends on the needs of the job. I actually learned FORTRAN in 2009, despite it being a rarely used skill at that point, because I needed to add code to a certain FORTRAN-based program to finish grad school. I make the remark because I'm the only person in this company who does any coding, and I sure haven't touched FORTRAN since 2009. It's a pretty useless skill around here, and my co-workers still wanted to hold onto that book. For God knows what weird reason.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: shadowmoss on December 28, 2018, 10:06:32 AM
I'm trying to make myself get rid of some PERL and general programming books I acquired around 2007.  I don't think donating them will work.  I need to just toss them.  I don't program anymore as I'm retired.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dave1442397 on December 28, 2018, 02:23:53 PM
textbooks from the 80s teaching people to code in FORTRAN

Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Yeah, fair enough. FORTRAN is a useful skill in some contexts. All depends on the needs of the job. I actually learned FORTRAN in 2009, despite it being a rarely used skill at that point, because I needed to add code to a certain FORTRAN-based program to finish grad school. I make the remark because I'm the only person in this company who does any coding, and I sure haven't touched FORTRAN since 2009. It's a pretty useless skill around here, and my co-workers still wanted to hold onto that book. For God knows what weird reason.

Yeah, the books are totally unnecessary at this point. There are multiple websites with full manuals, coding samples, and Q&A about various algorithms.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on December 29, 2018, 10:38:01 PM
Train commute is not as bad as a driving commute.

I agree but not sure on the ratio.  Would you rather have a 1 hour train commute or 30 minute drive?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: faithless on December 30, 2018, 03:27:15 AM
Train commute is not as bad as a driving commute.

I agree but not sure on the ratio.  Would you rather have a 1 hour train commute or 30 minute drive?

I'd love a train commute!

I've currently got the option of:

- an early start and a 40 min stressful inner city drive, then a 20 min walk (from where there's free parking if you're early enough, otherwise similar drive but £12/day parking - lol, nope, that's an hour's wages after tax)
Pros: being in your own car is nice, with no other people! Cons: v early start required, and I found the inner city drive and hoping for parking really quite stressful, I noticed I was wound up when arriving at work.

- a 40 min bus ride then a 20 min walk across town, bus is more expensive than driving and is unpleasant, the town walk is not very nice. A slightly more expensive option would be to get a connecting bus for a 10 minutes ride e.g. if raining heavily, but I've not done this.
I started off doing this option, but the buses on this route are old and crappy, infrequent and sometimes just don't turn up on the way home for a hour or two.
I thought this would be a nice relaxing option, as it doesn't require anything from me, but it's actually a horrible clunky journey that makes me feel sick, with a crap walk at the other end. I gave up on this after it took me 2.5 hours to get home one day when there was nothing wrong, just the buses being crap. Can't tolerate the uncertainty of when I'm going to get home.

- Current choice is an easy 15 min drive (5 mins of which is on a motorway), to a Park and Ride, then a nice modern, frequent P&R bus to right outside my office that's half an hour. Less than half the price of the bus.


They're supposed to be reopening/building a train line which would be amazing - a 15 min stroll from my house, 15 min ride, then a 10 minute walk, but frustratingly they're not getting this done quickly/at all.

Fortunately I can now work from home 2 days per week on average, which makes the commute manageable!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: meghan88 on December 30, 2018, 03:48:43 PM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MissNancyPryor on December 30, 2018, 07:59:04 PM
ptf (there will be a couple pages of this new thread devoted to ptf!)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on December 30, 2018, 10:16:17 PM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html


Wow.   Simply wow.


The first request would have been met with a "No!"


If there was a second request, it would have been "I'll be posting screen shots of this conversation at work as a gift to all our colleagues.   I won't be removing the names from the screen shots.  Have a Merry Christmas!"


Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Inaya on December 30, 2018, 11:31:53 PM
Was talking to one of my coworkers and found out his commute is more than an hour and a half (one way)! I said that sounds awful, and he replied that it wasn't so bad, because he spends most of it on the train and can "get some extra work done" (in addition to the 8-9 hours he spends in the office). Someone's institutionalized...


My train-commuter bus commute is 2h one-way . It's not so bad, since I'm not the one driving. Bus has WiFi, so I can get some work or homework done. Or just catch up on sleep. When I first started at this job, I had to do it every weekday, and it was awful. Now I work from home at least 2 days a week, and it's much more manageable.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on December 31, 2018, 01:12:41 AM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html

There are some goddamn crazy people around. I don't even know what connections would have to be loose in the upstairs in order to think that way.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on December 31, 2018, 01:47:05 AM
Hey, I resemble that remark! I've been coding in FORTRAN at my current job since 2010. Every time we get new management, they say "Oh, we're going to rewrite that system in <trendy language of the day>". Then, after some discussion, they realize that no, they're not rewriting 20-million odd lines of FORTRAN anytime soon.

Perhaps I should learn FORTRAN now that I'm considering FIREing.  Having enough knowlege to charge a high consultancy fee could be a good way to put a little gold in my pocket in the future? 

FORTRAN-FIRE?

(also, PTF).

Actually, I know a guy who did exactly that. He was the last guy on the team that knew the ancient computer system well enough to do maintenance and fix problems. He retired and they now hire him back as a consultant whenever they have issues (for $$$, I assume). They were going to replace the system 10 years ago, which is why they never bothered to train someone else, but the new system never happened.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on December 31, 2018, 01:55:30 AM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html


Wow.   Simply wow.


The first request would have been met with a "No!"


If there was a second request, it would have been "I'll be posting screen shots of this conversation at work as a gift to all our colleagues.   I won't be removing the names from the screen shots.  Have a Merry Christmas!"

New phone who dis?

I prefer to read the actual reddit post rather than a yahoo “article” summarizing the images and top comments

https://www.reddit.com/r/ChoosingBeggars/comments/a6irjn/honestly_didnt_believe_people_like_this_actually/?st=JQC38YXS&sh=eeb0e2bb


Ps it turned out to be fake but was hilarious nonetheless
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: meghan88 on December 31, 2018, 02:28:19 PM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html


Wow.   Simply wow.


The first request would have been met with a "No!"


If there was a second request, it would have been "I'll be posting screen shots of this conversation at work as a gift to all our colleagues.   I won't be removing the names from the screen shots.  Have a Merry Christmas!"

New phone who dis?

I prefer to read the actual reddit post rather than a yahoo “article” summarizing the images and top comments

https://www.reddit.com/r/ChoosingBeggars/comments/a6irjn/honestly_didnt_believe_people_like_this_actually/?st=JQC38YXS&sh=eeb0e2bb


Ps it turned out to be fake but was hilarious nonetheless

Ahaha ... sucked into a yahoo post ... but I am happy to have amused you.  Dragoncar - I am missing your old signature line with the porn on your blender quote.  I should've bookmarked it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LPG on December 31, 2018, 02:31:31 PM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html


Wow.   Simply wow.


The first request would have been met with a "No!"


If there was a second request, it would have been "I'll be posting screen shots of this conversation at work as a gift to all our colleagues.   I won't be removing the names from the screen shots.  Have a Merry Christmas!"

New phone who dis?

I prefer to read the actual reddit post rather than a yahoo “article” summarizing the images and top comments

https://www.reddit.com/r/ChoosingBeggars/comments/a6irjn/honestly_didnt_believe_people_like_this_actually/?st=JQC38YXS&sh=eeb0e2bb


Ps it turned out to be fake but was hilarious nonetheless

Wow, I'm extremely glad to see you say it was fake. When I read through that story and thought it was true...My desire to be a human temporarily plummeted.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on December 31, 2018, 10:58:34 PM

Wow, I'm extremely glad to see you say it was fake. When I read through that story and thought it was true...My desire to be a human temporarily plummeted.

Well some reddit “investigators” turned up another post from the OP indicating he was still in school and looking for a job then he deleted his account so... probably fake but unfortunately believable.


Ahaha ... sucked into a yahoo post ... but I am happy to have amused you.  Dragoncar - I am missing your old signature line with the porn on your blender quote.  I should've bookmarked it.

Im really trying to remember which sig you are referring to.  Porn on a blender?  Sounds like something I’d say.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on December 31, 2018, 11:40:10 PM
Something about your toaster getting hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender. Right?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 01, 2019, 03:26:35 AM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 01, 2019, 04:06:21 AM
Something about your toaster getting hacked because you tried to watch porn on your blender. Right?

I don’t think it was in my sig.  maybe this post from another thread that we shall never speak of again: https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/msg1314732/#msg1314732
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Adventine on January 01, 2019, 05:18:59 AM
Posting to follow, as the original Overheard at Work thread was (is) one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: KodeBlue on January 01, 2019, 07:53:28 AM
We have free coffee at work. Every break room has a coffee maker that the hospital provides and keeps stocked with different types of coffee, creamer sugar etc.
Recently an outside company put a little "market" where you create an account and pay by scanning your finger print. Coffee is is $1.50 a cup. So I see all my coworkers lining up to buy this coffee and like an idiot I ask them why they're paying for coffee when it's supplied free. Answer: "because it's only a $1.50!".

Why drink coffee for free when you can pay "only" a $1.50 for it, right?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 01, 2019, 01:30:25 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 01, 2019, 02:40:44 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.

"self imposed poverty" - that perfectly describes so many of my past and current coworkers.

Sadly, I know so many other coworkers who suffer from this. Ten years ago, I worked with a woman who had 2 daughters and a borderline abusive husband. DD1 was the child of a former spouse that she brought into the marriage with the borderline abusive husband. DD2 was his child. They lived in a beautiful house on the water in a "prestigious" East Coast town, but her commute to work was 80 miles round trip.

She drove a relatively new BMW 300 something, very nice suits, hair always done, full court press makeup, nails, Tiffany jewelry - even eyelash extensions... EVERYDAY...

Now, I am all for someone taking good care of themselves and wanting to look their best at all times... Right up until she came to my desk and asked me to help figure out how to pay for DD1 to go to college.

DD1 had decided that no matter what it took, she was getting as far away as possible from her step-dad and had her heart set on going to college in California, specifically in San Bernardino. DD1 had figured out if she went to San Bernardino Community College, after 2 years she could transfer to CSUSB, which I thought sounded great... right up until.....

Her mother presented me with several loan documents from different banks and asked me to help her figure out which one DD1 should apply for to get the best terms. After ascertaining that CW had not saved a single dime to send DD1 to college and had no interest in a PLUS loan (don't blame her), I reviewed the loan documents and was astounded to discover that out of state tuition for SBCC cost 4 to 5 times what in state (where CW lived) would cost (This was in 2007, I think..).

I asked her to seriously consider convincing DD1 to go in state, but due to the horrible behavior of the step-dad, DD1 would have none of it. So I then asked CW, is there something you can sell to pay for the first semester? The longer DD1 can put off taking out a loan, the better. CW had also expressed to me that she wasn't sure DD1 would make it through SBCC because DD1 had done poorly in high school, but wanted to give DD1 a chance "away from her step-dad". (CW also confessed she knew her husband had treated DD1 badly, and so wanted to support DD1's wish to go to SBCC).

Anyway, CW (wearing her Tiffany jewelry with salon eyelash extensions, and professionally manicured nails) replied she had nothing she could sell to offset the cost of the first semester. I gently mentioned the BMW, and explained she could sell the BMW and probably get enough $ for at least the first semester at SBCC and see if DD1 could hack it before DD1 had to take out any loans. I mentioned that CW could purchase a small Toyota or Honda for a minimal amount and would actually be a better car for such a long commute.

At this point, CW crossed her legs, locked her arms around her chest, leaned back in the chair away from me and outright refused to part with her BMW. So I advised her which loan her DD1 should take out (at just under 6% interest).

Fast forward a few months, DD1 graduates from highschool and CW buys DD1 a graduation gift: a Louis Vuitton purse ($1,000) and a pair of Uggs... "It's the least I can do and this way she'll fit in at SBCC".

0_o
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Fi(re) on the Farm on January 01, 2019, 02:50:53 PM
PTF, no good stories right now but don't want to miss out on the fun.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 02, 2019, 05:27:47 AM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

Normally I find it very unMustachian when people use paper dishes for daily use. But I do understand it in your case.

We have a cabin without running water and therefore no dishwater. It is indeed time consuming and not so motivating to wash dishes by hand. We do it when we are there, because then we have the time to do so. But I remember a period when we had to do some hard work (digging drainage) all day and I even bought half fabricated food for dinner that could be prepared really fast. If you have a busy day, spending a lot of time on cooking and on dishwashing leaves little time for other things.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 02, 2019, 12:04:59 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

Normally I find it very unMustachian when people use paper dishes for daily use. But I do understand it in your case.

We have a cabin without running water and therefore no dishwater. It is indeed time consuming and not so motivating to wash dishes by hand. We do it when we are there, because then we have the time to do so. But I remember a period when we had to do some hard work (digging drainage) all day and I even bought half fabricated food for dinner that could be prepared really fast. If you have a busy day, spending a lot of time on cooking and on dishwashing leaves little time for other things.

Agreed. However, we had reached a point with the dishwasher that unless we basically washed 99% of the food residue off, the dishwasher wasn't going to get it clean. We ended up several times just running the dishwasher twice to clean one set of dishes. So we were cleaning one set of dirty dishes sometimes 3x just to get them clean.... Complaints to the landlord fell on deaf ears. As far as LL was concerned, dishwasher runs, what's the problem? I guess cleanliness is a judgement call? Et voila, paper plates...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TexasStash on January 02, 2019, 12:13:13 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.

"self imposed poverty" - that perfectly describes so many of my past and current coworkers.

Sadly, I know so many other coworkers who suffer from this. Ten years ago, I worked with a woman who had 2 daughters and a borderline abusive husband. DD1 was the child of a former spouse that she brought into the marriage with the borderline abusive husband. DD2 was his child. They lived in a beautiful house on the water in a "prestigious" East Coast town, but her commute to work was 80 miles round trip.

She drove a relatively new BMW 300 something, very nice suits, hair always done, full court press makeup, nails, Tiffany jewelry - even eyelash extensions... EVERYDAY...

Now, I am all for someone taking good care of themselves and wanting to look their best at all times... Right up until she came to my desk and asked me to help figure out how to pay for DD1 to go to college.

DD1 had decided that no matter what it took, she was getting as far away as possible from her step-dad and had her heart set on going to college in California, specifically in San Bernardino. DD1 had figured out if she went to San Bernardino Community College, after 2 years she could transfer to CSUSB, which I thought sounded great... right up until.....

Her mother presented me with several loan documents from different banks and asked me to help her figure out which one DD1 should apply for to get the best terms. After ascertaining that CW had not saved a single dime to send DD1 to college and had no interest in a PLUS loan (don't blame her), I reviewed the loan documents and was astounded to discover that out of state tuition for SBCC cost 4 to 5 times what in state (where CW lived) would cost (This was in 2007, I think..).

I asked her to seriously consider convincing DD1 to go in state, but due to the horrible behavior of the step-dad, DD1 would have none of it. So I then asked CW, is there something you can sell to pay for the first semester? The longer DD1 can put off taking out a loan, the better. CW had also expressed to me that she wasn't sure DD1 would make it through SBCC because DD1 had done poorly in high school, but wanted to give DD1 a chance "away from her step-dad". (CW also confessed she knew her husband had treated DD1 badly, and so wanted to support DD1's wish to go to SBCC).

Anyway, CW (wearing her Tiffany jewelry with salon eyelash extensions, and professionally manicured nails) replied she had nothing she could sell to offset the cost of the first semester. I gently mentioned the BMW, and explained she could sell the BMW and probably get enough $ for at least the first semester at SBCC and see if DD1 could hack it before DD1 had to take out any loans. I mentioned that CW could purchase a small Toyota or Honda for a minimal amount and would actually be a better car for such a long commute.

At this point, CW crossed her legs, locked her arms around her chest, leaned back in the chair away from me and outright refused to part with her BMW. So I advised her which loan her DD1 should take out (at just under 6% interest).

Fast forward a few months, DD1 graduates from highschool and CW buys DD1 a graduation gift: a Louis Vuitton purse ($1,000) and a pair of Uggs... "It's the least I can do and this way she'll fit in at SBCC".

0_o

Too many disastrous things in this post to determine which is the most alarming - the abusive relationship, the $0 saved for college, the graduation gift, the inability to compromise or sacrifice, the high maintenance routine....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Hunny156 on January 02, 2019, 12:36:53 PM
Happy New Year and YAY for the new thread!

I work in financial services, and my company is a 401K provider to many other companies.  We have great benefits, and lots of little perks that no one but me seems to be aware of.

One of those perks is that the first contribution to your 401K every year, you get your match PLUS a flat $250.  I am tickled pink by this perk, and I do check in after the first paycheck of the year, to make sure the extra $250 posted.  Last year, I mentioned it to a co-worker, who like so many others, had no idea.  We both checked out accounts, confirmed the extra funds, and started to chat about the other nice perks that come with that first paycheck, like the $1K to the HSA, plus an extra $300 if you completed the bloodwork test a few months prior and achieved a "passing" grade.  Co-worker doesn't even try for that extra $300, b/c he's overweight and doesn't think he'll get it.  OK, your loss.  I happened to mention that when I had received my last promotion, I didn't want a penny of that money going to the tax man, so I increased my 401K contribution just as the raise hit my paycheck, which brought my contribution up to 12% (I don't max this out, yet).  Co-worker was SHOCKED that I contribute that much $$ to my 401K, as he could never afford to do so.  He's older than I, makes considerably more, and last year, when buying a modest home, he had to borrow the down payment from his 401K.  I didn't bother to tell him that between the HSA I max out, and the ESPP I also max out, more than half of my paycheck never makes it to my checking account, and I still save $$ from that amount!  He's a great guy, but he's got a ton of family members taking advantage of him, and he lets them bleed him dry.

The other think to note is that we just moved to a brand new campus, and among the many amenities we have here, we have an actual Starbucks onsite.  There are at least three break rooms on each floor, all of which offer adequate free coffee, multiple options, along with assorted teas, hot chocolate, and every single type of sweetener and creamer.  The amount of employees who will buy Starbucks multiple times/day is insane and baffling to me!  Most used excuse?  Oh, the coffee in the break rooms suck.  The employer recently switched to a more expensive option, but according to these folks, it still sucks.  I usually drink coffee at home before work, but the few times I've tried the break room coffee, it's actually pretty good!  It just pains me, as our company tagline is very clear about saving for a better tomorrow, and so many people here don't get all the ways they could take advantage of all the perks to get there faster.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: phildonnia on January 02, 2019, 01:33:08 PM
We got an email at work reminding us that the 401(k) limit had been raised to $19k.  People were talking about it at lunch, and I mentioned casually that you can also put an extra $6k in your personal Roth.  Oh, and your spouse can do the same. 

There was a beat, during which everyone realized (and I realized too) that I was making a cynical joke.  Because, you know, how could two people with professional careers possibly save $50k.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 02, 2019, 02:16:41 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.

"self imposed poverty" - that perfectly describes so many of my past and current coworkers.

Sadly, I know so many other coworkers who suffer from this. Ten years ago, I worked with a woman who had 2 daughters and a borderline abusive husband. DD1 was the child of a former spouse that she brought into the marriage with the borderline abusive husband. DD2 was his child. They lived in a beautiful house on the water in a "prestigious" East Coast town, but her commute to work was 80 miles round trip.

She drove a relatively new BMW 300 something, very nice suits, hair always done, full court press makeup, nails, Tiffany jewelry - even eyelash extensions... EVERYDAY...

Now, I am all for someone taking good care of themselves and wanting to look their best at all times... Right up until she came to my desk and asked me to help figure out how to pay for DD1 to go to college.

DD1 had decided that no matter what it took, she was getting as far away as possible from her step-dad and had her heart set on going to college in California, specifically in San Bernardino. DD1 had figured out if she went to San Bernardino Community College, after 2 years she could transfer to CSUSB, which I thought sounded great... right up until.....

Her mother presented me with several loan documents from different banks and asked me to help her figure out which one DD1 should apply for to get the best terms. After ascertaining that CW had not saved a single dime to send DD1 to college and had no interest in a PLUS loan (don't blame her), I reviewed the loan documents and was astounded to discover that out of state tuition for SBCC cost 4 to 5 times what in state (where CW lived) would cost (This was in 2007, I think..).

I asked her to seriously consider convincing DD1 to go in state, but due to the horrible behavior of the step-dad, DD1 would have none of it. So I then asked CW, is there something you can sell to pay for the first semester? The longer DD1 can put off taking out a loan, the better. CW had also expressed to me that she wasn't sure DD1 would make it through SBCC because DD1 had done poorly in high school, but wanted to give DD1 a chance "away from her step-dad". (CW also confessed she knew her husband had treated DD1 badly, and so wanted to support DD1's wish to go to SBCC).

Anyway, CW (wearing her Tiffany jewelry with salon eyelash extensions, and professionally manicured nails) replied she had nothing she could sell to offset the cost of the first semester. I gently mentioned the BMW, and explained she could sell the BMW and probably get enough $ for at least the first semester at SBCC and see if DD1 could hack it before DD1 had to take out any loans. I mentioned that CW could purchase a small Toyota or Honda for a minimal amount and would actually be a better car for such a long commute.

At this point, CW crossed her legs, locked her arms around her chest, leaned back in the chair away from me and outright refused to part with her BMW. So I advised her which loan her DD1 should take out (at just under 6% interest).

Fast forward a few months, DD1 graduates from highschool and CW buys DD1 a graduation gift: a Louis Vuitton purse ($1,000) and a pair of Uggs... "It's the least I can do and this way she'll fit in at SBCC".

0_o

Too many disastrous things in this post to determine which is the most alarming - the abusive relationship, the $0 saved for college, the graduation gift, the inability to compromise or sacrifice, the high maintenance routine....

As a final follow up.... When I first met CW, she was trying to get a promotion at work that would move her to Colorado, at which point, she planned to divorce her husband and take the girls. (I am uncertain if she could have just done that with DD2, although she could have with DD1.) The promotion never came through, so she didn't leave him. Over the course of the first six months of getting to know her she described her life with him:

1) he kept a freezer in the basement full of HIS food, locked with a padlock, (but when guests would come over, the lock would mysteriously disappear)
2) he purchased a new state of the art washer dryer set and had them installed upstairs in a laundry closet next to the master bedroom... For HIS clothes only. CW and the girls had to use the old washer dryer in the basement
3) he would go on work trips and bring home a gift for CW and DD2, but not DD1 (who was 1 year old when CW married him and thus knew no other father figure - I understand bio-dad was and is a no show)
4) taught DD2 to drive in his car but would not do so for DD1
5) sometimes in the morning, the phone on her desk would start to ring and ring. When we answered it, the caller always hung up. Turns out, he would call her on her cell phone as she drove into work. When CW pulled into the underground garage and lost signal, he would count down 5 minutes and start calling her desk. If she didn't answer it by the time the 5 minutes were up, he'd scream at her asking where she had been since it didn't take 5 minutes to walk from the garage to her desk...

And the list goes on and on...

For the life of me, I can't understand why she stayed with him since he treated DD1 like a shifty renter as opposed to a baby girl who grew up with him as her dad. At the time, CW made a fairly good salary - upwards of $60k a year - easily enough to divorce him and take DD1 out of the toxic home and fight for custody of DD2. But instead she would tell us about how they were spending a fortune renovating and upgrading and improving their waterfront home (and aforementioned BMW, hair, makeup, nails, clothes, jewelry, eyelash extensions)...

I heard later that sadly DD1 dropped out of SBCC after 2 years, having borrowed a full two years of tuition at the out of state rate with no degree to show for it. There have been no updates since, I suspect because DD1 cut ties with her mom for choosing the step-dad and the lifestyle CW had to have over her first born child...

CW is still with the husband...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: galliver on January 02, 2019, 06:45:11 PM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.

"self imposed poverty" - that perfectly describes so many of my past and current coworkers.

Sadly, I know so many other coworkers who suffer from this. Ten years ago, I worked with a woman who had 2 daughters and a borderline abusive husband. DD1 was the child of a former spouse that she brought into the marriage with the borderline abusive husband. DD2 was his child. They lived in a beautiful house on the water in a "prestigious" East Coast town, but her commute to work was 80 miles round trip.

She drove a relatively new BMW 300 something, very nice suits, hair always done, full court press makeup, nails, Tiffany jewelry - even eyelash extensions... EVERYDAY...

Now, I am all for someone taking good care of themselves and wanting to look their best at all times... Right up until she came to my desk and asked me to help figure out how to pay for DD1 to go to college.

DD1 had decided that no matter what it took, she was getting as far away as possible from her step-dad and had her heart set on going to college in California, specifically in San Bernardino. DD1 had figured out if she went to San Bernardino Community College, after 2 years she could transfer to CSUSB, which I thought sounded great... right up until.....

Her mother presented me with several loan documents from different banks and asked me to help her figure out which one DD1 should apply for to get the best terms. After ascertaining that CW had not saved a single dime to send DD1 to college and had no interest in a PLUS loan (don't blame her), I reviewed the loan documents and was astounded to discover that out of state tuition for SBCC cost 4 to 5 times what in state (where CW lived) would cost (This was in 2007, I think..).

I asked her to seriously consider convincing DD1 to go in state, but due to the horrible behavior of the step-dad, DD1 would have none of it. So I then asked CW, is there something you can sell to pay for the first semester? The longer DD1 can put off taking out a loan, the better. CW had also expressed to me that she wasn't sure DD1 would make it through SBCC because DD1 had done poorly in high school, but wanted to give DD1 a chance "away from her step-dad". (CW also confessed she knew her husband had treated DD1 badly, and so wanted to support DD1's wish to go to SBCC).

Anyway, CW (wearing her Tiffany jewelry with salon eyelash extensions, and professionally manicured nails) replied she had nothing she could sell to offset the cost of the first semester. I gently mentioned the BMW, and explained she could sell the BMW and probably get enough $ for at least the first semester at SBCC and see if DD1 could hack it before DD1 had to take out any loans. I mentioned that CW could purchase a small Toyota or Honda for a minimal amount and would actually be a better car for such a long commute.

At this point, CW crossed her legs, locked her arms around her chest, leaned back in the chair away from me and outright refused to part with her BMW. So I advised her which loan her DD1 should take out (at just under 6% interest).

Fast forward a few months, DD1 graduates from highschool and CW buys DD1 a graduation gift: a Louis Vuitton purse ($1,000) and a pair of Uggs... "It's the least I can do and this way she'll fit in at SBCC".

0_o

Too many disastrous things in this post to determine which is the most alarming - the abusive relationship, the $0 saved for college, the graduation gift, the inability to compromise or sacrifice, the high maintenance routine....

As a final follow up.... When I first met CW, she was trying to get a promotion at work that would move her to Colorado, at which point, she planned to divorce her husband and take the girls. (I am uncertain if she could have just done that with DD2, although she could have with DD1.) The promotion never came through, so she didn't leave him. Over the course of the first six months of getting to know her she described her life with him:

1) he kept a freezer in the basement full of HIS food, locked with a padlock, (but when guests would come over, the lock would mysteriously disappear)
2) he purchased a new state of the art washer dryer set and had them installed upstairs in a laundry closet next to the master bedroom... For HIS clothes only. CW and the girls had to use the old washer dryer in the basement
3) he would go on work trips and bring home a gift for CW and DD2, but not DD1 (who was 1 year old when CW married him and thus knew no other father figure - I understand bio-dad was and is a no show)
4) taught DD2 to drive in his car but would not do so for DD1
5) sometimes in the morning, the phone on her desk would start to ring and ring. When we answered it, the caller always hung up. Turns out, he would call her on her cell phone as she drove into work. When CW pulled into the underground garage and lost signal, he would count down 5 minutes and start calling her desk. If she didn't answer it by the time the 5 minutes were up, he'd scream at her asking where she had been since it didn't take 5 minutes to walk from the garage to her desk...

And the list goes on and on...

For the life of me, I can't understand why she stayed with him since he treated DD1 like a shifty renter as opposed to a baby girl who grew up with him as her dad. At the time, CW made a fairly good salary - upwards of $60k a year - easily enough to divorce him and take DD1 out of the toxic home and fight for custody of DD2. But instead she would tell us about how they were spending a fortune renovating and upgrading and improving their waterfront home (and aforementioned BMW, hair, makeup, nails, clothes, jewelry, eyelash extensions)...

I heard later that sadly DD1 dropped out of SBCC after 2 years, having borrowed a full two years of tuition at the out of state rate with no degree to show for it. There have been no updates since, I suspect because DD1 cut ties with her mom for choosing the step-dad and the lifestyle CW had to have over her first born child...

CW is still with the husband...
I would classify this as "abusive," not "borderline"... Wouldn't be surprised if there was serious emotional abuse and isolation of CW that she isn't willing to talk about...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 03, 2019, 02:23:09 AM
Abusive or not, I'm stealing the personal fridge idea.  Somehow all my chicken tendies go missing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: leviticus on January 03, 2019, 04:25:20 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 03, 2019, 05:47:58 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Terrible... We spent 3 at FIL's house. But he assigned both us and BIL to make dinner one night, including buying the ingredients. Nice to share the expenses. BIL also brought beers and cheese along. FIL did not have high costs, apart from that he bought LOTS of extra vegetables, while we were supposed to cook. But that was his own mistake.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 03, 2019, 05:49:13 AM
Abusive or not, I'm stealing the personal fridge idea.  Somehow all my chicken tendies go missing.

My DH always snacks away the blue cheese that I buy to use for dinner. Maybe just a small box with a lock on it would do the trick...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on January 03, 2019, 06:47:13 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Dear lord. Does the rest of the family ever reciprocate or is he enabling a bunch of freeloaders?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: leviticus on January 03, 2019, 07:08:40 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Dear lord. Does the rest of the family ever reciprocate or is he enabling a bunch of freeloaders?

From the mutterings I gather that they are freeloaders, but it's alright because his Mother In Law brought a Christmas Cake. SMH.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: carolinap on January 03, 2019, 07:28:21 AM
I work for the government, and I have a coworker who has been in this workplace for 20 years. Hard work but good payment, job security, all that. I already knew she liked to spend, had a lot of clothes, bought clothes and after a while donate them still with the price tag on them (!), 100+ pairs of shoes... crazy for me, but not the worst case I have seen.

Talking during work, she tells me that she lived with her parents until she was 40, then got a mortgage and is paying for it, now at 43 years old. She didn't save ANYTHING from her good salary as a government employee for 20 years living rent free and food free with her parents! She spent all in clothes, travel and "minor expenses"!

I felt so offended, I'm not against people living with their parents as long as they take care of some expenses, but if I was in her situation I probably would be homeowner and FIRE'd at age 45.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on January 03, 2019, 08:35:41 AM
I work for the government, and I have a coworker who has been in this workplace for 20 years. Hard work but good payment, job security, all that. I already knew she liked to spend, had a lot of clothes, bought clothes and after a while donate them still with the price tag on them (!), 100+ pairs of shoes... crazy for me, but not the worst case I have seen.

Talking during work, she tells me that she lived with her parents until she was 40, then got a mortgage and is paying for it, now at 43 years old. She didn't save ANYTHING from her good salary as a government employee for 20 years living rent free and food free with her parents! She spent all in clothes, travel and "minor expenses"!

I felt so offended, I'm not against people living with their parents as long as they take care of some expenses, but if I was in her situation I probably would be homeowner and FIRE'd at age 45.

Wow, what a particularly horrifying wasted opportunity. And to boot, she is going to feel poor now that she is making a mortgage payment. Call me cynical, but I am doubting she will be able to dial back the spending. She will fall deeply into debt. Oh, what could have been.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 03, 2019, 08:51:57 AM
Yesterday, a guy at work was wondering if the cafeteria took post-dated checks because we didn't get paid until today.  First, who the hell writes checks for things that aren't mailed anymore.  Secondly, this is the only single guy with no kids in the office.  Third, today he's talking about buying a utility trailer to haul his toys around on.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 03, 2019, 11:49:24 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Wait... 49 people... in HOTELS, and MEALS, and GIFTS, FOR A WEEK? (Please note my tone of my voice rises until it hits a screech at the end of the sentence....)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on January 03, 2019, 12:18:18 PM
That’s totally ridiculous!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 03, 2019, 12:46:39 PM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Wait... 49 people... in HOTELS, and MEALS, and GIFTS, FOR A WEEK? (Please note my tone of my voice rises until it hits a screech at the end of the sentence....)

I think, if you can afford it, it would be a great once in a lifetime family reunion type thing.  But if it’s gonna cause monetary stress, people should just pay their own way and maybe some people can’t show up.  That’s also assuming the recipients aren’t acting like spoiled freeloaders to begin with.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: leviticus on January 04, 2019, 02:11:00 AM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

Wait... 49 people... in HOTELS, and MEALS, and GIFTS, FOR A WEEK? (Please note my tone of my voice rises until it hits a screech at the end of the sentence....)

I think, if you can afford it, it would be a great once in a lifetime family reunion type thing.  But if it’s gonna cause monetary stress, people should just pay their own way and maybe some people can’t show up.  That’s also assuming the recipients aren’t acting like spoiled freeloaders to begin with.

I agree, if you can afford it, it would be a lovely one off way to spend the festive season.

But I don't think he can afford it, and I don't think the attendees really deserve it.

His spend on celebrating Christmas is more than the deposit I'm saving to buy a house, it blew my mind a bit.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on January 04, 2019, 02:19:17 AM
Guess this is as good a place as any to post this - office greed in the form of a not-so-secret Santa recipient:

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/naughty-nice-woman-goes-viral-asking-secret-santa-colleague-buy-kids-70-tablet-135432482.html


Wow.   Simply wow.


The first request would have been met with a "No!"


If there was a second request, it would have been "I'll be posting screen shots of this conversation at work as a gift to all our colleagues.   I won't be removing the names from the screen shots.  Have a Merry Christmas!"
More wow. What an asshat.

ETA I actually have a sister who would pull this kind of shit. Luckily, we're not currently speaking.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Unique User on January 04, 2019, 06:20:58 AM
After literally years of lurking, I have a post.

My husband and I both work full time. We have toddler twins. Coworker has 3 kids under the age of 7. Wife is SAHM. Coworker mentions that after work he's exhausted and wife is too after caring for kids. He mentions that by the time he comes home and they fix dinner and clean up, he doesn't have a lot of time to spend with them. I commiserate with him and mention we had the same issue. I was able to carve out an extra half hour or so a day by switching to paper plates (we are renting - dishwasher is anemic and kitchen has no garbage disposal - thus we have to go through Olympic effort dishwashing everyday - turns out so do they). When the kids get a little older (able to do some chores to help) we will switch back to regular dishes. We have spent maybe... $80 on paper plates in a year in order to get back 30 minutes of quality time A DAY with our kids.

He basically tells me that they can't afford papers plates (90 for about $2 - $3 - lasts for 2-3 weeks) because they are a single income household.

He drives a BMW 500 something. She drives a BMW X5. o_0

So self imposed poverty... That's fun.

People's sense of expensive can be so odd. Sometimes the luxury items are a must at all costs. Sometimes $10 is too much without luxury items.

I remember a coworker who came to me (I'm a shadetree mechanic as well as an engineer) about his broken headlight. I said, no sweat. You have an older car that is common. Look here on eBay - there is a good used headlight for ~$10-$15. Nope. He was looking for the 10 cent solution like wrapping the headlight in Saran Wrap or gluing a piece of plexiglass over the headlight. Why? The headlight would not likely stay waterproof, the bulb would burn out frequently (rain water), the beam might not be focused, etc. He wasn't being frugal, he was being cheap.

"self imposed poverty" - that perfectly describes so many of my past and current coworkers.

Sadly, I know so many other coworkers who suffer from this. Ten years ago, I worked with a woman who had 2 daughters and a borderline abusive husband. DD1 was the child of a former spouse that she brought into the marriage with the borderline abusive husband. DD2 was his child. They lived in a beautiful house on the water in a "prestigious" East Coast town, but her commute to work was 80 miles round trip.

She drove a relatively new BMW 300 something, very nice suits, hair always done, full court press makeup, nails, Tiffany jewelry - even eyelash extensions... EVERYDAY...

Now, I am all for someone taking good care of themselves and wanting to look their best at all times... Right up until she came to my desk and asked me to help figure out how to pay for DD1 to go to college.

DD1 had decided that no matter what it took, she was getting as far away as possible from her step-dad and had her heart set on going to college in California, specifically in San Bernardino. DD1 had figured out if she went to San Bernardino Community College, after 2 years she could transfer to CSUSB, which I thought sounded great... right up until.....

Her mother presented me with several loan documents from different banks and asked me to help her figure out which one DD1 should apply for to get the best terms. After ascertaining that CW had not saved a single dime to send DD1 to college and had no interest in a PLUS loan (don't blame her), I reviewed the loan documents and was astounded to discover that out of state tuition for SBCC cost 4 to 5 times what in state (where CW lived) would cost (This was in 2007, I think..).

I asked her to seriously consider convincing DD1 to go in state, but due to the horrible behavior of the step-dad, DD1 would have none of it. So I then asked CW, is there something you can sell to pay for the first semester? The longer DD1 can put off taking out a loan, the better. CW had also expressed to me that she wasn't sure DD1 would make it through SBCC because DD1 had done poorly in high school, but wanted to give DD1 a chance "away from her step-dad". (CW also confessed she knew her husband had treated DD1 badly, and so wanted to support DD1's wish to go to SBCC).

Anyway, CW (wearing her Tiffany jewelry with salon eyelash extensions, and professionally manicured nails) replied she had nothing she could sell to offset the cost of the first semester. I gently mentioned the BMW, and explained she could sell the BMW and probably get enough $ for at least the first semester at SBCC and see if DD1 could hack it before DD1 had to take out any loans. I mentioned that CW could purchase a small Toyota or Honda for a minimal amount and would actually be a better car for such a long commute.

At this point, CW crossed her legs, locked her arms around her chest, leaned back in the chair away from me and outright refused to part with her BMW. So I advised her which loan her DD1 should take out (at just under 6% interest).

Fast forward a few months, DD1 graduates from highschool and CW buys DD1 a graduation gift: a Louis Vuitton purse ($1,000) and a pair of Uggs... "It's the least I can do and this way she'll fit in at SBCC".

0_o

Too many disastrous things in this post to determine which is the most alarming - the abusive relationship, the $0 saved for college, the graduation gift, the inability to compromise or sacrifice, the high maintenance routine....

As a final follow up.... When I first met CW, she was trying to get a promotion at work that would move her to Colorado, at which point, she planned to divorce her husband and take the girls. (I am uncertain if she could have just done that with DD2, although she could have with DD1.) The promotion never came through, so she didn't leave him. Over the course of the first six months of getting to know her she described her life with him:

1) he kept a freezer in the basement full of HIS food, locked with a padlock, (but when guests would come over, the lock would mysteriously disappear)
2) he purchased a new state of the art washer dryer set and had them installed upstairs in a laundry closet next to the master bedroom... For HIS clothes only. CW and the girls had to use the old washer dryer in the basement
3) he would go on work trips and bring home a gift for CW and DD2, but not DD1 (who was 1 year old when CW married him and thus knew no other father figure - I understand bio-dad was and is a no show)
4) taught DD2 to drive in his car but would not do so for DD1
5) sometimes in the morning, the phone on her desk would start to ring and ring. When we answered it, the caller always hung up. Turns out, he would call her on her cell phone as she drove into work. When CW pulled into the underground garage and lost signal, he would count down 5 minutes and start calling her desk. If she didn't answer it by the time the 5 minutes were up, he'd scream at her asking where she had been since it didn't take 5 minutes to walk from the garage to her desk...

And the list goes on and on...

For the life of me, I can't understand why she stayed with him since he treated DD1 like a shifty renter as opposed to a baby girl who grew up with him as her dad. At the time, CW made a fairly good salary - upwards of $60k a year - easily enough to divorce him and take DD1 out of the toxic home and fight for custody of DD2. But instead she would tell us about how they were spending a fortune renovating and upgrading and improving their waterfront home (and aforementioned BMW, hair, makeup, nails, clothes, jewelry, eyelash extensions)...

I heard later that sadly DD1 dropped out of SBCC after 2 years, having borrowed a full two years of tuition at the out of state rate with no degree to show for it. There have been no updates since, I suspect because DD1 cut ties with her mom for choosing the step-dad and the lifestyle CW had to have over her first born child...

CW is still with the husband...

That is just so freaking sad.  My parent stayed with an abusive husband until I was 21.  They married when I was 3 and it took me years and lots of therapy to have even the shallow relationship we have now.  My parent will sometimes try to rewrite history, but my sister and I will have none of that.  I hope DD1 has supportive and loving extended family, that is truly what saved my mental health early on.   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tabitha on January 04, 2019, 09:48:54 AM
We have a generous early retirement program, and a significant number of people who “retire” and return on contract often on reduced hours or project work. One coworker “retired” in the fall, but was at the Xmas party with her team. She’s working a full schedule doing the same work as before. She proud of her frugality because she drives (nurses) a 12 year old Toyota, but the reason that she and her husband can’t make it on the their two professional salaries (she’s pulling 120k and his is at a higher grade) is they’ve been paying tuition for three adult children out of cash flow (no savings)PLUS four mortgages (their own plus three). The reason they still have a mortgage is they pulled out their equity for three down payments.  I hope the third income stream keeps their head above water longer than the next department reorganization which will end her contract.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: FireHiker on January 04, 2019, 10:18:44 AM
I've mentioned my one co-worker before who makes questionable financial decisions and is barely paycheck to paycheck because of them. We were talking yesterday about New Year's activities. I stayed home, watched the ball drop at 9pm (for free) with my kids. She went out to some concert with a "VIP" thing, stayed at a fancy hotel nearby, drank to abandon. Sigh. It makes me sad, but I know she's not going to change, so I just stay thankful that I have different priorities.

@Tabitha We are preparing to cash flow my oldest's college beginning this year; so painful. It will reduce our travel and really drive us down to true mustachianism for the most part, but I'm just thankful that we can swing it. Definitely not pulling any equity out of our house although we have over 50% equity. With a 3.25% fixed rate on our mortgage we will never pay a penny off early. At least your co-worker doesn't get a ridiculous car on top of it all; it's sad how many people come up in this thread that would have a new car on a lease anyway because they "work hard" and "deserve it". I wish we had saved up more in advance of college, but we have at least maxed out our retirement for a couple years now and that won't change during these leaner college years.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on January 04, 2019, 11:34:38 AM
CW1: ...blah blah blah...but you're getting close to retirement, aren't you?
CW2: 5 more years! (I've known her for 2 years, and it was 5 more years 2 years ago, too. She is now 63. Maybe 62.)
ME: Holy F&@K! Why? *
CW1 & CW2: ...continued conversation about a place they both used to work together...


* No, I did not actually say this out loud, but my thoughts may have been audible, as they were very loud in my head. I wasn't part of the conversation; I was just sitting nearby and overheard it. The part that makes me a bit sad is CW2 is actually my boss, and 2019 is my FIRE year. I wonder how THAT conversation is going to go!!??

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Evildunk99 on January 04, 2019, 11:50:28 AM
#1)  During 2019 benefits overview, colleague #1 breaks down in tears in front of half the company because they eliminated the HMO option, and are only offering HSA/FSA.  She couldn't fathom how to cover her children's basic healthcare in 2019 when she is forced to save up her new HSA.  $5,000 deductible plan costs ~$70 paycheck + whatever she wants to contribute to HSA. 

#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.

#3)  55 y/o executive co-worker making $200k+ / year (likely more) explains to 60 y/o co-worker that 4 days in august 2019 are the only chance he'll have to take any vacation time with his family for the whole year because he's so busy at work.  SMH...

#4)  67 y/o co-worker won an annual "mvp" award for her scrupulous work in 2018.  67... SMH...

not all of these examples are anti-mustachian, but I couldn't help myself not to share :)

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on January 04, 2019, 12:12:20 PM
#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.
The neighborhood I grew up in, dental insurance was for rich people and you didn't really go to the dentist unless there was a big problem. When I was in high school, I had to have my wisdom teeth extracted and the cost to do here was so high that it was worth my dad and I flying to brazil, staying with family for a week and getting it done there.
I'm now 30 with a good job and I still can't bring myself to pay for dental insurance. Now I get checked out once a year at the local dental college for free because graduating students need to perform on a person to pass their boards.
If you ask me, the 28 year old waitress is being pretty mustachian by finding a cheaper way to get her necessary medical work done, instead of putting five figures on a credit card...etc.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: pachnik on January 04, 2019, 12:17:10 PM
I work in an office with 3 other people.  Now that Christmas vacation is over, a couple of them are comparing notes on their new Apple watches and spouses' new ipads.   Apparently, this was a low spend Christmas at their homes.    Low spend Christmas at my house this year too so my husband and I didn't exchange gifts at all. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Evildunk99 on January 04, 2019, 12:21:08 PM
#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.
The neighborhood I grew up in, dental insurance was for rich people and you didn't really go to the dentist unless there was a big problem. When I was in high school, I had to have my wisdom teeth extracted and the cost to do here was so high that it was worth my dad and I flying to brazil, staying with family for a week and getting it done there.
I'm now 30 with a good job and I still can't bring myself to pay for dental insurance. Now I get checked out once a year at the local dental college for free because graduating students need to perform on a person to pass their boards.
If you ask me, the 28 year old waitress is being pretty mustachian by finding a cheaper way to get her necessary medical work done, instead of putting five figures on a credit card...etc.

It's certainly a mustachian solution, but a debatable case study of:  receiving preventative care 2x per year for 10 years (thus possibly reducing the cavities etc.), or pocketing the difference, and wind up in the situation she's in.  Dental insurance is dirt cheap vs. broad health insurance for what it's worth.  The dental college is a very good tip regardless!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on January 04, 2019, 12:25:41 PM
Overheard co-workers talking about how the stock market is down and why there is no point in investing or saving. 

CW1 The market is crashing.  Apple is lowering it's outlook for the year. 
CW2 See that's why it is not smart to invest.  Why save any money if you are just going to lose it in the stock market?
....conversation switched to all the shopping done over the holidays.

I just bit my tongue and didn't say anything.

   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on January 04, 2019, 12:45:57 PM
Overheard co-workers talking about how the stock market is down and why there is no point in investing or saving. 

CW1 The market is crashing.  Apple is lowering it's outlook for the year. 
CW2 See that's why it is not smart to invest.  Why save any money if you are just going to lose it in the stock market?
....conversation switched to all the shopping done over the holidays.

I just bit my tongue and didn't say anything.

 

I've had a recent conversation with someone that was exactly this. And this person is otherwise quite smart. What on earth are people thinking?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on January 04, 2019, 12:57:26 PM
Overheard co-workers talking about how the stock market is down and why there is no point in investing or saving. 

CW1 The market is crashing.  Apple is lowering it's outlook for the year. 
CW2 See that's why it is not smart to invest.  Why save any money if you are just going to lose it in the stock market?
....conversation switched to all the shopping done over the holidays.

I just bit my tongue and didn't say anything.

 

I've had a recent conversation with someone that was exactly this. And this person is otherwise quite smart. What on earth are people thinking?

I mean...why invest when you can just play the lottery instead for a much bigger reward? Right?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on January 04, 2019, 01:03:25 PM
Quote
I mean...why invest when you can just play the lottery instead for a much bigger reward? Right?

I wish I thought of saying that! Of course I would be saying it sarcastically, but I am sure they would both agree and think it was a better investment.

It's really difficult to explain the virtues of index investing and planning for the long term, everyone is living in the moment and looking for the quick fix. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on January 04, 2019, 01:20:59 PM
Quote
I mean...why invest when you can just play the lottery instead for a much bigger reward? Right?

I wish I thought of saying that! Of course I would be saying it sarcastically, but I am sure they would both agree and think it was a better investment.

It's really difficult to explain the virtues of index investing and planning for the long term, everyone is living in the moment and looking for the quick fix.

My 60 year old self employed contractor coworker sold off all her retirement investments in October and was acting pretty smug about her great sense of market timing.

Retirement savings are now in a 0,25% interest savings account (Europe). Sure great market timing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kronsey on January 04, 2019, 01:22:00 PM
Overheard co-workers talking about how the stock market is down and why there is no point in investing or saving. 

CW1 The market is crashing.  Apple is lowering it's outlook for the year. 
CW2 See that's why it is not smart to invest.  Why save any money if you are just going to lose it in the stock market?
....conversation switched to all the shopping done over the holidays.

I just bit my tongue and didn't say anything.

 

I've had a recent conversation with someone that was exactly this. And this person is otherwise quite smart. What on earth are people thinking?

I think there is way more to these comments than most of us realize. The system is setup to screw people not smart enough to ride out the downturns. Truthfully, the VAST majority of the US population has the risk appetite for a portfolio heavily concentrated in bonds/cash. It just FEELS way too risky for them to change their minds. And then when they are talked into investing in equities (even great funds like VTSAX), they still sell when the market drops because they should have NEVER been that heavily invested in equity positions in the first place.

Also, they might somewhat understand inflation, and realize that saving cash will provide them a negative return, so dog gone it we might as well spend it now while we have it! and don't forget, YOLO.

Here's a personal example to support my thoughts...

My now deceased grandfather is a perfect example of someone who still saved, but way underestimated the impact of inflation. He retired in 1986 at 59 years old with a great pension (at the time). He had a paid for house as well as some savings (all cash/CDs).  By the time he started drawing SS at 62, they were making around $3,500 month between one decent pension, one very small pension, and two SS checks. $3,500/month in 1989 (year he turned 62) with a paid off house and paid off vehicles was a hell of a living. Now a days it isn't a drop in the bucket.

Fast forward to today - my grandmother is now 89 and is showing some signs of dementia. She is still in good physical health. My grandfather died 18 months ago. There goes the pension and his social security. She now lives in a paid off house (worth about $160K) while drawing $1K a month in SS benefits. Still has about $100K of cds and cash in savings accounts, but the interest income last year totaled around $90. She is trying to "live independently" to preserve the small inheritance for her kids (2 kids will split everything 50-50), but her "living independently" includes relying on my mom *her daughter) for everything.

Moral of the story, it might have been better for them to "enjoy life" when younger and then just live on the pension and SS. Now that my grandfather has passed, it would be much better on everyone if grandma had zero assets and wasn't trying to live independently leaving my poor mother to be her caretaker all to inherit less money than she would have accumulated by simply continuing to work.

And yes, you could respond and say grandpa should have put all the money in a bond fund and equities fund in 1986 and then he would have had plenty of assets... blah blah blah. I agree with you, but grandpa (and many of his current contemporaries) would NEVER do that because it is just too damn risky...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 04, 2019, 01:36:02 PM
Something similar-ish happened with my grandmother before she died. The morale of the story again is that inflation eats away like crazy at a portfolio if you aren’t invested in equities for the long-term. I think too much emphasis is spent on protecting against the scary ride of the stock market in “safe” investments that are actually very unsafe if you have a long time horizon.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 04, 2019, 01:51:48 PM
* No, I did not actually say this out loud, but my thoughts may have been audible, as they were very loud in my head. I wasn't part of the conversation; I was just sitting nearby and overheard it. The part that makes me a bit sad is CW2 is actually my boss, and 2019 is my FIRE year. I wonder how THAT conversation is going to go!!??

You are SO LUCKY to be able to retire. There are all these different reasons that the boss can't retire. She can't change her circumstances. Every weekend she must spend money here and there. During the week there are a different set of reasons but she needs to continue to spend. And luxury things just b/c.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kronsey on January 04, 2019, 01:59:02 PM
Something similar-ish happened with my grandmother before she died. The morale of the story again is that inflation eats away like crazy at a portfolio if you aren’t invested in equities for the long-term. I think too much emphasis is spent on protecting against the scary ride of the stock market in “safe” investments that are actually very unsafe if you have a long time horizon.

Agreed, with a few small points to consider:

1. We are talking about human beings with emotions. They aren't robots who automatically do the financially prudent thing.

2. If you convince these risk averse people to invest in VTSAX, and the market declines, they will SELL no matter how much you plead with them not to!

3. This is why William Bernstein concluded that MOST of the population actually needs a fiduciary financial advisor. If for nothing more than to talk them off the cliff when December 2018s happen.

Source: my grandpa, your grandma, and hundreds of clients that I have worked with on the tax side in the last decade. Not to mention all the research done showing the buy low sell high problems in the US...

I think it would be interesting to see some sort of research on the droves of people who sell high and buy low due to risk aversion. What would their portfolio look like if they had a much heavier allocation to bonds and cash as opposed to stocks and then bail out when the market declines.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 04, 2019, 02:47:37 PM
I agree with what you are saying but I actually wonder if we should conclude that most people are not cut out to be investors. Probably most people would be better off with defined benefit plans like a beefed-up social security, pensions for all, or something similar. It is a tough job to go up against human psychology with masses of mostly uninterested people.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: pachnik on January 04, 2019, 02:51:42 PM
I agree with what you are saying but I actually wonder if we should conclude that most people are not cut out to be investors. Probably most people would be better off with defined benefit plans like a beefed-up social security, pensions for all, or something similar. It is a tough job to go up against human psychology with masses of mostly uninterested people.

I agree with this.  I don't think most people are cut out to be investors.  The Cdn government is slowing starting to see it.  In the last few years they've raised the CPP premiums.  CPP is like American social security.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: galliver on January 04, 2019, 04:18:20 PM
#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.
The neighborhood I grew up in, dental insurance was for rich people and you didn't really go to the dentist unless there was a big problem. When I was in high school, I had to have my wisdom teeth extracted and the cost to do here was so high that it was worth my dad and I flying to brazil, staying with family for a week and getting it done there.
I'm now 30 with a good job and I still can't bring myself to pay for dental insurance. Now I get checked out once a year at the local dental college for free because graduating students need to perform on a person to pass their boards.
If you ask me, the 28 year old waitress is being pretty mustachian by finding a cheaper way to get her necessary medical work done, instead of putting five figures on a credit card...etc.

It's certainly a mustachian solution, but a debatable case study of:  receiving preventative care 2x per year for 10 years (thus possibly reducing the cavities etc.), or pocketing the difference, and wind up in the situation she's in.  Dental insurance is dirt cheap vs. broad health insurance for what it's worth.  The dental college is a very good tip regardless!
A noticeable number of my friends, after not having dental insurance through college and early 20s, finally went to see a dentist in the past few years (mid- late 20s) Many of them needed a root canal. As well as a couple fillings each.

I don't have a pre-ACA frame of reference, but I remember hearing open-market (non employer) dental insurance wasn't worth it given what it covered, cheaper to pay for two cleanings out of pocket, esp if you can find new-patient discounts. I was lucky to have good insurance through my dad and subsequently grad school.

Now, we can talk about unwillingness/inability of people with decent incomes/lifestyles to plan for and cover an occasional 100-200 expense for their health (dental cleaning, urgent care, etc). While waitressing isn't of itself a "decent lifestyle" in general, I think it may be if living with parents, ahem.

But mostly I find it sad that we isolate this very important aspect of health care and people legitimately have complications and die because of it at times. Glad this lady is catching up on the care she needs.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kronsey on January 04, 2019, 04:20:53 PM
I agree with what you are saying but I actually wonder if we should conclude that most people are not cut out to be investors. Probably most people would be better off with defined benefit plans like a beefed-up social security, pensions for all, or something similar. It is a tough job to go up against human psychology with masses of mostly uninterested people.

I agree with this.  I don't think most people are cut out to be investors.  The Cdn government is slowing starting to see it.  In the last few years they've raised the CPP premiums.  CPP is like American social security.

I completely agree with both of you.

In my grandfather's generation (both my grandparents were born in the 20s), union membership was very high. Most union jobs came with a pension, social security, and the general understanding by the population to have a paid off mortgage as they approached retirement. Commonly known as the three legged stool.

That was mostly on the way out with my parents generation (both parents born early 50s), with lobbyists convincing Congress to pass the 401K laws so big business could funnel the cost of providing retirement benefits to the employee rather than employer. Even with pensions being eliminated, there were still many corporate jobs that provided stable employment with lots of upward mobility.

By the time my generation got to the workforce (me and my siblings born in the 80s), not only were pensions and unions a thing of the past, but now just relying on a good job with built in promotions and raises is not a realistic option for a good majority of the population.

It is really sad when a government employee is outpacing MOST private sector employees in pay AND benefits. I have nothing against those who work for the gov't, but I think it is sad snapshot at the state of our country and our economy when the best available jobs (admittedly with a few exceptions) are government work.

Add up all those major societal shifts over the past 60 years coupled with the lack of mandatory financial education, and we now have a population with zero basic financial knowledge who is supposed to be able to create their own retirement plan, choose the right investments, understand safe withdrawal rates, understand markets go up and down (while being disciplined enough not to panic) and plan for huge future unknowns (healthcare and end of life care especially).  The truth is most of our citizens couldn't explain basic compounding interest, and yet are responsible to plan and execute their entire retirement picture.

Some easy solutions (but ones that would never be passed due to people like me and all the sleazy financial salesman being out of a job) would be:

1. Social security combined with a defined benefit plan. Say like 10% to social security (reduced from 15.3%) and then start a separate defined benefit plan of another 10% that was invested in the TSP just like all our corrupt politicians get. 20% invested wisely over a person's working career should be satisfactory for a modest retirement.

2. Medicare for all. I haven't run the numbers to see what the current 2.9% would need to be increased to, but let's say 7.5% of all income/wages.

3. A flat tax on all earnings, income, wages, capital gains, etc. No special tax treatment, period. I'm sure we could figure out what that number needed to be, then we could set a "poverty line limit" so those at the bottom get exempted from income taxes at the federal and state levels. But no more welfare through the income tax system.

4. Still allow for IRAs with no maximum contributions. This would allow those us interested in FIRE to achieve our goals but would take the pressure off of the average Joe having to DIY his own retirement plan. Also do away with retirement savings being connected to employment at all. That way big business doesn't have people by the balls with the benefits they offer. Would be a more level playing field which I think would then create better working conditions for all (hopefully easing the feeling of being chained to a good job for benefits).

I realize most of this is but a mere pipe dream. Both Dems and Repubs alike are in the back pocket of big business and special interests. I never see that changing in my lifetime.

But just wanted to point out some potential options as I agree the average Joe just isn't going to pick up a Bogle book on investing and break years of terrible habits and emotional conditioning. Maybe the growing retirement crisis will change things, but it might be too late to make adjustments by the time people in their 30's and 40's get to retirement age.

And I know my personal experience is very anecdotal, but I only have one acquaintance (my younger brother) who will be adequately prepared for retirement. And that is out of a pretty wide social circle plus all the clients I have worked for presently and over the last decade. Even though talking finances is a taboo subject, it is impossible to avoid with your accountant to some degree :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kronsey on January 04, 2019, 04:40:21 PM
But mostly I find it sad that we isolate this very important aspect of health care and people legitimately have complications and die because of it at times. Glad this lady is catching up on the care she needs.

I agree with this. But don't tell that to the dentists in private practice. If in a fairly low dentist to population area, dentists can work a 4 day work week and bank $400K+ net without being all that great of a business person and without working too hard.

There seems to be a real lack of basic understanding among them about the state of most people's finances. They don't understand why people can't/wont pay hundreds or thousands of dollars a year for dental care out of pocket. After all, if you make half a mil a year working 4 days a week, you aren't going to understand why Johnny who works 55 hours/week at the local auto parts store cancelled his routine cleaning because he didn't feel like he could afford it.

It is accurate that many potential dental patients have misplaced priorities (would rather buy a new iPhone instead of going to the dentist twice a year for cleanings and checkups), but they are marketed to like crazy for those shiny, new objects. It is never going to be sexy to go see the hygienist no matter what marketing the dentist does. And those big corporate marketing machines are effective.

I have a couple of dentists as clients and they are really great people and great clients. But they are also out of touch with the everyday Joe in the US in the current economy.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on January 04, 2019, 05:11:17 PM
She now lives in a paid off house (worth about $160K) while drawing $1K a month in SS benefits. Still has about $100K of cds and cash in savings accounts, but the interest income last year totaled around $90.

How the hell do you only get $90 a year yield on $100k? Even utterly crap local bank CDs should earn more than $1K.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kronsey on January 04, 2019, 05:49:59 PM
She now lives in a paid off house (worth about $160K) while drawing $1K a month in SS benefits. Still has about $100K of cds and cash in savings accounts, but the interest income last year totaled around $90.

How the hell do you only get $90 a year yield on $100k? Even utterly crap local bank CDs should earn more than $1K.

Most of the $100k is in a savings account paying literally nothing. I have no idea what the CDs pay, but I believe they were all in the 1-2% range. I also believe it was less than $10k of the $100k as my grandpa quit reinvesting in new CDs as his health was declining (was afraid they would need the cash immidiately).

I don't know all the complete details as I try to stay out of it. But my grandma was asking me something about RMDs for IRAs and if she would have to file taxes. I asked how much interest she received from the CDs and savings account, and she said 'I think somewhere between $85 and $95 total for the year."

At that point I told her there was no reason to go searching for the tax doc they sent her as she had no chance of having to file a return.

So as unbelievable as it is, I'm pretty confident it is 100% accurate as my grandma would never lie about that plus she was really scared to handle most of that stuff on her own after my grandfather's passing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tabitha on January 05, 2019, 12:18:38 PM
#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.
The neighborhood I grew up in, dental insurance was for rich people and you didn't really go to the dentist unless there was a big problem. ...
If you ask me, the 28 year old waitress is being pretty mustachian by finding a cheaper way to get her necessary medical work done, instead of putting five figures on a credit card...etc.

Mustachian would be brushing and flossing like it was a religion to avoid 16 cavities plus root canals. Professional Dental Hygenist cleaning helps overcome the results of poor brushing/flossing. My brother in his 50’s still has no cavities, though he also rarely has had dental insurance. I’m not quite as disciplined, so I’ve had a few. 

The exceptions of course are impacted/wisdom teeth and chalky teeth caused by poor maternal health. My Mother has chalky teeth, and her fillings end up replaced every 10 years or so. She was determined we would have good dental habits, but good brushing for her only delays the inevitable.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on January 05, 2019, 02:21:29 PM
#2)  Learned over the weekend that co-worker's sister is going to a Latin American country because she had zero dental insurance over the past 10 years, and needs 16 cavities 2 root canals and a cap that would cost 5 figures in the U.S. out of pocket.  Said person lives paycheck to paycheck as a waitress, is 28, and lives at home with parents.  Negative net wealth.  SMH.
The neighborhood I grew up in, dental insurance was for rich people and you didn't really go to the dentist unless there was a big problem. ...
If you ask me, the 28 year old waitress is being pretty mustachian by finding a cheaper way to get her necessary medical work done, instead of putting five figures on a credit card...etc.

Mustachian would be brushing and flossing like it was a religion to avoid 16 cavities plus root canals. Professional Dental Hygenist cleaning helps overcome the results of poor brushing/flossing. My brother in his 50’s still has no cavities, though he also rarely has had dental insurance. I’m not quite as disciplined, so I’ve had a few. 

The exceptions of course are impacted/wisdom teeth and chalky teeth caused by poor maternal health. My Mother has chalky teeth, and her fillings end up replaced every 10 years or so. She was determined we would have good dental habits, but good brushing for her only delays the inevitable.

This.
I avoid the dentist like the plague. I have a phobia. When I do HAVE to go, I just get knocked out completely, but the anxiety leading up to it is a killer in itself. Anyway, I'll do just about anything to avoid going - I brush, I floss, I rinse, I polish etc etc etc, I don't eat things like chewy candy or popcorn with hard bits, or drink soda or fruit juice.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Basenji on January 05, 2019, 02:58:52 PM
My mother lives in Mexico. I should schedule all my dental needs for when I go down to visit her. It's insanely cheap. I think, actually, that's a thing now, medical tourism.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dave1442397 on January 05, 2019, 07:42:10 PM
My mother lives in Mexico. I should schedule all my dental needs for when I go down to visit her. It's insanely cheap. I think, actually, that's a thing now, medical tourism.

Yes, it is. I have friends who've gone to Mexico and Costa Rica for dental work.

The person who went to Mexico said that the office was state-of-the-art, way ahead of their local dentist in the US.

The person who went to Costa Rica said everything went well, but had a crazy amount of work done at one time. As far as I know it all turned out ok.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Fi(re) on the Farm on January 06, 2019, 09:12:41 AM
So, the government is shut down and my co-worker just realized that they can't file early and get their tax return because the IRS is furloughed. They are in a panic because they "need" their income tax refund to pay off their credit card. When they asked me what I was going to do I told them that I only get about $100 back each year. I make sure that I have my money to invest during the year instead of it being in a non-interest bearing account with the U.S.A. They really couldn't get the concept that the tax return wasn't a gift from the government but money that they paid in. They actually thought that I needed to find someone to do my taxes so I could get a bigger refund.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on January 06, 2019, 09:31:28 AM
So, the government is shut down and my co-worker just realized that they can't file early and get their tax return because the IRS is furloughed. They are in a panic because they "need" their income tax refund to pay off their credit card. When they asked me what I was going to do I told them that I only get about $100 back each year. I make sure that I have my money to invest during the year instead of it being in a non-interest bearing account with the U.S.A. They really couldn't get the concept that the tax return wasn't a gift from the government but money that they paid in. They actually thought that I needed to find someone to do my taxes so I could get a bigger refund.

Yeah, I think this is the first time I’ve been glad about my tax situation as a freelancer. My estimated tax payments usually fall a bit short, but husband’s refund makes up most or all of the difference. We never get a refund so we don’t even consider it. However, most people we know plan big things around their refunds. If the shutdown continues indefinitely, I expect to hear a LOT of outrage starting next month.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gin1984 on January 06, 2019, 10:02:06 AM
We have a generous early retirement program, and a significant number of people who “retire” and return on contract often on reduced hours or project work. One coworker “retired” in the fall, but was at the Xmas party with her team. She’s working a full schedule doing the same work as before. She proud of her frugality because she drives (nurses) a 12 year old Toyota, but the reason that she and her husband can’t make it on the their two professional salaries (she’s pulling 120k and his is at a higher grade) is they’ve been paying tuition for three adult children out of cash flow (no savings)PLUS four mortgages (their own plus three). The reason they still have a mortgage is they pulled out their equity for three down payments.  I hope the third income stream keeps their head above water longer than the next department reorganization which will end her contract.
Are the three other mortgages on rental properties?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LiveLean on January 06, 2019, 01:47:33 PM
I was without dental insurance for about 8 years between being self-employed (as always) and my wife either being a SAHM or having an employer that didn't provide it. Unlike self-employed health insurance (at least pre-ObamaCare when we had it), which was outrageously expensive but at least easy to understand and get the coverage you wanted, self-employed dental insurance is a train wreck. You never knew what you were getting and what few choices you had in terms of dentists (usually the chain strip mall types.)

Not wanting to go without dental care - and thankfully this was mostly pre-kids -- we simply took advantage of all of those introductory $59 cleaning/X-Ray offers that dentists are always offering. Sure it was a pain to go to a new dentist every 6-12 months and fill out all of the new patient paperwork -- this was before your longtime medical providers made you fill it all out every appointment anyway --- but it kept our teeth in good shape for about $120 per person per year.

Here's the thing, too. If you floss daily and brush after every meal, preferably once a day with a SonicCare or similar, don't smoke and eat a reasonable diet, your dental needs should be few. I'm 49 and have never had a cavity. And after going through braces as a kid, I do everything possible to keep my teeth in mint condition. It's not that hard.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: exterous on January 07, 2019, 04:03:25 AM
Figured I'd post a good story to show that not all is lost with coworkers. I had the pleasure to be able to hire an excellent intern into a full-time position. This meant he could go from working 65 hours a week total split between two jobs down to 40 hours a week at one job and make more. After his first full week I was asking him how things were going and if he had any questions on the benefits. He said "No" but I reminded him about our excellent company match. He said he already set it up to completely max out his contribution because he was happy enough to work less and he didn't need to increase his spending to match his salary. He's 26
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I-Ranger on January 07, 2019, 07:49:26 AM

Here's the thing, too. If you floss daily and brush after every meal, preferably once a day with a SonicCare or similar, don't smoke and eat a reasonable diet, your dental needs should be few. I'm 49 and have never had a cavity. And after going through braces as a kid, I do everything possible to keep my teeth in mint condition. It's not that hard.

This.

While my co-workers routinely miss work because of dental appointments and complain about the cost of some of their dental bills, I am left to wonder how necessary much of it is. I am 42, have never had a cavity, and have not been to a dentist in 15 years. I brush every morning, eat a pretty healthy diet, don't smoke, and exercise regularly. I stopped flossing years ago because it seemed stupid, and as it turns out, flossing was dropped from HHS guidelines because there is no real evidence that it helps. (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/health/flossing-teeth-cavities.html)

I don't see a podiatrist, dermatologist, or cardiologist two times every year, so why would I go see a dentist that often?


Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: geekette on January 07, 2019, 08:45:59 AM
Hey, y'all, guess what? People are different!  Different body chemistry, different history (especially fluoride). 

And I'm curious how you "know" you don't have any cavities when you haven't been to the dentist in 15 years. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: exterous on January 07, 2019, 08:48:31 AM

Here's the thing, too. If you floss daily and brush after every meal, preferably once a day with a SonicCare or similar, don't smoke and eat a reasonable diet, your dental needs should be few. I'm 49 and have never had a cavity. And after going through braces as a kid, I do everything possible to keep my teeth in mint condition. It's not that hard.

This.

While my co-workers routinely miss work because of dental appointments and complain about the cost of some of their dental bills, I am left to wonder how necessary much of it is. I am 42, have never had a cavity, and have not been to a dentist in 15 years. I brush every morning, eat a pretty healthy diet, don't smoke, and exercise regularly. I stopped flossing years ago because it seemed stupid, and as it turns out, flossing was dropped from HHS guidelines because there is no real evidence that it helps. (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/health/flossing-teeth-cavities.html)

I don't see a podiatrist, dermatologist, or cardiologist two times every year, so why would I go see a dentist that often?

It can depend on your body and your saliva. My wife could brush everother day and not get a cavity. I brush 2-3 times a day (including with a sonic care) and occasionally get cavities. Our diet is basically the same.

When I complained about the fairness of that to my dentist he told me how much saliva is produced and it's pH has a large effect on tooth health. So some of it is beyond their (my) control
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I-Ranger on January 07, 2019, 09:27:24 AM
Hey, y'all, guess what? People are different!  Different body chemistry, different history (especially fluoride). 

And I'm curious how you "know" you don't have any cavities when you haven't been to the dentist in 15 years.

Fair enough, I may have 32 cavities right now, but I don't have any pain, temperature sensitivity, or discoloring, so I have no plans to visit a dentist until I do. It's a risk I'm willing to take.

The last time I was at the dentist, he was surprised that I still had my wisdom teeth. He recommended I get them removed, and said "If you don't, they are going to give you problems." I have had no problems with my wisdom teeth. Avoiding the cost and risk of an unnecessary surgery seems like a Mustachian decision to me.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on January 07, 2019, 09:50:48 AM
Hey, y'all, guess what? People are different!  Different body chemistry, different history (especially fluoride). 

And I'm curious how you "know" you don't have any cavities when you haven't been to the dentist in 15 years.

Fair enough, I may have 32 cavities right now, but I don't have any pain, temperature sensitivity, or discoloring, so I have no plans to visit a dentist until I do. It's a risk I'm willing to take.

The last time I was at the dentist, he was surprised that I still had my wisdom teeth. He recommended I get them removed, and said "If you don't, they are going to give you problems." I have had no problems with my wisdom teeth. Avoiding the cost and risk of an unnecessary surgery seems like a Mustachian decision to me.

Wisdom tooth removal often depends on the size of your jaw. Even if they grow in straight, they can sometimes slowly push other teeth out of alignment and cause malocclusion over time, which can cause other problems especially with age. For example, age-related dysphagia and a reduced ability to chew food properly due to malocclusion could increase your risks of choking and aspiration pneumonia (I'm a science editor, and you'd be surprised at how many papers I read about geriatric health issues related to chewing and swallowing ability). Dentists are actually experts in their field, and it sounds like this one is giving you the actually Mustachian suggestion of taking care of something before it becomes a more expensive problem.

If your wisdom teeth are straight (e.g., not impacted), it may only involve a couple shots of novocaine, pliers, and some painkillers (I speak from personal experience). At the very least, it would be worth visiting a dentist at least every couple of years to make sure that the wisdom teeth are not causing a need for orthodontic correction.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: fattest_foot on January 07, 2019, 09:59:08 AM
It can depend on your body and your saliva. My wife could brush everother day and not get a cavity. I brush 2-3 times a day (including with a sonic care) and occasionally get cavities. Our diet is basically the same.

When I complained about the fairness of that to my dentist he told me how much saliva is produced and it's pH has a large effect on tooth health. So some of it is beyond their (my) control

Do you drink a lot of water? I had a dentist a long time ago who told me that if you drink lots of water after eating/drinking, it helps rebalance the acidity in your mouth.

I'm also one who doesn't go to the dentist often. I brush twice a day, floss at night, and only drink water. I had about 4 years between dental cleanings and the dentist was shocked how good my teeth looked (I also had a lot of fillings when I was younger and had a crap diet, so it's not an issue of just genetics). It's now been about 7 years since my last dentist visit.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on January 07, 2019, 10:26:17 AM
I'm a government employee but our agency had enough money to ride out a few weeks of a shutdown. We are officially out of money and we get to work for 4 hours today to close things up and then we are furloughed until the shutdown ends. Most of us have enough savings that even if we don't get backpay we aren't really worried about it but a few people are freaking out/their spouses are freaking out. Today is definitely a day when you can separate the mustacians from the others :)

For my part I'm going to tile the backsplash in my new house.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on January 07, 2019, 11:36:36 AM
It can depend on your body and your saliva. My wife could brush everother day and not get a cavity. I brush 2-3 times a day (including with a sonic care) and occasionally get cavities. Our diet is basically the same.

When I complained about the fairness of that to my dentist he told me how much saliva is produced and it's pH has a large effect on tooth health. So some of it is beyond their (my) control

Do you drink a lot of water? I had a dentist a long time ago who told me that if you drink lots of water after eating/drinking, it helps rebalance the acidity in your mouth.

I'm also one who doesn't go to the dentist often. I brush twice a day, floss at night, and only drink water. I had about 4 years between dental cleanings and the dentist was shocked how good my teeth looked (I also had a lot of fillings when I was younger and had a crap diet, so it's not an issue of just genetics). It's now been about 7 years since my last dentist visit.
Fillings don't last forever. If you have some really old ones, it might be prudent to have them checked.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I-Ranger on January 07, 2019, 01:24:53 PM
Hey, y'all, guess what? People are different!  Different body chemistry, different history (especially fluoride). 

And I'm curious how you "know" you don't have any cavities when you haven't been to the dentist in 15 years.

Fair enough, I may have 32 cavities right now, but I don't have any pain, temperature sensitivity, or discoloring, so I have no plans to visit a dentist until I do. It's a risk I'm willing to take.

The last time I was at the dentist, he was surprised that I still had my wisdom teeth. He recommended I get them removed, and said "If you don't, they are going to give you problems." I have had no problems with my wisdom teeth. Avoiding the cost and risk of an unnecessary surgery seems like a Mustachian decision to me.

Wisdom tooth removal often depends on the size of your jaw. Even if they grow in straight, they can sometimes slowly push other teeth out of alignment and cause malocclusion over time, which can cause other problems especially with age. For example, age-related dysphagia and a reduced ability to chew food properly due to malocclusion could increase your risks of choking and aspiration pneumonia (I'm a science editor, and you'd be surprised at how many papers I read about geriatric health issues related to chewing and swallowing ability). Dentists are actually experts in their field, and it sounds like this one is giving you the actually Mustachian suggestion of taking care of something before it becomes a more expensive problem.

If your wisdom teeth are straight (e.g., not impacted), it may only involve a couple shots of novocaine, pliers, and some painkillers (I speak from personal experience). At the very least, it would be worth visiting a dentist at least every couple of years to make sure that the wisdom teeth are not causing a need for orthodontic correction.

Or, I could take the Mustachian route and do some research myself, and discover studies such as this one from the American Journal of Public Health, which concludes that 2/3 of wisdom tooth extractions are unnecessary. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1963310/ (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1963310/) "The Prophylactic Extraction of Third Molars: A Public Health Hazard."

Back on topic, my mind was blown the other day by co-worker telling me that she can't afford to put more than the 3%   (matched)into her 401k, despite her and her husband making a combined 200k while living in an insanely LCOL area. I did show her a couple MMM posts, and she seemed to like the FIRE idea rather than reject it out of hand, so perhaps a seed was planted...
 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: NoVa on January 07, 2019, 01:48:04 PM
My dentist asked me to have one wisdom tooth removed, because if it went bad it could easily affect the tooth next to it. The other three he was not concerned with, and they are still in there.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: honeybbq on January 07, 2019, 02:52:34 PM
This is the first time I've had a story to share, which is far more exciting for me than it should be. . .

Coworker comes into work today, fist day back since he finished for Christmas, and when asked how his time off was he slumped in his chair and started complaining about how expensive the holidays were.

Apparently he and his wife had to host their two children and partners, their 6 grandchildren, the partners parents, as well as his and his wife's parents, siblings, siblings partners and children. Totaling 49 people for Christmas day. They couldn't all sleep in the house, so he and his wife paid for hotel rooms for all of them, and they spend Christmas through to New Year living in a hotel, paying for everyone to eat, have presents (iPads and gadgets from what I could gather) and do activities.

He ran up a bill into the five figures, just to host Christmas.

?? I'm so confused. To me "hosting" Xmas means opening your doors to people, not paying for hotel rooms. How did he get suckered into that??

@Piglet : what a depressing story about that mother not having enough courage or confidence to leave an @hole who was abusive to her daughter. There's more than one reason to have FU money I suppose, but it takes a spine to use it. :/
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: honeybbq on January 07, 2019, 03:01:22 PM

Here's the thing, too. If you floss daily and brush after every meal, preferably once a day with a SonicCare or similar, don't smoke and eat a reasonable diet, your dental needs should be few. I'm 49 and have never had a cavity. And after going through braces as a kid, I do everything possible to keep my teeth in mint condition. It's not that hard.

This.

While my co-workers routinely miss work because of dental appointments and complain about the cost of some of their dental bills, I am left to wonder how necessary much of it is. I am 42, have never had a cavity, and have not been to a dentist in 15 years. I brush every morning, eat a pretty healthy diet, don't smoke, and exercise regularly. I stopped flossing years ago because it seemed stupid, and as it turns out, flossing was dropped from HHS guidelines because there is no real evidence that it helps. (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/health/flossing-teeth-cavities.html)

I don't see a podiatrist, dermatologist, or cardiologist two times every year, so why would I go see a dentist that often?

You all should consider yourself lucky. A lot of it is genetic. I have shit teeth. Always have. I do not drink soda, and rarely eat sweets. I've had molar sealed and needed root canals under them. I brush and floss like a mofo and always get cavities. My spouse is much more laid back about his dental care and I think he's had one cavity in 10 years? My gums are beautiful and super healthy... my teeth, just hate life. It sucks. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: exterous on January 08, 2019, 12:08:05 AM
It can depend on your body and your saliva. My wife could brush everother day and not get a cavity. I brush 2-3 times a day (including with a sonic care) and occasionally get cavities. Our diet is basically the same.

When I complained about the fairness of that to my dentist he told me how much saliva is produced and it's pH has a large effect on tooth health. So some of it is beyond their (my) control

Do you drink a lot of water? I had a dentist a long time ago who told me that if you drink lots of water after eating/drinking, it helps rebalance the acidity in your mouth.

I'm also one who doesn't go to the dentist often. I brush twice a day, floss at night, and only drink water. I had about 4 years between dental cleanings and the dentist was shocked how good my teeth looked (I also had a lot of fillings when I was younger and had a crap diet, so it's not an issue of just genetics). It's now been about 7 years since my last dentist visit.

I do drink a lot of water. I have it for most meals and refill my water bottle at work a few times during the day
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Fomerly known as something on January 08, 2019, 04:26:16 AM
I was doing a periodic background investigation on a co-worker (Law Enforcement).  Speaking to one of his neighbors.  One of my standard questions is does, X live above his means.  Neighbor says, no X is in fact very frugal.  I was actually stunned, I was not expecting that he lived large but I don't associate frugal with X.  X is better than ok with money (has been around long enough to be a 401k millionaire at least before the last downturn.) but the office in no way considers him to be the frugal one.  He's more penny wise pound foolish.  He's the one with the timeshare that he can't find the time use, doesn't 100% max out his 401k but will tell you about the great deal he got from Khol's. 

But then he lives in one of the "richer" subdivisions a couple of miles from me, likely compared to the rest of the neighborhood he is the frugal one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on January 08, 2019, 10:04:02 AM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 08, 2019, 11:44:21 AM
Or frequent little habits like beer and smokes. It adds up when a person's budget is tissue paper thin.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: DaMa on January 08, 2019, 12:57:30 PM
My cousin hasn't been to a dentist except to get teeth pulled when in extreme pain in 30 years.  But she always has money for cigarettes.

When I was in San Diego, many coworkers went to Mexico for dental work.  The company I worked for covered it (self-insured), because it was cheaper than US costs.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: seanc0x0 on January 08, 2019, 01:02:26 PM
Came back after a break to see my favourite thread had been ended. Hard to believe it's over, but the new one is off to a good start.

Anyway, back on topic. Today I learned my coworker spends almost $1500/mo on her kids activities. 2 kids, both in organized sports. There's practice, league fees, equipment fees, one-on-one coaching, tournaments, travel...   She also gets up at 4am several times a week to take the kids to practice and spends most evenings/weekends at the pool or rink. Makes me glad my kids are into cheap activities like non-competitive community association classes and going to the library!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tabitha on January 08, 2019, 01:25:04 PM
We have a generous early retirement program, and a significant number of people who “retire” and return on contract often on reduced hours or project work. One coworker “retired” in the fall, but was at the Xmas party with her team. She’s working a full schedule doing the same work as before. She proud of her frugality because she drives (nurses) a 12 year old Toyota, but the reason that she and her husband can’t make it on the their two professional salaries (she’s pulling 120k and his is at a higher grade) is they’ve been paying tuition for three adult children out of cash flow (no savings)PLUS four mortgages (their own plus three). The reason they still have a mortgage is they pulled out their equity for three down payments.  I hope the third income stream keeps their head above water longer than the next department reorganization which will end her contract.
Are the three other mortgages on rental properties?

Sadly no. They bought a house for each kid. Started with buying for the one who went away to school and has continued for the two who’re attending in this city, to be “fair”.

Rent from fellow student roommates are supposed to be covering mortgage and property taxes.  Houses are jointly owned with the kids and supposed to be fully turned over once each kid graduates.

Mom was agonizing over what to do about the kid who dropped out, but thankfully kid went back the following year with only one year tuition wasted.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 08, 2019, 01:38:13 PM
We have a generous early retirement program, and a significant number of people who “retire” and return on contract often on reduced hours or project work. One coworker “retired” in the fall, but was at the Xmas party with her team. She’s working a full schedule doing the same work as before. She proud of her frugality because she drives (nurses) a 12 year old Toyota, but the reason that she and her husband can’t make it on the their two professional salaries (she’s pulling 120k and his is at a higher grade) is they’ve been paying tuition for three adult children out of cash flow (no savings)PLUS four mortgages (their own plus three). The reason they still have a mortgage is they pulled out their equity for three down payments.  I hope the third income stream keeps their head above water longer than the next department reorganization which will end her contract.
Are the three other mortgages on rental properties?

Sadly no. They bought a house for each kid. Started with buying for the one who went away to school and has continued for the two who’re attending in this city, to be “fair”.

Rent from fellow student roommates are supposed to be covering mortgage and property taxes.  Houses are jointly owned with the kids and supposed to be fully turned over once each kid graduates.

Mom was agonizing over what to do about the kid who dropped out, but thankfully kid went back the following year with only one year tuition wasted.

I knew someone who bought a condo in a college town when the oldest of his three went to college.  The expectation was always that any child who chose to go to that school (and all three did) would live there.  He figured out that the monthly mortgage ended up being a lot cheaper than a smaller dorm room would be and wouldn't require a meal plan.  Plus mom and dad had a place to crash on football weekends.  After the third kid graduated, he sold it for a small profit. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on January 08, 2019, 03:19:51 PM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.


Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tabitha on January 08, 2019, 03:50:22 PM

I knew someone who bought a condo in a college town when the oldest of his three went to college.  The expectation was always that any child who chose to go to that school (and all three did) would live there.  He figured out that the monthly mortgage ended up being a lot cheaper than a smaller dorm room would be and wouldn't require a meal plan.  Plus mom and dad had a place to crash on football weekends.  After the third kid graduated, he sold it for a small profit.

That investment makes sense and is relatively common around here. I contrast it with CW mortgaging (literally) her retirement.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Rural on January 08, 2019, 05:00:04 PM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.


+1


When I got to the point I could afford both insurance and food/shelter, I bought health insurance, not dental.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on January 08, 2019, 05:22:04 PM

I knew someone who bought a condo in a college town when the oldest of his three went to college.  The expectation was always that any child who chose to go to that school (and all three did) would live there.  He figured out that the monthly mortgage ended up being a lot cheaper than a smaller dorm room would be and wouldn't require a meal plan.  Plus mom and dad had a place to crash on football weekends.  After the third kid graduated, he sold it for a small profit.

That investment makes sense and is relatively common around here. I contrast it with CW mortgaging (literally) her retirement.
When we started house hunting, the first place we looked at was a 2BR condo like this.  One of our pick-up volleyball friends was finally finishing his PhD and his parents were selling the 2BR condo.  He didn't even know if the dishwasher worked, because he owned 1 bowl, 1 pot, 1 fork, 1 knife, 1 spoon, 1 plate. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on January 08, 2019, 06:06:25 PM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.
Hey @SwordGuy, I thought about that in the shower, too. When I was writing my post I found myself heading down the beer, cannabis and cigarettes path. I decided to just shut up and stop writing. Sorry I didn't get to that thought.

FWIW - I put myself through college by working three jobs, so I really do get it. Fortunately, I was six months into my first career job when I was diagnosed with cancer. I had taken the job after getting an AA at a Junior College. I needed to earn more money to continue my schooling, so I got a "real" job, even though I only planned for it to be temporary. Not only did I have excellent medical coverage, but they paid me longer than they had to and let me keep my company car the whole time I was out. And they held my job for me. Amazing.

Holy shit! It's revelation time almost forty years later. I've always wished I'd somehow figured out a way to stay in school. At times I have really, really regrettted the path I chose, but I did not want to take on student debt. Writing this in response to your comment made me realize if I had done so, I wouldn't have had that insurance coverage and my ass would have been grass. Wow! How have I never put that together before now? Thanks for the nudge, SwordGuy. That was a total paradigm shift. Double Wow! I need to go sit and think about this for a while...

P.S. Sorry for the semi-hijack. I did not see that coming.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on January 08, 2019, 06:59:52 PM
FWIW - I put myself through college by working three jobs, so I really do get it. Fortunately, I was six months into my first career job when I was diagnosed with cancer. I had taken the job after getting an AA at a Junior College. I needed to earn more money to continue my schooling, so I got a "real" job, even though I only planned for it to be temporary. Not only did I have excellent medical coverage, but they paid me longer than they had to and let me keep my company car the whole time I was out. And they held my job for me. Amazing.

Holy shit! It's revelation time almost forty years later. I've always wished I'd somehow figured out a way to stay in school. At times I have really, really regrettted the path I chose, but I did not want to take on student debt. Writing this in response to your comment made me realize if I had done so, I wouldn't have had that insurance coverage and my ass would have been grass. Wow! How have I never put that together before now? Thanks for the nudge, SwordGuy. That was a total paradigm shift. Double Wow! I need to go sit and think about this for a while...

Scary, isn't it?    Either choice would have been "the right thing to do", but one of them could have ended up with you bankrupt or dead.   

It's why I'm for things like affordable health care for everyone.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 08, 2019, 07:42:33 PM
Wow, @Dicey. What a story. I’m so glad things worked out for you as they did.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: flipboard on January 08, 2019, 10:51:53 PM
I knew someone who bought a condo in a college town when the oldest of his three went to college.  The expectation was always that any child who chose to go to that school (and all three did) would live there.  He figured out that the monthly mortgage ended up being a lot cheaper than a smaller dorm room would be and wouldn't require a meal plan.  Plus mom and dad had a place to crash on football weekends.  After the third kid graduated, he sold it for a small profit.
Similar at my work - but they only bought when their child actually started university. Apparently they'll end up making some profit from it too, but they're doing it mainly because it was the cheapest way to get decent-standard housing.

Meanwhile, I've heard of other people moving _country_ to follow their child to university. Some people don't seem to be able to let go...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: RidinTheAsama on January 08, 2019, 11:49:42 PM
ptf
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 09, 2019, 02:48:30 AM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.

In Norway dental insurance doesn't exist as far as I know. At least, DH and I don't have it. We go to the dentist once a year for a full check with pictures and cleaning. Costs approx 100$++ per checkup per person. Once I had a root canal treatment with crown and had to pay it myself, about 600$. That was at a cheap, but good dentist. I also had a tooth pulled out. And I had 4 wisdom teeth surgically removed at 140$ a piece. Although those were for a small part (30% or so) covered by a government grant.
If you want to go somewhere cheaper, you can go to the school where they teach dentists to be. And become a practice object for the students with professor supervision. I haven't dared to do that yet.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on January 09, 2019, 04:59:55 AM
I knew someone who bought a condo in a college town when the oldest of his three went to college.  The expectation was always that any child who chose to go to that school (and all three did) would live there.  He figured out that the monthly mortgage ended up being a lot cheaper than a smaller dorm room would be and wouldn't require a meal plan.  Plus mom and dad had a place to crash on football weekends.  After the third kid graduated, he sold it for a small profit.
Similar at my work - but they only bought when their child actually started university. Apparently they'll end up making some profit from it too, but they're doing it mainly because it was the cheapest way to get decent-standard housing.

Meanwhile, I've heard of other people moving _country_ to follow their child to university. Some people don't seem to be able to let go...

That’s very normal here in China. At my husband’s international school, several families have bought condos near the school for their Elementary School-Aged child. These condos go for around half a million USD for a three-bedroom unit.

I have also heard of parents who move country to follow their child to college, then buy two condos in the same building because the kid doesn’t want to live with mom.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on January 09, 2019, 07:16:34 AM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.

In Norway dental insurance doesn't exist as far as I know. At least, DH and I don't have it. We go to the dentist once a year for a full check with pictures and cleaning. Costs approx 100$++ per checkup per person. Once I had a root canal treatment with crown and had to pay it myself, about 600$. That was at a cheap, but good dentist. I also had a tooth pulled out. And I had 4 wisdom teeth surgically removed at 140$ a piece. Although those were for a small part (30% or so) covered by a government grant.
If you want to go somewhere cheaper, you can go to the school where they teach dentists to be. And become a practice object for the students with professor supervision. I haven't dared to do that yet.
Wow, @Linda_Norway , those prices are really low! In the US, just the copays can exceed your entire bill. I'm sure my last crown cost over $1200 and the little sucker chipped within a year. The dentist won't budge on replacement unless I pay for it all over again. She says it's likely to just happen again. She bought this practice when my original dentist retired. Grrr. Time to find a new dentist, but the prices are pretty standard for the Bay Area.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on January 09, 2019, 12:02:05 PM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.

In Norway dental insurance doesn't exist as far as I know. At least, DH and I don't have it. We go to the dentist once a year for a full check with pictures and cleaning. Costs approx 100$++ per checkup per person. Once I had a root canal treatment with crown and had to pay it myself, about 600$. That was at a cheap, but good dentist. I also had a tooth pulled out. And I had 4 wisdom teeth surgically removed at 140$ a piece. Although those were for a small part (30% or so) covered by a government grant.
If you want to go somewhere cheaper, you can go to the school where they teach dentists to be. And become a practice object for the students with professor supervision. I haven't dared to do that yet.
Wow, @Linda_Norway , those prices are really low! In the US, just the copays can exceed your entire bill. I'm sure my last crown cost over $1200 and the little sucker chipped within a year. The dentist won't budge on replacement unless I pay for it all over again. She says it's likely to just happen again. She bought this practice when my original dentist retired. Grrr. Time to find a new dentist, but the prices are pretty standard for the Bay Area.

In the Netherlands prices are similar. A check-up + Xray + cleaning is around €80. Just the check-up is about €25 and I usually go for the whole package once every 2 years with cheap checks in between. I don't need to be exposed to X rays all the time.

These are commercial prices and dentists are still rich, but the prices are capped by the government at reasonable levels  At €2000/year our tuition is significantly lower so medical professionals don't have massive student loans to pay off.

Dental insurance does exist in here but it's basically a scam for poor people who can't afford to pay €150 out of pocket for a root canal or €450 for a crown. Self insuring is much cheaper, dental insurance is €15-20/month.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on January 09, 2019, 08:58:14 PM
The Fortran and hoarding references remind me of the Fortran class I took in college in 1996. The professor was a hoarder whose office was filled to the ceiling with stacks of papers and binders. He carved a small path from the door to the desk. Anyone visiting during office hours had to stand next to the seven-foot stacks of papers. By the way, it turns out while I'm really good at following instructions, I'm awful at writing instructions for a computer.

At work, the walls, which have been gray or off-white for a long time, are now being painted random colors. Some are now yellow, some are green, some are various shades of blue and red. One conference room is red and black, and it looks like the Twin Peaks dream sequences. It's as if the bosses looked at a color wheel and said "We'll take one of each."
I learned Fortran, the worst part was making the punchcards!
That was the late 70's. :-)
 No, maybe the worst was watching some one drop a stack of 350 punchcards.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 09, 2019, 11:08:07 PM
The Fortran and hoarding references remind me of the Fortran class I took in college in 1996. The professor was a hoarder whose office was filled to the ceiling with stacks of papers and binders. He carved a small path from the door to the desk. Anyone visiting during office hours had to stand next to the seven-foot stacks of papers. By the way, it turns out while I'm really good at following instructions, I'm awful at writing instructions for a computer.

At work, the walls, which have been gray or off-white for a long time, are now being painted random colors. Some are now yellow, some are green, some are various shades of blue and red. One conference room is red and black, and it looks like the Twin Peaks dream sequences. It's as if the bosses looked at a color wheel and said "We'll take one of each."
I learned Fortran, the worst part was making the punchcards!
That was the late 70's. :-)
 No, maybe the worst was watching some one drop a stack of 350 punchcards.

I'm so glad punchcards are  before my time.  I know if I was alive then, I would have a bumbersticker reading "punchcard life"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TheGrimSqueaker on January 10, 2019, 07:34:45 AM
I was thinking about the whole dental care thing while in the shower this morning. I wonder how many of the folks who used not having insurance to avoid going to the dentist somehow managed to find enough for manicures, massages, parties, etc. I guess it's always about priorities.

Well, when we didn't have dental or health insurance, it was because we were poor.   

We didn't have the insurance because, you know, priorities.  Like cheap food and cheap shelter.

In Norway dental insurance doesn't exist as far as I know. At least, DH and I don't have it. We go to the dentist once a year for a full check with pictures and cleaning. Costs approx 100$++ per checkup per person. Once I had a root canal treatment with crown and had to pay it myself, about 600$. That was at a cheap, but good dentist. I also had a tooth pulled out. And I had 4 wisdom teeth surgically removed at 140$ a piece. Although those were for a small part (30% or so) covered by a government grant.
If you want to go somewhere cheaper, you can go to the school where they teach dentists to be. And become a practice object for the students with professor supervision. I haven't dared to do that yet.

In my city in the USA, the prices you describe for just the annual cleaning are less than the insurance premiums for dental insurance. The price you quoted for a root canal and the wisdom teeth are lower than what I had to pay for my daughter's, and that's even *with* the dental and health insurance.

One of the things that cause costs to be grossly inflated here are all the extra tests and office visits that are forced on you as a condition of getting the treatment you need. Every dental service provider is a specialist, so you can't get a diagnosis AND the root canal AND the crown done at the same place. Every single provider insists on repeating the X-ray and billing you for the X-ray. They are not capable of using an X-ray taken by somebody else just a few days before. They also require three office visits apiece: one to determine whether you need the service they provide (the answer is always yes!), the second to perform the service, and the third to follow up. That's a total of eight separate office visits per dental surgery. They refuse to perform the work unless you do the office visits and the X-rays with them, and you'd better believe that there's a bill attached for every single visit. This is why doctors' and dentists' offices are packed and nobody is accepting new patients: everyone has to dip his or her beak not just once, but several times.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: FIRE@50 on January 10, 2019, 07:39:59 AM
I'm surprised that they forced your daughter to get repeated x-rays. Isn't that dangerous?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TheGrimSqueaker on January 10, 2019, 08:15:35 AM
I'm surprised that they forced your daughter to get repeated x-rays. Isn't that dangerous?

For the patient, yes. But the patient's well-being is hardly a blip on Big Medical's radar screen. Patients exist for one purpose: to generate cash flow for insurance companies AND medical providers.

When I was desperately searching for a way to address my hearing problems, I ended up paying five separate people, two of whom were ENT doctors, to look into my ears and tell me they couldn't see any problem, and that they'd have to look at the audiogram. I had to have the audiogram test done twice because they're declared artificially invalid after six months (do they expect the hearing problem to IMPROVE?) Then, despite massive evidence that my hearing loss was due to a disease (which is covered by the policy I have and have been paying for these last 20 years), the insurance company turned down the claim for hearing aids in blatant but routine violation of their own policy. Result: more than 18 months of effort, two sets of tests paid for, five hearing professionals paid for including the assistant to the ENT who did nothing but look in my ears, and NOTHING. No hearing aids, just a couple thousand dollars in extra payments to medical professionals and their various test services.

By contrast, I started training the Venomous Spaz Beast as a hearing ear dog, and spent roughly the same amount of time and money, and now I have a fantastic service dog. A Chihuahua with a brain the size of a walnut is outperforming Big Medical.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 10, 2019, 09:24:03 AM
I missed the punchcards era by a year or so at college. Thank goodness.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: geekette on January 10, 2019, 10:22:44 AM
Graduation, early 80's:  punch cards raining down from the top of an 8 story dorm.  Good times.

I've gone to the same dentist for over 20 years and have had 2 crowns.  Same office, no need to go to a specialist, and the initial visit, temp crown, permanent crown, and follow up were all included in the one charge.  They do root canals, too.  Odd how different some areas of the US are.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on January 10, 2019, 11:35:10 AM
When we were young many jobs didn’t have dental insurance. Regardless the 5 of us never neglected our teeth. There were times we paid on the bill for months.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Hunny156 on January 10, 2019, 02:21:58 PM
My dentist's office actually has a computer screen in front of the patient, and when they schedule follow up visits, I can clearly see the Outlook calendar, with each patient's name and a DOLLAR amount next to the name.  That's the OOP goal for each sucker.

My parents did not provide me with dental care from 6-16 years of age.  Not b/c of finances, they are immigrants and when the Italian dentist they knew retired, they simply couldn't find another one for a decade.  Luckily, other than a few cavities, my teeth were OK, so I got routine care for a few years, and then didn't make it a priority until my mid 30's.  Again, fairly lucky, some cavities, a small inlay, and pulling my upper molars b/c my impacted wisdom teeth were pushing down and caused a pocket where tooth decay occurred.  From this point forward, I go 2X/year, same office, everything's great.  Until three years ago, when the dentist walks in w/a stern look, and informs me that the gum loss on an upper front tooth is severe and will need a periodontist to review and operate.  I mean, I could see that the gumline was higher, but it's always been that way, and the tooth is SLIGHTLY crooked, but no one said anything for over seven years!  I casually ask if perhaps an implant makes more sense, and I can actually see the dollar signs in the dentist's eyes.  When I learn that it's a several month process, without a noticeable tooth, AND will cost me $5K OOP after insurance, I was like, nope, let's save this tooth instead.  It took them over a year to update my chart to remove the icon for the implant, just b/c I asked a question.

They have a perio on staff, so I make an appointment.  She's all doom and gloom, and informs me that the odds are good that I will need to have 5-8 upper front teeth removed!  By that point, I was done, so I told the office manager I was getting a second opinion.  My insurance covered ONE perio office in the area, who luckily had great reviews.  His office is completely different, and we talk about options, he explains that I will need to do something, but it's not anywhere near as dire as they told me, and it's also not incredibly urgent.  (Open enrollment at work was coming up, so I wanted to wait and see if it would make sense to get better dental coverage prior to the surgery.)

Long story short, he recommends a deep cleaning ($175 OOP), which helps a lot, but we ultimately do the surgery 6 months later ($1,350 OOP), followed by quarterly cleanings ($90 OOP) at his office.  The cleanings cost more there, but they teach me how to properly brush my teeth, show me some tools I didn't know about, and those cleanings were 45 minutes of actual cleaning like I've never had done before - she offers topical numbing each time, and you actually do want that, she goes to town!  My gums are amazing now, the damage has been mitigated with excellent success.  :)

However, I am required to go see my dentist once/year, mostly so he can bill insurance for another round of X-rays.  Then he comes in, pushes down on my teeth like he's trying to break them, shakes his head and tells me how it's a miracle that my teeth and gums are so healthy now, and then tries to suggest that implant or braces for that slightly crooked tooth.  I give him a blank look, then ask "cosmetic?"  He says yes, and I say I'm fine with how my teeth look.  He shakes his head and leaves.  We do this every damn year.  The only reason I don't switch is b/c my insurance pretty much only pays for those chain places, and my experience w/those has been far worse.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 10, 2019, 02:53:18 PM
I’m surprised to hear of such bad experiences with dentists. Mine does not push xrays every year and initially monitored what later turned into a need to replace two fillings. I was actually the one sort of pushing to have them done sooner rather than later as I wanted to get everything possible done during the two weeks I had in between jobs.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 10, 2019, 03:06:00 PM
I’m surprised to hear of such bad experiences with dentists. Mine does not push xrays every year and initially monitored what later turned into a need to replace two fillings. I was actually the one sort of pushing to have them done sooner rather than later as I wanted to get everything possible done during the two weeks I had in between jobs.

I went to a rock-bottom hmo dentist this year to try it out.  The insurance is better/cheaper For big stuff but you have to use a very small list of participating dentists.  They can not afford nice offices/equipment.

The first time I went they took extensive xrays to the point I started to research how often I can skip xrays.  So I went in the second time ready to fight them on the xrays but they just said “ok”.  I’m very low risk for carries since I’ve never had one and I don’t even brush as often as I should.  It could be genetics, but somehow the rest of my immediate family has multiple fillings.  Somehow I got lucky with genetics or oral flora (inoculated with an extremely beneficial bacteria strain that outcompetes acid pooping bacteria and has no ill effects... is that possible? Cause if it is maybe we can develop a “vaccine”
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: merula on January 10, 2019, 04:41:05 PM
I was thinking about starting a new thread to complain about my recent dental experience, but now I can just piggyback on this dental foam.

To start with, my parent is a dental professional, and was always very harsh on my visits in childhood. I thought dental appoints would be relatively smooth sailing now, but I was wrong.

Six months ago, my two kids and I went to our appointment as usual, but instead of being seen by our dentist (who was there!) we were seen by his new partner, Dr. Awful. Who: Fast forward to this week. I specifically requested an appointment with my dentist, and confirmed the day before that we would be seeing him. As soon as I'm in my chair for my cleanings, Dr. Awful swoops into the bay next to me where my children are being seen and evaluates them, confirming all her prior theories she spouted at me last time. Her hygienist (RDH Awful) does not tell me anything about my children's actual teeth, but instead spends 5 minutes telling me all about how great Dr. Awful is.

Oh and now untreated tongue ties cause ADHD too. And sleep apnea.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LetItGrow on January 10, 2019, 05:43:41 PM
Wow, I think merula's post really puts us into foam territory.

I think my dentist has been a big churner. For a couple decades, no problem. I move here four years ago and have had to several old fillings redone and one new one. I asked for one to be orange and one to be black.

We have an issue with some tuition repayments being delayed and while some just roll with it, one has been really concerned. Then I hear him talk about new firearms, new carpet for no apparent reason, etc. He seems to do pretty good, but maybe hasn't fully connected all the dots.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: familyandfarming on January 10, 2019, 06:08:22 PM
Speaking of children and dentists, I would give my children $100 per year if they didn't have cavities. It was a win-win! I didn't have to spend any more time carting them back and forth and their teeth stayed in better shape with careful brushing.

Is it bad that I hoped that they had impacted wisdom teeth as teenagers as my health insurance then covered the extraction?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on January 10, 2019, 06:17:32 PM
Is it bad that I hoped that they had impacted wisdom teeth as teenagers as my health insurance then covered the extraction?

Yes. I'm reporting you to the authorities. Expect someone to knock on your door any second to remove your (presumably) adult children from your home.  ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ShoulderThingThatGoesUp on January 10, 2019, 07:47:04 PM
I don’t carry dental insurance. It has such low maximum benefits, and my family’s teeth are so healthy, I don’t see the point.

I got my dentist to agree to extend the time between x-rays after he had seen me for 18 months and he realized I was telling the truth about never having a cavity in my life. Every time I go in he tells me I have the best teeth he’ll see all day, just like all the other dentists I have had. I think I have dragoncar’s strain of mouth bacteria.

My orthodontist BIL recommended that I be the one to share food, etc with our kids to see if we could get them my mouth germs instead of my wife’s. We’ll see.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 11, 2019, 03:56:35 AM
Speaking of children and dentists, I would give my children $100 per year if they didn't have cavities. It was a win-win! I didn't have to spend any more time carting them back and forth and their teeth stayed in better shape with careful brushing.

Is it bad that I hoped that they had impacted wisdom teeth as teenagers as my health insurance then covered the extraction?

Can't you let their current dentist take an x-ray of the wisdom teeth area when they are 17, to see whether those teeth are laying horizontally? Then they will guaranteed give problems later and can maybe be removed preventively.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 11, 2019, 06:10:42 AM

Is it bad that I hoped that they had impacted wisdom teeth as teenagers as my health insurance then covered the extraction?


My wisdom teeth had been coming in in bits and spurts for a couple of years.  Just before I lost coverage under my parents' dental insurance I found a doctor who would go ahead and take all four of them at once even though it was really just the one that was growing in sideways.  I think I had the surgery (which I woke up in the middle of...fun times) in January and turned 21 in February. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: KodeBlue on January 11, 2019, 07:24:11 AM
My dentist's office actually has a computer screen in front of the patient, and when they schedule follow up visits, I can clearly see the Outlook calendar, with each patient's name and a DOLLAR amount next to the name.  That's the OOP goal for each sucker.

Wow...you can see other pt's names? Sounds like a HIPPA violation to me. Pt info is supposed to be confidential.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sibley on January 11, 2019, 08:46:57 AM
I was thinking about starting a new thread to complain about my recent dental experience, but now I can just piggyback on this dental foam.

To start with, my parent is a dental professional, and was always very harsh on my visits in childhood. I thought dental appoints would be relatively smooth sailing now, but I was wrong.

Six months ago, my two kids and I went to our appointment as usual, but instead of being seen by our dentist (who was there!) we were seen by his new partner, Dr. Awful. Who:
  • Told me I needed to get my kids to stop breathe through their mouths at all times, even when sleeping, so their mouths would grow bigger.
  • Said that breathing through the nose cures allergies, ADD and ADHD.
  • Alleged that my 6 y/o has a tongue tie. "This will cause speech impediments and eating issues." He's been a precocious speaker forever, is bilingual and breastfed for a year without issue.
  • Also alleged that my 4 y/o has a tongue tie. He did have a speech delay, and was seen by a speech-language pathologist for over a year. He was specifically evaluated for tongue tie, and did not have one.
  • Had her dog on her lap for most of our visit. Not a service dog. I'm allergic; I was never asked if I wanted the dog 2 feet from me.
Fast forward to this week. I specifically requested an appointment with my dentist, and confirmed the day before that we would be seeing him. As soon as I'm in my chair for my cleanings, Dr. Awful swoops into the bay next to me where my children are being seen and evaluates them, confirming all her prior theories she spouted at me last time. Her hygienist (RDH Awful) does not tell me anything about my children's actual teeth, but instead spends 5 minutes telling me all about how great Dr. Awful is.

Oh and now untreated tongue ties cause ADHD too. And sleep apnea.

Realistically, 1, you should consider finding a new dentist. If not, you need to refuse care from that provider and 2, file a complaint with the licensing board.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on January 11, 2019, 10:36:38 AM
Meryl’s, that’s awful and I would find a new dentist.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: merula on January 11, 2019, 10:42:27 AM
Realistically, 1, you should consider finding a new dentist. If not, you need to refuse care from that provider and 2, file a complaint with the licensing board.

Definitely considering finding a new dentist. I'd love to report her, but I'm not sure if her behavior is reportable. The dog thing is weird, but in honesty I didn't say anything in the moment (and it wasn't there when I went back). The rest seems to be her professional opinion, and while it seems crazy, it's also clear from internet searching that she's not alone in those opinions.

(What I can't figure out is why all these professionals and peer-reviewed journals don't see the causation <> correlation issues with "small mouth" and "mouth breathing". Seems to me that larger mouths would be correlated with larger airway anatomy, decreasing the likelihood of mouth breathing. So larger mouths are negatively correlated with mouth breathing, but claiming that no mouth breathing CAUSES larger mouths would require randomized studies that don't appear to be done. Plus you can't exactly double-blind breathing technique. Nothing I've ever read in anthropology or human anatomy would suggest that cranial anatomy is influenced by an individual's behavior, outside of deliberate modification.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: billy b on January 11, 2019, 10:53:50 PM
My coworker has told me in the course of a few few weeks, that his $400 Apple watch was for work, his $1,200 Apple watch was for home, he's frustrated that he's out of money by the 5th day of the month, last month he couldn't pay his $150 cell phone bill (did you know watches have sims now) and had to pay a reactivation fee to turn his service back on. And cried when he saw a Disney commercial because he couldn't afford to take his kid.   

I tried to give my coworker small bits of advice but did a whole lot of nothing. The whole thing is just wild to me. On a weekly basis my coworkers are always in shock and ahhh that I paid off my house fast (like it's mmm magic).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: six-car-habit on January 12, 2019, 03:32:20 AM
 MAybe Billy B's co-worker and kid can see a Disney movie on his watch screen ?

 So yeah, I work with a guy who is  ~68 yrs old, been in government service for 40+ years. Often talks about how he'll get 80% of his pay when retired, and happy he is under the old retirement system because he didn't have to put money into Social security, nor fund a 401K like the younger folks on the new retirement system [ CSRS vs FERS] . So his base pay is about 70K, plus add another 10K in shift differential, sunday, + holiday work. He could have left years ago.

Lives w/ girlfriend , her house, he has no legal interest / ownership in it. She gets minimal income from a pension. Still has a small mortgage, a few hundred a month, which he partially pays for.

 * They bought an 80's Chevrolet El Camino car for about $3000 a couple years ago, for her supposedly. In the last 2 yrs he has spent At Least $17000 on a new performance engine, body and paintwork, exhaust , various interior parts, and paying all sorts of mechanics since he will not attempt to do any of this install and upgrade work himself. 
 * No money set aside for retirement
 * They bought a brand new 20+ foot towable camper trailer about 4 yrs ago, retail was $20K plus, I am unsure of the actual amount , except they are still paying on it, and they owe more than it is worth... And they have Never used it.... Not even Once ! .... but he wants to put new tires on it in case they try to sell it.  Literally the only miles on the thing are the 50 miles between the RV dealer and their home.  It's never been slept in, not even once out in the yard.
* The 60" OLED 4K [?] TV he bought a bit over a year ago has an issue, out of warranty, "gonna need a new one"
* Chevy money pit needs tinted windows, quoted $400, "since the back window is concave curved, tricky installation"

 Genuinely a nice guy, and I've tried to make some suggestions , but it falls on deaf ears.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: billy b on January 12, 2019, 06:02:56 AM
Ya I'm seeing a trend. I had coworkers that wouldn't retire after 26-30 years with there pension, so they can do lots of overtime or so the X does not get it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: DutchGirl on January 13, 2019, 08:25:29 AM
Co-worker moved to our country at age 30. Always complains about how his income is too low (it must be more than the median Dutch income though). But he has four kids, aged 4, 12, 20 and 25 and all of them live at home and go to school or study, so I can understand why he feels pinched.

But I talked to him on Friday and somehow the conversation came to pension plans. He apparently didn't know that in our country old pensions (from previous jobs) stay intact (they just don't grow anymore - when you worked there you built up a certain claim and that claim will stay, at most adapt to inflation but that's it). So I hope the conversation has stimulated him to look at his combined pension benefits. Hopefully that will make him feel a bit better about his future after age 67.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: six-car-habit on January 13, 2019, 12:03:56 PM
Ya I'm seeing a trend. I had coworkers that wouldn't retire after 26-30 years with there pension, so they can do lots of overtime or so the X does not get it.

 ex-coworker at supervisor level , finally retired a year ago at 72 - Had gotten divorced ~15 years ago.  Divorce agreement stipulated he would give his ex-wife 1/2 of  his retirement annuity. He got remarried, and stayed working. Didn't want to give anything to the ex-wife.

 A few years ago he became erratic in turning in maintenance +operations paperwork , personnel paperwork-requests for time off, etc..   Would tell the same stories a lot, like twice or more in the same day to the same people, often. People thought maybe senility was creeping in. But he had lots of knowledge of archaic decades old electrical systems installed in the 1930's thru 1960's and forgotten or unknown by most others, and those systems were routing power to current national defense facilities.  Management was getting frustrated as they couldn't meet the "metrics" without his workcenters paperwork, even though the workers were doing the work.

 Management solution, as they could not or would not force retirement, was to put him in charge of a 12 hr Graveyard crew shift.  Management probably Thinking the graveyard routine will sap his will to continue working. So a new crew of frustrated workers under him. Within the year he had called in 3 , possibly more times at 2-3am [ shift turnover @ midnight ] , not knowing where he was, in his truck 30 miles away in the wrong direction. I pointed out to his boss, this was reckless on their part - sooner or later he would drive the wrong way on the highway and cause a wreck.  A few months later they finally moved him to a dayshift "special project" where he lingered for a few months until his current wife convinced him to retire.

  He worked at that location over 40 yrs, nearly 50 in all .  On his last day, They gave him a cake at the noon shift turnover [ several of the folks who would have shown up to wish him well were therfore otherwise engaged in higher prioriy work ] --- out in the dirty locker filled hallway, next to the freight elevator and candy machines.......
   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on January 13, 2019, 12:24:10 PM
Overheard co-workers talking about how the stock market is down and why there is no point in investing or saving. 

CW1 The market is crashing.  Apple is lowering it's outlook for the year. 
CW2 See that's why it is not smart to invest.  Why save any money if you are just going to lose it in the stock market?
....conversation switched to all the shopping done over the holidays.

I just bit my tongue and didn't say anything.

  I would have this need to post some stock market charts around the office, marked with $1,000 in vested here is $2,300 to today. Save and Invest for Tomorrow!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on January 13, 2019, 02:21:44 PM
But mostly I find it sad that we isolate this very important aspect of health care and people legitimately have complications and die because of it at times. Glad this lady is catching up on the care she needs.

I agree with this. But don't tell that to the dentists in private practice. If in a fairly low dentist to population area, dentists can work a 4 day work week and bank $400K+ net without being all that great of a business person and without working too hard.
I hope that's true, we are paying for my daughter to go through dental school.
It will cost pretty close to $300k by the time she's done.
She's in the later part of her first year.
Quote

There seems to be a real lack of basic understanding among them about the state of most people's finances. They don't understand why people can't/wont pay hundreds or thousands of dollars a year for dental care out of pocket. After all, if you make half a mil a year working 4 days a week, you aren't going to understand why Johnny who works 55 hours/week at the local auto parts store cancelled his routine cleaning because he didn't feel like he could afford it.

  I go to the dentist twice a year,have a mouth fill of fillings but I never thought it out of my ability to pay even
earning just above median income. I never understood dental insurance either, unless you could get it to pay for implants it seems most people will pay more than they get back. Of course, that's the way insurance works,
but dental problems don't usually bankrupt a family.

 
 
Quote
It is accurate that many potential dental patients have misplaced priorities (would rather buy a new iPhone instead of going to the dentist twice a year for cleanings and checkups), but they are marketed to like crazy for those shiny, new objects. It is never going to be sexy to go see the hygienist no matter what marketing the dentist does. And those big corporate marketing machines are effective.

I have a couple of dentists as clients and they are really great people and great clients. But they are also out of touch with the everyday Joe in the US in the current economy.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on January 14, 2019, 06:39:04 AM
Coworker is an accountant. No idea how much she makes but I'm sure she's paid well. Her husband is a medical professional, probably also well paid. Her husband needs to pay €800 in professional registration fees that his employer will reimburse. Apparantly this is a big problem...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kahooli on January 14, 2019, 11:26:36 AM
Not to drag out the dental part... but I have great dental insurance through my job. Cost to me is like $120/year. I see my dentist twice a year for regular cleanings and checkups, x-rays once per year, panoramic x-ray every 2-3? I'm supposed to have a copay for each visit; they never charge me for it.  Maybe the combination of having never had a cavity in my adult teeth with how little work the dentist has to do with me he is just being generous. I see him less than 3 minutes. His operation is a bit impressive, like 6-8 hygienists and one him. He recently partnered a second Dentist in to his practice and they are adding chairs. Both of them are pretty good guys, I wish everyone could have the same experience I do.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Hirondelle on January 14, 2019, 12:57:37 PM
Re dental insurance. I usually choose to carry it every other year. I usually have no cavities, but my teeth do get yellowish easily so once a year or so I like to get a proper cleanup. So I prefer to take the insurance, get a cleaning early and late in that year + the regular check ups and then cancel the dental insurance the year after. This year I expect one of my wisdom teeth to be pulled out (it's 'out there', so no jaw surgeon required) so I took the insurance again. Sure I can pay cash, but I make the calculation every year and if you expect some procedures to be needed it can save you money.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on January 15, 2019, 01:38:25 AM
I was reminded today of a colleague I worked with about 10 years ago.

He was in his 60s, obese with severe health complications, and was woefully under-qualified for his job.

He ended up needing surgery as a result of complications of his weight, and was off for months on paid sick leave.

After about a month, he contacted his manager and offered to do some work from home.

The manager was mildly interested, until the guy made it clear that he expected to be paid. In addition to being on sick leave at full salary.

Swing and a miss.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 15, 2019, 01:44:58 PM
Not overheard at work but overseen.

I work in a dog-friendly workplace. Mostly I don’t think of it because people don’t bring their dogs, but someone one row over has his fat dog in a big dog bed under his desk. I came back to my desk and before I sat down I happened to stare off into the distance and caught sight of the dog. As he started humping his dog bed.

Keep it classy, fido.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Comar on January 16, 2019, 04:20:40 AM
A story from my wife. Her coworker is planning to get married... ON A GLACIER. We have some of those in Iceland you see, so she doesn't have to pay for the flight over. BUT she is living in her dad's garage with her 1 year old son and dreams of buying an apartment with her soon to be husband. But first GLACIER WEDDING yoloooo
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marty998 on January 16, 2019, 04:41:47 AM
I was reminded today of a colleague I worked with about 10 years ago.

He was in his 60s, obese with severe health complications, and was woefully under-qualified for his job.

He ended up needing surgery as a result of complications of his weight, and was off for months on paid sick leave.

After about a month, he contacted his manager and offered to do some work from home.

The manager was mildly interested, until the guy made it clear that he expected to be paid. In addition to being on sick leave at full salary.

Swing and a miss.

The sense of entitlement is strong in this one....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 16, 2019, 07:50:14 AM
A story from my wife. Her coworker is planning to get married... ON A GLACIER. We have some of those in Iceland you see, so she doesn't have to pay for the flight over. BUT she is living in her dad's garage with her 1 year old son and dreams of buying an apartment with her soon to be husband. But first GLACIER WEDDING yoloooo

I'd kick in on a bag of ice from a nearby grocery store... ;)

Sounds like her weekly budget needs all the extra cash it can spare. Let 'em vacation to a glacier later and repeat their vows. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: turketron on January 16, 2019, 11:15:12 AM
I've overheard some discussions in the past between coworkers about those Funko Pop figurines, they always seemed dumb to me and I never understood the point (they just sit on a shelf!), but whatever. Live and let live.

Until yesterday. A coworker mentioned that a friend of his was looking to sell their Funko Pop collection and he shared a spreadsheet of everything that was for sale. The total listed for the entire collection was $1,700 dollars.

Some selected quotes from the Slack conversation:


OP: "the prices are extremely reasonable"
CW1: "I think prices are extremely reasonable isn't a thing that matters to this group"

CW1: "thanks to you, im going to be broke now"
CW2: "Do you need my bank account? How much for all of it?"
CW1: "I think between [CW2] and I, he's going to end up buying a new car at this rate"

CW3: "Between us 3, we should just buy this whole collection and sort out who wants what haha... total ask is $1700, he might take $1500 cash for the whole shebang"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 16, 2019, 11:25:35 AM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MissNancyPryor on January 16, 2019, 11:33:18 AM
I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 16, 2019, 11:37:39 AM
I had the same kind of gut reaction to something I heard about Bitcoin back in the 2009-2010 timeframe. Turns out I could have gambled and won big on that one had I a crystal ball/gray luck, but my risk tolerance just doesn’t let me play with speculation like that.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: turketron on January 16, 2019, 11:37:53 AM
yeah, they're basically this generation's Beanie Babies except pop-culture related? But at least with Beanie Babies the entire thing (not that it ever came to pass) was that they were "rare" and they would be worth more at some point in the future. As far as I know that's never been a thing with Funko Pop figurines.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Chris22 on January 16, 2019, 11:39:03 AM
I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts.

My wife and her family had some sort of hookup back in the 90s on Beanie Babies, I dunno how.  They ended up with a bunch of rare ones that they paid sticker or close to it for.

They ended up selling their whole collection and netted enough to take all 5 of them on a trip to Maui for a week (minus airfare, that was covered with dad's miles from work). 

Pretty amazing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I'm a red panda on January 16, 2019, 11:46:09 AM
yeah, they're basically this generation's Beanie Babies except pop-culture related? But at least with Beanie Babies the entire thing (not that it ever came to pass) was that they were "rare" and they would be worth more at some point in the future. As far as I know that's never been a thing with Funko Pop figurines.

The fun thing about beanie babies is they were cute and fun to play with.  At least it was a tangible thing to collect.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TVRodriguez on January 16, 2019, 12:23:30 PM
A colleague bought himself a nice car.  I think it was a Mercedes of some sort, but I don't really remember.  I saw it once when we drove up at the same time to work--it was pretty, and he seemed to like it, so fine.  Then, because he didn't want to get it too dirty (?), he bought himself a VW Jetta for "regular driving."  I don't get it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on January 16, 2019, 12:40:19 PM
yeah, they're basically this generation's Beanie Babies except pop-culture related? But at least with Beanie Babies the entire thing (not that it ever came to pass) was that they were "rare" and they would be worth more at some point in the future. As far as I know that's never been a thing with Funko Pop figurines.

The fun thing about beanie babies is they were cute and fun to play with.  At least it was a tangible thing to collect.
Funko Pops are also tangible. I have 4 of them on my desk right now. I don't see them as an investment, but as something that I like that represents my interests. Do you know anyone who has movie posters or prints of artwork they like? It's the same deal.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: saguaro on January 16, 2019, 12:48:54 PM
I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts.

My wife and her family had some sort of hookup back in the 90s on Beanie Babies, I dunno how.  They ended up with a bunch of rare ones that they paid sticker or close to it for.

They ended up selling their whole collection and netted enough to take all 5 of them on a trip to Maui for a week (minus airfare, that was covered with dad's miles from work). 

Pretty amazing.

This reminds me of in the baseball card craze in the early 90s (I believe it may have started late 80s).   I was working with a guy who talked about his son who was collecting baseball cards as an "investment", how great that was and how this would fund his college education.   I didn't have the heart to tell him that it was rarity that made them valuable (my husband is a collector but not of baseball cards) and if everyone was collecting cards as an investment, that didn't make them rare.  I left the place shortly after and never knew what happened when the market went bust. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I'm a red panda on January 16, 2019, 01:22:14 PM
yeah, they're basically this generation's Beanie Babies except pop-culture related? But at least with Beanie Babies the entire thing (not that it ever came to pass) was that they were "rare" and they would be worth more at some point in the future. As far as I know that's never been a thing with Funko Pop figurines.

The fun thing about beanie babies is they were cute and fun to play with.  At least it was a tangible thing to collect.
Funko Pops are also tangible. I have 4 of them on my desk right now. I don't see them as an investment, but as something that I like that represents my interests. Do you know anyone who has movie posters or prints of artwork they like? It's the same deal.

Sorry, I wasn't following the conversation well. Just ignore me... i'm really tired.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 16, 2019, 02:38:00 PM
I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts.

My wife and her family had some sort of hookup back in the 90s on Beanie Babies, I dunno how.  They ended up with a bunch of rare ones that they paid sticker or close to it for.

They ended up selling their whole collection and netted enough to take all 5 of them on a trip to Maui for a week (minus airfare, that was covered with dad's miles from work). 

Pretty amazing.

This reminds me of in the baseball card craze in the early 90s (I believe it may have started late 80s).   I was working with a guy who talked about his son who was collecting baseball cards as an "investment", how great that was and how this would fund his college education.   I didn't have the heart to tell him that it was rarity that made them valuable (my husband is a collector but not of baseball cards) and if everyone was collecting cards as an investment, that didn't make them rare.  I left the place shortly after and never knew what happened when the market went bust.
Reminds me of someone I knew I high school whose parents bought a special Christmas Barbie every year and stored it away in a closet as her college “investment”. Even as I kid I thought it was ridiculous.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I'm a red panda on January 16, 2019, 02:40:24 PM
I have those damn barbies. They were never an investment, but they stayed unopened to "preserve them". (Which was OK because they were display dolls.)

They are my go-to white elephant gift now.  I just grab one from the doll shelf.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: six-car-habit on January 16, 2019, 08:31:31 PM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...
Haha - Don't !
Picture a "bobblehead" figurine that your local major metropolitan sports franchise/ stadium hands out to every fan thru the gates on a certain home game night. But the heads don't bobble and graphics are probably better.

 I have a friend who has a bunch of these funnko-pop dolls, many in triplicate.  Dude, if you found 3 of the DarthVader figurines at the local toy store , how rare can they possibly be ?  He does have one he is rather proud of, he paid a premium [ I think $18 ]- it is a lady actress from a short lived TV show - that he bought for his wife, as she is a fan of the show.  They actually only did make a few of those particular actress figurines [ probably worth $26 ]

    Same guy will look up a Star Wars figure that he owns , and has seen advertised for sale on E-bay and say "look it's worth $100 " . I have then had him drill down the parameters of the search to find the same items that have Actually Sold on E-bay, and it's usually well less than $100 that they actually traded hands for....

 I wonder what the actual retail cost, + tax , etc , was for the $1700 collection ??
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on January 17, 2019, 07:10:49 AM
Had an IT guy at my previous employer who kept a nice Nissan GT-R (latest model at the time) as his Friday/weekend ride and garage queen. Daily driver was Chevy Trailblazer SS. He sat in the office and traded oil and currencies, swore off index funds, except those in his employer's 401K. He kept his house at 84F, with the thermostat locked in a transparent security cover. Last I know, his long-term GF left him.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: fattest_foot on January 17, 2019, 09:59:31 AM
Had an IT guy at my previous employer who kept a nice Nissan GT-R (latest model at the time) as his Friday/weekend ride and garage queen. Daily driver was Chevy Trailblazer SS. He sat in the office and traded oil and currencies, swore off index funds, except those in his employer's 401K. He kept his house at 84F, with the thermostat locked in a transparent security cover. Last I know, his long-term GF left him.

Holy crap!

We live in the Mojave desert and have a swamp cooler as our only cooling option, and 84 is about what our house gets to when it's 115F+ outside.

Why would someone purposefully do that to themselves?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 17, 2019, 10:38:00 AM
84F in the winter might be just right for some folks. I'll bet in the summer he runs the a/c to some very cold temp.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Flynlow on January 17, 2019, 02:13:50 PM
I never collected beanie babies or funko pop figurines (didnt think I was that old, but never even heard of these), but I do have a small collection on top of my bookshelf at work: Hot Wheels. 

It started as a joke from a friend, we used to buy and exchange one every christmas.  I now have 1 for every year I've worked since college.  Total cost: about $14.  They make me smile on bad days.  I occasionally drive them around my desk and make engine noises. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dcheesi on January 17, 2019, 02:18:31 PM
Had an IT guy at my previous employer who kept a nice Nissan GT-R (latest model at the time) as his Friday/weekend ride and garage queen. Daily driver was Chevy Trailblazer SS. He sat in the office and traded oil and currencies, swore off index funds, except those in his employer's 401K. He kept his house at 84F, with the thermostat locked in a transparent security cover. Last I know, his long-term GF left him.
I had a dorm-mate in college who liked to keep his thermostat at 80F. I know because due to a quirk of the dorm's design, the thermostat inside his room also controlled the heat in my room (everyone else was on a different thermostat). I had to keep my window or door open all the time, or else I would roast!

Turns out he liked it that way so he could spend all his time naked (which was TMI at the time).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: pab88 on January 17, 2019, 06:10:03 PM
Two stories, not that dramatic but I'll share.

First is a Coworker in their mid thirties who has been working for about a decade for our organisation, five years at current place of work, so is on higher pay than myself. Coworker rents a place and complains about not being able to save for a deposit on a place in Sydney, which to be fair is HCOL and a 20% deposit on a modest 500-600k apartment will run 100k-150k. Their share of the rent is about $400/week, after-tax pay is about $1300/week. Goes on overseas holidays every year with partner and child, usually preceded by angst about being able to pay for things. Has gym membership and overheard talking about sound bar purchased for new TV using Afterpay. To their credit they only have one car and it is a modest second-hand one. Has refused to pay union membership on the basis of Sydney being too expensive and needing the money.

Doing the sums myself I reckon coworker could save $20K a year pretty easily after tax with basically their current lifestyle, allowing for $20k in rent and a further generous $20k in living expenses. In the five years they have spent at current place of work they could have saved a $100k deposit.

Second is dear sister, who has a 'bad with money' identity and doesn't seem to realise that her financial outcomes are linked to her spending habits. Bought a brand new Jeep Compass (25k plus a 'service pack' with the dealership) in 2015 using a car loan, as she was convinced by her partner (who went through 4 new cars in 2 years) that used cars are bad because of the unexpected repair costs. When DS bought the new car she was on a temporary contract of employment, which was soon after terminated. So she had to use hardship provisions to pause car loan repayments while collecting unemployment benefits.

Three years on and a few temp jobs later, she has finally secured a permanent position and her new car loan is down to about 5k. So what does she do 3 months into her first permanent job? Book a 2 month trip to Latin America and Europe with her new partner! She hasn't told her supervisor yet and I have no idea what will happen to her job. She also mentioned at Christmas buying another new car, mentioning the same logic about old used cars being money pits because of repairs.

She is in her late 20s and has lived at home rent free her whole life. I worry that in a decades time she will be in roughly the same position, without a capital base/savings and that this will fuel resentment towards myself, or helplessness in terms of her ability to manage her own affairs. I have been thinking of buying her a popular finance book and talking over it with her over a lunch or similar.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gail2000 on January 17, 2019, 06:36:06 PM


Second is dear sister, who has a 'bad with money' identity and doesn't seem to realise that her financial outcomes are linked to her spending habits. Bought a brand new Jeep Compass (25k plus a 'service pack' with the dealership) in 2015 using a car loan, as she was convinced by her partner (who went through 4 new cars in 2 years) that used cars are bad because of the unexpected repair costs. When DS bought the new car she was on a temporary contract of employment, which was soon after terminated. So she had to use hardship provisions to pause car loan repayments while collecting unemployment benefits.

Three years on and a few temp jobs later, she has finally secured a permanent position and her new car loan is down to about 5k. So what does she do 3 months into her first permanent job? Book a 2 month trip to Latin America and Europe with her new partner! She hasn't told her supervisor yet and I have no idea what will happen to her job. She also mentioned at Christmas buying another new car, mentioning the same logic about old used cars being moneys pits because of repairs.

She is in her late 20s and has lived at home rent free her whole life. I worry that in a decades time she will be in roughly the same position, without a capital base/savings and that this will fuel resentment towards myself, or helplessness in terms of her ability to manage her own affairs. I have been thinking of buying her a popular finance book and talking over it with her over a lunch or similar.

This is my brother ( he’s in Canada so no real chance of making them a wining pair). He has been working for Walmart for ten years and living with mum and dad. Now the the guys is in a panick because mum wants to move 2hours away to be closer to her grand daughter. At 37 he is I’ll equiped to leave the nest. What to do?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: crazy jane on January 17, 2019, 07:25:57 PM


I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts.

My wife and her family had some sort of hookup back in the 90s on Beanie Babies, I dunno how.  They ended up with a bunch of rare ones that they paid sticker or close to it for.

They ended up selling their whole collection and netted enough to take all 5 of them on a trip to Maui for a week (minus airfare, that was covered with dad's miles from work). 

Pretty amazing.

This reminds me of in the baseball card craze in the early 90s (I believe it may have started late 80s).   I was working with a guy who talked about his son who was collecting baseball cards as an "investment", how great that was and how this would fund his college education.   I didn't have the heart to tell him that it was rarity that made them valuable (my husband is a collector but not of baseball cards) and if everyone was collecting cards as an investment, that didn't make them rare.  I left the place shortly after and never knew what happened when the market went bust.

You must have worked with my ex-husband. How it turned out is we got divorced. I'm financially independent and he is not. Our son still has the cards. He's 30 and keeps them on a shelf to remind him not to be stupid with his money. He just recently bought a bunch of Vanguard funds. Happy ending
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on January 18, 2019, 06:52:52 AM
84F in the winter might be just right for some folks. I'll bet in the summer he runs the a/c to some very cold temp.

84F was the summer indoor temperature with the A/C running. He didn't use heating for the winter, claimed that his mini-datacenter provided plenty of heat for the 2000 sqft house.

I keep our house at 77-78F. I'd prefer 75, wife wants 80. We don't have carpet and don't have high ceilings, so 78F is fine. Summers, we don't sleep with heavy blankets, just a cotton sheet, optional.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: boyerbt on January 18, 2019, 07:03:02 AM

Second is dear sister:

So what does she do 3 months into her first permanent job? Book a 2 month trip to Latin America and Europe with her new partner! She hasn't told her supervisor yet and I have no idea what will happen to her job.

How is this even possible? What is her end game and how does she expect her boss to react when told that she will be leaving her NEW position for two months in the near future? That is insane.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dcheesi on January 18, 2019, 07:10:19 AM
84F in the winter might be just right for some folks. I'll bet in the summer he runs the a/c to some very cold temp.

84F was the summer indoor temperature with the A/C running. He didn't use heating for the winter, claimed that his mini-datacenter provided plenty of heat for the 2000 sqft house.

I keep our house at 77-78F. I'd prefer 75, wife wants 80. We don't have carpet and don't have high ceilings, so 78F is fine. Summers, we don't sleep with heavy blankets, just a cotton sheet, optional.
Well heck, that's almost mustachian! Except for when his pipes freeze in the winter, and his food spoils in the summer... Sounds like the definition of cheap vs. frugal to me.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 18, 2019, 10:47:45 AM
Simple strategy for discussion with new car sis. Total up six months of her payment. Point out that this would pay for anything that would likely go wrong with a car for the first 150K+ miles.

Of course then she'd prob spend the savings...

 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Izybat on January 19, 2019, 07:41:10 AM
Yet another car related one. A coworker recently hit a deer in his car (which really sucks, feel bad for the guy). His three-year old car was totaled, so he took a day to go buy a new car. Because of the amount of negative equity he "had to" get something with a big rebate on it, so he got a new Ram Truck (possibly on lease? this part is unclear). However, he already had one Ram truck (also three years old), and his wife didn't want to drive a truck, so now they "had to" buy a new car for her. She wanted an SUV, so the bought a Porsche SUV (it was used, so I guess that's something). Then he says that three years is the longest they've ever kept a car, the usual was 12-18 months. Oh, and they also have cars for their two college age kids, a Camaro and a Mustang.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: I-Ranger on January 19, 2019, 08:49:16 AM


I remember in 1996 a person I met in Chicago was talking about their massive Beanie Baby collection.  Another person was saying how collectible they were going to be and how smart they were to be trading them and that $200 on eBay for such-and-such was a great deal, etc.  I didn't get it, still don't.  I was right in my instincts.



My wife and her family had some sort of hookup back in the 90s on Beanie Babies, I dunno how.  They ended up with a bunch of rare ones that they paid sticker or close to it for.

They ended up selling their whole collection and netted enough to take all 5 of them on a trip to Maui for a week (minus airfare, that was covered with dad's miles from work). 

Pretty amazing.

This reminds me of in the baseball card craze in the early 90s (I believe it may have started late 80s).   I was working with a guy who talked about his son who was collecting baseball cards as an "investment", how great that was and how this would fund his college education.   I didn't have the heart to tell him that it was rarity that made them valuable (my husband is a collector but not of baseball cards) and if everyone was collecting cards as an investment, that didn't make them rare.  I left the place shortly after and never knew what happened when the market went bust.

You must have worked with my ex-husband. How it turned out is we got divorced. I'm financially independent and he is not. Our son still has the cards. He's 30 and keeps them on a shelf to remind him not to be stupid with his money. He just recently bought a bunch of Vanguard funds. Happy ending

My brother and I collected cards from all sports like crazy from 84-92. We thought they would be valuable some day. They are not. At all.

About 5 years ago, my parents cleaned out their basement and asked us to take out ten full Rubbermaid storage totes of cards out of their house. I spent a weekend going through them and seeing what they were worth today. I found about twenty cards that were "worth" more than $10, kept those, and me and my brother dumped the rest in the fire pit and watched them burn. My Mom was slightly upset, because the cards were such a big part of my and my brother's childhood, but she did see that it would be insane to hold on to such a huge amount of something that is essentially just garbage at this point.

The cards of that era are worthless not just because so many were made and purchased, but also because everyone bought protective sleeves and cases for individual cards. So, not only does everyone have the cards, but they are all in mint condition!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MissNancyPryor on January 19, 2019, 10:40:03 AM
Anyone remember how you could get the MLB Topps sets at Costco?  Something like "Limit 4" boxes or similar? 

We had Ken Griffey Jr.'s rookie card in one of the those sets.  Never opened the box, still had the shrink wrap sleeve over box too.  Thought it would be worth a lot one day.   

I see it on eBay today for $4. 

At least the XH took all that crap with him when he poofed. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: pab88 on January 19, 2019, 12:45:46 PM

Second is dear sister:

So what does she do 3 months into her first permanent job? Book a 2 month trip to Latin America and Europe with her new partner! She hasn't told her supervisor yet and I have no idea what will happen to her job.

How is this even possible? What is her end game and how does she expect her boss to react when told that she will be leaving her NEW position for two months in the near future? That is insane.

I have no idea. I think the most likely scenario is that she actually booked the trip before she was made permanent, and did not tell anyone. She has got it into her head that she 'needs' to go to Brasil as our cousin is getting married. We are not particularly close with this cousin since we live on the other side of the world, and no one else from our family, including my mother, who is this cousin's Aunty, is going to go. I guess she feels like she is representing the family or something, I dunno.

I tried to talk with her at the end of last year, before she booked her trip, about priorities, told her that she didn't 'need' to do anything, and that she would have to decide what was more important to her - an overseas trip or a shot at building some savings and maybe moving out of home. That's when she kind of fobbed it off and said "I'm not the sort of person who's focused on money". As above I think she had probably already booked the trip.

DS' first partner, the one who rotated through 4 new cars in about two years, was on a decent six figure salary and got her used to a high-spend lifestyle. They would rent a house down or up the coast for a weekend away, for example. They rented a clifftop coastal home just south of Sydney ($$$) for the weekend for one of DS' birthdays. They would spend a lot on eating out.

This year has been less extravagant, but she went to a wedding south of Perth for a few days on the other side of the country for a few days, which would have cost 2k or so all in with flights, hire car and accommodation.

One of the reasons is she hasn't felt much desire to save is her place at my parent's house is very nice, she has an almost self-contained granny flat (Aussie word for a detached studio in a backyard). If that was rented it would easily fetch $250 a week. In contrast I lived in a small 2.5x3m bedroom in the main house and I hated the noise (my Dad runs the TV loud pretty much all the time he is home) and lack of personal quiet space.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AMandM on January 19, 2019, 02:13:56 PM
That's when she kind of fobbed it off and said "I'm not the sort of person who's focused on money".

When the inevitable day comes when she is unhappy because she's in debt and can't afford X, would it be cruel to remind her that she said this?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sibley on January 19, 2019, 05:17:23 PM
That's when she kind of fobbed it off and said "I'm not the sort of person who's focused on money".

When the inevitable day comes when she is unhappy because she's in debt and can't afford X, would it be cruel to remind her that she said this?

Or the day when her parents get sick of her and tell her to move out?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: pab88 on January 19, 2019, 05:58:16 PM
That's when she kind of fobbed it off and said "I'm not the sort of person who's focused on money".

When the inevitable day comes when she is unhappy because she's in debt and can't afford X, would it be cruel to remind her that she said this?

Or the day when her parents get sick of her and tell her to move out?

My parents like the company I think. They were happy for me to stay at home, indefinitely, and I think they would get a little lonely if my sister moved out.

The saying that comes to mind is the one that goes "you might not take an interest in politics, but politics will eventually take an interest in you" - that applies so well to personal finance. I really care for her, so I don't want to be the 'I told you so' person. I'm thinking of some non-preachy ways I can introduce her to moustachian ideas. I was thinking of taking her to lunch and sketching out a budget for her so she at least has a picture of how much is coming in versus how much is going out, then I can offer some suggestions or we can agree on a goal regarding a savings rate.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Davey Crockett on January 19, 2019, 10:06:43 PM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...

I did. You'll save yourself a few minutes of your time if you take a pass on the google search and just assume it's as dumb as you think it is.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 20, 2019, 03:35:40 AM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...

I did. You'll save yourself a few minutes of your time if you take a pass on the google search and just assume it's as dumb as you think it is.
Thanks for taking one for the team. :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on January 20, 2019, 08:17:16 AM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...

I did. You'll save yourself a few minutes of your time if you take a pass on the google search and just assume it's as dumb as you think it is.
Thanks for taking one for the team. :)

Dangit...I had to look. Couldn't just take your word for it. But I should have.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TheGrimSqueaker on January 20, 2019, 10:12:54 AM
I don’t even know what funko pop figurines are. I’m a little reluctant to even google it...

I did. You'll save yourself a few minutes of your time if you take a pass on the google search and just assume it's as dumb as you think it is.
Thanks for taking one for the team. :)

Dangit...I had to look. Couldn't just take your word for it. But I should have.

Ditto. Cannot be unseen.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: imadandylion on January 20, 2019, 10:32:14 AM
Not just overheard but said to my face:

"I don't get the point of saving money if I'll only earn like 5 cents in interest."

(Coworker in high amount of student loan and consumer debt who doesn't contribute to 401k or IRA, commenting on why he doesn't save money/doesn't want to save, during a discussion on savings account with higher interest rates than what he's currently using.)

:/
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: markbike528CBX on January 20, 2019, 02:48:11 PM
It has been suggested that the thread
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/  was getting big and unwieldy at 400+ pages.

In response this new thread has been created.

For newer people, topics in the previous thread exhaustively covered and thoroughly beaten to death in the old thread include:

Foam:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/msg717494/#msg717494
TL;DR - Foam is way off topic stuff.

The color of boxes:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/msg717747/#msg717747
TL;DR  -  Airplane voice/data Black boxes are Orange.

I'm open to editing this post to enumerate and describe other dead horses beaten past leather to the point of foamy-ness, so we don't have to figure out the color of boxes again.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 20, 2019, 02:53:55 PM
About 15 years ago when I lived in Virginia, I interviewed a young woman who would eventually take the job I was leaving to go back to get my Master's degree. Since she was now working with my old coworkers, I would run into her and her husband at get togethers. 3 years later, I got a job in the same place of employment that I had left but in a completely different department from where I worked previously. As luck would have it, I ended up working with my replacement's husband. Let's call him "Reprehensible A-hole Extraordinaire" or "RAE" for short. I hope I'm not giving away too much of the story already:).

Needless to say, after working with RAE for About 6 months, I developed strong negative feelings for him as a person. Just as an example of his character, he announced one day that he was going to go to lunch with his "surprise to all of us" now 10 year old son. Turns out, 10 years ago, his girlfriend got pregnant with his child. They moved into a house together and he told her that they would be together as a family. Then one day, when she was about 2 weeks away from the due date, he went out to get groceries and just never came back. Now remember, HE is telling us this story, so this is first person vice the rumor mill. Anyway, he admits he just left her with nothing, no $, no support, nada. About 2 years after the child was born, the exGF asked him to sign over all parental rights so the boy could be adopted by her new husband. RAE was more than happy to do so. Now, 10 years later the boy wanted to meet RAE and get to know him. During those 10 years, he met and married the above mentioned young lady who replaced me in my old job. (Let's call her Naive Wife #1, or NW1 for short). (Again, hope I'm not giving too much away....) It was my understanding that NW1 knew about the circumstances of RAE's first child and married him anyway...

RAE and I worked together for about a year during which time, RAE and NW1 show a penchant for lunches out, luxury sedans, dinners out with drinks, designer clothes, Harley Davidson motorcycle, and high end cigars. Given RAE and NW1's DINK status, I never questioned their spending. They bought a home about 45 minutes drive from work. All seemed well on the financial front. However, after my first year at my new job, I overheard a loud and very contentious meeting between RAE and our boss and less than 2 months later, RAE left abruptly and got a new job at another company.

Years pass and I lose touch with RAE (honestly, I made no effort to keep in contact with him) and NW1, but hear occasionally about them from my old coworkers, mainly that they now have 3 daughters. I relocate to Florida with my company, and I hear that RAE and NW1 are in the same city (having also been relocated to Florida since NW1 and I still work for the same company). But by this time, I have had no contact with them in years, so I really had no idea what was going on in their lives. 2 years after moving to Florida, an old coworker friend and his wife come to visit me. They call me to let me know they are leaving NW1's house and will be at mine in 10 minutes. I laughed, and said, "NW1 doesn't live 10 minutes away, they live about an hour away, so I will see you in an hour..."

12 minutes later, my friends ring my doorbell! I am so surprised that when I open the door, I blurt out, "Did RAE and NW1 move?" To which my friends replied in sudden hushed voices, "Don't you know what happened?"  I tell them no....

Turns out, RAE, being RAE, decided to not just step in, but full body bathe in his own crapulence and ended up having an affair with his 22 year old step-niece, who is the daughter of his brother's wife from a prior relationship. So step-niece was not blood related, but RAE and NW1 had known her since she was 10 years old and had been a family fixture at Christmas, birthdays and other family gatherings.

So NW1, having discovered the affair, immediately filed for divorce and moved to a small townhouse about 10 minutes from my place with her and RAE's 3 daughters. I was totally gobsmacked not only at the sordidness of the entire affair, but the follow on details which I discover from our mutual friends are as follows:

1) RAE had left his employer in Virginia and took a new job with another employer in Florida. About 9 months before the affair was discovered, he was let go due to"ethical issues". I have no idea what those ethical issues were, but am fairly certain, given RAE's past, they were grounded. So, at the time of the divorce, RAE had been unemployed for several months...

2) RAE and NW1 had sold their home in Virginia (for quite a bit of profit), but were renting in Florida. I have no idea what happened to the profit from the sale of the VA home.

3) After filing for divorce, NW1 moved to another rental closer to work with the 3 daughters, which necessitated them moving from the schools and friends they had been in previously, because they could no longer afford to rent the home they lived in before. So now they had to start over in a new school, no friends, and no dad (and the aftermath of whatever fallout on their dad's side of the family).

4) Worst of all, due to RAE's unemployment, and (it turns out very very very poor financial decisions on both RAE and NW1's part for their entire marriage during which time RAE made over $100k per year and NW1 made just under $100k per year for well over 10 years) they had no assets to split. So poor NW1 got nothing from RAE, not even child support for their 3 young daughters, and I would guess, she probably got slapped with half of the debt they probably incurred with their lifestyle.

I understand that NW1 remarried less than a year later, and RAE moved up north to try to start his own consulting company.

SMH...


Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 20, 2019, 04:56:28 PM
Wow. Just, wow.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Step37 on January 20, 2019, 11:44:59 PM
Indeed, wow. Some jaw-dropping stories on here. PTF
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 21, 2019, 11:24:47 AM
In 20 years, I've worked in a few industries, but the things I've seen tend to transcend fields. I had a young coworker, just starting out in a financial analysis job who felt he had to "keep up" (whatever that means)... So on his starting salary on the first rung of the career ladder, rented a one bedroom apartment in the suburbs of DC and bought a new Acura. He spent the first year stealing people's lunches from the fridge. It got to the point, where his boss, who felt bad for him, started bringing extra food into the office to keep him from pilfering other coworkers food.

About 2 years into the job, (he apparently was very good at what he did), he felt a calling to preach the word of God in a university town in TN. He told everyone at work who was very supportive of his dream. (I believe no one really knew it was him responsible for the food that disappeared from the communal fridge). He also met a young woman who also was inspired to join him (my understanding was that she was a certified nursing assistant). Anyway, after he met her, his plans to leave and preach were greatly accelerated. So within a few months, with no $$ saved and no theological seminary or divinity school background, he quit his job and moved to TN with his now wife and they both got jobs waiting tables at Ruby Tuesday.

He launched a blog that captured his "sermons" while also doing a great job at documenting their financial implosion which included requesting $$$ from former colleagues to finance the opening of a coffee shop that would be a welcoming and warm place for young Christians from the local university to hang out (with no business plan or anything other than reassurances that they had found a GREAT location for said coffee shop). Some of my coworkers were very generous and sent him $$, all of which went into their living expenses, which (not surprisingly) exceeded their incomes. The coffee shop idea never got off the ground...

Months pass, and their financial situation gets more and more desperate, and finally, he decides that what's really missing is theological seminary, so he quits his job at Ruby Tuesday and takes out student loans for them to live on while taking seminary classes online. More months pass and the financial situation continues to spiral, but now they've decided to add 2 (or 3?) dogs to the situation, and then of course, the ultimate of bright ideas: "Let's have a baby!" Once pregnant, the wife decides she can no longer work, and their financial situation goes into free fall.

Eventually, they are evicted, (at some point, the Acura is either sold or repossessed) and move to another home, then another - each one an eviction situation, until finally, unable to rent any place to live in that TN town, they move in with the wife's parents. Who apparently, according to the wife's tandem eyebrow raising blog, are horrible beyond words, despite taking in their now indigent daughter and son-in-law, 2-3 dogs and soon to be grand baby. Husband is now supplementing the student loan $ by selling AFLAC insurance on the side. After months of tolerating the wife's parents' "abusive behavior" (which included a roof over their heads, food, and food and care of their dogs), they save up enough to move out and returned to the DC area where they somehow rent a 3 bedroom 2.5 bath townhouse... But justify the home because, you know... The baby is coming... And the now 3 dogs...

Shortly after moving in to their new home, the baby is born, and the wife continues to insist that there is no way she can possibly work. The husband finally realizes that he cannot sustain their lifestyle and breaks down, gives up his dream of preaching, and contacts all his old coworker friends in order to try to get a job in financial analysis again. A lot of the coworkers who had given him $ for the coffee shop, understandably did not respond. His old boss, however, replies, GIVES him several hundred $$s but insists that he get a real job, stop taking out student loans, and face the reality that he's basically an unemployed married father with no real income living a lifestyle that DINKs in the DC suburbs cannot afford.

The husband gets a job at Home Depot, buys a beater with the $$ his old boss gifted him, and after 9 months of sending out his resume, and with a good recommendation from his old boss, lands a job in Charlottesville in financial analysis making less than what he did when he started on this entire journey.

I heard from his old boss that they rented a large farmhouse (basically for the 3 dogs) and now 3 kids that's about 45 minutes from his work.  Wife continues to refuse to go back to work.

My greatest hope, having watched this entire saga unfold over the course of years, is that the hard knocks, period of almost homelessness, and now 3 small kids, would have hit this couple over the head like a large sock full of marbles. But no.... His old boss informed me that last she heard from him, he was trying to take advantage of some program that would subsidize a car (I have never heard of such a program before, but apparently it's a thing where he lives?) for work.

What kind of car, you ask? Another Acura...

O_O

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marty998 on January 21, 2019, 01:30:09 PM
Oh boy this thread throws up some horrifying epics from time to time

Thanks @Piglet for sharing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: accountingteacher on January 21, 2019, 01:31:00 PM
In 20 years, I've worked in a few industries, but the things I've seen tend to transcend fields. I had a young coworker, just starting out in a financial analysis job who felt he had to "keep up" (whatever that means)... So on his starting salary on the first rung of the career ladder, rented a one bedroom apartment in the suburbs of DC and bought a new Acura. He spent the first year stealing people's lunches from the fridge. It got to the point, where his boss, who felt bad for him, started bringing extra food into the office to keep him from pilfering other coworkers food.

About 2 years into the job, (he apparently was very good at what he did), he felt a calling to preach the word of God in a university town in TN. He told everyone at work who was very supportive of his dream. (I believe no one really knew it was him responsible for the food that disappeared from the communal fridge). He also met a young woman who also was inspired to join him (my understanding was that she was a certified nursing assistant). Anyway, after he met her, his plans to leave and preach were greatly accelerated. So within a few months, with no $$ saved and no theological seminary or divinity school background, he quit his job and moved to TN with his now wife and they both got jobs waiting tables at Ruby Tuesday.

He launched a blog that captured his "sermons" while also doing a great job at documenting their financial implosion which included requesting $$$ from former colleagues to finance the opening of a coffee shop that would be a welcoming and warm place for young Christians from the local university to hang out (with no business plan or anything other than reassurances that they had found a GREAT location for said coffee shop). Some of my coworkers were very generous and sent him $$, all of which went into their living expenses, which (not surprisingly) exceeded their incomes. The coffee shop idea never got off the ground...

Months pass, and their financial situation gets more and more desperate, and finally, he decides that what's really missing is theological seminary, so he quits his job at Ruby Tuesday and takes out student loans for them to live on while taking seminary classes online. More months pass and the financial situation continues to spiral, but now they've decided to add 2 (or 3?) dogs to the situation, and then of course, the ultimate of bright ideas: "Let's have a baby!" Once pregnant, the wife decides she can no longer work, and their financial situation goes into free fall.

Eventually, they are evicted, (at some point, the Acura is either sold or repossessed) and move to another home, then another - each one an eviction situation, until finally, unable to rent any place to live in that TN town, they move in with the wife's parents. Who apparently, according to the wife's tandem eyebrow raising blog, are horrible beyond words, despite taking in their now indigent daughter and son-in-law, 2-3 dogs and soon to be grand baby. Husband is now supplementing the student loan $ by selling AFLAC insurance on the side. After months of tolerating the wife's parents' "abusive behavior" (which included a roof over their heads, food, and food and care of their dogs), they save up enough to move out and returned to the DC area where they somehow rent a 3 bedroom 2.5 bath townhouse... But justify the home because, you know... The baby is coming... And the now 3 dogs...

Shortly after moving in to their new home, the baby is born, and the wife continues to insist that there is no way she can possibly work. The husband finally realizes that he cannot sustain their lifestyle and breaks down, gives up his dream of preaching, and contacts all his old coworker friends in order to try to get a job in financial analysis again. A lot of the coworkers who had given him $ for the coffee shop, understandably did not respond. His old boss, however, replies, GIVES him several hundred $$s but insists that he get a real job, stop taking out student loans, and face the reality that he's basically an unemployed married father with no real income living a lifestyle that DINKs in the DC suburbs cannot afford.

The husband gets a job at Home Depot, buys a beater with the $$ his old boss gifted him, and after 9 months of sending out his resume, and with a good recommendation from his old boss, lands a job in Charlottesville in financial analysis making less than what he did when he started on this entire journey.

I heard from his old boss that they rented a large farmhouse (basically for the 3 dogs) and now 3 kids that's about 45 minutes from his work.  Wife continues to refuse to go back to work.

My greatest hope, having watched this entire saga unfold over the course of years, is that the hard knocks, period of almost homelessness, and now 3 small kids, would have hit this couple over the head like a large sock full of marbles. But no.... His old boss informed me that last she heard from him, he was trying to take advantage of some program that would subsidize a car (I have never heard of such a program before, but apparently it's a thing where he lives?) for work.

What kind of car, you ask? Another Acura...

O_O

You should forward his blog to whoever hired the guy to be a FINANCIAL ANALYST!!!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 21, 2019, 02:06:41 PM
Oh boy this thread throws up some horrifying epics from time to time

Thanks @Piglet for sharing.

Thanks for letting me vent... After 20 years of biting my tongue, it's cathartic to let it out....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Piglet on January 21, 2019, 02:14:20 PM
In 20 years, I've worked in a few industries, but the things I've seen tend to transcend fields. I had a young coworker, just starting out in a financial analysis job who felt he had to "keep up" (whatever that means)... So on his starting salary on the first rung of the career ladder, rented a one bedroom apartment in the suburbs of DC and bought a new Acura. He spent the first year stealing people's lunches from the fridge. It got to the point, where his boss, who felt bad for him, started bringing extra food into the office to keep him from pilfering other coworkers food.

About 2 years into the job, (he apparently was very good at what he did), he felt a calling to preach the word of God in a university town in TN. He told everyone at work who was very supportive of his dream. (I believe no one really knew it was him responsible for the food that disappeared from the communal fridge). He also met a young woman who also was inspired to join him (my understanding was that she was a certified nursing assistant). Anyway, after he met her, his plans to leave and preach were greatly accelerated. So within a few months, with no $$ saved and no theological seminary or divinity school background, he quit his job and moved to TN with his now wife and they both got jobs waiting tables at Ruby Tuesday.

He launched a blog that captured his "sermons" while also doing a great job at documenting their financial implosion which included requesting $$$ from former colleagues to finance the opening of a coffee shop that would be a welcoming and warm place for young Christians from the local university to hang out (with no business plan or anything other than reassurances that they had found a GREAT location for said coffee shop). Some of my coworkers were very generous and sent him $$, all of which went into their living expenses, which (not surprisingly) exceeded their incomes. The coffee shop idea never got off the ground...

Months pass, and their financial situation gets more and more desperate, and finally, he decides that what's really missing is theological seminary, so he quits his job at Ruby Tuesday and takes out student loans for them to live on while taking seminary classes online. More months pass and the financial situation continues to spiral, but now they've decided to add 2 (or 3?) dogs to the situation, and then of course, the ultimate of bright ideas: "Let's have a baby!" Once pregnant, the wife decides she can no longer work, and their financial situation goes into free fall.

Eventually, they are evicted, (at some point, the Acura is either sold or repossessed) and move to another home, then another - each one an eviction situation, until finally, unable to rent any place to live in that TN town, they move in with the wife's parents. Who apparently, according to the wife's tandem eyebrow raising blog, are horrible beyond words, despite taking in their now indigent daughter and son-in-law, 2-3 dogs and soon to be grand baby. Husband is now supplementing the student loan $ by selling AFLAC insurance on the side. After months of tolerating the wife's parents' "abusive behavior" (which included a roof over their heads, food, and food and care of their dogs), they save up enough to move out and returned to the DC area where they somehow rent a 3 bedroom 2.5 bath townhouse... But justify the home because, you know... The baby is coming... And the now 3 dogs...

Shortly after moving in to their new home, the baby is born, and the wife continues to insist that there is no way she can possibly work. The husband finally realizes that he cannot sustain their lifestyle and breaks down, gives up his dream of preaching, and contacts all his old coworker friends in order to try to get a job in financial analysis again. A lot of the coworkers who had given him $ for the coffee shop, understandably did not respond. His old boss, however, replies, GIVES him several hundred $$s but insists that he get a real job, stop taking out student loans, and face the reality that he's basically an unemployed married father with no real income living a lifestyle that DINKs in the DC suburbs cannot afford.

The husband gets a job at Home Depot, buys a beater with the $$ his old boss gifted him, and after 9 months of sending out his resume, and with a good recommendation from his old boss, lands a job in Charlottesville in financial analysis making less than what he did when he started on this entire journey.

I heard from his old boss that they rented a large farmhouse (basically for the 3 dogs) and now 3 kids that's about 45 minutes from his work.  Wife continues to refuse to go back to work.

My greatest hope, having watched this entire saga unfold over the course of years, is that the hard knocks, period of almost homelessness, and now 3 small kids, would have hit this couple over the head like a large sock full of marbles. But no.... His old boss informed me that last she heard from him, he was trying to take advantage of some program that would subsidize a car (I have never heard of such a program before, but apparently it's a thing where he lives?) for work.

What kind of car, you ask? Another Acura...

O_O

You should forward his blog to whoever hired the guy to be a FINANCIAL ANALYST!!!

Right? But both he and the wife took down their blogs. Apparently in the first months back in DC he would honestly tell potential employers about his time in TN, which I think led to some of them finding his blog... Both blogs disappeared a few months afterwards...

Brace yourself... He specialized in risk mitigation.... O_o
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: PrairieBeardstache on January 21, 2019, 02:29:24 PM
*** bat-shit-crazy story***

You should forward his blog to whoever hired the guy to be a FINANCIAL ANALYST!!!

I literally LOL'd at this comment because as all of the other details had me gripped in terror I overlooked the obvious. Good at his job, you say? Huh...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dcheesi on January 21, 2019, 03:00:00 PM
*** bat-shit-crazy story***

You should forward his blog to whoever hired the guy to be a FINANCIAL ANALYST!!!

I literally LOL'd at this comment because as all of the other details had me gripped in terror I overlooked the obvious. Good at his job, you say? Huh...
Sometimes I wonder if folks like this aren't a little like some of the patient cases described in the book Descartes' Error (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descartes%27_Error): fully capable of reasoning (in the abstract) about what someone else should do in a given situation, yet utterly incapable of applying that reasoning to their own lives.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LennStar on January 22, 2019, 05:20:11 AM
*** bat-shit-crazy story***

You should forward his blog to whoever hired the guy to be a FINANCIAL ANALYST!!!

I literally LOL'd at this comment because as all of the other details had me gripped in terror I overlooked the obvious. Good at his job, you say? Huh...
Sometimes I wonder if folks like this aren't a little like some of the patient cases described in the book Descartes' Error (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descartes%27_Error): fully capable of reasoning (in the abstract) about what someone else should do in a given situation, yet utterly incapable of applying that reasoning to their own lives.

It is easier to change the world into a better place, than to change yourself into a better person.

Habits, habits, habits.
One of the bad habits I have is getting angry about my many other bad habits, like reading the MMM forums instead of doing something productive.
In this sense, I am off ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on January 22, 2019, 08:03:18 AM
Coworker has complained on a couple of occasions recently about how much money he is dropping on Christmas. His family is coming to visit and he has to buy gifts for aunts, uncles, their kids, etc., and take them all out to dinner. While purchasing all these gifts he bought a 75" flat screen to treat himself and he found a "great deal" on a pool table. Also, he just got back from Disneyland a couple weeks ago. I have no clue how much money he makes but that is an alarming spending rate.

I had to post an update on this same coworker. Just heard over the cubicle wall...

Coworker is complaining about his very high heating bill (mostly because he bought too much house - which also has a bad commute). My other coworker, with whom he is conversing, recommended that he turn the thermostat down when nobody is home. He said, no, "it's too much of a pain in the butt." Oh, and he keeps his house at 75 degrees!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gail2000 on January 22, 2019, 09:04:06 AM
Coworker has complained on a couple of occasions recently about how much money he is dropping on Christmas. His family is coming to visit and he has to buy gifts for aunts, uncles, their kids, etc., and take them all out to dinner. While purchasing all these gifts he bought a 75" flat screen to treat himself and he found a "great deal" on a pool table. Also, he just got back from Disneyland a couple weeks ago. I have no clue how much money he makes but that is an alarming spending rate.

I had to post an update on this same coworker. Just heard over the cubicle wall...

Coworker is complaining about his very high heating bill (mostly because he bought too much house - which also has a bad commute). My other coworker, with whom he is conversing, recommended that he turn the thermostat down when nobody is home. He said, no, "it's too much of a pain in the butt." Oh, and he keeps his house at 75 degrees!

I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: slugline on January 22, 2019, 09:17:39 AM
I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.

They're like the digital equivalent of hot peppers. It burns . . . it burns . . . may I have another? :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 22, 2019, 10:44:23 AM
Too much trouble? What other little life chores does this guy avoid? Does he brush his teeth or are they too much trouble too? Does he ties his shoes? Change the oil in his car?

Wonder if he knows that even basic digital thermostats will do this automatically?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: fattest_foot on January 22, 2019, 10:57:36 AM
Speaking of collectibles, I had three; comic books, cards, and coins.

The coins were probably my first foray as I inherited my dad's coin collection when he died (I was 2 at the time). The comics and various cards (baseball, soccer, comics, etc) were late 80's and early 90's where I wasted an inordinate amount of my childhood savings. Worse is I almost never read them, I just collected.

Turns out they all ended up being worthless. By the 80's, I think everyone had caught onto the whole, "If I buy this and keep it in mint condition, it'll be worth a fortune!"

The coins were probably the biggest slap in the face, as I realized that the only ones actually worth anything are things like mis-prints. And by the time I was even born, everyone knew about them. Worse, my wife worked at a bank and they allowed her to "buy" (trade in) quarters that she wanted. She did this for a few months grabbing the pre-1962 quarters. I think a year or two ago I went through the entire coin collection and her quarters. The silver value of her quarters made them actually valuable; about $800. The rest of the coin collection? I might be able to get $50 if I could unload them all.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gail2000 on January 22, 2019, 11:26:21 AM
I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.

They're like the digital equivalent of hot peppers. It burns . . . it burns . . . may I have another? :)

Hmmmm..apt metaphor =).   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on January 25, 2019, 08:29:10 AM
Anyone remember how you could get the MLB Topps sets at Costco?  Something like "Limit 4" boxes or similar? 

We had Ken Griffey Jr.'s rookie card in one of the those sets.  Never opened the box, still had the shrink wrap sleeve over box too.  Thought it would be worth a lot one day.   

I see it on eBay today for $4. 

At least the XH took all that crap with him when he poofed.

With all the discussion about Rivera being a unanimous HOF candidate, I have to say I would have been fine with Griffey getting that honor. I have childhood memories of the cool kids having his Upper Deck Rookie card (I never owned it). I have teenage memories of him becoming one of the elite homerun hitters in the game. And I got to see him play during his final years in Cincinnati; he was old, but still managed a triple in one of those games. $4 seems like a bargain for those memories.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Prairie Moustache on January 25, 2019, 09:07:57 AM
I overheard my office mate say recently "yeah we'll be paying off that truck for a while, but we'll be building equity in it so it's okay!"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on January 25, 2019, 10:18:44 AM
I overheard my office mate say recently "yeah we'll be paying off that truck for a while, but we'll be building equity in it so it's okay!"

Yikes! There's nothing like paying interest to build equity on something that loses value every year!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: x02947 on January 25, 2019, 01:31:20 PM
I overheard my office mate say recently "yeah we'll be paying off that truck for a while, but we'll be building equity in it so it's okay!"

Yikes! There's nothing like paying interest to build equity on something that loses value every year!

Really, you build your % of equity faster that way! 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Prairie Moustache on January 25, 2019, 01:51:12 PM
I overheard my office mate say recently "yeah we'll be paying off that truck for a while, but we'll be building equity in it so it's okay!"

Yikes! There's nothing like paying interest to build equity on something that loses value every year!

Really, you build your % of equity faster that way!

I like the positivity! ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on January 25, 2019, 02:19:29 PM
I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.

They're like the digital equivalent of hot peppers. It burns . . . it burns . . . may I have another? :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jojoguy on January 26, 2019, 03:51:11 AM
I come across so many older people who make a lot more than me and have less savings than me at work. They have to have that 400K-500K home and a car that is less than 2 years old. Then I come across a very young guy making 40K+ a year who is already saving pretty well, and is very welcoming to the idea of saving his wealth for an early retirement. Wow, if only I had that mindset when I was in my early 20s.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MissNancyPryor on January 26, 2019, 10:05:09 AM
Anyone remember how you could get the MLB Topps sets at Costco?  Something like "Limit 4" boxes or similar? 

We had Ken Griffey Jr.'s rookie card in one of the those sets.  Never opened the box, still had the shrink wrap sleeve over box too.  Thought it would be worth a lot one day.   

I see it on eBay today for $4. 

At least the XH took all that crap with him when he poofed.

With all the discussion about Rivera being a unanimous HOF candidate, I have to say I would have been fine with Griffey getting that honor. I have childhood memories of the cool kids having his Upper Deck Rookie card (I never owned it). I have teenage memories of him becoming one of the elite homerun hitters in the game. And I got to see him play during his final years in Cincinnati; he was old, but still managed a triple in one of those games. $4 seems like a bargain for those memories.

See, it isn't about the little piece of cardboard for $4, though you can get one today on eBay if it helps.

Me, I know exactly where I was and what I was doing when Edgar hit that glorious shot up the 3rd base line and Griffey trucked around the bases to win in the playoffs.  (I was holding a newborn and I jumped up and held her up high like a scene from Roots and screamed to the high heaven.)  That baby is a grown woman today. 

And Edgar finally got voted into the Hall just this week. 

I also had the joy of witnessing in real time that dribbler go up the 1st base line and between Bill Buckner's legs.  I was standing in my XH's living room as a teenager, about ready to go on a date.  I knew even then as a kid (and a gurl) that it was a huge deal. 

Yeah, I don't need the card to relive all those wonderful times, but I get how holding something in your hand is a talisman of memory. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 26, 2019, 02:51:59 PM
I'm taking several unopened boxes of baseball cards from the 90s to donate today. They've hung around here long enough and I'm sure after checking eBay they are worth maybe $10 each. Not really worth the effort to auction. Hopefully some little kid will have a ball with 'em.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on January 28, 2019, 07:20:29 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gail2000 on January 28, 2019, 06:37:18 PM
I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.

They're like the digital equivalent of hot peppers. It burns . . . it burns . . . may I have another? :)

That’s it! My colleague struck again but fully admitted to the mistake. She had her car brought in to the dealership and had them put on windshield wipers. Said she tried. Said her dad tried. Paid 75$. Ok now today had the, replace the, and provide the part.... F! An sais I’m out of debt be cause I’m married. I’m a receptionist. She’s an accredited accountant. She doesn’t need a man! Ok nor do I really but the income helps and he’s kinda cute ( etc.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on January 28, 2019, 10:59:19 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: nnls on January 28, 2019, 11:56:25 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: HappierAtHome on January 29, 2019, 12:14:22 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 29, 2019, 12:51:45 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)

I think it was early in my working career (maybe in year 2000) that I noticed that we saved a lot more than other people of our age. I once mentioned to a colleague that we saved about 20K a year. He was completely baffled and looked like he saw water burning. I thought a lot about what it was that we did different, as I thought his income should be pretty similar to mine. Was it just the fact that we brewed beer at home? But it was probably our whole lifestyle in total.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marty998 on January 29, 2019, 02:23:38 AM
Work colleague was talking to another this morning

"How was your trip?"
"It was great, we took the kids skiing in Japan [for 5 days]"
"That's cool, I've got a couple of mates who like to go there for weekends, really good time of year to go, lots of snow"
"No kidding, I've got a mate who owns a cabin up there"

.... and on it went.


Bear in mind this is Sydney... Japan isn't exactly down the road.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: patrickza on January 29, 2019, 06:52:54 AM
I enjoy these posts but at the same time it causes pain in an area of my brain that i would be curious as to what it specifically does. In the name of science i should get a scan.

They're like the digital equivalent of hot peppers. It burns . . . it burns . . . may I have another? :)
Yes that's what it is. I used to always think of it as rubber necking road accidents. You really shouldn't look, and screw up the traffic for everyone else but you just can't help it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 29, 2019, 07:32:24 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)

I think it was early in my working career (maybe in year 2000) that I noticed that we saved a lot more than other people of our age. I once mentioned to a colleague that we saved about 20K a year. He was completely baffled and looked like he saw water burning. I thought a lot about what it was that we did different, as I thought his income should be pretty similar to mine. Was it just the fact that we brewed beer at home? But it was probably our whole lifestyle in total.

Same here.  I don't mention how much I save anymore.  At least two of the guys I work with are only saving the 5% in our TSP to get the agency match.  One is my age and has a wife in graduate school and the other is in his late 40s and trying to get the last kiddo out of undergraduate.  I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 29, 2019, 07:54:40 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)

I think it was early in my working career (maybe in year 2000) that I noticed that we saved a lot more than other people of our age. I once mentioned to a colleague that we saved about 20K a year. He was completely baffled and looked like he saw water burning. I thought a lot about what it was that we did different, as I thought his income should be pretty similar to mine. Was it just the fact that we brewed beer at home? But it was probably our whole lifestyle in total.

Same here.  I don't mention how much I save anymore.  At least two of the guys I work with are only saving the 5% in our TSP to get the agency match.  One is my age and has a wife in graduate school and the other is in his late 40s and trying to get the last kiddo out of undergraduate.  I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality.

At the beginning of 2017 I mentioned out loud to a frugal colleague that we had managed to save 60% of our income in 2016. Despite being a frugal person, she was still flabbergasted. But she visits her family in law in the US every year, with husband and children. That isn't cheap. So I know where some of her family's money is going.
At the beginning of 2018 I did not mention our new savings rate of 75% in 2017. It is so far from other people's reality, even from frugal people, that there is not really a point in talking about it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on January 29, 2019, 08:36:54 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)

I think it was early in my working career (maybe in year 2000) that I noticed that we saved a lot more than other people of our age. I once mentioned to a colleague that we saved about 20K a year. He was completely baffled and looked like he saw water burning. I thought a lot about what it was that we did different, as I thought his income should be pretty similar to mine. Was it just the fact that we brewed beer at home? But it was probably our whole lifestyle in total.

Same here.  I don't mention how much I save anymore.  At least two of the guys I work with are only saving the 5% in our TSP to get the agency match.  One is my age and has a wife in graduate school and the other is in his late 40s and trying to get the last kiddo out of undergraduate.  I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality.

At the beginning of 2017 I mentioned out loud to a frugal colleague that we had managed to save 60% of our income in 2016. Despite being a frugal person, she was still flabbergasted. But she visits her family in law in the US every year, with husband and children. That isn't cheap. So I know where some of her family's money is going.
At the beginning of 2018 I did not mention our new savings rate of 75% in 2017. It is so far from other people's reality, even from frugal people, that there is not really a point in talking about it.
Yeah, I don't talk much about how frugal I am or about my savings rate/investments at work. One of the ones who were shocked at how much I spend on groceries came by today and said they felt like I would be disappointed in them because they spent $300 on ONE grocery visit this weekend. *shrug*
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 29, 2019, 09:03:09 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I've had a similar reaction from a coworker because I'm on a few weeks unpaid leave right now. She made a snooty comment about it being nice for some to afford to take a few weeks off. No thought to the fact that I worked through xmas and this is effectively my break now, and even less thought to that fact that she proudly tells everyone she gives herself $200 a week 'fun money'. The woman is delusional.

I have the same thing when I go on holidays (admittedly not very mustachian holidays sometimes) and people at my work question how I can afford it, when I point out my car is 11 years old, I live in a small house, dont have a boat, dont gamble ect but they dont seem to see the correlation causation

Fixed that for you :-)

I think it was early in my working career (maybe in year 2000) that I noticed that we saved a lot more than other people of our age. I once mentioned to a colleague that we saved about 20K a year. He was completely baffled and looked like he saw water burning. I thought a lot about what it was that we did different, as I thought his income should be pretty similar to mine. Was it just the fact that we brewed beer at home? But it was probably our whole lifestyle in total.

Same here.  I don't mention how much I save anymore.  At least two of the guys I work with are only saving the 5% in our TSP to get the agency match.  One is my age and has a wife in graduate school and the other is in his late 40s and trying to get the last kiddo out of undergraduate.  I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality.

At the beginning of 2017 I mentioned out loud to a frugal colleague that we had managed to save 60% of our income in 2016. Despite being a frugal person, she was still flabbergasted. But she visits her family in law in the US every year, with husband and children. That isn't cheap. So I know where some of her family's money is going.
At the beginning of 2018 I did not mention our new savings rate of 75% in 2017. It is so far from other people's reality, even from frugal people, that there is not really a point in talking about it.

I'm damn impressed by 75%.  I'm only at about 28% until we recover from the trainwreck that was 2018.  But even that's up from about 19%.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on January 29, 2019, 09:08:35 AM
Listened to two coworkers discuss their cars.

CW#1 bought something newish (used - yay!) and loves it top to bottom. I drove it to a lunch with everyone piled in. Made a little compliment about how the four cylinder had alot of power. A frown came over their face. They were certain they had purchased a V6. Its definitely an I4. I didn't argue, I quit that hot potato topic. A previous vehicle they bought had AWD - except it didn't. A quick peek underneath proved that. I'm hoping - and I did not ask - that they did not pay extra for those features except I know they did b/c bigger engines and AWD come with a slight premium in most vehicles. In the future I'll just smile and say "I really like it" and leave it at that.

CW#2 Bought a used car (yay!) which the seller promised was all squared away. Except it wasn't. Off to mechanic #1 who did something. CW#2 wrote the check but doesn't know what. It didn't fix the problem. Then it went to mechanic #2 who did something else that CW#2 wrote a check for and doesn't understand - and it remains to be seen whether that fixed it or not.

Over the years I've been amazed at the "blank check" people give dealers and mechanics b/c the average person doesn't know and doesn't want to know anything about their car.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AMandM on January 29, 2019, 09:48:22 AM
I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality.

This.
A few months ago my husband said, "You know, I'm a tenured full professor. Maybe we should get a couch that doesn't look like a grad student's."
We got one from Craigslist for $150.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on January 29, 2019, 09:56:47 AM
I think that I spent so much time in college (without the "benefit" of loans) that I've never really outgrown that broke-college-kid mentality.

This.
A few months ago my husband said, "You know, I'm a tenured full professor. Maybe we should get a couch that doesn't look like a grad student's."
We got one from Craigslist for $150.

Up until a year ago, I was still using the sofa and loveseat that my grandparents bought in about 1993.  They were ugly, but actually a lot more comfy than what I have now.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: RetiredAt63 on January 29, 2019, 10:24:52 AM
My daughter still teases me about spending/living like a university student.  I love being retired/eccentric.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: onlykelsey on January 29, 2019, 10:30:00 AM
TomTX beat me to it, still wish it was more.  I know some gov workers can do a lot more, never really looked into why as I never expect to be one.

So, while most employer plans (401k, 403b, SIMPLE IRA, etc) "count" against the same per-person $19k limit, the 457 plan has its own separate $19k limit. Only government entities and nonprofits can offer the 457. Some of them will offer both types of plan, effectively allowing $38k in contributions.

The flip side is that salaries tend to be notably lower than private sector, so it's more difficult to take advantage of the extra space.
Posting to follow, and also to hopethat I may be able to put away 38K this year if I change jobs!  I'll max my 401K in my seventh paycheck (early April) then can hopefully get to another 19K before year end in my much lower-salary job...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Lucky Penny Acres on January 29, 2019, 11:28:05 AM
If you change jobs mid-year and if they are both normal 401k plans, the total yearly contribution is aggregated across both plans.
That means the aggregate contribution limit is still only $19k (not $38k) and you cannot contribute $19k to each plan. 

If you max out $19k in the first job, it would be an overcontribution if you also contribute anything to the second job.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cool Friend on January 29, 2019, 01:08:34 PM
This thread is a panacea for when I feel bad about myself and my life choices.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on January 29, 2019, 01:10:52 PM
If you change jobs mid-year and if they are both normal 401k plans, the total yearly contribution is aggregated across both plans.
That means the aggregate contribution limit is still only $19k (not $38k) and you cannot contribute $19k to each plan. 

If you max out $19k in the first job, it would be an overcontribution if you also contribute anything to the second job.
I think that @onlykelsey is moving to a government/non profit job where they will have access to the 457 plan.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on January 29, 2019, 01:42:05 PM
the 457 401 thing :  i wonder if anyone switches jobs like they do credit cards in order to do this technique
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gus on January 29, 2019, 03:14:18 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I feel like you could easily respond to that without being a jerk -- talk about the cost of the program and then talk about other things you've passed over. I think it sounds like a great deal and not something to save for if you make it a point to do so.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 30, 2019, 01:57:23 AM
I'm damn impressed by 75%.  I'm only at about 28% until we recover from the trainwreck that was 2018.  But even that's up from about 19%.

That is simple: I counted the amount of money I had transferred to our stock accounts, as part of our nett income. So I just calculated savings rate, not stash growth.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: onlykelsey on January 30, 2019, 07:13:39 AM
If you change jobs mid-year and if they are both normal 401k plans, the total yearly contribution is aggregated across both plans.
That means the aggregate contribution limit is still only $19k (not $38k) and you cannot contribute $19k to each plan. 

If you max out $19k in the first job, it would be an overcontribution if you also contribute anything to the second job.
I think that @onlykelsey is moving to a government/non profit job where they will have access to the 457 plan.
]
Yes, exactly.  Going from private to public (maybe).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on January 30, 2019, 07:23:25 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on January 30, 2019, 09:57:46 AM
I'm damn impressed by 75%.  I'm only at about 28% until we recover from the trainwreck that was 2018.  But even that's up from about 19%.

That is simple: I counted the amount of money I had transferred to our stock accounts, as part of our nett income. So I just calculated savings rate, not stash growth.

to clarify:  if you took 100k home after taxes, you invested 75k in stocks?  not including home equity. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 30, 2019, 01:54:25 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on January 30, 2019, 03:27:34 PM
trenchant
thank you using a word I've never heard of....made me go look it up....I'm definately working it into the dinner conversation to see if DH knows it (his vocabulary is better than mine and we like this kind of stuff)

Definition of trenchant
1 : KEEN, SHARP
2 : vigorously effective and articulate
a trenchant analysis
also : CAUSTIC
trenchant remarks
3a : sharply perceptive : PENETRATING
a trenchant view of current conditions
b : CLEAR-CUT, DISTINCT
the trenchant divisions between right and wrong
— Edith Wharton
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 30, 2019, 04:34:28 PM
From the French word « tranche » meaning “slice”. :)

I love how so many fancy words in English are just a normal French word meaning the same thing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on January 30, 2019, 05:12:30 PM
From the French word « tranche » meaning “slice”. :)

I love how so many fancy words in English are just a normal French word meaning the same thing.
Very astut
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Rural on January 30, 2019, 06:48:13 PM
From the French word « tranche » meaning “slice”. :)

I love how so many fancy words in English are just a normal French word meaning the same thing.


It's all because of the Normans.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on January 30, 2019, 06:52:51 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”

I made the assumptions that the original poster knows mean-spirited snark vs other kinds of comments.  It's not an unreasonable assumption to make.   I also made the assumption that there was enough pattern of that behavior that all doubt about the mean spiritedness had been removed.   (Sometimes people are just socially awkward, not mean.)

I believe that if people are being mean on a repeated basis, they need to be taught to stop doing that.   If I choose a moment when the snark has targetted me, it's a way to defend other people without putting them in the spotlight, like it would if I stepped in to defend them when they got snarked.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on January 31, 2019, 05:32:49 AM
I'm damn impressed by 75%.  I'm only at about 28% until we recover from the trainwreck that was 2018.  But even that's up from about 19%.

That is simple: I counted the amount of money I had transferred to our stock accounts, as part of our nett income. So I just calculated savings rate, not stash growth.

to clarify:  if you took 100k home after taxes, you invested 75k in stocks?  not including home equity.

Yes.
We haven't had a mortgage for the last 13 years or so and that of course accelerated our savings rate. Our stash didn't grow more than a tiny bit in 2018. So the savings just went into a black hole, called the stock market.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JZinCO on January 31, 2019, 01:19:00 PM
I'm going to throw out a second-hand 'heard at work'.
So I bought a home. And apparently it's the equivalent of having a birthday. I am emotionally pleased with my decision but I don't see it as a a celebratory thing. The math works out to being somewhat equivalent to renting (The NYTimes Rent vs Buy tradeoff calculator truly applies to me because I will be diverting cash once destined for market investments to pay the mortgage). So financially it's close to a wash at face value, though I will rent out a room so I will come out ahead.
At any rate I keep having these conversations:
CW: I head you bought a place!
Me: Yup
CW: Congratulations, you're way better off and no longer throwing money away.
Me: Thanks.
CW: [Sensing my blank expression] Are you happy?
Me: Yeah
I think the several years of 10% appreciation in my locale are painting the picture that the only way to get ahead is to buy a primary home...Coworkers cite the recent stock market correction but conveniently forget the entirety of the bull run, long-term market perfomances, long-term primary home valuations, carrying costs of owning a home, etc. No coworker has been biased the other way ,e.g. 'Yeah, I prefer renting because of the flexibility', etc...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LPG on January 31, 2019, 01:26:48 PM
I'm going to throw out a second-hand 'heard at work'.
So I bought a home. And apparently it's the equivalent of having a birthday. I am emotionally pleased with my decision but I don't see it as a a celebratory thing. The math works out to being somewhat equivalent to renting (The NYTimes Rent vs Buy tradeoff calculator truly applies to me because I will be diverting cash once destined for market investments to pay the mortgage). So financially it's close to a wash at face value, though I will rent out a room so I will come out ahead.
At any rate I keep having these conversations:
CW: I head you bought a place!
Me: Yup
CW: Congratulations, you're way better off and no longer throwing money away.
Me: Thanks.
CW: [Sensing my blank expression] Are you happy?
Me: Yeah
I think the several years of 10% appreciation in my locale are painting the picture that the only way to get ahead is to buy a primary home...Coworkers cite the recent stock market correction but conveniently forget the entirety of the bull run, long-term market perfomances, long-term primary home valuations, carrying costs of owning a home, etc. No coworker has been biased the other way ,e.g. 'Yeah, I prefer renting because of the flexibility', etc...

I'm not sure that this perception is limited to the recent "several years of 10% appreciation". At least in the US the middle class is convinced that buying a home is the single best investment you can ever make, and anything else guarantees that you'll be poor forever. It's so extreme that people try to convince me to buy a condo at ~$2500/month with only ~$400 going to principal at first rather than renting for ~$1500. Right, because throwing $2100/month into interest, taxes, HOA is worth it for $400/mo in principal, but throwing $1500/mo into rent and $1000/mo into the stock market is throwing money away? Such a very ingrained assumption that people rarely look into the numbers before making a decision.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JZinCO on January 31, 2019, 01:35:24 PM
Yeah you're right.
Talking to coworkers I found that the average down payment is 3-5%. I put down 10% and many of them gave an audible 'wow'.
side: to avoid facepunches, please know my PMI is $420 annually, effectively increasing my rate by 0.5% for 8 years. I haven't yet decided if it's worth extra payments to get to 20% or investing.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: markbike528CBX on January 31, 2019, 01:56:03 PM
From the French word « tranche » meaning “slice”. :)

I love how so many fancy words in English are just a normal French word meaning the same thing.

I once described myself and an American colleague (a one-time, near-Olympic heavyweight weightlifter) as the minions of one of our French colleagues(a petite younger lady).

And hilarity ensued.   When the laughter died down, our French colleagues noted that mignon implied little dancing gay boys at the French court.  And hilarity ensued.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mignon   open up the the English historical noun dropdown

or the French -
mignon (feminine singular mignonne, masculine plural mignons, feminine plural mignonnes)
cute (of a baby, an animal, etc.)
cute (sexually attractive).      -- neither of which really applies to us.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on January 31, 2019, 03:54:12 PM
I call my little girls “mignonne” all the time. ;)

Your story brings a smile to my face.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Ever_Anon on February 01, 2019, 10:52:16 AM
I don't usually discuss finances with my coworkers, but I just had a weird conversation with one of them. We're contractors, and about 1.5 years ago our contract was taken over by a different company. Today a coworker asked me if I'd had a 401k with the previous company, and if so what I'd done with the money when the contract switched.

This guy is about 20 years older then me. He's definitely held way more professional jobs. But he apparently left that balance sitting there for 1.5 years without thinking about what to do with it. Our 401k options at the first company were horrible. He's probably lost a fuckton of money in fees.  Plus he admitted he has another 401k lurking somewhere he's done nothing with.

Okay, whatever, a lot of Americans don't roll over their 401ks. Except during our conversation he said "I hope I didn't miss the window to get that money." Which implies that he actually thought there was a possibility that whatever money he contributed would disappear if he didn't do something about it, and then left it there anyway.

He also apparently never set up a 401k with our current company, because he "needed the money."

I hope he's got a trust fund or something waiting in the wings, because otherwise I fear for his ability to ever retire.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: gaja on February 01, 2019, 11:42:44 AM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”

I made the assumptions that the original poster knows mean-spirited snark vs other kinds of comments.  It's not an unreasonable assumption to make.   I also made the assumption that there was enough pattern of that behavior that all doubt about the mean spiritedness had been removed.   (Sometimes people are just socially awkward, not mean.)

I believe that if people are being mean on a repeated basis, they need to be taught to stop doing that.   If I choose a moment when the snark has targetted me, it's a way to defend other people without putting them in the spotlight, like it would if I stepped in to defend them when they got snarked.

Sometimes, the most efficient way to teach that lesson, is to be extraordinary nice and positive. "Oh, yes! I'm so glad you are happy for us, we enjoyed it so so much! [big smile and small hug]. All the money we don't waste on other stuff really pays off when we can do this type of thing. I am soooo glad we didn't waste it on mindless shopping or big food bills. You know, I heard some people spend $800/month on food! That must be so limiting!"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 01, 2019, 03:44:15 PM
I don't usually discuss finances with my coworkers, but I just had a weird conversation with one of them. We're contractors, and about 1.5 years ago our contract was taken over by a different company. Today a coworker asked me if I'd had a 401k with the previous company, and if so what I'd done with the money when the contract switched.

This guy is about 20 years older then me. He's definitely held way more professional jobs. But he apparently left that balance sitting there for 1.5 years without thinking about what to do with it. Our 401k options at the first company were horrible. He's probably lost a fuckton of money in fees.  Plus he admitted he has another 401k lurking somewhere he's done nothing with.

Okay, whatever, a lot of Americans don't roll over their 401ks. Except during our conversation he said "I hope I didn't miss the window to get that money." Which implies that he actually thought there was a possibility that whatever money he contributed would disappear if he didn't do something about it, and then left it there anyway.

He also apparently never set up a 401k with our current company, because he "needed the money."

I hope he's got a trust fund or something waiting in the wings, because otherwise I fear for his ability to ever retire.

I left a small retirement account when I left a job about 10 years ago.  My departure, and subsequent financial life, was...not good.  I managed to follow the account for awhile.  I didn't have anything to roll it into, so I just left it alone.  Eventually, I lost track of it.  About a year ago, I tried talking to the last known management company and all they could tell me was that it had been transfered somewhere else.  A few days ago I got a letter saying that a new company has it.  I tried to set up that account online this moring to roll it into my TSP.  I've been divorced and remarried since then, so it looks like proving my identity is going to be a nightmare.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 03, 2019, 09:22:49 AM
$500 a month for cell phones and cable TV!

By my MMM Inc. mental yardstick that sounds so expensive.

My brain was automatically running down the opportunity cost.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on February 03, 2019, 08:55:54 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”

I made the assumptions that the original poster knows mean-spirited snark vs other kinds of comments.  It's not an unreasonable assumption to make.   I also made the assumption that there was enough pattern of that behavior that all doubt about the mean spiritedness had been removed.   (Sometimes people are just socially awkward, not mean.)

I believe that if people are being mean on a repeated basis, they need to be taught to stop doing that.   If I choose a moment when the snark has targetted me, it's a way to defend other people without putting them in the spotlight, like it would if I stepped in to defend them when they got snarked.

Sometimes, the most efficient way to teach that lesson, is to be extraordinary nice and positive. "Oh, yes! I'm so glad you are happy for us, we enjoyed it so so much! [big smile and small hug]. All the money we don't waste on other stuff really pays off when we can do this type of thing. I am soooo glad we didn't waste it on mindless shopping or big food bills. You know, I heard some people spend $800/month on food! That must be so limiting!"

That's an excellent method to use.   

If it works, all the better.   If it doesn't stop the behavior, one can escalate.   Some people can take a hint, others a blunt comment, and some need a clue-by-four upside the head.  It's usually best to start small and work up as needed.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: hudsoncat on February 04, 2019, 12:15:51 PM
$500 a month for cell phones and cable TV!

By my MMM Inc. mental yardstick that sounds so expensive.

My brain was automatically running down the opportunity cost.

My dad who is otherwise fairly frugal and a good saver, spends $190+ per month for cable. Just cable (internet is a local company and cheap, cell phones through his work). Just so he can have the five channels he likes to watch. It makes my eye twitch a little every time he mentions it. Usually while complaining about the quality of service.

To bring this back around to the topic of the thread... a co-worker mentioned today in passing that they had a water heater go out this weekend. They replaced it, but now are $300 short until next pay day in two weeks for their monthly budget and they have to decide which bills to pay and which to see if they can get an extension.

Oomph... I know we hear this stuff and we see the headlines that most "Americans are $400 away from disaster" (Or whatever the exact amount is), but it's hard to imagine the stress of living like that all the time.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Cassie on February 04, 2019, 12:36:00 PM
HUD, if your dad is older he may watch more tv.  We never had it when raising the kids but have it now in our 60’s.  We watch tv more than we used to when working. We pay 200 for cable, internet and house phone. If we let the house phone go it’s more expensive.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: hudsoncat on February 04, 2019, 12:58:44 PM
HUD, if your dad is older he may watch more tv.  We never had it when raising the kids but have it now in our 60’s.  We watch tv more than we used to when working. We pay 200 for cable, internet and house phone. If we let the house phone go it’s more expensive.

He totally does. And I'd never tell him I thought it was crazy... but it still makes my eye twitch a bit to think about paying that much for cable alone! It really amuses me more than anything. Dude will walk around a store three times picking up and putting back something he actually needs, but damned if he'll ever get rid of the western channel! He is super easy to get a gift for though, all I have to do is ask my step-mom what he has been talking himself out of for the last six months. ha!

Please note this is all said with affection. My dad is the best.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: markbike528CBX on February 04, 2019, 01:30:07 PM
HUD, if your dad is older he may watch more tv.  We never had it when raising the kids but have it now in our 60’s.  We watch tv more than we used to when working. We pay 200 for cable, internet and house phone. If we let the house phone go it’s more expensive.

He totally does. And I'd never tell him I thought it was crazy... but it still makes my eye twitch a bit to think about paying that much for cable alone! It really amuses me more than anything. Dude will walk around a store three times picking up and putting back something he actually needs, but damned if he'll ever get rid of the western channel! He is super easy to get a gift for though, all I have to do is ask my step-mom what he has been talking himself out of for the last six months. ha!

Please note this is all said with affection. My dad is the best.

Some cable companies have ala-carte options.  I've gotten some flyers from my local internet/cable co.
 I think you might have to look really hard to find them though, and the ala-carte options are basically one level above standard cable (ie. not premium channels).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: galliver on February 04, 2019, 01:37:38 PM



He also apparently never set up a 401k with our current company, because he "needed the money."


I recently started my first professional job with a 401k (after grad school). Due to Reasons, my company didn't do 401k deductions until last month, so I got to compare my paycheck with and without deductions, without willingly forgoing them. Turns out due to the tax exemption alone, I get almost $1.60 in my 401k per dollar out of my paycheck. Close to $600/mo if maxing it out, before match, etc!

I can't afford *not* to contribute, I need the money! ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on February 04, 2019, 01:39:05 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”

I made the assumptions that the original poster knows mean-spirited snark vs other kinds of comments.  It's not an unreasonable assumption to make.   I also made the assumption that there was enough pattern of that behavior that all doubt about the mean spiritedness had been removed.   (Sometimes people are just socially awkward, not mean.)

I believe that if people are being mean on a repeated basis, they need to be taught to stop doing that.   If I choose a moment when the snark has targetted me, it's a way to defend other people without putting them in the spotlight, like it would if I stepped in to defend them when they got snarked.

Sometimes, the most efficient way to teach that lesson, is to be extraordinary nice and positive. "Oh, yes! I'm so glad you are happy for us, we enjoyed it so so much! [big smile and small hug]. All the money we don't waste on other stuff really pays off when we can do this type of thing. I am soooo glad we didn't waste it on mindless shopping or big food bills. You know, I heard some people spend $800/month on food! That must be so limiting!"


uh, we spend $800 on food a month, and without any take out and hardly any comfort food 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on February 04, 2019, 04:10:04 PM
I had a coworker get a bit snarky with me after hearing that I went to Hamilton this weekend. "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money" We were talking about groceries last week and she admitted she spends $800 a month for her and her husband; that's $500 more than we spend! Really wanted to point out that she is spending $6K a year more than us on groceries and could go to any show she could possibly want for that much money. Our season tickets, which these were part of, cost us just $600 and include 7 shows.

I don't accept snarky comments.   I prefer to toss some trenchant observations about the snark back, pretty much like a handgrenade into their foxhole.   It tends to discourage them from snarking at or near me again.

Then again, I had FU money.   But the real defense is that people who do that kind of snark do it to any and all possible victims, so you've got lots of passive support out there waiting to cheer you on.

Her: "Must be nice to be able to spend all that money!"

Me: "Sure is!   I had a great time!   I've heard you say you spend $800 a month on groceries for you and your husband.   We spend $300 a month for the 3 of us.  That's, let see, $500 per month times 12 months, why, that's $6000 more than us on just groceries!   That's how we could afford that show.   But hey, enough about me, you're clearly the expert here on big spending!  Tell us more!"

I don’t get why “must be nice” is even snarky.  I mean I get the intent and tone are key here, but objectively it is nice.  If someone said that to me, even sneakily, my response would probably just be “yeah it is nice”

I made the assumptions that the original poster knows mean-spirited snark vs other kinds of comments.  It's not an unreasonable assumption to make.   I also made the assumption that there was enough pattern of that behavior that all doubt about the mean spiritedness had been removed.   (Sometimes people are just socially awkward, not mean.)

I believe that if people are being mean on a repeated basis, they need to be taught to stop doing that.   If I choose a moment when the snark has targetted me, it's a way to defend other people without putting them in the spotlight, like it would if I stepped in to defend them when they got snarked.

Sometimes, the most efficient way to teach that lesson, is to be extraordinary nice and positive. "Oh, yes! I'm so glad you are happy for us, we enjoyed it so so much! [big smile and small hug]. All the money we don't waste on other stuff really pays off when we can do this type of thing. I am soooo glad we didn't waste it on mindless shopping or big food bills. You know, I heard some people spend $800/month on food! That must be so limiting!"


uh, we spend $800 on food a month, and without any take out and hardly any comfort food

Probably depends on how many people are in your household.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JZinCO on February 05, 2019, 02:43:13 PM
To bring this back around to the topic of the thread... a co-worker mentioned today in passing that they had a water heater go out this weekend. They replaced it, but now are $300 short until next pay day in two weeks for their monthly budget and they have to decide which bills to pay and which to see if they can get an extension.

Oomph... I know we hear this stuff and we see the headlines that most "Americans are $400 away from disaster" (Or whatever the exact amount is), but it's hard to imagine the stress of living like that all the time.

There's a mental hurdle that I can't get over... How is it that people pre-allocate every dollar to some expense before the money arrives? I mean I went through this when I was poor, but I find it hard to accomplish when there is alot of cash flowing. I guess someone is like 'I have X surplus so I can afford Y each month. Oh, our son likes soccer and that costs Z per month. We still have X-Y available so now we have X-Y-Z.. ad infinitum until the remainder is close to 0.'. But I mean.. I just don't understand that decision making process.
I really enjoy having flexibility to change my cash flow's allocation as life changes and that my bank account ebbs and flows as savings go in or one-time big expenses go out.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 05, 2019, 04:51:10 PM
To bring this back around to the topic of the thread... a co-worker mentioned today in passing that they had a water heater go out this weekend. They replaced it, but now are $300 short until next pay day in two weeks for their monthly budget and they have to decide which bills to pay and which to see if they can get an extension.

Oomph... I know we hear this stuff and we see the headlines that most "Americans are $400 away from disaster" (Or whatever the exact amount is), but it's hard to imagine the stress of living like that all the time.

There's a mental hurdle that I can't get over... How is it that people pre-allocate every dollar to some expense before the money arrives? I mean I went through this when I was poor, but I find it hard to accomplish when there is alot of cash flowing. I guess someone is like 'I have X surplus so I can afford Y each month. Oh, our son likes soccer and that costs Z per month. We still have X-Y available so now we have X-Y-Z.. ad infinitum until the remainder is close to 0.'. But I mean.. I just don't understand that decision making process.
I really enjoy having flexibility to change my cash flow's allocation as life changes and that my bank account ebbs and flows as savings go in or one-time big expenses go out.

Part of it comes down to "If I can afford the payments, I can afford the thing."

Being on the savings side of the mental hurdle is why I am most impressed with people who come here and make the lifestyle changes.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 06, 2019, 06:38:32 AM
To bring this back around to the topic of the thread... a co-worker mentioned today in passing that they had a water heater go out this weekend. They replaced it, but now are $300 short until next pay day in two weeks for their monthly budget and they have to decide which bills to pay and which to see if they can get an extension.

Oomph... I know we hear this stuff and we see the headlines that most "Americans are $400 away from disaster" (Or whatever the exact amount is), but it's hard to imagine the stress of living like that all the time.

There's a mental hurdle that I can't get over... How is it that people pre-allocate every dollar to some expense before the money arrives? I mean I went through this when I was poor, but I find it hard to accomplish when there is alot of cash flowing. I guess someone is like 'I have X surplus so I can afford Y each month. Oh, our son likes soccer and that costs Z per month. We still have X-Y available so now we have X-Y-Z.. ad infinitum until the remainder is close to 0.'. But I mean.. I just don't understand that decision making process.
I really enjoy having flexibility to change my cash flow's allocation as life changes and that my bank account ebbs and flows as savings go in or one-time big expenses go out.

I do that....with the caveat that everything that doesn't get allocated to something else is designated as savings (or, unfortunately, loan repayments at the moment).  Day to day, it keeps me accountable.  Freedom for me is knowing that I have $X to spend on Y so I don't stress about spending it because that's what it's there for.  I also know that if I run out of money for Y that I shouldn't pull it from Z because it's a different color of money, so to speak.  That's not to say that I can't change the color of some money, but it's a thought out process instead of on the fly. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on February 06, 2019, 08:58:06 AM
To bring this back around to the topic of the thread... a co-worker mentioned today in passing that they had a water heater go out this weekend. They replaced it, but now are $300 short until next pay day in two weeks for their monthly budget and they have to decide which bills to pay and which to see if they can get an extension.

Oomph... I know we hear this stuff and we see the headlines that most "Americans are $400 away from disaster" (Or whatever the exact amount is), but it's hard to imagine the stress of living like that all the time.
I've always wondered how they phrase the question on the survey.....depending on how they asked the question, I might answer yes.....there are times when there is less than $100 in my checking account (I don't count the $2,000 that keeps in above the minimum because I'm not paying fees for all the features the account has).....and since we're FI, just not RE (next year), it's not like I don't have the money 'somewhere', just not in my chequing account.   I am a cynic, and I often read survey questions and know what answer they're trying to elicit.  And I'm also damn good at manipulating statistics to produce the chart that 'proves' whatever point I want to make. 
But I also know I don't live in the 'real' world, and DH and I joke about living 'pay cheque to pay cheque', but that's only because I moved the money out of the chequing account on pay day to a higher purpose.  99% of all our spending goes on a credit card, for an unexpected expense doesn't really show up for a month.....and given that time and our cash flow, it would no longer be an unexpected expense, it would be in my spreadsheet (I love spreadsheets)......I also know it's a gift of genetics and environment that allows me to do a job that pays me well, and a brain that thinks the way it does (the way this community does)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 06, 2019, 04:15:59 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues buys breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 06, 2019, 04:30:06 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 06, 2019, 04:44:24 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on February 06, 2019, 05:00:52 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

Just....sourdough bread and butter? For $8?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: nnls on February 06, 2019, 05:03:21 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

Just....sourdough bread and butter? For $8?

The $8 probably had the option of having jam or Vegemite as well as butter (well that is what its like at the cafe near my place for $6)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 06, 2019, 06:41:27 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

Just....sourdough bread and butter? For $8?

The $8 probably had the option of having jam or Vegemite as well as butter (well that is what its like at the cafe near my place for $6)

Bingo, Vegemite.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JZinCO on February 06, 2019, 07:23:40 PM
I do that....with the caveat that everything that doesn't get allocated to something else is designated as savings (or, unfortunately, loan repayments at the moment).  Day to day, it keeps me accountable.  Freedom for me is knowing that I have $X to spend on Y so I don't stress about spending it because that's what it's there for.  I also know that if I run out of money for Y that I shouldn't pull it from Z because it's a different color of money, so to speak.  That's not to say that I can't change the color of some money, but it's a thought out process instead of on the fly.
I see, I suppose I do the same. I have regular bills + savings that are equally pre-destined for a set amount of money to go towards. The remainder is 'homeless' and ends accumulating as cash until I usually buy investments with it.
I am very averse to accumulating frequent one-off purchases or fixed, monthly costs. I think it's just that I come from a scarcity mindset..

Your point reminds me of a way of framing savings. As in 'I'm still spending my money on all things I want. I just want to make more freedom purchases instead of lattes'. Sounds a bit more of a mustachian approach to money.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on February 06, 2019, 07:44:37 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 06, 2019, 07:49:57 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Yeah, but how much does vegemite cost in the US?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 06, 2019, 07:50:22 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

Wow, and just a few years ago people were up in arms about a mere $4 toast (https://www.businessinsider.com/we-tried-the-fancy-4-toast-san-francisco-is-going-crazy-for-2015-6)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on February 06, 2019, 08:01:04 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Yeah, but how much does vegemite cost in the US?

Amazon says $9.42 for a 150-g jar. It seems like one could spend $20 and have enough bread, vegemite, and coffee for at least a week of breakfast.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 06, 2019, 09:21:16 PM
So.... she pays $12 for breakfast every day? Does she also pay for lunch???
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 06, 2019, 09:23:21 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

EIGHT BUCKS FOR TOAST??? No wonder it's not a thing in NZ. We're a cheap nation. Bloody eight dollars for toast.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 06, 2019, 09:50:24 PM
Hold up, maybe she’s a millennial and it’s avocado toast, which is why she can’t afford a house
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 07, 2019, 12:34:16 AM
So.... she pays $12 for breakfast every day? Does she also pay for lunch???

Yep.

And a vending machine Coke and a second coffee.

And Uber Eats for dinner.

She tells me that I'm unusually careful with money. I ... don't think I'm the unusual one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 07, 2019, 02:18:03 AM
So.... she pays $12 for breakfast every day? Does she also pay for lunch???

Yep.

And a vending machine Coke and a second coffee.

And Uber Eats for dinner.

She tells me that I'm unusually careful with money. I ... don't think I'm the unusual one.

I think we are indeed the unusual ones. Maybe is is not solely about making all our meals at home, but it's also about having cheap vacations (I am the only one at work who camps in a tent), not having cable TV, not using streaming services, not buying new clothes all the time, not having expensive cell phones and driving an old car.

But this co-worker above is on the other side of the scale. I guess most people are a bit more in between.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marty998 on February 07, 2019, 02:19:08 AM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Yeah, but how much does vegemite cost in the US?

Amazon says $9.42 for a 150-g jar. It seems like one could spend $20 and have enough bread, vegemite, and coffee for at least a week of breakfast.

Wow, we pay AU$6 for a 380g jar here in Australia. You guys should fly here and load up a suitcase (like the chinese do with our baby formula)

@mustachepungoeshere I too have a friend who loves his sourdough.... $10,000* a year habit.

Makes me die a little inside.

*Edit to clarify, meant to say it's all food during the day - includes sourdough brekkie, work lunches and coffees.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 07, 2019, 02:30:21 AM
So.... she pays $12 for breakfast every day? Does she also pay for lunch???

Yep.

And a vending machine Coke and a second coffee.

And Uber Eats for dinner.

She tells me that I'm unusually careful with money. I ... don't think I'm the unusual one.

That's crazy. I often think that these super spendy people have never been financially tested. They've never been without an income, or seen their parents without an income. They have no idea how quickly things can go wrong.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Davnasty on February 07, 2019, 06:57:41 AM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Or $6 at Aldi, and that's for the good stuff, not the bargain brands.

Also, HOLY SHIT $8 for toast? AUD to USD exchange is .71 right now but that's still $5.68 USD. I'd rather starve. I mean fast, I'd rather fast.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 07, 2019, 07:28:15 AM
EIGHT BUCKS FOR TOAST??? No wonder it's not a thing in NZ. We're a cheap nation. Bloody eight dollars for toast.

Don't post her budget! it'll leave a burn mark on my screen.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on February 07, 2019, 07:43:30 AM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Or $6 at Aldi, and that's for the good stuff, not the bargain brands.

Also, HOLY SHIT $8 for toast? AUD to USD exchange is .71 right now but that's still $5.68 USD. I'd rather starve. I mean fast, I'd rather fast.

Of course, but I’m extrapolating from my own experiences. The people I know who would have no qualms about dropping $12 on toast and coffee every morning are the same people who refuse to shop at Aldi because it’s “weird.” They may be convinced to slum it at Trader Joe’s.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on February 07, 2019, 10:05:39 AM
So.... she pays $12 for breakfast every day? Does she also pay for lunch???

Yep.

And a vending machine Coke and a second coffee.

And Uber Eats for dinner.

She tells me that I'm unusually careful with money. I ... don't think I'm the unusual one.

That's crazy. I often think that these super spendy people have never been financially tested. They've never been without an income, or seen their parents without an income. They have no idea how quickly things can go wrong.

I had a conversation like that a while back. Person told me to be less careful with money and have more fun (spendypants fun obviously, frugal fun isn't real fun). Live is for living you know, you might fall ill tomorrow and then you've saved all this money for nothing.

Actually, I did get pretty seriously ill in my early 20s and I can't tell you how glad I was that I had money saved up. The costs add up quickly even in a country with cheap health care. I was able to outsource things like cleaning, paid for loads of extra physical therapy, had money to travel to the most specialized hospital in the country. I'm doing much better now because I had money then - and if something happens to me now, my partner won't struggle financially (at all). This is worth more than 1000 trips to Thailand for me. Plus, when I was ill I was way too busy being ill to even think about memories from the past.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: penguintroopers on February 07, 2019, 12:34:03 PM
I've mentioned this before but one of my colleagues breakfast - usually toast and coffee - on her way to work and eats it in the office every day.

Yesterday she complained about having to stand in line for 15 minutes to buy toast. She said this like the cafe was the problem.

Today she wanted pastries instead of toast, so she went to a different cafe where the pastries are better.

But someone from her usual cafe saw her, and she felt guilty and like she had to explain her actions.

And yet all this is more convenient than dropping bread in a toaster?

I've never heard or anyone buying toast. I didn't even know it was an option. Is there something special about this toast that she can't do at home? How much does one pay for toast?

She pays $8 for the toast, $4 for the coffee.

She justifies it because it's sourdough. I make Vegemite toast on sourdough at home.

But...you could easily buy a whole loaf of good bread and half-pound of coffee beans for $12 even at Whole Foods! Toast and coffee is the easiest thing!

Or $6 at Aldi, and that's for the good stuff, not the bargain brands.

Also, HOLY SHIT $8 for toast? AUD to USD exchange is .71 right now but that's still $5.68 USD. I'd rather starve. I mean fast, I'd rather fast.

Of course, but I’m extrapolating from my own experiences. The people I know who would have no qualms about dropping $12 on toast and coffee every morning are the same people who refuse to shop at Aldi because it’s “weird.” They may be convinced to slum it at Trader Joe’s.

My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.

on the subject of the toast, I had a moment similar to when dogs will move their heads in confusion.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on February 07, 2019, 01:09:31 PM
i had a starbucks gift card someone gave me and with it i got a cup of tea.
 and it was 2.75 USD for a regular tea bag in a cup. 
and this was 8 years ago,  maybe it's more now. 

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on February 07, 2019, 01:10:10 PM
but toast, that's messed up.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TVRodriguez on February 07, 2019, 02:10:57 PM
My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.


I have to admit that the first time we went to Aldi, my husband picked up a gallon of milk and when we got home I noticed that it expired that day.  So there may be something to your co-worker's theory.  I just make extra sure now to check expiration dates!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on February 07, 2019, 02:27:41 PM
My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.


I have to admit that the first time we went to Aldi, my husband picked up a gallon of milk and when we got home I noticed that it expired that day.  So there may be something to your co-worker's theory.  I just make extra sure now to check expiration dates!

Meh. Drink it anyway. Even when it smells a little funky, it still tastes fine.

Rather than thinking of it as old milk, think of it as really, really young cheese.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Mairuiming on February 08, 2019, 06:10:34 AM
Recently a co-workers (aged around 25yr) asked for some suggestions about managing personal finances.
I welcomed the discussion and appreciated her enthusiasm.

Me: How much do you normally save in a month or in a year.
CW: I want to save RMB 10,000 (around USD 1500) this year. I am only RMB 20,000 away from the target.
Me: (Facepalm)

Showed her a monthly budget app. She was quite amazed to see such apps exist.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LittleWanderer on February 08, 2019, 10:26:04 AM
i had a starbucks gift card someone gave me and with it i got a cup of tea.
 and it was 2.75 USD for a regular tea bag in a cup. 
and this was 8 years ago,  maybe it's more now.

I have about $40 worth of Starbucks gift cards that I got from various work things.  So, obviously, I went to Starbucks.  I don't normally go out for coffee.  Since this wasn't my money, I opted to splurge and get something fancy.  I ordered a grande vanilla latte with soy milk and an extra shot of espresso.  $6.80.  Holllleeeee shiiiittttt. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ducky19 on February 08, 2019, 10:27:06 AM
Rather than thinking of it as old milk, think of it as really, really young cheese.

Thanks, I needed that chuckle - 5 internet points to you!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: onlykelsey on February 08, 2019, 02:32:30 PM
i had a starbucks gift card someone gave me and with it i got a cup of tea.
 and it was 2.75 USD for a regular tea bag in a cup. 
and this was 8 years ago,  maybe it's more now.

I have about $40 worth of Starbucks gift cards that I got from various work things.  So, obviously, I went to Starbucks.  I don't normally go out for coffee.  Since this wasn't my money, I opted to splurge and get something fancy.  I ordered a grande vanilla latte with soy milk and an extra shot of espresso.  $6.80.  Holllleeeee shiiiittttt.

It's probably not worth it for gift cards in that amount, but you can sell unwanted gift cards to raise.com at a discount.  I haven't sold to them, but I've bought from them and it's always worked perfectly.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on February 08, 2019, 09:07:20 PM
...
Meh. Drink it anyway. Even when it smells a little funky, it still tastes fine.

Rather than thinking of it as old milk, think of it as really, really young cheese.
This is legit! If your milk's about to expire, there are tons of ways to use it, but specifically I used to make a lot of cheese with Aldi milk: heat/acid curdled cheeses can be fried or just cubed up for pasta dishes or snacking. Older milk is great to seed with yogurt for more-yogurt, too, which also blends into great frozen yogurt with some brown sugar. And Aldi sells a good rustic Italian loaf that, once stale, makes a killer bread pudding with milk or cream on the edge; dates just give you an approximate sense of how old something is.

But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: nnls on February 09, 2019, 12:33:35 AM

But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

I have heard people say this, my company does payrises in March, a few people who had new years resolutions around saving more or budgeting or paying off debt have basically said its no point trying to start yes as it all changes in March. I tried saying they could have started and then with what ever payrise they get they just put the total amount towards the debt since they know they can live off pre-payrise money but apparently thats crazy talk
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 09, 2019, 03:15:35 PM
But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

Well DUH! A person has to spend all of it. Can't leave any money in the bank account at the end of the month. It gets stale like bread.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 09, 2019, 05:44:05 PM

 It gets stale like bread.

That made me laugh
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on February 09, 2019, 09:56:51 PM

 It gets stale like bread.

That made me laugh

I've also read (on the internet, of course) that it can mold. So yeah, it's gotta be spent before it goes bad.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ditheca on February 09, 2019, 10:22:21 PM
Wait... 49 people... in HOTELS, and MEALS, and GIFTS, FOR A WEEK? (Please note my tone of my voice rises until it hits a screech at the end of the sentence....)

I knew I shouldn't be grumpy at getting stuck with the bill for Christmas Dinner!  I certainly wasn't planning on hosting my brother, parents, grandparents, and in-laws...

$200+ for that meal probably extended my time to FIRE by less than a day... small price for keeping the peace.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Prodigal Daughter on February 11, 2019, 08:29:23 AM
Ya'll. I'm sure this thread is lousy with coworker car buying examples, but I'm so astounded that I just have to share. Also, because it's probably not appropriate for me to gossip about AT work...

Our new coworker, who is 23 or 24 was buying her first (well, second) car. Meaning, she's been driving the same old Toyota since high school that has over 200,000 miles, etc. We all gave her some advice and tried to point her in the right direction. One of my coworkers even sold used cars for a few months after she graduated from college over a decade ago, and she has great advice about how to deal with dealerships if you are going that route.

Cut to this morning. She's STOKED about her new used car. It's a 2018 RAV4. Which, of course, is a much newer and more expensive used car than I would ever buy, but she shares a house with roommates and has no kids and so I'm not going to judge too much.

But then she starts telling us about her extended warranty, gap coverage, and how her payments are only $455 a month. It took ALL MY WILLPOWER not to drop my jaw. THEN, my other coworker (whom I must mention is the NICEST and MOST WONDERFUL PERSON IN THE WORLD and would give you the shirt off her back, so I feel terrible saying this) goes "oh yeah, gap insurance, that's legit".

I am DYING over here. I refused to s*** on her happiness about her new car, but oh my god. It made me grateful that I've always bought cheaper cars and also always done a ton of research before ever going through the car buying process.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 11, 2019, 09:10:47 AM
Ya'll. I'm sure this thread is lousy with coworker car buying examples, but I'm so astounded that I just have to share. Also, because it's probably not appropriate for me to gossip about AT work...

Our new coworker, who is 23 or 24 was buying her first (well, second) car. Meaning, she's been driving the same old Toyota since high school that has over 200,000 miles, etc. We all gave her some advice and tried to point her in the right direction. One of my coworkers even sold used cars for a few months after she graduated from college over a decade ago, and she has great advice about how to deal with dealerships if you are going that route.

Cut to this morning. She's STOKED about her new used car. It's a 2018 RAV4. Which, of course, is a much newer and more expensive used car than I would ever buy, but she shares a house with roommates and has no kids and so I'm not going to judge too much.

But then she starts telling us about her extended warranty, gap coverage, and how her payments are only $455 a month. It took ALL MY WILLPOWER not to drop my jaw. THEN, my other coworker (whom I must mention is the NICEST and MOST WONDERFUL PERSON IN THE WORLD and would give you the shirt off her back, so I feel terrible saying this) goes "oh yeah, gap insurance, that's legit".

I am DYING over here. I refused to s*** on her happiness about her new car, but oh my god. It made me grateful that I've always bought cheaper cars and also always done a ton of research before ever going through the car buying process.

At least she's (probably) not stretching it out to a 7 year loan...


Trying to give her the benefit of the doubt here.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Prodigal Daughter on February 11, 2019, 09:56:38 AM
Ya'll. I'm sure this thread is lousy with coworker car buying examples, but I'm so astounded that I just have to share. Also, because it's probably not appropriate for me to gossip about AT work...

Our new coworker, who is 23 or 24 was buying her first (well, second) car. Meaning, she's been driving the same old Toyota since high school that has over 200,000 miles, etc. We all gave her some advice and tried to point her in the right direction. One of my coworkers even sold used cars for a few months after she graduated from college over a decade ago, and she has great advice about how to deal with dealerships if you are going that route.

Cut to this morning. She's STOKED about her new used car. It's a 2018 RAV4. Which, of course, is a much newer and more expensive used car than I would ever buy, but she shares a house with roommates and has no kids and so I'm not going to judge too much.

But then she starts telling us about her extended warranty, gap coverage, and how her payments are only $455 a month. It took ALL MY WILLPOWER not to drop my jaw. THEN, my other coworker (whom I must mention is the NICEST and MOST WONDERFUL PERSON IN THE WORLD and would give you the shirt off her back, so I feel terrible saying this) goes "oh yeah, gap insurance, that's legit".

I am DYING over here. I refused to s*** on her happiness about her new car, but oh my god. It made me grateful that I've always bought cheaper cars and also always done a ton of research before ever going through the car buying process.

At least she's (probably) not stretching it out to a 7 year loan...


Trying to give her the benefit of the doubt here.

I know! I did a rough calculation and it's probably a 5 year loan...but damn. That's a long time to be locked into $455 payments!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: HamsterStache on February 11, 2019, 10:22:23 AM

My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.


Nothing wrong with those either!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 11, 2019, 10:41:54 AM
Gap insurance in indeed legit if you don’t have a lot of money
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 11, 2019, 01:26:33 PM
She's STOKED about her new used car. It's a 2018 RAV4.

She could have still had more or less a new car had she gone for a three year old off-lease. Those still only have 40K miles and the payment would be much lower. 40K miles ain't nothing when a modern car will last north of 250K miles if well kept.

I've even seen 15 year old cars with low miles. That can be a real money saver done right.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 12, 2019, 01:21:29 AM
I've even seen 15 year old cars with low miles. That can be a real money saver done right.

I once bought a 10 year old car with low mileage and well kept. We used it as car number two, for driving short distances to the train station, which is a bit too far to walk to. The car is now in it's 19th year. Last year it needed a new wheel bearer, but that is the only repair we have had in all those years.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cassafrass on February 12, 2019, 08:16:29 AM

But then she starts telling us about her extended warranty, gap coverage, and how her payments are only $455 a month.

Not overheard at work, but this car payment reminds me of something I over-read in a moms' group:

A mom was complaining about the cost of childcare - which I agree is expensive, but (for me) a necessary and justified expense. But then she lost me when she said, "$2000/mo? That's ridiculous! It's even more than my car payment!"

Whaaaat?? The idea that someone has a monthly car payment anywhere near that amount is totally shocking to me. I thought bills like that were for movie stars and CEOs! I'm still begrudgingly paying off my husband's $155/mo payment and it hurts every time I see the money leave our account.

And the thought that anyone would be surprised and indignant about paying more for childcare than their car was a little saddening. Priorities people!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 12, 2019, 08:26:55 AM
But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

Well DUH! A person has to spend all of it. Can't leave any money in the bank account at the end of the month. It gets stale like bread.

Nope. It goes bad like milk. Too bad they don't turn it into tasty cheese.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jimmymango on February 12, 2019, 10:21:38 AM
I made many bad car decisions (and decisions in general) when I was younger, all of which started during the height of gas prices after Katrina. Sold the (paid-off) truck my dad gave to me because the cost of gas was killing me for my 90 minute (!) commute. Bought a 1981 Toyota Celica with 220,000 miles on it, into which I had to immediately invest thousands of dollars to repair. To be fair, I loved that car so much, even though the thing could barely go 70 without feeling like the engine was going to 'splode and didn't have working seatbelts when I got it (what was I thinking?!)...when you were on a winding back road low to the ground shifting with the 5 speed, you felt like you were a Formula 1 driver. One day in a rainstorm when I hadn't rolled the window up using the special technique you needed to get a good seal and subsequently sat down in a puddle, I donated it to Kars for Kids (the jingle is now stuck in my head again). This would be a great weekend project car now that I'm in a far different and better stage of life, but alas...

Anyway, this is not a Face Punch Me thread, so to the point at hand...

Received this text from my wife today: "I just heard one of the nurses say to another nurse, 'Do you have a credit card? Can I use your credit card to book a vacation and I'll pay you $50 a week?'"

So much wrong with the statement and the thought process (or lack of) that lead to the statement...I'm can't stop thinking about this.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mlipps on February 12, 2019, 10:35:51 AM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 12, 2019, 12:06:22 PM
But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

Well DUH! A person has to spend all of it. Can't leave any money in the bank account at the end of the month. It gets stale like bread.

Nope. It goes bad like milk. Too bad they don't turn it into tasty cheese.

Fun fact: Cheddar isn't naturally yellow.  They add a food coloring so it will be more visible in case of an airplane crash.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TVRodriguez on February 12, 2019, 12:29:33 PM
Received this text from my wife today: "I just heard one of the nurses say to another nurse, 'Do you have a credit card? Can I use your credit card to book a vacation and I'll pay you $50 a week?'"

No words.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on February 12, 2019, 12:48:10 PM
Received this text from my wife today: "I just heard one of the nurses say to another nurse, 'Do you have a credit card? Can I use your credit card to book a vacation and I'll pay you $50 a week?'"

No words.
cannot compute.....cannot fathom.....the optimist in me wants to believe your wife over-heard a joke.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: oldmannickels on February 12, 2019, 01:33:53 PM
The co-worker in the office next to me is leaving after 20+ years where I work. I thought good for him kids out of college, trying something new. Heard through the grapevine that he had to leave so he could access his 401k to pay of debtors.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 12, 2019, 01:36:46 PM
The co-worker in the office next to me is leaving after 20+ years where I work. I thought good for him kids out of college, trying something new. Heard through the grapevine that he had to leave so he could access his 401k to pay of debtors.

Wouldn't it be better to keep the job and pay the penalty on the 401k??
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: oldmannickels on February 12, 2019, 02:06:34 PM
The co-worker in the office next to me is leaving after 20+ years where I work. I thought good for him kids out of college, trying something new. Heard through the grapevine that he had to leave so he could access his 401k to pay of debtors.

Wouldn't it be better to keep the job and pay the penalty on the 401k??

Some plans don't allow "in service" distributions. He applied and got denied and that's how we all know.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Maenad on February 12, 2019, 02:57:25 PM
Hold up, maybe she’s a millennial and it’s avocado toast, which is why she can’t afford a house
OT, but a friend noticed I was making avocado toast once and said, "You own a house, you're allowed."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: okits on February 12, 2019, 10:21:08 PM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 13, 2019, 01:34:23 AM
I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

The website doesn't let me read the article as long as I don't switch off my ad-blocker, which I won't do. :-(

But what a concept. I understand that the concept sells, apart from the absurd price...
When I ever buy flowers (a few times a year), I usually buy roses, because they normally last longer than most other flowers.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 13, 2019, 01:45:28 AM
And the thought that anyone would be surprised and indignant about paying more for childcare than their car was a little saddening. Priorities people!

Well, at least a car is useful. /s
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AMandM on February 13, 2019, 08:23:27 AM
Received this text from my wife today: "I just heard one of the nurses say to another nurse, 'Do you have a credit card? Can I use your credit card to book a vacation and I'll pay you $50 a week?'"

PLEASE tell me the other nurse said no right away!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SheWhoWalksAtLunch on February 13, 2019, 09:37:26 AM
I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that. 

The website doesn't let me read the article as long as I don't switch off my ad-blocker, which I won't do. :-(

But what a concept. I understand that the concept sells, apart from the absurd price...
When I ever buy flowers (a few times a year), I usually buy roses, because they normally last longer than most other flowers.


Allow me to recommend Alstroemeria.  They're pretty, generally less expensive than roses, and very long lasting.  And as a bonus, contain no formaldehyde.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: markbike528CBX on February 13, 2019, 09:52:26 AM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

I have a negative reaction to cut flowere.   Eww... severed sex organs for purely viewing pleasure.. 

Associations llke The Bobbits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_and_Lorena_Bobbitt come to mind. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 13, 2019, 10:25:20 AM
I think I just outed myself at work.  The guys were having a discussion about how sometimes working too much overtime will push you into the next tax bracket (obviously they don't understand marginal tax brackets and I didn't have it in me to explain it).  The discussion turned to how much it would take to max out our TSP and without thinking I blurted out how much it would take, to the penny.  At least one of them was also under the impression that the agency match counted toward that limit.  I think this stemmed from some badly explained info from a retirement seminar years ago.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 13, 2019, 10:27:09 AM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

I have a negative reaction to cut flowere.   Eww... severed sex organs for purely viewing pleasure.. 

Associations llke The Bobbits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_and_Lorena_Bobbitt come to mind.

I also have a negative reaction to flowers: watery eyes, sneezing, asthma in the worst cases ...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jimmymango on February 13, 2019, 11:28:05 AM
Received this text from my wife today: "I just heard one of the nurses say to another nurse, 'Do you have a credit card? Can I use your credit card to book a vacation and I'll pay you $50 a week?'"

PLEASE tell me the other nurse said no right away!

I could not stop thinking about this and my wife later said she wasn't sure if the person was joking or not. With the nonsense I see people pull (a grandmother in her 30s [went to high school with her] creating a GoFundMe page to raise $5,000 because she's pregnant again and the dad is...surprise surprise...not in the picture), I'm inclined to think this was a real request. Because why not owe someone $50/week instead of save $50/week to pay for a vacation? You deserve the vacation now!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Pencil_Stash on February 13, 2019, 11:34:36 AM
My boyfriend's coworkers/friends were complaining about getting an advance on their paychecks before Christmas (paid 1.5-2 months pay all at once).  They were upset because - as we all know - that means you have to make the money last longer...

Here's the cringey bit:
Later I asked my boyfriend if that was normal for his coworkers and he said, "Yeah, before I met you I would literally put everything on my debit card and spendspendspendspendspend until it was declined.  Check the date.  'Oh shit it's only the 21st.'"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 13, 2019, 11:41:05 AM
My boyfriend's coworkers/friends were complaining about getting an advance on their paychecks before Christmas (paid 1.5-2 months pay all at once).  They were upset because - as we all know - that means you have to make the money last longer...

Here's the cringey bit:
Later I asked my boyfriend if that was normal for his coworkers and he said, "Yeah, before I met you I would literally put everything on my debit card and spendspendspendspendspend until it was declined.  Check the date.  'Oh shit it's only the 21st.'"

I once worked with a guy who would borrow $20 bucks pay me back the next pay check, borrow $20, pay me back...

I wonder how people who work as wait staff do overall? I literally had cash in my pocket every shift, but had to keep most of it to pay rent.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on February 13, 2019, 11:45:00 AM
i bought a ladie's and bag at a store once for Xmas.
i did not know that some women just buy like a handbag every day. 
the woman in front of me had to try 3 credit/debit  cards before one was accepted
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 14, 2019, 03:04:12 AM
i bought a ladie's and bag at a store once for Xmas.
i did not know that some women just buy like a handbag every day. 
the woman in front of me had to try 3 credit/debit  cards before one was accepted

Sometimes the card or the terminal just doesn't work correctly. I recently had to try different cards in a grocery shop before one of them worked. Nothing wrong with the coverage on them.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AMandM on February 14, 2019, 07:54:29 AM
Because why not owe someone $50/week instead of save $50/week to pay for a vacation? You deserve the vacation now!

Especially if you owe the $50 a week to a coworker, who probably won't have the guts to come after you if you're having hard time finding that $50 this month....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dcheesi on February 14, 2019, 09:20:09 AM
i bought a ladie's and bag at a store once for Xmas.
i did not know that some women just buy like a handbag every day. 
the woman in front of me had to try 3 credit/debit  cards before one was accepted

Sometimes the card or the terminal just doesn't work correctly. I recently had to try different cards in a grocery shop before one of them worked. Nothing wrong with the coverage on them.
Yeah, my main rewards card has gotten flaky, presumably from overuse. It can take two or three tries to get the chip to work, and sometimes it has to fall back to using the mag-stripe (still an option in the US). Sometimes I'll just switch cards instead, even though the rewards aren't as good on the other card I carry.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Slow&Steady on February 14, 2019, 10:01:19 AM
I just went down to HR to ask if I could change my 401k contribution on just my bonus.  I have now learned that not only can I NOT change my 401k contribution for my bonus, bonuses do not contribute to the 401k at all, not even at my current selected contribution rate!!

It was suggested to me to just up my contribution rate for the next couple of regularly scheduled paychecks, when I asked what the max contribution % I was allowed was, HR had to look it up.

The main reason that I wanted to divert most of my bonus to 401k was to stop the standard 50% from being deducted for taxes.  We are expecting something to happen this year that will make our tax liability basically 0 and I don't want to give the IRS an interest free loan.  Even if I up my current contribution rate and decrease what is currently be withheld for taxes (already set pretty low due to expectations) there is still the fact that I am giving the IRS a pretty hefty interest free loan in March that I probably won't get paid back for 12-14 months. I am annoyed!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: flipboard on February 14, 2019, 10:10:11 AM
]Yeah, my main rewards card has gotten flaky, presumably from overuse. It can take two or three tries to get the chip to work, and sometimes it has to fall back to using the mag-stripe (still an option in the US). Sometimes I'll just switch cards instead, even though the rewards aren't as good on the other card I carry.
Have you tried asking for a replacement? I think most card companies give you a free replacement for damaged cards every so often (e.g. at least once a year).

The alternative is to attach it to Apple/Android Pay on your smartphone, and pay contactless. Although when I last visited the US I noticed hardly any shops actually offer contactless (whereas it's ubiquitous here where I live).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SunnyDays on February 14, 2019, 10:20:26 AM

My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.


Wish we had Aldi's in Canada!  I once called Maple Leaf about an old can of ham I found in a relative's cupboard and was told that it was actually good for 2 YEARS past the expiry date.  So I imagine other company's products are similar.  I also heard that the taste and nutritional value may be altered, but that nothing canned will ever make you sick as long as there are no dents in the tin.  Now, I'm way less concerned about dates.

Nothing wrong with those either!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 14, 2019, 10:22:07 AM
]Yeah, my main rewards card has gotten flaky, presumably from overuse. It can take two or three tries to get the chip to work, and sometimes it has to fall back to using the mag-stripe (still an option in the US). Sometimes I'll just switch cards instead, even though the rewards aren't as good on the other card I carry.
Have you tried asking for a replacement? I think most card companies give you a free replacement for damaged cards every so often (e.g. at least once a year).

The alternative is to attach it to Apple/Android Pay on your smartphone, and pay contactless. Although when I last visited the US I noticed hardly any shops actually offer contactless (whereas it's ubiquitous here where I live).

The Apple/Android/Google Pay thing has gotten better as of late.  I can pretty much pay for everything except gas with my phone.  Which is good, because I tend to keep my credit cards locked in a drawer in my office because there is a certain person who lives in my house who don't seem to grasp the concept that you don't buy something with a card that you can't pay off immediately. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Jouer on February 14, 2019, 11:10:24 AM
Hold up, maybe she’s a millennial and it’s avocado toast, which is why she can’t afford a house
OT, but a friend noticed I was making avocado toast once and said, "You own a house, you're allowed."

Excellent joke! I sometimes make avo toast for my wife, a millennial. I like to jokingly ask if I'm allowed to have some given I'm GenX.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dcheesi on February 14, 2019, 11:21:06 AM
I just went down to HR to ask if I could change my 401k contribution on just my bonus.  I have now learned that not only can I NOT change my 401k contribution for my bonus, bonuses do not contribute to the 401k at all, not even at my current selected contribution rate!!

It was suggested to me to just up my contribution rate for the next couple of regularly scheduled paychecks, when I asked what the max contribution % I was allowed was, HR had to look it up.

The main reason that I wanted to divert most of my bonus to 401k was to stop the standard 50% from being deducted for taxes.  We are expecting something to happen this year that will make our tax liability basically 0 and I don't want to give the IRS an interest free loan.  Even if I up my current contribution rate and decrease what is currently be withheld for taxes (already set pretty low due to expectations) there is still the fact that I am giving the IRS a pretty hefty interest free loan in March that I probably won't get paid back for 12-14 months. I am annoyed!
The counterpoint to this is when 401K is applied to the bonus, and it screws up people's carefully planned out contribution rate.

If your company match is X% of salary and paid per-paycheck, then if you hit your max early you may miss out on matching payment for the last few checks of the year. So many folks will tweak their contribution % to hit the max right at the end of the year.

Then, if the bonus is equivalent to multiple paychecks, and 401K is applied to that, then you may get the standard X% of salary in match there, only to lose 2 or 3*X% in matching at the end of the year (after hitting your max 2-3 paychecks early).

If it's mid-year, then you may be able to lower your contribution % for the rest of the year, but if it's near the end of the year that might not be feasible.

[In any case, this sounds more like a candidate for the MPP thread. We now return you to your regularly scheduled workplace shame and comedy, already in progress...]
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Slow&Steady on February 14, 2019, 11:40:58 AM
I just went down to HR to ask if I could change my 401k contribution on just my bonus.  I have now learned that not only can I NOT change my 401k contribution for my bonus, bonuses do not contribute to the 401k at all, not even at my current selected contribution rate!!

It was suggested to me to just up my contribution rate for the next couple of regularly scheduled paychecks, when I asked what the max contribution % I was allowed was, HR had to look it up.

The main reason that I wanted to divert most of my bonus to 401k was to stop the standard 50% from being deducted for taxes.  We are expecting something to happen this year that will make our tax liability basically 0 and I don't want to give the IRS an interest free loan.  Even if I up my current contribution rate and decrease what is currently be withheld for taxes (already set pretty low due to expectations) there is still the fact that I am giving the IRS a pretty hefty interest free loan in March that I probably won't get paid back for 12-14 months. I am annoyed!
The counterpoint to this is when 401K is applied to the bonus, and it screws up people's carefully planned out contribution rate.

If your company match is X% of salary and paid per-paycheck, then if you hit your max early you may miss out on matching payment for the last few checks of the year. So many folks will tweak their contribution % to hit the max right at the end of the year.

Then, if the bonus is equivalent to multiple paychecks, and 401K is applied to that, then you may get the standard X% of salary in match there, only to lose 2 or 3*X% in matching at the end of the year (after hitting your max 2-3 paychecks early).

If it's mid-year, then you may be able to lower your contribution % for the rest of the year, but if it's near the end of the year that might not be feasible.

[In any case, this sounds more like a candidate for the MPP thread. We now return you to your regularly scheduled workplace shame and comedy, already in progress...]

Excellent points!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 14, 2019, 11:57:05 AM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

I have a negative reaction to cut flowere.   Eww... severed sex organs for purely viewing pleasure.. 

Associations llke The Bobbits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_and_Lorena_Bobbitt come to mind.

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2594
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: sherr on February 14, 2019, 12:32:53 PM
I just went down to HR to ask if I could change my 401k contribution on just my bonus.  I have now learned that not only can I NOT change my 401k contribution for my bonus, bonuses do not contribute to the 401k at all, not even at my current selected contribution rate!!

It was suggested to me to just up my contribution rate for the next couple of regularly scheduled paychecks, when I asked what the max contribution % I was allowed was, HR had to look it up.

The main reason that I wanted to divert most of my bonus to 401k was to stop the standard 50% from being deducted for taxes.  We are expecting something to happen this year that will make our tax liability basically 0 and I don't want to give the IRS an interest free loan.  Even if I up my current contribution rate and decrease what is currently be withheld for taxes (already set pretty low due to expectations) there is still the fact that I am giving the IRS a pretty hefty interest free loan in March that I probably won't get paid back for 12-14 months. I am annoyed!

@Slow&Steady Just increase the number of deductions you claim on your W-4. Tax withholding is all an estimation game anyway. Just don't undershoot your withholding by more than 9% or you'll end up owing an underpayment penalty.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on February 14, 2019, 12:41:06 PM
I am so grateful to my company. They make it easy (and even encourage) people to stick their entire bonuses into 401k. People front-load all the time and you don’t need to space it out over the entire year to get the full match.

But back to our regularly scheduled programming.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: phildonnia on February 14, 2019, 02:27:39 PM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

I'm requesting cremated flowers at my funeral.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: markbike528CBX on February 14, 2019, 09:23:41 PM
Valentine's Day is upon us...

My coworker just got this weird box of roses from a company called Venus et Fleur. She kept exclaiming that they last a year so I had to google the company to see if that was real. The roses cost FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS.

All of her coworkers keep fussing over how beautiful they are and 3 people have sent pictures to their significant others. Another woman counted how many roses there were--I'm sure so she could figure out if it was the $300 or $400 arrangement.

I had to look this up.

Basically, they are embalmed flowers (https://www.businessinsider.com/celeb-favorite-venus-et-fleur-2016-8).  I have an involuntary “ew” reaction to that.  🤢

I have a negative reaction to cut flowere.   Eww... severed sex organs for purely viewing pleasure.. 

Associations llke The Bobbits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_and_Lorena_Bobbitt come to mind.

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2594

Thanks dragoncar.   I'm here for the confirmation bias, and that was awesome!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 15, 2019, 11:58:19 AM
A lady, in her late 50s/early 60s in the next row over: So how do Zero interest loans work? I think I might get one.

She's a govt employee in the DoD and not affected by the recent shutdown.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Apples on February 15, 2019, 05:58:49 PM
I have a coworker who got a DUI in a crash that nearly killed him.  He drives farm equipment on my family's farm for a living, and my dad is looking into what exactly the insurance company says he can and can't do and still be an insured driver.  In the meantime, the basic assumption, by us, him, and everyone, is that he will likely be fired.  He has known this for 4 months, and will bring it up sometimes.  The house he lives in rent-free is tied to him being employed by the farm.  In the last 4 moths, he started selling his Jeeps (he buys cars for less than $1500 and does work on them and drives around in them for a while before selling them).  My thought:  wonderful, he's building up some emergency money in case he needs to get going quickly.  Then he buys a 3 year old Jeep on a 7 year loan for several hundred a month in payments, plus the increase in insurance and such.  WHAT.  That's such a terrible decision.  He has all sorts of little side things he does for money, but seriously buying this now is a terrible idea.  Gah.  It hurts to watch.
Title: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: FI-King_Awesome on February 15, 2019, 09:03:12 PM
One idiot at work bought a new AMG only to sell it due to relo a little more than a year later. $55k down the drain.







Yeah, it was me.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: horsepoor on February 16, 2019, 11:18:31 AM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat. 

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TheGrimSqueaker on February 16, 2019, 02:29:29 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: 11ducks on February 16, 2019, 03:41:54 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

Exactly- adorably dressed baby sits afront giant elaborate cake and is encouraged to smash, squish and face plant into cake by adoring idiots. Expensive photographer records event for posterity.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: horsepoor on February 16, 2019, 04:32:01 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

@TheGrimSqueaker  I'm sorry that you now know about this idiotic trend.  I'm sure the kid gets in trouble later when it sees another cake and naturally tries to smash it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: MissNancyPryor on February 16, 2019, 06:03:05 PM
Millennials now repeat the smash cake thing for their 30th birthday, too. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 16, 2019, 06:16:52 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TheGrimSqueaker on February 16, 2019, 07:30:15 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.

Cupcake and genuine attempt to eat: fine. Wasteful nonsemse characterized by no attempt to eat: horrifying.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: PrairieBeardstache on February 16, 2019, 08:51:03 PM
One idiot at work bought a new AMG only to sell it due to relo a little more than a year later. $55k down the drain.







Yeah, it was me.

Thanks, I bought it! Saved me $55k!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 16, 2019, 11:11:40 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.

Cupcake and genuine attempt to eat: fine. Wasteful nonsemse characterized by no attempt to eat: horrifying.

(https://i.imgur.com/BKLCImO.gif?1)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on February 17, 2019, 02:41:23 AM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.

Cupcake and genuine attempt to eat: fine. Wasteful nonsemse characterized by no attempt to eat: horrifying.

I've seen a number of cake smash birthdays for teeny weenies. It's actually pretty cool. You stick this entire cake in front of a wee one, whose little eyes bug out and little hands take whole fist fulls and stuff their mouths. The look on their faces when they realise it's for them is hilarious. To be fair, no one I know would spend $200 on a cake for this purpose. I've put together a few smash cakes - low sugar plain sponge, plain whipped cream filling and decorated with cream and organic colouring, fruit, perhaps some marshmallows. You don't really want a 1 year old eating the amount of sugar and crap in an adult cake. Pretty sure the last one I made cost about $10, max. The last one year old bday I went to descended into a bunch of happy babies on the lawn covering themselves and each other in cream and cake, while giggling grown ups took photos. Best birthday party ever!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: crispy on February 17, 2019, 04:35:33 PM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.

Cupcake and genuine attempt to eat: fine. Wasteful nonsemse characterized by no attempt to eat: horrifying.

I've seen a number of cake smash birthdays for teeny weenies. It's actually pretty cool. You stick this entire cake in front of a wee one, whose little eyes bug out and little hands take whole fist fulls and stuff their mouths. The look on their faces when they realise it's for them is hilarious. To be fair, no one I know would spend $200 on a cake for this purpose. I've put together a few smash cakes - low sugar plain sponge, plain whipped cream filling and decorated with cream and organic colouring, fruit, perhaps some marshmallows. You don't really want a 1 year old eating the amount of sugar and crap in an adult cake. Pretty sure the last one I made cost about $10, max. The last one year old bday I went to descended into a bunch of happy babies on the lawn covering themselves and each other in cream and cake, while giggling grown ups took photos. Best birthday party ever!

Publix offers a free smash cake when you order a regular cake for a first birthday. It is a tiny cake made just for the baby. My girls had them for their first birthdays, and it was cute to watch them taste cake for the first time. They were a mess!  I definitely wouldn't pay $200 for a smash cake though.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: merula on February 17, 2019, 06:11:06 PM
Made my kids smash cakes for their first birthdays, but I'm absolutely willing to eat food my kids have touched and haven't finished, so the actual amount of food wasted was maybe slightly above an average meal for a 1 year old.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: okits on February 17, 2019, 07:11:41 PM
Made my kids smash cakes for their first birthdays, but I'm absolutely willing to eat food my kids have touched and haven't finished, so the actual amount of food wasted was maybe slightly above an average meal for a 1 year old.

Yeah, wash their hands, sit them in their high chair, and eat some smooshed cake once they’re done exploring it.  A $200 cake had better be for a wedding!!!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: limeandpepper on February 17, 2019, 07:53:42 PM

My husband had to explain to a coworker what Aldi actually was. The coworker thought it was a "about-to-expire" food discount store.


Nothing wrong with those either!

+1  I eat BETTER when I shop at a discount store. All sorts of fancy stuff I might not usually buy, that cost less than the price of the regular stuff. The store I go to also has a policy that if there's something wrong with the food I can get a refund. So far nothing has been wrong with anything I bought which is great, but it's good to know that I'm covered if that ever happens.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: sapphail on February 17, 2019, 09:06:24 PM
Then he buys a 3 year old Jeep on a 7 year loan for several hundred a month in payments, plus the increase in insurance and such.  WHAT.

Maybe I'm cynical, but my first thought was that it could that be a ploy to keep from being fired? As in, they wouldn't be so heartless as to let me go, now that I have this huge monthly expense?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 18, 2019, 12:01:02 AM
Some colleagues were drinking coffee together when I arrived at work and switched shoes.

Co-worker 1 (who drives a similar 8 year old Subaru as I do): <mumbles something I cannot hear>
Co-worker 2 (very interested in cars) to co-worker 1: So now you afford new rims for the car. No excuse anymore!

I guess that co-worker 1 had gotten a financial benefit of some kind.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on February 18, 2019, 12:55:11 AM
Some colleagues were drinking coffee together when I arrived at work and switched shoes.

Co-worker 1 (who drives a similar 8 year old Subaru as I do): <mumbles something I cannot hear>
Co-worker 2 (very interested in cars) to co-worker 1: So now you afford new rims for the car. No excuse anymore!

I guess that co-worker 1 had gotten a financial benefit of some kind.

Hey check out this fat cat with more than one pair of shoes
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 18, 2019, 06:59:22 AM
Young employee, metro area, commutes 1 hr+. Wore out their old car. Needs another car to make commute. Can't afford another car. Waiting to see what they choose to do. Hopefully something smart like some sort of cash car and save hard for something better in a year. I offered my suggestion gently.

There are benefits to short commutes, bicycle commutes, etc.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on February 18, 2019, 11:45:55 AM
I just went down to HR to ask if I could change my 401k contribution on just my bonus.  I have now learned that not only can I NOT change my 401k contribution for my bonus, bonuses do not contribute to the 401k at all, not even at my current selected contribution rate!!

It was suggested to me to just up my contribution rate for the next couple of regularly scheduled paychecks, when I asked what the max contribution % I was allowed was, HR had to look it up.

The main reason that I wanted to divert most of my bonus to 401k was to stop the standard 50% from being deducted for taxes.  We are expecting something to happen this year that will make our tax liability basically 0 and I don't want to give the IRS an interest free loan.  Even if I up my current contribution rate and decrease what is currently be withheld for taxes (already set pretty low due to expectations) there is still the fact that I am giving the IRS a pretty hefty interest free loan in March that I probably won't get paid back for 12-14 months. I am annoyed!
Sorry if this has been answered. You have two options: change the number of exemptions, or fill out the necessary paperwork to declare yourself exempt from taxation for X amount of time. Just be sure to reset as needed. In my working days, I was on full commission, so even with 10 exemptions (Is this the correct term? Hope so), I got a shitload of money back. On my CPA's advice, i just let it run until I had had as much withheld as I owed the previous year. Then I shut off the tap. Worked great, though HR didn't like it (tough shit). I just used the same letter with a new date every year.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 18, 2019, 03:51:33 PM
Made my kids smash cakes for their first birthdays, but I'm absolutely willing to eat food my kids have touched and haven't finished, so the actual amount of food wasted was maybe slightly above an average meal for a 1 year old.

Yeah, wash their hands, sit them in their high chair, and eat some smooshed cake once they’re done exploring it.  A $200 cake had better be for a wedding!!!

Having now done three birthday cakes, I can understand why those cakes you see on Pinterest cost $300+.  The last one I did for my son took 3 days and probably cost $40 in ingredients by the time I made and tinted 6 different shades of marshmallow fondant.  I've had people ask if I sell them, but once every other year is enough for me.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 19, 2019, 08:37:43 AM
I feel so much better about paying $9 for a 5# bag of fancy, organic sprouted wheat flour after reading about $8 Vegemite toast!

This week, as part of a larger story, my co-worker told me her SIL and his wife are having a fight currently because she wanted to spend $200 for a custom "smash cake" for their baby's first birthday.  So like, a cake nobody is even going to eat.

What is a "smash cake"? It sounds like food that will intentionally be destroyed. Is it? If so, the correct amount to spend is zero. Buying food to intentionally destroy it is an abomination given that so many go hungry.

I've seen this done with a homemade cupcake. It's just an adorable photo-op of a 1 year old trying to navigate eating a delicious messy thing. No $200 cake required.

Cupcake and genuine attempt to eat: fine. Wasteful nonsemse characterized by no attempt to eat: horrifying.

I've seen a number of cake smash birthdays for teeny weenies. It's actually pretty cool. You stick this entire cake in front of a wee one, whose little eyes bug out and little hands take whole fist fulls and stuff their mouths. The look on their faces when they realise it's for them is hilarious. To be fair, no one I know would spend $200 on a cake for this purpose. I've put together a few smash cakes - low sugar plain sponge, plain whipped cream filling and decorated with cream and organic colouring, fruit, perhaps some marshmallows. You don't really want a 1 year old eating the amount of sugar and crap in an adult cake. Pretty sure the last one I made cost about $10, max. The last one year old bday I went to descended into a bunch of happy babies on the lawn covering themselves and each other in cream and cake, while giggling grown ups took photos. Best birthday party ever!

Publix offers a free smash cake when you order a regular cake for a first birthday. It is a tiny cake made just for the baby. My girls had them for their first birthdays, and it was cute to watch them taste cake for the first time. They were a mess!  I definitely wouldn't pay $200 for a smash cake though.

Was just about to say this, you beat me to  it.
813 represent!

ALso, if you order a bunch of cupcakes instead of a sheet cake for 1st birthday, they'll bunch together a couple of cupcakes in a separate box for baby smashing.

It's fun to watch, it's not expensive if family and friends get into paparazzi mode with their smartphones and DSLRs. Upload all photos and videos to Google Photos or some cloud shared drive.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on February 20, 2019, 12:59:46 PM
Some colleagues were drinking coffee together when I arrived at work and switched shoes.

Co-worker 1 (who drives a similar 8 year old Subaru as I do): <mumbles something I cannot hear>
Co-worker 2 (very interested in cars) to co-worker 1: So now you afford new rims for the car. No excuse anymore!

I guess that co-worker 1 had gotten a financial benefit of some kind.

Hey check out this fat cat with more than one pair of shoes
This made me giggle.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on February 21, 2019, 11:16:13 AM
But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

Well DUH! A person has to spend all of it. Can't leave any money in the bank account at the end of the month. It gets stale like bread.

Nope. It goes bad like milk. Too bad they don't turn it into tasty cheese.

Fun fact: Cheddar isn't naturally yellow.  They add a food coloring so it will be more visible in case of an airplane crash.

Made me literally LOL. Reference appreciated.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jaylbail on February 22, 2019, 05:08:08 AM
Manager at work is pushing to get everyone AWS certified. The exam costs about $140, and if you pass, you get a full reimbursement. I've signed up for the exam and a couple of other coworkers are joining me.

Of course, neither of them can sign up for the exam just yet - need to wait for next pay, you see. One of these coworkers only started work six weeks ago, so...okay, fair enough. We're not expecting everyone to be Mustachians, here. But the other's been there for seven months. You make six figures, dude. We all do. How do you not have 140 bucks to spare a week before payday?

Next day, 7-month guy comes in with a $10 bagel for lunch, while I just sit there, eat my meal-prepped spag bol, and try not to have an aneurysm.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 22, 2019, 06:14:49 AM
But on-topic - coworkers were discussing budgeting with the usual "I-can't"-isms, and one of them cited among reasons budgets didn't apply well to their situation was that they keep having changes in their circumstances that throw off their planning: a promotion, a raise... how does MORE income throw off a budget?

Well DUH! A person has to spend all of it. Can't leave any money in the bank account at the end of the month. It gets stale like bread.

Nope. It goes bad like milk. Too bad they don't turn it into tasty cheese.

Fun fact: Cheddar isn't naturally yellow.  They add a food coloring so it will be more visible in case of an airplane crash.

Made me literally LOL. Reference appreciated.

It's a special cheddar. Creates orange foam on contact with ocean water. Hi Viz Cheddar.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 22, 2019, 08:56:09 AM
But does it change to blue under certain conditions like high altitude dress shops?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Mesmoiselle on February 22, 2019, 10:26:05 AM
Millennials now repeat the smash cake thing for their 30th birthday, too.

*Gasp*

We do not! This is the first time this millennial has heard of it!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: onlykelsey on February 22, 2019, 12:40:26 PM
Millennials now repeat the smash cake thing for their 30th birthday, too.

*Gasp*

We do not! This is the first time this millennial has heard of it!
Okay that's actually hilarious.  -a millennial.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on February 22, 2019, 01:08:06 PM
I hadn’t heard of the expression “smash cake” before and I have two littles at home.

Signed: An Old Millenial
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: CarolinaGirl on February 22, 2019, 01:16:03 PM
Totally a thing where I live.  My kids are now 14 and 16 and both went to many parties while little where the 1 year old had a smash cake.  The tradition still continues...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on February 22, 2019, 01:21:04 PM
Totally a thing where I live.  My kids are now 14 and 16 and both went to many parties while little where the 1 year old had a smash cake.  The tradition still continues...

Is this a first child thing or for all the children?

I ask, because anyone who has been around children knows they can make a big enough mess with a cupcake.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TomTX on February 22, 2019, 06:06:02 PM
Millennials now repeat the smash cake thing for their 30th birthday, too.

*Gasp*

We do not! This is the first time this millennial has heard of it!

I'm going to totally do it for my 50th birthday. And still eat it all.

If I don't forget, of course. ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: horsepoor on February 22, 2019, 06:09:49 PM
Manager at work is pushing to get everyone AWS certified. The exam costs about $140, and if you pass, you get a full reimbursement. I've signed up for the exam and a couple of other coworkers are joining me.

Of course, neither of them can sign up for the exam just yet - need to wait for next pay, you see. One of these coworkers only started work six weeks ago, so...okay, fair enough. We're not expecting everyone to be Mustachians, here. But the other's been there for seven months. You make six figures, dude. We all do. How do you not have 140 bucks to spare a week before payday?

Next day, 7-month guy comes in with a $10 bagel for lunch, while I just sit there, eat my meal-prepped spag bol, and try not to have an aneurysm.

Good first post.  It's kind of hard to NOT have $140 when you make 6 figures.  WTF.

Smash cake person has her ailing FIL driving all the way across town on a daily basis in his giant truck to walk her dog, because it is apparently annoying her when she's feeding baby, and she won't hire a dog walker or take it to doggy daycare.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on February 24, 2019, 04:53:37 PM
One co-works explaining to another that leasing a car is better than buying one.

Co-worker1 -I am looking at buy this new car.
Co-worker2 -Why make payments for 96 months on a car when you can lease it and get a new one every four years?
Co-worker1 -Yeah you are right 96 months is like 8 years the car will be too old by then.
Co-worker2 -Your payments will be the same and cars last four years with almost everything covered by warrantee.  Getting a new one every four years makes economical sense. 

Me- Biting my tongue and not saying anything......(in my head) WTF! a 8 year car loan...just buy a used car for cash!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 25, 2019, 12:45:53 AM
I hadn’t heard of the expression “smash cake” before and I have two littles at home.

Signed: An Old Millenial

I didn't know what it was either, and was a bit cautious of the word "smash". And indeed, the baby is supposed to smash it's face in the cake...

https://www.angesdesucre.com/blogs/anges-de-sucre/is-cake-smashing-the-dumbest-cake-trend-ever

I guess the parents need to order an additional cake to serve the guests who come to celebrate the baby's first birthday.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 25, 2019, 07:47:12 AM
We had a smash cake.  I made it.  The icing melted off before he got to it.  Which is just as well because he hated getting his hands dirty at that time.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: martyconlonontherun on February 25, 2019, 07:54:45 AM
Manager at work is pushing to get everyone AWS certified. The exam costs about $140, and if you pass, you get a full reimbursement. I've signed up for the exam and a couple of other coworkers are joining me.

Of course, neither of them can sign up for the exam just yet - need to wait for next pay, you see. One of these coworkers only started work six weeks ago, so...okay, fair enough. We're not expecting everyone to be Mustachians, here. But the other's been there for seven months. You make six figures, dude. We all do. How do you not have 140 bucks to spare a week before payday?

Next day, 7-month guy comes in with a $10 bagel for lunch, while I just sit there, eat my meal-prepped spag bol, and try not to have an aneurysm.

Good first post.  It's kind of hard to NOT have $140 when you make 6 figures.  WTF.

Smash cake person has her ailing FIL driving all the way across town on a daily basis in his giant truck to walk her dog, because it is apparently annoying her when she's feeding baby, and she won't hire a dog walker or take it to doggy daycare.
Besides the MMW-WTF, can't he/she just pay on a card and would get reimbursed by the time the card is due?

But yea, it really has to be hard to make/spend that much to be living pay check to pay check. With that much spending, you think it would just collapse quicker.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 25, 2019, 08:29:39 AM
Manager at work is pushing to get everyone AWS certified. The exam costs about $140, and if you pass, you get a full reimbursement. I've signed up for the exam and a couple of other coworkers are joining me.

Of course, neither of them can sign up for the exam just yet - need to wait for next pay, you see. One of these coworkers only started work six weeks ago, so...okay, fair enough. We're not expecting everyone to be Mustachians, here. But the other's been there for seven months. You make six figures, dude. We all do. How do you not have 140 bucks to spare a week before payday?

Next day, 7-month guy comes in with a $10 bagel for lunch, while I just sit there, eat my meal-prepped spag bol, and try not to have an aneurysm.

Good first post.  It's kind of hard to NOT have $140 when you make 6 figures.  WTF.

Smash cake person has her ailing FIL driving all the way across town on a daily basis in his giant truck to walk her dog, because it is apparently annoying her when she's feeding baby, and she won't hire a dog walker or take it to doggy daycare.
Besides the MMW-WTF, can't he/she just pay on a card and would get reimbursed by the time the card is due?

But yea, it really has to be hard to make/spend that much to be living pay check to pay check. With that much spending, you think it would just collapse quicker.

I have a couple of AWS associate certs. It cost me $10-15 for each Udemy/ACloudGuru course, $20 in Whizlabs practice tests, and $150 for the exam. I charged the exam time to my company, and was reimbursed for training and test expenses. We get a $5k annual training allowance per employee, so everything comes from that pot. Even AWS conferences/summits/local events. Or if you're on an Azure-related assignment, then the same applies to attend Microsoft Ignite.

Right now I have a company-paid annual subscription to Linux Academy to help me prepare for an AWS pro exam.

I've turned down corporate recruiters (I don't deal with the 3rd party staffing firms) if there's no training budget. If they claim it is, I make sure it is written into the employment contract. If they balk at this, I gracefully exit the call.

Everything I learn directly impacts the customer's success and in turn my employer's. It's a win-win-win.

At some point, how much the employer is willing to pay is not the main factor. It's the work and the training and camaraderie that matters. I've turned down offers for 10k+ more just for these reasons.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 25, 2019, 08:34:19 PM
A colleague is moving house soon.

She asked me if I thought she should buy plastic tubs ($8 each) because "they're almost the same price as buying moving boxes" ($4 each).

1. $8 is not "almost the same price" as $4.
2. Paying for plastic tubs or paying for new cardboard boxes are not the only two options. I suggested she could buy second-hand boxes from a moving company, or look online for freebies. I even found a set of 50 moving boxes for free less than 20km from her place. She said it would cost too much in fuel.

I looked at a moving house calculator online. For her size house and level of stuff, it estimated 140 boxes. That would be $1120 worth of plastic tubs.

I just mentioned that we have a heap of spare bubble wrap, packing peanuts, newspaper, etc, in the office if she's interested. "Nah, I'll just buy bubble wrap and butcher paper."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 25, 2019, 09:39:01 PM
Seems like her mind is already made up and she really isn't worrying about the cost of fuel.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on February 25, 2019, 10:57:00 PM
Seems like her mind is already made up and she really isn't worrying about the cost of fuel.

Exactly. She wasn't asking for my opinion; she just wanted me to agree with her.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on February 26, 2019, 12:56:22 AM
A colleague is moving house soon.

She asked me if I thought she should buy plastic tubs ($8 each) because "they're almost the same price as buying moving boxes" ($4 each).

1. $8 is not "almost the same price" as $4.
2. Paying for plastic tubs or paying for new cardboard boxes are not the only two options. I suggested she could buy second-hand boxes from a moving company, or look online for freebies. I even found a set of 50 moving boxes for free less than 20km from her place. She said it would cost too much in fuel.

I looked at a moving house calculator online. For her size house and level of stuff, it estimated 140 boxes. That would be $1120 worth of plastic tubs.

I just mentioned that we have a heap of spare bubble wrap, packing peanuts, newspaper, etc, in the office if she's interested. "Nah, I'll just buy bubble wrap and butcher paper."

The last 2 times I moved, I got boxes for free, from work or from a neighbour. The first time I bought a pile of el cheapo boxes that were a good bargain.

One issue to consider nowadays with moving boxes, even official ones, are grey silverfish (Ctenolepisma longicaudata). In Norway many houses are now affected with these critters and they come in with carton boxes. They are difficult, if not impossible to remove from your house and your house might not be equally attractive for new buyers.

Some plastic crates can come in super handy, if you want to use them for storage later. We use those boxes for tools, camping gear and some other stuff. But not 140 of them.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on February 26, 2019, 09:39:28 AM
Last time we moved we slowly collected cardboard moving boxes from our work. I even asked the janitor who was happy to hand some off to me. Those boxes are nicer than the ones you can buy because they have a nice closing design on the top. The best thing is that my husband packaged them up ten at a time and made a little $ after the move selling then on Craigslist!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kahooli on February 26, 2019, 03:40:34 PM
A colleague is moving house soon.

She asked me if I thought she should buy plastic tubs ($8 each) because "they're almost the same price as buying moving boxes" ($4 each).

1. $8 is not "almost the same price" as $4.
2. Paying for plastic tubs or paying for new cardboard boxes are not the only two options. I suggested she could buy second-hand boxes from a moving company, or look online for freebies. I even found a set of 50 moving boxes for free less than 20km from her place. She said it would cost too much in fuel.

I looked at a moving house calculator online. For her size house and level of stuff, it estimated 140 boxes. That would be $1120 worth of plastic tubs.

I just mentioned that we have a heap of spare bubble wrap, packing peanuts, newspaper, etc, in the office if she's interested. "Nah, I'll just buy bubble wrap and butcher paper."

The last 2 times I moved, I got boxes for free, from work or from a neighbour. The first time I bought a pile of el cheapo boxes that were a good bargain.

One issue to consider nowadays with moving boxes, even official ones, are grey silverfish (Ctenolepisma longicaudata). In Norway many houses are now affected with these critters and they come in with carton boxes. They are difficult, if not impossible to remove from your house and your house might not be equally attractive for new buyers.

Some plastic crates can come in super handy, if you want to use them for storage later. We use those boxes for tools, camping gear and some other stuff. But not 140 of them.
I'll take silverfish over bedbugs any day.
I don't use anything second-hand that I can't sterilize.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on February 26, 2019, 04:56:35 PM
Seems like her mind is already made up and she really isn't worrying about the cost of fuel.

Exactly. She wasn't asking for my opinion; she just wanted me to agree with her.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on February 27, 2019, 11:31:06 AM
HUD, if your dad is older he may watch more tv.  We never had it when raising the kids but have it now in our 60’s.  We watch tv more than we used to when working. We pay 200 for cable, internet and house phone. If we let the house phone go it’s more expensive.
Get a firestick and learn how to load some Apps on it. (use youtube videos)
Apps aften called APKs on the android (Firestick like boxes.)
You will get way more stations than you get on cable.
I pay $45 for my internet (60Mbs) and have three Apps.
These three are plenty for us, Mobdro, Cyberflix and PlutoTV,
oh, also have Amazon Prime but only use it occasionally.
 It's a different style of watching, you need to pick what you watch, not just flip channels.
  You'd save $1,800 a year to spend on other things.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on February 27, 2019, 11:56:29 AM
HUD, if your dad is older he may watch more tv.  We never had it when raising the kids but have it now in our 60’s.  We watch tv more than we used to when working. We pay 200 for cable, internet and house phone. If we let the house phone go it’s more expensive.
Get a firestick and learn how to load some Apps on it. (use youtube videos)
Apps aften called APKs on the android (Firestick like boxes.)
You will get way more stations than you get on cable.
I pay $45 for my internet (60Mbs) and have three Apps.
These three are plenty for us, Mobdro, Cyberflix and PlutoTV,
oh, also have Amazon Prime but only use it occasionally.
 It's a different style of watching, you need to pick what you watch, not just flip channels.
  You'd save $1,800 a year to spend on other things.

I've been considering PlutoTV.  How do you like it?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: 10dollarsatatime on February 27, 2019, 01:47:09 PM
One of my employees... No rent, although I think he recently started paying the electric bill.  No transportation costs.  He lives less than two blocks from work, so he walks.  Still spends every penny he makes, usually on electronics and fast food.  Makes me sad.  At some point his benefactor will pass away and I'm not sure how he'll survive.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: haflander on February 27, 2019, 01:50:40 PM
... Mobdro, Cyberflix and PlutoTV ...

Would love to hear more about these. Are they free? Where does the content come from? What kind of content is available? Is it legal? Do I need a VPN? Is there a primer somewhere?

Maybe we could start a new thread.

+1
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on February 27, 2019, 02:02:49 PM

But then she starts telling us about her extended warranty, gap coverage, and how her payments are only $455 a month.

  Getting old must throw off a persons frame of reference.
 My first mortgage was $336 a month with a mortgage interest rate of
13.75%, including taxes, insurance, and PMI.

Ya, sorry about the PMI, but not really, I got layed off exactly one month
after the closing, glad I didn't use all my savings on the down payment.
 No, I didn't see the layoff coming.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: hudsoncat on February 27, 2019, 03:21:53 PM
Two co-workers were discussing car woes. Both drive cars that are 9 years old. CW1 is thinking about a new car because her spouse bought a (new to them) car and she wants something newer now too. CW2 has a car that over the last few months has been costing a lot of work. I'm sitting at the same table with them at lunch and I have worked with them for years for context as to why I butted into their conversation.

CW1: Did you get your car back [from the mechanic]?
CW2: yes. It's running fine now. But I'm still looking for a new car. I've averaged out our spending over the last 6 months to about $200 per month. That's basically a car payment!
CW1: Yes. I have been looking too. It's not fair that [spouse] drives around in a such a nicer car than mine.
CW2: Cars are so expensive to maintain though. I'm thinking about leasing this time.
CW1: Yeah, I like the peace of mind from a lease.
Me: Leasing is almost never fiscally smart in the long run. Really run those numbers, especially since you have 90+ mile daily commute (roundtrip for CW2). I'd imagine those miles would add up fast.
CW2: Probably, but those miles would be a lot more fun in a brand new car!
CW1: I agree. Can you send me any information you find? I need to convince [spouse]!

While certainly not to this board's standards, I would generally have considered both of these co-workers reasonably fiscally responsible. They drove older cars and usually bring their lunches from home... I hope that research will also telling them leasing is a bad idea, but I got the sense they were looking for information to support a decision already made.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 27, 2019, 03:56:12 PM
'Cause if one spouse gets a newer car, the other one needs to as well for twice the debt.

At least stagger the payments. Pay off one before buying the second one. 90 miles - wow.

The mental gymnastics required to justify choices like this is always entertaining. We did that once too.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: a286 on February 27, 2019, 05:55:26 PM
Couples who debt together stay together!


Wait....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on February 28, 2019, 07:06:22 AM
It's a different style of watching, you need to pick what you watch, not just flip channels.

Makes me wonder how much time people waste flipping channels. I prefer to pick the TV series/film/documentary I want to watch.

Go to Prime Video's main screen, select category, select show. Select to play in 4k or HDR if possible, as long as it doesn't cost extra.

No more of the "hey let's see what's on TV today" or looking through TV Guides (on your cable box or online).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on February 28, 2019, 11:48:17 AM
CW1: Yes. I have been looking too. It's not fair that [spouse] drives around in a such a nicer car than mine...

And here I am working on my DW trying to get us down to one car between us.

If I sell my car she has threatened to retaliate by not allowing me to use the remaining car (which is hers) for any reason. This would obviously make the proposition impractical. So once my car dies, I just won't replace it. It seems easier, in my thinking, for her to admonish me for selling my car than for not buying a new one. The former is actively aggressive while the latter is passively aggressive.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on February 28, 2019, 11:59:00 AM
When your car dies replace it with a $1500 wonder. Financially it will like not having a car at all. We have one. Cheap to maintain, presentable, reliable, etc. Just not a popular brand or model. We rarely need a second car but it happens. We drive the cheap one and save the nice one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on February 28, 2019, 12:11:42 PM
Quote
$1500 wonder

What is a wonder?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: FIRE@50 on February 28, 2019, 12:15:26 PM
Quote
$1500 wonder

What is a wonder?
Sliced bread
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on February 28, 2019, 12:23:00 PM
(http://spencer1984.com/review/image/r067a.jpg)

I don't think this car is the "$1500 Wonder" Just Joe was talking about.
I don't think it can be bought for $1500, also not cheap to maintain I am sure the insurance would be really high too! 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on February 28, 2019, 12:23:58 PM
Quote
$1500 wonder

What is a wonder?
Sliced bread
In all fairness, bad sliced bread
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on March 01, 2019, 06:17:24 AM
When your car dies replace it with a $1500 wonder. Financially it will like not having a car at all. We have one. Cheap to maintain, presentable, reliable, etc. Just not a popular brand or model. We rarely need a second car but it happens. We drive the cheap one and save the nice one.

Well, I admit, that is another reason my wife is winning the argument. My car is a paid-off, older Matrix with paint peeling off the doors. I wanted to sell it to pay down debt. But if you have to keep a car, this is the one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 01, 2019, 06:48:24 AM
Give it a paint job. Take it to a community college that teaches autobody. See if they can do a cheap paintjob. You'll prob need to buy the materials. Look for single stage urethane paint. Its the kind of paint that is put on commercial vehicles. Tough, simple and more affordable. I've used it with good results.

Maybe your other half will be more enthusiastic about it b/c it is shiny and tidy. Keep it forever. Or "accidentally" sell it. A paint job might raise the resale value to a point where it really makes sense to sell it in favor of a scooter or ebike and money into your investment accounts.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Threshkin on March 03, 2019, 11:15:14 PM
We have a $1,500 wonder as our second car.  A 2000 Dodge Caravan.  It has a few dents, scratches and stains but it runs like a champ and we wouldn't hesitate driving it across the country on a moment's notice.

I like to say "It is worth more than it is worth."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 04, 2019, 07:49:26 AM
That's a great way to define vehicles like that! I like unpopular vehicles. Low resale value but good utility for a long time. Who cares if its resale value at the end of a decade is a little less than a deluxe pizza?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Hirondelle on March 04, 2019, 01:19:35 PM
My coworker is considering starting a side-hustle/entrepreneurship option. So what's she considering? Right, buying $1200 worth of top-of-the-notch equipment that she doesn't really need for something she's barely thought about yet.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on March 05, 2019, 03:44:26 PM
My coworker is considering starting a side-hustle/entrepreneurship option. So what's she considering? Right, buying $1200 worth of top-of-the-notch equipment that she doesn't really need for something she's barely thought about yet.

it's easier than doing the work or asking the hard questions
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on March 06, 2019, 06:25:37 AM
While I was talking with one co-worker about something else (he wanting to buy a house), the others around the lunch table were talking about pensions. We just switched to another pension system, so pensions have gotten some attention lately. One very new co-worker is a lot older than me, I think halfway his 50-ies. I heard him say that he never before bothered to think about his pension. He thought that from now on, maybe he should look into it. I also heard with half an ear that some people talked about pension: I don't see the point of putting aside money for when I'm old. I'd rather use it now.

At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age. Than she needs to transfer the money to Norway while the dollar course is high (preferably).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on March 06, 2019, 07:20:57 AM
At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age.

Not completely accurate.  Have her google SEPP and 401K to learn how to get the money out of the 401k earlier without penalties. 

Not sure about the Roth details, but I know that some of the Roth money can be removed without penalty.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on March 06, 2019, 07:27:54 AM
At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age.

Not completely accurate.  Have her google SEPP and 401K to learn how to get the money out of the 401k earlier without penalties. 

Not sure about the Roth details, but I know that some of the Roth money can be removed without penalty.

I mentioned her to google "Roth backdoor" that is often mentioned on this forum. But I'll tell her to google SEPP as well.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 06, 2019, 07:53:56 AM
While I was talking with one co-worker about something else (he wanting to buy a house), the others around the lunch table were talking about pensions. We just switched to another pension system, so pensions have gotten some attention lately. One very new co-worker is a lot older than me, I think halfway his 50-ies. I heard him say that he never before bothered to think about his pension. He thought that from now on, maybe he should look into it. I also heard with half an ear that some people talked about pension: I don't see the point of putting aside money for when I'm old. I'd rather use it now.

At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age. Than she needs to transfer the money to Norway while the dollar course is high (preferably).

I know how old age in the USA with no savings goes (a person works a job until they can't). How does old age work in Norway without savings?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: gaja on March 06, 2019, 10:32:08 AM
While I was talking with one co-worker about something else (he wanting to buy a house), the others around the lunch table were talking about pensions. We just switched to another pension system, so pensions have gotten some attention lately. One very new co-worker is a lot older than me, I think halfway his 50-ies. I heard him say that he never before bothered to think about his pension. He thought that from now on, maybe he should look into it. I also heard with half an ear that some people talked about pension: I don't see the point of putting aside money for when I'm old. I'd rather use it now.

At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age. Than she needs to transfer the money to Norway while the dollar course is high (preferably).

I know how old age in the USA with no savings goes (a person works a job until they can't). How does old age work in Norway without savings?

The minimum state pension (for those who have no, or very low work history) is about $16k/year from age 67. Medical is of course covered, and there is housing assistance and other help available. Life is not luxurious for those with minimum pensions, but they don’t starve. When it is time to move into a home, you pay based on what you can afford. There are very few private care facilities that I know of. Most people use the public ones, regardless of their financial state. No one saves up for that time, or pays for care insurance.

If you have worked 20-30 years, the state pension is enough to live a MMM lifestyle quite comfortably. In addition, both public and private employers are mandated to provide pension savings for their employees.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: flipboard on March 06, 2019, 12:03:03 PM
At least I have one sensible co-worker. She worked in the USA for a couple of years. She mentioned that the has both a 401 and a Roth and said she couldn't touch it without penalties until a certain age. Than she needs to transfer the money to Norway while the dollar course is high (preferably).
Tell your coworker to read the Norway-USA double tax agreement. They may be surprised... (Specifically: the US can't tax it.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: The Fake Cheap on March 06, 2019, 06:03:46 PM
This one wasn't really overheard, but happened to me directly.

I had a minor issue with my pay cheque where some extra funds were deducted off on 3 pays, $46 per pay.  We were notified in advance, by about 2 weeks this was going to happen, my issue wasn't with the amount (some minor budget issues), but the fact that HR KNEW this would happen for almost a year, and didn't tell anyone until 2 weeks before.  Here is the conversation I had with them:


Me "Hi HR.  I just received notice about these deductions that are going to come off my next 3 pays, it's not really a big deal, but I would have liked to receive more notice so I could have set some money aside to cover this."

HR: "Oh, that would not of been possible, the deductions had to come off of these particular pay cheques, there is no other way for us to do this."

Me: "Yes, but I could have set the $150 aside months ago, had I known, and then just transferred $46 that I saved into my account when I get paid, and it would be like I was getting my normal pay cheque."

HR: *8 seconds of silence while his mind was exploding processing that*  "Yeah, I guess you could have done that."

Me: "If you could just pass that along for next time, that would be great.  Thanks."
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on March 06, 2019, 06:06:40 PM
This one wasn't really overheard, but happened to me directly.

I had a minor issue with my pay cheque where some extra funds were deducted off on 3 pays, $46 per pay.  We were notified in advance, by about 2 weeks this was going to happen, my issue wasn't with the amount (some minor budget issues), but the fact that HR KNEW this would happen for almost a year, and didn't tell anyone until 2 weeks before.  Here is the conversation I had with them:


Me "Hi HR.  I just received notice about these deductions that are going to come off my next 3 pays, it's not really a big deal, but I would have liked to receive more notice so I could have set some money aside to cover this."

HR: "Oh, that would not of been possible, the deductions had to come off of these particular pay cheques, there is no other way for us to do this."

Me: "Yes, but I could have set the $150 aside months ago, had I known, and then just transferred $46 that I saved into my account when I get paid, and it would be like I was getting my normal pay cheque."

HR: *8 seconds of silence while his mind was exploding processing that*  "Yeah, I guess you could have done that."

Me: "If you could just pass that along for next time, that would be great.  Thanks."

If anyone with authority has had to do something similar before, there was probably a conscious decision to make the announcement at a time that allowed for minimal bitching and freaking out for HR to deal with.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: The Keen Saver on March 07, 2019, 03:59:12 AM
Couldn't get over a co-workers reaction recently when I said I rarely spend money:

CW: "So what, you save all your money????"

Didn't have the heart to tell her that my savings rate is in the 80% - 90% range.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on March 07, 2019, 04:48:03 AM
Couldn't get over a co-workers reaction recently when I said I rarely spend money:

CW: "So what, you save all your money????"

Didn't have the heart to tell her that my savings rate is in the 80% - 90% range.

People think the concept of delayed gratification is strange.

I once mention at work that we saved a lot, like 70% of our income last year. A co-worker who heard it said that in that case, I must have really low expenses. He himself has a mortgage and ows a small airplane (flying is his passion). I don't have any of these, so yes.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on March 07, 2019, 06:56:41 AM
To a normal person, saving 2/3 of your income must seem cartoonish.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Jouer on March 07, 2019, 07:51:32 AM
To a normal person, saving 2/3 of your income must seem cartoonish.

It totally does. I'm MMM-lite - save about 40% - and even that blows people's minds.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on March 07, 2019, 08:03:10 AM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on March 07, 2019, 09:02:37 AM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: penguintroopers on March 07, 2019, 09:03:27 AM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Given we're around 50% of income going to student loan repayment, ditto. Members on the forms in the 70+% to me are the amazing ones. However, according to normal people I'm sure they would think I was crazy if they saw our budget.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on March 07, 2019, 09:19:50 AM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.

I hate to burst your bubble, but after school and summer care have been almost as expensive as daycare. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: accountingteacher on March 07, 2019, 11:21:31 AM
To a normal person, saving 2/3 of your income must seem cartoonish.

It totally does. I'm MMM-lite - save about 40% - and even that blows people's minds.

I like that expression: MMM-lite.  I'm frequently confused because I'm the most intense saver of anyone I know at about 40% of net income, but then I still do some (carefully considered and planned) spendypants things that I would be embarrassed to admit here.  (Maybe I'm clown-lite too?)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: HamsterStache on March 07, 2019, 11:24:43 AM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.

Those daycare costs really bite, don't they. I haven't calculated our savings rate since it is surely depressingly miniscule - we're barely operating in the black. Really looking forward to the day when daycare costs go away and we can really start making progress.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: tyrannostache on March 07, 2019, 12:02:04 PM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.

I hate to burst your bubble, but after school and summer care have been almost as expensive as daycare.

YMMV. Full-time care for our preschool kid costs $850/mo. After-school care for our elementary kid costs $150/month, and next year she'll be independent enough to take the bus home and hang out/play while I work from home, so $0/month

Summer care for the elementary kid costs about $700-1000/month, depending on what kind of daycamps we sign up for.

All in all, even if you figure in the other activities the elem. kid does, care for the elementary school kid costs at least $5,000 less per year than the preschooler. I'm very much looking forward to the day when we can sock away those additional funds.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 07, 2019, 12:02:37 PM
My oldest starts K later this year and while the  after school program is less than daycare (just barely), I have no f-ing clue what we will do during the summer. Maybe that is when I will throw up my hands in defeat and exit the workforce.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: HamsterStache on March 07, 2019, 12:42:54 PM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.

I hate to burst your bubble, but after school and summer care have been almost as expensive as daycare.

YMMV. Full-time care for our preschool kid costs $850/mo. After-school care for our elementary kid costs $150/month, and next year she'll be independent enough to take the bus home and hang out/play while I work from home, so $0/month

Summer care for the elementary kid costs about $700-1000/month, depending on what kind of daycamps we sign up for.

All in all, even if you figure in the other activities the elem. kid does, care for the elementary school kid costs at least $5,000 less per year than the preschooler. I'm very much looking forward to the day when we can sock away those additional funds.

Thankfully in our case, DW doesn't work during the summer (school employee) so no need to spend on camp, and when the kids are a bit older, she will probably work at a camp over the summer for extra money (and she really enjoys working at camp) as well as have the kids go there free/discounted, at least for part of the summer.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on March 07, 2019, 02:21:40 PM
You guys are really making me jealous with your daycare costs. The only daycare option for us costs $1800 per month for the newborn room.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: solon on March 07, 2019, 02:33:02 PM
CW1: Texas is awesome. They have no income tax.

CW2: Yeah, but they get you in other ways, like with the sales tax.

Me: Yeah, but you can control your sales tax, just don't buy stuff.

CW1: Well, you can't stop spending.

Me: You can spend a lot less than you think you can.

CW1: I think the Astros are going to kick ass this year!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 07, 2019, 03:21:35 PM
This morning I was speaking with a big boss from an adjacent org. He talked about how he has to travel a lot for work and isn’t home much for his family, including his daughter who is a senior in HS. She is into journalism and met certain expectations they set for her, so they rewarded her good behavior/achievements by giving her a good camera. That cost $2k.

I found it sad that he was in a position of buying his daughter stuff instead of being able to spend more time with her. This especially hit close to home for me as I was a big daddy’s girl when I was a kid.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on March 07, 2019, 03:29:23 PM
No joke, I think of myself has half-ass, not bad-ass.

Same here. We save about 35%, which feels downright depressing. We should be able to jack that up to 50% when our kids are all in school and daycare expenses go away.

I hate to burst your bubble, but after school and summer care have been almost as expensive as daycare.
YMMV, but my after school/ summer care is about half of daycare, maybe a little less.  (Kid 1: $10k to $4500/yr.  Kid 2, 6 years later: $15k to $6500/yr.)

I don't, however, go for the really expensive summer camps.  We aim for full day basic camps for most of the summer.  If you fill your summer with labor intensive camps (swimming, surfing, sports, nature camps, etc. that require a high ratio of adults to students, plus bus expenses, etc... that's different.  Or if you piece together 2 half day camps.  We usually have 2-4 "fun" more expensive camps.  The rest are basic and are $200/week or less.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on March 07, 2019, 03:43:37 PM
My oldest starts K later this year and while the  after school program is less than daycare (just barely), I have no f-ing clue what we will do during the summer. Maybe that is when I will throw up my hands in defeat and exit the workforce.
millions do it I'm sure.  I think my friends in Mountain View always had a nanny.  There's this:

https://www.bayareakidfun.com/summer-camps-in-the-bay-area/

We've pieced things together.
- Our kinder/1st/2nd grade after school program actually runs for most of the summer (all but a week or two).  Full days.  7:30-5:30 includes food.  About 2x the cost of the after school care.
- For our bigger kid, we had a similar drop in program at the schools that we did for 2-3 years.  That was free.  Budget cuts though - only 2 sites now and there are income limits.
- Nanny.  Once in awhile a friend's daughter would be home from college, looking to pick up dough.
- Summer camps.  These can be very competitive, as in - March 1 the city camps opened, and if you weren't online at 9 am trying to get your slot, you are screwed.  But these generally aren't the ones that we have tried to get.  There are a few very popular, very well priced camps that are almost full day.  9-4.  Those just go really fast.  The more expensive camps are slower to fill up.

So we tended to fill *most* of our summer with lower priced full day camps - the UC camp (run by students) - lots of outdoor time, send sunscreen!  Swimming.  Sports, etc.  Not very educational, but the cheapest around.  About half of the summer was this.  Sometimes we'd throw in a slightly more expensive YMCA camp.
Then we'd fill in with "almost full time camps", 9 to 3 pm.  Lego camps, programming camps, baseball camp. 

Because we work FT, we aren't often competing with people who want the fun 9-12 noon camps.  Now that big kid is older (almost 13), we can do this.  Last summer, half the summer was just half day sailing or volleyball or programming camps, then he just chilled at home rest of the day.  That's totally doable when those camps are $125-250 per week.  If you have a 6 yo (like my younger kid), and have to fill in both morning and afternoon, then you are getting into $500-600/week territory.  And...no.

Then we usually take 1-2 week vacation of the 10 total weeks.

And yes, every summer I have a "summer camp spreadsheet", with each kid in a separate column, a row for each week, the camp they are in, the hours, the cost, etc.  I call it "Summer Camp Tetris".  Welcome to the fun.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 07, 2019, 03:48:43 PM
That sounds exhausting. And “almost full time” 9-4 stop doesn’t work to allow two parents to have full-time careers. And that is just one kid. Naturally, the other will be on a different schedule with different care at a different location. God forbid one parent has to travel, then the carefully constructed house of cards comes falling down.

I need more sleep. I’m feeling particularly grumpy today. Damn this country.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: CindyBS on March 07, 2019, 04:46:10 PM
That sounds exhausting. And “almost full time” 9-4 stop doesn’t work to allow two parents to have full-time careers. And that is just one kid. Naturally, the other will be on a different schedule with different care at a different location. God forbid one parent has to travel, then the carefully constructed house of cards comes falling down.

I need more sleep. I’m feeling particularly grumpy today. Damn this country.

Then that is only if the children are not disabled in anyway.  Add to all that the need for multiple doctor appointments, speech/OT/PT, IEP meetings, etc. etc., etc. and it becomes a nightmare.  Especially if you do not have able-bodied grandparents who are retired, available year round, live near you, you are on good terms with, and are dependable enough to do appointments or school pick ups. My son's disabilities basically prevented me from having a full time career, which has cost us hundreds of thousands dollars over the years.  Other than losing the majority of your assets and going on SSI, there are no programs like paid parental leave, unemployment, short or long term disability, etc. to replace the income lost by caring for a disabled child and many critically ill or severely disabled children cannot go to regular daycare.  I am fortunate to be able to work part time.  Making less money per hour than I did in 2002.  'Merica - the greatest country in the world, amirite?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 07, 2019, 06:20:49 PM
I am fortunate to be able to work part time.  Making less money per hour than I did in 2002.  'Merica - the greatest country in the world, amirite?

Well...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Montecarlo on March 07, 2019, 08:27:01 PM
You guys are really making me jealous with your daycare costs. The only daycare option for us costs $1800 per month for the newborn room.

I think Au Pairs are cheaper than that!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on March 07, 2019, 08:31:04 PM
You guys are really making me jealous with your daycare costs. The only daycare option for us costs $1800 per month for the newborn room.

I think Au Pairs are cheaper than that!

Not in Denver! Everything I’ve seen says between $16-$18 per hour for a full-time nanny. When I nannied 10 years ago I got $14 per hour. There could be cheaper daycares in the area but not that will work for our family. We are currently considering having my husband quit his job and stay at home for at least the first year.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Montecarlo on March 07, 2019, 08:34:25 PM


Not in Denver! Everything I’ve seen says between $16-$18 per hour for a full-time nanny. When I nannied 10 years ago I got $14 per hour. There could be cheaper daycares in the area but not that will work for our family. We are currently considering having my husband quit his job and stay at home for at least the first year.

You can get an au pair for 18K/year.  8K for the agency and 200/week for the au pair.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on March 07, 2019, 08:49:31 PM


Not in Denver! Everything I’ve seen says between $16-$18 per hour for a full-time nanny. When I nannied 10 years ago I got $14 per hour. There could be cheaper daycares in the area but not that will work for our family. We are currently considering having my husband quit his job and stay at home for at least the first year.

You can get an au pair for 18K/year.  8K for the agency and 200/week for the au pair.

But they have to live with you and we don't have an extra room. Squeezing in a baby will be hard enough. Thank you for the idea though! I don't want to hijack this thread anymore :)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on March 19, 2019, 01:46:00 PM
One of my colleagues is around 60. During the lunch break he was talking about his retirement at the standard age of 67. Another co-worker asked him if he didn't vision retiring at 62, which is a legal option. The older colleague explained that he has a wife who still works and a living mother and MIL. He thinks that if he retires early, they will use him as an errand boy for everything. So he doesn't want to make himself available for that. His mother is 85 and he hopes that she won't live another 10 years. I can actually understand what he says. He lives too close to them.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on March 26, 2019, 07:24:42 AM
DH dropped these two stories at dinner last night (at home, of course).

Colleague the first is paying $1,000 per month for car insurance. In the last year, he's totalled two vehicles,  his luve-in GF totalled her car and the GF's live-in daughter totalled hers. He totalled his truck by hitting a telephone while pulling out of his very long driveway. He was texting. Presumably the telephone pole was not newly installed.

Colleague the second's spouse is a pill popper. She used through her pregnancy and their six year old is so delayed that she's still in diapers. The wife has had five car accidents in the last 60 days. In the latest one, she sideswiped a guardrail, abandoned the vehicle, then reported it stolen. Colleague is filing for divorce this week. Their poor child.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JLee on March 26, 2019, 08:45:58 AM
I was just overhearing a conversation about retirement planning and how most of the country is woefully unprepared. It made me happy to hear that discussed at work.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: carolinap on March 26, 2019, 09:48:55 AM
DH dropped these two stories at dinner last night (at home, of course).

Colleague the first is paying $1,000 per month for car insurance. In the last year, he's totalled two vehicles,  his luve-in GF totalled her car and the GF's live-in daughter totalled hers. He totalled his truck by hitting a telephone while pulling out of his very long driveway. He was texting. Presumably the telephone pole was not newly installed.

Colleague the second's spouse is a pill popper. She used through her pregnancy and their six year old is so delayed that she's still in diapers. The wife has had five car accidents in the last 60 days. In the latest one, she sideswiped a guardrail, abandoned the vehicle, then reported it stolen. Colleague is filing for divorce this week. Their poor child.

The first story is antimustachian, the second is just sad
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: boyerbt on March 26, 2019, 11:27:42 AM
I was just overhearing a conversation about retirement planning and how most of the country is woefully unprepared. It made me happy to hear that discussed at work.

Was it an upbeat conversation then? I overhear similar conversations but it typically is a more cynical conversation where the people are agreeing that it is impossible to save and retire in:

- this economy
- this day and age
- city/state
- any other excuse
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on March 26, 2019, 11:28:50 AM
In my country, pension premiums are paid for jointly by employers and employees. The pension contributions are tax-deferred so your taxable income is lower + you don't pay wealth tax over money that is tied up in a pension instead of in your bank account. Pensions also seem to be much safer than they are in the US.

In some situations the employer doesn't pay the premium (for example during unpaid leave, parental leave, sabbatical) but the employee is offered the option to pay the full premium so this period is covered by the pension. Seems like payroll has been routinely advising people not to pay their own premiums, because "they yearly pension doesn't rise as much as the amount of premium you pay now" which is
 1. Not true in all cases
2. Very much depends on how long you or your spouse will receive the pension (i.e. if your spouse is 20 years younger in all likelihood you'll get your money's worth out of the pension contributions)
3. Assumes the employee has no savings
4. Doesn't factor in that contributions are tax deductible
5. Doesn't factor in the benefits of having a lower taxable income
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JLee on March 26, 2019, 11:41:26 AM
I was just overhearing a conversation about retirement planning and how most of the country is woefully unprepared. It made me happy to hear that discussed at work.

Was it an upbeat conversation then? I overhear similar conversations but it typically is a more cynical conversation where the people are agreeing that it is impossible to save and retire in:

- this economy
- this day and age
- city/state
- any other excuse

Mostly yeah - basically they were saying how they were meeting with the (work / Fidelity provided) financial advisor and they were largely on track, but most Americans can't handle a $400 emergency and that's rather scary overall.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on March 26, 2019, 11:44:31 AM
Two of my coworkers who are always complaining about money were talking excitedly in the hallway. One of them had gotten a package and was opening it. It was a pair of Rothys. One coworker was talking about how she's got 2 of them now and is wanting to buy a third pair in a print. That's over $500 in shoes!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: bluebelle on March 26, 2019, 12:06:54 PM
In my country, pension premiums are paid for jointly by employers and employees. The pension contributions are tax-deferred so your taxable income is lower + you don't pay wealth tax over money that is tied up in a pension instead of in your bank account. Pensions also seem to be much safer than they are in the US.

In some situations the employer doesn't pay the premium (for example during unpaid leave, parental leave, sabbatical) but the employee is offered the option to pay the full premium so this period is covered by the pension. Seems like payroll has been routinely advising people not to pay their own premiums, because "they yearly pension doesn't rise as much as the amount of premium you pay now" which is
 1. Not true in all cases
2. Very much depends on how long you or your spouse will receive the pension (i.e. if your spouse is 20 years younger in all likelihood you'll get your money's worth out of the pension contributions)
3. Assumes the employee has no savings
4. Doesn't factor in that contributions are tax deductible
5. Doesn't factor in the benefits of having a lower taxable income
I am always amazed at how uninformed most HR folks are.  It seems to be universal.  And it doesn't seem to stop them from speaking with authority.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Prairie Stash on March 26, 2019, 01:42:42 PM
In my country, pension premiums are paid for jointly by employers and employees. The pension contributions are tax-deferred so your taxable income is lower + you don't pay wealth tax over money that is tied up in a pension instead of in your bank account. Pensions also seem to be much safer than they are in the US.

In some situations the employer doesn't pay the premium (for example during unpaid leave, parental leave, sabbatical) but the employee is offered the option to pay the full premium so this period is covered by the pension. Seems like payroll has been routinely advising people not to pay their own premiums, because "they yearly pension doesn't rise as much as the amount of premium you pay now" which is
 1. Not true in all cases
2. Very much depends on how long you or your spouse will receive the pension (i.e. if your spouse is 20 years younger in all likelihood you'll get your money's worth out of the pension contributions)
3. Assumes the employee has no savings
4. Doesn't factor in that contributions are tax deductible
5. Doesn't factor in the benefits of having a lower taxable income
I am always amazed at how uninformed most HR folks are.  It seems to be universal.  And it doesn't seem to stop them from speaking with authority.
It borders into illegal here to present an employee with financial advice without being a financial advisor, the company becomes responsible if it’s bad advice. My HR is very careful to present options, they never encourage a choice though. It’s a fine line, but it’s their duty to be a resource of information, not to tell or advise people what to do.

When my wife went on leave she had the option of keeping optional insurance. HR was careful to say what benefits she would get, they never once said she should keep it. We opted out, it wasn’t right for us. They did their jobs perfectly, lots of information but never telling a person what to do.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dicey on March 26, 2019, 02:37:51 PM
DH dropped these two stories at dinner last night (at home, of course).

Colleague the first is paying $1,000 per month for car insurance. In the last year, he's totalled two vehicles,  his luve-in GF totalled her car and the GF's live-in daughter totalled hers. He totalled his truck by hitting a telephone while pulling out of his very long driveway. He was texting. Presumably the telephone pole was not newly installed.

Colleague the second's spouse is a pill popper. She used through her pregnancy and their six year old is so delayed that she's still in diapers. The wife has had five car accidents in the last 60 days. In the latest one, she sideswiped a guardrail, abandoned the vehicle, then reported it stolen. Colleague is filing for divorce this week. Their poor child.

The first story is antimustachian, the second is just sad
I agree that it's sad, but there's plenty of anitmustachianism to go along with the sadness.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gerard on March 26, 2019, 04:02:38 PM
his luve-in GF

This is either very clever or the Freudian slip of the day. Kudos either way.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on March 26, 2019, 04:57:35 PM
In my country, pension premiums are paid for jointly by employers and employees. The pension contributions are tax-deferred so your taxable income is lower + you don't pay wealth tax over money that is tied up in a pension instead of in your bank account. Pensions also seem to be much safer than they are in the US.

In some situations the employer doesn't pay the premium (for example during unpaid leave, parental leave, sabbatical) but the employee is offered the option to pay the full premium so this period is covered by the pension. Seems like payroll has been routinely advising people not to pay their own premiums, because "they yearly pension doesn't rise as much as the amount of premium you pay now" which is
 1. Not true in all cases
2. Very much depends on how long you or your spouse will receive the pension (i.e. if your spouse is 20 years younger in all likelihood you'll get your money's worth out of the pension contributions)
3. Assumes the employee has no savings
4. Doesn't factor in that contributions are tax deductible
5. Doesn't factor in the benefits of having a lower taxable income
I am always amazed at how uninformed most HR folks are.  It seems to be universal.  And it doesn't seem to stop them from speaking with authority.
It borders into illegal here to present an employee with financial advice without being a financial advisor, the company becomes responsible if it’s bad advice. My HR is very careful to present options, they never encourage a choice though. It’s a fine line, but it’s their duty to be a resource of information, not to tell or advise people what to do.

When my wife went on leave she had the option of keeping optional insurance. HR was careful to say what benefits she would get, they never once said she should keep it. We opted out, it wasn’t right for us. They did their jobs perfectly, lots of information but never telling a person what to do.

It's basically the same in here. I work in payroll as well and always try to present the options in a neutral way, with a list of pros and cons for each option.

What this person has been doing is making staff sign a waiver that they were informed of the risk that they would pay more than they'd get paid out in retirement and that they can't hold the company liable in that case. They hadn't informed the employee about any of the other aspects and were pretty clear about what the "right" choice was from their tone of voice.

If you tell the average employee their choice is so bad they need to sign a waiver, without providing context, to me that's basically the same as giving very bad advice. The employee thinks you're the expert and most of them follow your advice blindly.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: GreenToTheCore on March 26, 2019, 10:36:12 PM
DH dropped these two stories at dinner last night (at home, of course).

Colleague the first is paying $1,000 per month for car insurance. In the last year, he's totalled two vehicles,  his luve-in GF totalled her car and the GF's live-in daughter totalled hers. He totalled his truck by hitting a telephone while pulling out of his very long driveway. He was texting. Presumably the telephone pole was not newly installed.

Colleague the second's spouse is a pill popper. She used through her pregnancy and their six year old is so delayed that she's still in diapers. The wife has had five car accidents in the last 60 days. In the latest one, she sideswiped a guardrail, abandoned the vehicle, then reported it stolen. Colleague is filing for divorce this week. Their poor child.

I wish vehicles were seen more in line with the risk that they pose, closer to lethal weapons.
"Jane's shot 5 people in the last 60 days" would get a lot more attention. 
I love cars, but with great power comes great responsibility.

My heart goes out to that child.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: accountingteacher on March 27, 2019, 08:28:59 AM
In my country, pension premiums are paid for jointly by employers and employees. The pension contributions are tax-deferred so your taxable income is lower + you don't pay wealth tax over money that is tied up in a pension instead of in your bank account. Pensions also seem to be much safer than they are in the US.

In some situations the employer doesn't pay the premium (for example during unpaid leave, parental leave, sabbatical) but the employee is offered the option to pay the full premium so this period is covered by the pension. Seems like payroll has been routinely advising people not to pay their own premiums, because "they yearly pension doesn't rise as much as the amount of premium you pay now" which is
 1. Not true in all cases
2. Very much depends on how long you or your spouse will receive the pension (i.e. if your spouse is 20 years younger in all likelihood you'll get your money's worth out of the pension contributions)
3. Assumes the employee has no savings
4. Doesn't factor in that contributions are tax deductible
5. Doesn't factor in the benefits of having a lower taxable income
I am always amazed at how uninformed most HR folks are.  It seems to be universal.  And it doesn't seem to stop them from speaking with authority.
It borders into illegal here to present an employee with financial advice without being a financial advisor, the company becomes responsible if it’s bad advice. My HR is very careful to present options, they never encourage a choice though. It’s a fine line, but it’s their duty to be a resource of information, not to tell or advise people what to do.

When my wife went on leave she had the option of keeping optional insurance. HR was careful to say what benefits she would get, they never once said she should keep it. We opted out, it wasn’t right for us. They did their jobs perfectly, lots of information but never telling a person what to do.

It's basically the same in here. I work in payroll as well and always try to present the options in a neutral way, with a list of pros and cons for each option.

What this person has been doing is making staff sign a waiver that they were informed of the risk that they would pay more than they'd get paid out in retirement and that they can't hold the company liable in that case. They hadn't informed the employee about any of the other aspects and were pretty clear about what the "right" choice was from their tone of voice.

If you tell the average employee their choice is so bad they need to sign a waiver, without providing context, to me that's basically the same as giving very bad advice. The employee thinks you're the expert and most of them follow your advice blindly.

It's kind of ironic that the waiver the payroll person is asking the employees to sign actually provides evidence of the ineptitude of the advice.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LennStar on March 27, 2019, 09:58:47 AM
It's kind of ironic that the waiver the payroll person is asking the employees to sign actually provides evidence of the ineptitude of the advice.

Yeah. If anyone is giving me "advice" and wants me to sign a waver, I put my hands on by back and am very dubious of this advise.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on March 27, 2019, 12:24:20 PM
Two of my coworkers who are always complaining about money were talking excitedly in the hallway. One of them had gotten a package and was opening it. It was a pair of Rothys. One coworker was talking about how she's got 2 of them now and is wanting to buy a third pair in a print. That's over $500 in shoes!

Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: marcela on March 27, 2019, 02:24:41 PM
Two of my coworkers who are always complaining about money were talking excitedly in the hallway. One of them had gotten a package and was opening it. It was a pair of Rothys. One coworker was talking about how she's got 2 of them now and is wanting to buy a third pair in a print. That's over $500 in shoes!

Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.
This is the coworker who is constantly talking about how she's not sure how she's going to cover her kids' college costs and needs a new car, but can't afford it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on March 27, 2019, 02:52:59 PM
Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

Maybe I live under a rock, but I have never heard of either of these brands.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on March 27, 2019, 03:10:58 PM
Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

Maybe I live under a rock, but I have never heard of either of these brands.

They are $200 pairs of flats. Rothy’s are made from recycled plastic and can be put in the washer which is why I’m enticed - I hate when flats get smelly.

Tieks are leather and have a blue stripe on the back
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on March 27, 2019, 03:33:49 PM
Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

Maybe I live under a rock, but I have never heard of either of these brands.

They are $200 pairs of flats. Rothy’s are made from recycled plastic and can be put in the washer which is why I’m enticed - I hate when flats get smelly.

Tieks are leather and have a blue stripe on the back

Interesting. Those plastic ones sound a little sweaty, but overall good for the environment. I hope.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 27, 2019, 09:33:16 PM
Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

Maybe I live under a rock, but I have never heard of either of these brands.

They are $200 pairs of flats. Rothy’s are made from recycled plastic and can be put in the washer which is why I’m enticed - I hate when flats get smelly.

Tieks are leather and have a blue stripe on the back

Interesting. Those plastic ones sound a little sweaty, but overall good for the environment. I hope.
I actually have Rothy’s after I put a call out for recommendations to my greater crowd of social media friends. I have pretty strict requirements for my wide feet (flexible, flat, thin soles, comfort above all, want quality that lasts). Flats from Target just don’t cut it for my oddly-shaped feet. I got a pair (I think the flats are $120) and got a second when I got several $20 off coupons stacked up from referring friends.

I love that they are recycled. The shoes are a woven material so they aren’t sweaty the way you’d expect a plastic shoe to be. I love that I wear them everywhere and doing everything, including rainy rides to work on my bike. If they get dirty, I throw them in the wash and they come out looking brand-new. I’ve worn pretty much nothing but them for the last year except when on a run or at the gym and they still look basically new. If they really do continue to hold up then I’ll consider them a better buy than my other shoes that give up after a few years.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on March 28, 2019, 01:36:24 AM
One of my co-workers (about 50 years old) is about to buy a home. He just emigrated here and is correctly renting a home. The and his wife have money from selling their previous home. So far, so good.

He talked to a bank to get a preapproval for a mortgage, which is something you need here to make an offer on a home. The bank was presenting him the option of the flexi-mortgage. This is just an amount of credit that the bank gives you, based on the value of your home and you need to pay it back on a certain date, e.g. after 30 years. You need to pay a monthly interest, but you can decide not to pay that fee for several months as often as you like. As long as you pay it in the end with all the extra interest. You can also take out a big sum when the mortgage is partly paid down, to buy a car or a new kitchen, and just use the same mortgage. The mortgage has a higher interest rate than a traditional mortgage.
My co-worker thinks this sounds as a good alternative. He likes to be able to not pay the monthly interest for some months and then catch up later when he receives a lump sum out of a savings fund.

From me he just wanted to know whether this was something safe to bet on. I have heard a sincere financial expert speaking about this type of mortgage, who said it was a good alternative for people who are financially responsible, something my co-worker says he is.

I really had to keep my mouth shut for the rest of my thoughts. I would not get a mortgage with higher interest than necessary. I would also not choose to not pay the monthly fee for some months, because that means paying extra interest later. I really had to keep in mind that for my co-worker, it might be a good alternative, even though it means he won't be paying down his mortgage any time soon.

The good thing is that the bank has pre-qualified him for a mortgage that is twice as high as he asked for and he is not planning to get such a high mortgage. Good for him.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on March 28, 2019, 07:19:54 AM
Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

Maybe I live under a rock, but I have never heard of either of these brands.

They are $200 pairs of flats. Rothy’s are made from recycled plastic and can be put in the washer which is why I’m enticed - I hate when flats get smelly.

Tieks are leather and have a blue stripe on the back

Interesting. Those plastic ones sound a little sweaty, but overall good for the environment. I hope.
I actually have Rothy’s after I put a call out for recommendations to my greater crowd of social media friends. I have pretty strict requirements for my wide feet (flexible, flat, thin soles, comfort above all, want quality that lasts). Flats from Target just don’t cut it for my oddly-shaped feet. I got a pair (I think the flats are $120) and got a second when I got several $20 off coupons stacked up from referring friends.

I love that they are recycled. The shoes are a woven material so they aren’t sweaty the way you’d expect a plastic shoe to be. I love that I wear them everywhere and doing everything, including rainy rides to work on my bike. If they get dirty, I throw them in the wash and they come out looking brand-new. I’ve worn pretty much nothing but them for the last year except when on a run or at the gym and they still look basically new. If they really do continue to hold up then I’ll consider them a better buy than my other shoes that give up after a few years.

I have no problem paying $$ for a quality pair of shoes that lasts for a few years. My Danskos, Birkenstocks, Merrell sneakers, and Frye boots have all been worth the money. I’m intrigued by the Rothy’s flats!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on March 28, 2019, 09:17:48 AM
I can't help but recall Carrie (From "Sex and the City"): "I like my money where I can see it: hanging in my closet!"
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on March 28, 2019, 10:40:50 AM
I can't help but recall Carrie (From "Sex and the City"): "I like my money where I can see it: hanging in my closet!"

*shrugs* I can pay a small price for cheap shoes that wear out quickly and need to be replaced often, or I can pay more for better quality and wear the same shoes (that have been broken in to fit my feet exactly) for several years. My Frye boots are on year 7. I need to have the heels resoled, but I expect to get at least another decade out of them. YMMV.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: sherr on March 28, 2019, 11:17:07 AM
*shrugs* I can pay a small price for cheap shoes that wear out quickly and need to be replaced often, or I can pay more for better quality and wear the same shoes (that have been broken in to fit my feet exactly) for several years. My Frye boots are on year 7. I need to have the heels resoled, but I expect to get at least another decade out of them. YMMV.

See also the Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Economic Injustice (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Sam_Vimes_Theory_of_Economic_Injustice).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cassafrass on March 28, 2019, 01:56:46 PM
Yesterday I walked into a conversation two coworkers were having about what they would do if they won the $750 million lottery jackpot. Both were spouting off the usual:  cars, houses, boats, world travel, personal masseuse etc.

But the really interesting part of the conversation came up when CW1 started talking about how she'd start by paying off all of her debt and then seemed to have an epiphany: "You know, if we didn't have any debt, no credit cards debt, no car payments, no mortgage, we could live a really nice life on our salary."

I smiled and nodded while inwardly cringing at the thought of what her monthly debt bills must be (this is the coworker who once told me that she, her mom and her sister shop as a hobby and often go out to the outlets on the weekend for some mindless spending).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eliza on March 28, 2019, 02:11:57 PM
Two of my coworkers who are always complaining about money were talking excitedly in the hallway. One of them had gotten a package and was opening it. It was a pair of Rothys. One coworker was talking about how she's got 2 of them now and is wanting to buy a third pair in a print. That's over $500 in shoes!

Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.

I got a pair of Tieks for Christmas in 2017.  They were comfy once broken in, but they didn't hold up well at all.  The (large interior) stitching started coming undone within a month or two.  I sent a picture to the company, but they insisted it was a cosmetic issue only.   Then after about eight months of semi-regular use the front sole of one of the shoes came half undone and the shoes became unwearable.  I thought about trying to insist the company fix them, but then realized I didn't actually like them enough to justify it.  I'll stick to my $20 Walmart/Target black flats instead.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 28, 2019, 08:14:51 PM
I used to not care about wearing cheap shoes. When I took up running in my mid-20s my feet got about a size bigger and my tolerance for squished toes and poorly fitting shoes went dramatically down. It was like I developed this awareness and appreciation for my feet that I hadn’t had previously. So I am more picky about my shoes now and more willing to spend $ to find something that fits my needs.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 29, 2019, 06:23:51 AM
With the right brand shoes can really last. I bought "cheap" shoes for years and years before finding shoes that suddenly lasted 3-4 times longer than the cheap shoes and felt good enough to wear everyday.

Imagine that - feels good and lasts too.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cassafrass on March 29, 2019, 06:31:57 AM
This is more of a "Spotted at Work," but I see it every Friday and it drives me crazy:

Every week my department has a morning seminar with free refreshments including coffee and bagels. Everyone on our floor is invited to attend. There is a group of coworkers who, pretty much every week, walk over to the Starbucks in our building to buy coffees to bring back and drink in the seminar.

Oh, and guess what type of coffee is brewed and served at the seminar? Starbucks! I JUST DON'T GET IT!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ixtap on March 29, 2019, 08:26:12 AM
This is more of a "Spotted at Work," but I see it every Friday and it drives me crazy:

Every week my department has a morning seminar with free refreshments including coffee and bagels. Everyone on our floor is invited to attend. There is a group of coworkers who, pretty much every week, walk over to the Starbucks in our building to buy coffees to bring back and drink in the seminar.

Oh, and guess what type of coffee is brewed and served at the seminar? Starbucks! I JUST DON'T GET IT!

Are they getting plain, brewed coffee or espresso with flavoring and dairy? Because frankly, Starbucks brewed coffee sucks.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cassafrass on March 29, 2019, 08:36:26 AM
Quote

Are they getting plain, brewed coffee or espresso with flavoring and dairy? Because frankly, Starbucks brewed coffee sucks.

Maybe some fancy-schmancy espresso drinks? Today someone literally got up in the middle of the seminar and came back with an iced coffee from Starbucks. I'm not much of a coffee snob, so I guess I'll never understand...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on March 29, 2019, 09:01:03 AM
Someone brought fancy cupcakes to a meeting at work. I just found out they were $9 per cupcake. I’m glad I ate one and took two to go (they were leftovers and no one wanted them).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on March 29, 2019, 09:09:14 AM
Someone brought fancy cupcakes to a meeting at work. I just found out they were $9 per cupcake. I’m glad I ate one and took two to go (they were leftovers and no one wanted them).

OK, so I'm going to need to hear a little more about these $9 cupcakes. Did they have gold foil?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LennStar on March 29, 2019, 09:25:08 AM
Someone brought fancy cupcakes to a meeting at work. I just found out they were $9 per cupcake. I’m glad I ate one and took two to go (they were leftovers and no one wanted them).

OK, so I'm going to need to hear a little more about these $9 cupcakes. Did they have gold foil?

That would be more expensive.
It was probably just some hand made cupcakes from a monk who meditated 20 years in the Himalaya on the meaning of cupcakes for your sould if working for $Megacorp
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on March 29, 2019, 09:30:56 AM
Someone brought fancy cupcakes to a meeting at work. I just found out they were $9 per cupcake. I’m glad I ate one and took two to go (they were leftovers and no one wanted them).

OK, so I'm going to need to hear a little more about these $9 cupcakes. Did they have gold foil?

They kind of looked like these cupcakes (picture courtesy of the Internet since I didn’t actually take a picture of the cupcake). They had a chocolate base. Some kind of fancy imported Belgian dark chocolate and imported chocolate chips. And each one’s frosting was individually hand crafted.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cassafrass on March 29, 2019, 09:38:47 AM
And each one’s frosting was individually hand crafted.

Not to argue that $9 cupcakes are worth it, but after trying to decorate my son's birthday cake this year, I realized how much time and skill goes into pretty decorations like that. So I can't blame whoever is selling them for that price - I just probably wouldn't ever buy them. But I like admiring pictures!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on March 29, 2019, 09:51:12 AM
And each one’s frosting was individually hand crafted.

Not to argue that $9 cupcakes are worth it, but after trying to decorate my son's birthday cake this year, I realized how much time and skill goes into pretty decorations like that. So I can't blame whoever is selling them for that price - I just probably wouldn't ever buy them. But I like admiring pictures!

Yeah, cake decorating is a tricky skill. I might splurge on a few fancy cupcakes like that for a special occasion (e.g., my MIL's upcoming 70th birthday, if she didn't prefer cheesecake). I wouldn't ever waste the money on a work meeting where people would be just as happy with donuts from Tim Horton's.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on March 29, 2019, 10:42:28 AM
Too pretty to eat.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on March 29, 2019, 10:54:52 AM
Those do look pretty sweet. I can appreciate some food art, even if I wouldn't buy it.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: phildonnia on March 29, 2019, 03:21:53 PM
It borders into illegal here to present an employee with financial advice without being a financial advisor, the company becomes responsible if it’s bad advice.

Back in the old days, I worked at a silicon-valley startup.  They became pretty desperate for money, and started marketing stock options heavily at employees.  They pretty much straight-up told us that we could make no better investment than putting large amounts of cash into a single tech company.  And I have to say, the company had a strong family feel, in which the CEO was a wise father whose advice we could trust to make us all rich.

One guy borrowed against his 401(k) to buy in.  I ended up flipping mine the instant it went public, and only lost a few thousand. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Threshkin on March 29, 2019, 04:21:38 PM
It borders into illegal here to present an employee with financial advice without being a financial advisor, the company becomes responsible if it’s bad advice.

Back in the old days, I worked at a silicon-valley startup.  They became pretty desperate for money, and started marketing stock options heavily at employees.  They pretty much straight-up told us that we could make no better investment than putting large amounts of cash into a single tech company.  And I have to say, the company had a strong family feel, in which the CEO was a wise father whose advice we could trust to make us all rich.

One guy borrowed against his 401(k) to buy in.  I ended up flipping mine the instant it went public, and only lost a few thousand.

I had a similar experience and loss with a silicon valley IPO.  Painful.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Wrenchturner on March 29, 2019, 05:40:08 PM
CW#1: Bought a 45k$ Civic(in Canada) but lamented he couldn't buy winter tires...
CW#2: Bought tickets to a cruise before his time off was approved.  It wasn't approved.  They sold his ticket to his wife's friend at a loss.
CW#3: Traded in their "old" car for a brand new one, driver side window promptly froze open in a drive thru!
CW#4: Has an adult daughter, son and his wife at home, he's the only breadwinner.  He's receiving an inheritance and buying a motorcycle.  (I think he should hire some muscle to "motivate" his son, jk...).  Actually I told him he should buy a condo and rent it to his son, but I guess his son is a deadbeat at 20. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: horsepoor on March 31, 2019, 09:15:31 PM
CW#1: Bought a 45k$ Civic(in Canada) but lamented he couldn't buy winter tires...

I didn't think that was possible, but maybe it's the Civic TypeR? https://automobiles.honda.com/civic-type-r

It even gets terrible mileage for a small car!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on March 31, 2019, 09:40:20 PM
I tend to find an inverse correlation between how pretty a cake is and how delicious it is. I think most frosting tastes like crap and just don’t understand the point of putting time and energy into foodstuffs that are at best barely edible. But maybe I say that in part because my family has a history of baking excellent-tasting cakes and then doing a crappy job on the frosting. I personally can make a damn good chocolate cake but it always looks like it was frosted by a 6 year-old.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on April 01, 2019, 01:13:46 AM
I tend to find an inverse correlation between how pretty a cake is and how delicious it is. I think most frosting tastes like crap and just don’t understand the point of putting time and energy into foodstuffs that are at best barely edible. But maybe I say that in part because my family has a history of baking excellent-tasting cakes and then doing a crappy job on the frosting. I personally can make a damn good chocolate cake but it always looks like it was frosted by a 6 year-old.

One word: ganache. Get some in your life immediately.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 01, 2019, 01:34:10 AM
I tend to find an inverse correlation between how pretty a cake is and how delicious it is. I think most frosting tastes like crap and just don’t understand the point of putting time and energy into foodstuffs that are at best barely edible. But maybe I say that in part because my family has a history of baking excellent-tasting cakes and then doing a crappy job on the frosting. I personally can make a damn good chocolate cake but it always looks like it was frosted by a 6 year-old.

One word: ganache. Get some in your life immediately.
Looks intriguing. Do you know of any good non-dairy recipes?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 01, 2019, 01:37:47 AM
Okay, a little googling seems to indicate that I can use dairy alternative mills. I’m curious to try with my most-excellent cashew milk actually.

https://blog.planete-gateau.com/ganache-sans-lactose/
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Linea_Norway on April 01, 2019, 02:00:27 AM
I tend to find an inverse correlation between how pretty a cake is and how delicious it is. I think most frosting tastes like crap and just don’t understand the point of putting time and energy into foodstuffs that are at best barely edible. But maybe I say that in part because my family has a history of baking excellent-tasting cakes and then doing a crappy job on the frosting. I personally can make a damn good chocolate cake but it always looks like it was frosted by a 6 year-old.

When we get served cake at work, I am the one who usually eats some of the marzipan flower decorations. As long as it is fresh, I like the taste of it. But when it is old and dried out, then meh!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 01, 2019, 02:04:48 AM
Marzipan is one thing but often cake decoration here is just vegetable fat and sugar with food coloring. Gross!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on April 01, 2019, 06:03:55 AM
Marzipan is one thing but often cake decoration here is just vegetable fat and sugar with food coloring. Gross!

And it's usually gritty sugar in the frosting. Blech. Even as a kid, I scraped off that stuff. Cake is good. Crap frosting is not.

Good real buttercream frosting, OTOH...yes please. Marzipan would also be acceptable.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Sugaree on April 01, 2019, 07:37:18 AM
I will do marshmallow fondant with a buttercream crumbcoat.  I completely understand why big, intricate cakes are so expensive.  The last cake I did for my kid took three days and probably $50 worth of ingredients.  And that was using cake mix (I doctored it up a little with different flavorings and stuff though).  Which is still cheaper than the chocolate/almond/raspberry concoction that I make about every other Thanksgiving. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on April 01, 2019, 08:08:25 AM
acquaintance has 7 TVS,  hubbie bought a $400 LIGHT saber for halloween (for him to use), they bought new SUV,

she got temporary raise for 3 months, and took her infant son and in-laws to LAS Vegas to blow the $

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: GreenToTheCore on April 01, 2019, 10:46:24 AM
CW#1: Bought a 45k$ Civic(in Canada) but lamented he couldn't buy winter tires...
This just makes me cringe.
So many people equate 4wd/car type to safety: "I needed to get a 4-wheel-drive vehicle. Now I can go 15mph faster than the speed limit in a snow storm."
Actually, no. You needed to get new tires and learn how to drive. Every car has 4-wheel-brakes.

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: GreenToTheCore on April 01, 2019, 10:49:17 AM
One word: ganache. Get some in your life immediately.

Thank you for this. I've been needing to find another cake-topper option (I grew up with buttercream, DH likes cream cheese, neither of us like fondant).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 01, 2019, 02:09:08 PM
CW#1: Bought a 45k$ Civic(in Canada) but lamented he couldn't buy winter tires...
This just makes me cringe.
So many people equate 4wd/car type to safety: "I needed to get a 4-wheel-drive vehicle. Now I can go 15mph faster than the speed limit in a snow storm."
Actually, no. You needed to get new tires and learn how to drive. Every car has 4-wheel-brakes.

Everybody talks about GOING when stopping and steering are the real important parts. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on April 01, 2019, 02:23:03 PM
Two of my coworkers who are always complaining about money were talking excitedly in the hallway. One of them had gotten a package and was opening it. It was a pair of Rothys. One coworker was talking about how she's got 2 of them now and is wanting to buy a third pair in a print. That's over $500 in shoes!

Rothy's and Tieks are a big deal around my office - LOTS of women have them. My supervisor says she buys shoes instead of clothes and she has at least 10 pairs of each. Craziness! I dream about having one pair of either one, but I just keep buying the cheap flats from Target instead.
They are popular among my friends, either the spendy ones or those without children.

I wear my old running shoes to work.  I could bust on people for their $125-$250 shoes, and multiple pairs...but I wear through 2 pairs of $120-160 running shoes a year too, so...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on April 01, 2019, 02:28:52 PM
That sounds exhausting. And “almost full time” 9-4 stop doesn’t work to allow two parents to have full-time careers. And that is just one kid. Naturally, the other will be on a different schedule with different care at a different location. God forbid one parent has to travel, then the carefully constructed house of cards comes falling down.

I need more sleep. I’m feeling particularly grumpy today. Damn this country.

Well, it does...it just depends on the career, the type of job, and the amount of flexibility.

Some of the camps have before and after care (for extra).  This all means that if you ABSOLUTELY NEED care until 5:30, then you choose a camp with those hours.

But, both my husband and I can work from home from time to time.

So nobody REALLY cares if the schedule looks like this:
Parent A goes to work at 7 and leaves at 3:30 pm to pick up the kids by 4 (that's 8.5 hours...so full time hours)
Parent B drops kids off at camp at 9, and works 9:15 to 6 pm or thereabouts. (again, full time hours)

If my husband travels (I don't travel), then often I don't get to work until 9:15 and then I have to leave at 3:30 pm (this happens during the school year too).  That's only 6 hours - SO, I either work from home for a couple of hours in the morning or at night OR I take PTO.

It's hard to figure out how to face it, until you've faced it.  It's not so bad once you've done it, or you've met other parents with kids in school - there are literally dozens of ways that people juggle their work and camp/ school/ childcare schedules.  I've found that trying to work a full 40 hours when my husband is traveling is just folly.  I get burned out.  So, I take PTO.  That means that 8 or 9 out of 10 times when it's a school holiday, but not a work holiday -  husband takes the holiday.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: klystomane on April 04, 2019, 04:58:12 PM
Following
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on April 06, 2019, 06:12:13 AM
We were having lunch with a group of coworkers and a few of them started complaining about a couple they all know (I don't). Apparantly they are succesful hard working professionals, but they only work short term well paid temp contracts. Then every time they've saved enough money they move out of their rental and sell all of their furniture and travel until their money is gone. Then they find a new place and get new stuff from the thrift store. They didn't have kids and have done this for decades. Everyone seemed shocked about what this would do to their pension, how they were scroungers, how they would never have any certainty in their life. I tried to bring up (closeted mustachian) that it sounded like they were living a good life and certainly didn't harm anyone with their life choices, but everyone else agreed their life can't be meaningful this way and was a very stupid choice that they would regret when they're old.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Maenad on April 06, 2019, 06:40:04 AM
Imma, that's a tough one to determine without more context. My FIL used to work until he got frustrated, then quit and live off of credit until it ran out, then find another job and slowly pay down his debt. Lather, rinse, repeat. He retired a few years ago without a good idea of his spending and moved to a new location without thoroughly researching COL. Now he needs to keep working at minimum wage jobs and rent out rooms in his house to supplement his meager savings, and he'll never be able to quit.

I could also see that possibly the couple in question saves a large amount of their pay and then travels frugally on what's left. It sounds like a fun life to me, but I'd definitely be doing something like that, because there is some truth in your coworkers' criticism. But they don't really know enough to be criticizing either, I'd guess!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on April 06, 2019, 07:12:56 AM
A colleague is moving house soon.

She asked me if I thought she should buy plastic tubs ($8 each) because "they're almost the same price as buying moving boxes" ($4 each).

1. $8 is not "almost the same price" as $4.
2. Paying for plastic tubs or paying for new cardboard boxes are not the only two options. I suggested she could buy second-hand boxes from a moving company, or look online for freebies. I even found a set of 50 moving boxes for free less than 20km from her place. She said it would cost too much in fuel.

I looked at a moving house calculator online. For her size house and level of stuff, it estimated 140 boxes. That would be $1120 worth of plastic tubs.

I just mentioned that we have a heap of spare bubble wrap, packing peanuts, newspaper, etc, in the office if she's interested. "Nah, I'll just buy bubble wrap and butcher paper."

The last 2 times I moved, I got boxes for free, from work or from a neighbour. The first time I bought a pile of el cheapo boxes that were a good bargain.

One issue to consider nowadays with moving boxes, even official ones, are grey silverfish (Ctenolepisma longicaudata). In Norway many houses are now affected with these critters and they come in with carton boxes. They are difficult, if not impossible to remove from your house and your house might not be equally attractive for new buyers.

Some plastic crates can come in super handy, if you want to use them for storage later. We use those boxes for tools, camping gear and some other stuff. But not 140 of them.
I have often went to the grocery store when I needed boxes, apple boxes are good, banana boxes are nice, but you need to fill the hole in the bottom, And there are few others that work well. Lately though, the stores are going to returnable plastic containers that are reusable and probably cheaper in the long run, this is making it harder to get the boxes I want.
 On the plus side, we had a hurricane---, no that's not the plus, in the thousands of piles of trash people threw out, were dozens of Rubbermaid and other brands of plastic containers of all different sizes. I know we picked up at least 60 containers some smaller for my electronics stuff and many, many larger size.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on April 06, 2019, 09:48:42 AM
Imma, that's a tough one to determine without more context. My FIL used to work until he got frustrated, then quit and live off of credit until it ran out, then find another job and slowly pay down his debt. Lather, rinse, repeat. He retired a few years ago without a good idea of his spending and moved to a new location without thoroughly researching COL. Now he needs to keep working at minimum wage jobs and rent out rooms in his house to supplement his meager savings, and he'll never be able to quit.

I could also see that possibly the couple in question saves a large amount of their pay and then travels frugally on what's left. It sounds like a fun life to me, but I'd definitely be doing something like that, because there is some truth in your coworkers' criticism. But they don't really know enough to be criticizing either, I'd guess!

That's true as well. No one really knows without having access to their bank accounts. Since they're in our field they likely making quite a lot as consultants during the months they are working. It sounds like they live a frugal life, renting an apartment and getting furniture from the thrift store. But of course if they spend all that's left when travelling they're looking at a lean retirement. We have a state pension, so in the worst case they'll have to live off that (around minimum wage) in old age. I can imagine some people will think that's worth it to live an exciting life now.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: imadandylion on April 06, 2019, 04:45:25 PM
We were having lunch with a group of coworkers and a few of them started complaining about a couple they all know (I don't). Apparantly they are succesful hard working professionals, but they only work short term well paid temp contracts. Then every time they've saved enough money they move out of their rental and sell all of their furniture and travel until their money is gone. Then they find a new place and get new stuff from the thrift store. They didn't have kids and have done this for decades. Everyone seemed shocked about what this would do to their pension, how they were scroungers, how they would never have any certainty in their life. I tried to bring up (closeted mustachian) that it sounded like they were living a good life and certainly didn't harm anyone with their life choices, but everyone else agreed their life can't be meaningful this way and was a very stupid choice that they would regret when they're old.

How do they know they travel until their money is gone? Doesn't make sense that they're able to just pick up where they left off and rent when you have no money. For most places (in my experience, anyway), you'll need to have 1st and last month's rent as well as security deposit upfront if your  rental application is approved. It would stand to reason they have some money in the bank, and probably for emergencies, too.

Also, there are ways to travel frugally. Maybe they are visiting places where COL is really low and their money goes further.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: katethekitcat on April 10, 2019, 11:25:29 AM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on April 10, 2019, 11:32:33 AM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.

IT IS LITERALLY IMPOSSIBLE FOR US TO ORDER LESS THAN 4 $15 COCKTAILS.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LennStar on April 10, 2019, 01:10:30 PM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
I was out yesterday. 3 people. <45 €.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mm1970 on April 10, 2019, 01:49:23 PM
We were having lunch with a group of coworkers and a few of them started complaining about a couple they all know (I don't). Apparantly they are succesful hard working professionals, but they only work short term well paid temp contracts. Then every time they've saved enough money they move out of their rental and sell all of their furniture and travel until their money is gone. Then they find a new place and get new stuff from the thrift store. They didn't have kids and have done this for decades. Everyone seemed shocked about what this would do to their pension, how they were scroungers, how they would never have any certainty in their life. I tried to bring up (closeted mustachian) that it sounded like they were living a good life and certainly didn't harm anyone with their life choices, but everyone else agreed their life can't be meaningful this way and was a very stupid choice that they would regret when they're old.
That's pretty funny. I have friends who do this too.  They love to travel (but they travel on the cheap - think  hostels, etc.)  They met while world traveling.  They dated while world traveling (would meet up for a few months of traveling).  They got married and kept traveling.  They would both work long enough to get itchy, then travel.

They settled down, had a kid, bought a condo.  Took an extended 3 month vacation.  Had a second kid.  Rented out the condo, quit the job, took BOTH kids on a year round world tour (mostly staying cheaply, again - Thailand, other areas of the So Pacific, some areas of China, etc.)  Came back to the condo for kindergarten.  Lasted 3 months - left again on ANOTHER tour. 

Finally came back.  Kid #1 just started kindergarten a year late (common in their school district anyway).  Not sure if Dad's found a job yet, but mom starts up soon (she hasn't worked since kid #1 was born 7 years ago).

TWICE they said "no, we are done doing that kind of travel" and did it again.  I won't be surprised if they do it again.  Save up enough to afford slow travel, then travel.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: OtherJen on April 10, 2019, 01:50:44 PM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
I was out yesterday. 3 people. <45 €.

In my area, sure, it would difficult to have a "full" dinner (appetizer + cocktails, salads, main course + wine, dessert + coffee) at an upscale restaurant for under $200. But I can think of many more casual places where $50 would buy excellent dinners and a couple of drinks for me and husband. We've managed this in Detroit, Grand Rapids, Traverse City, Cleveland, Boston, Chicago, and San Diego in recent years, so it isn't location-dependent. Or we could go more casual and stuff ourselves with very good tacos al pastor for <$20 (which we've also done in both Detroit and San Diego). Saying that it's impossible suggests a major lack of imagination, as well as a severe case of tunnel vision. This person might also be spoiled into food snobbery.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kitsune on April 11, 2019, 12:03:30 PM
3 months ago, one of our employees switched off the company health insurance plan because a different private plan was a bit cheaper - because it had no peripheral services or coverage for short-term disability.

Today, PANIC - she needs to be off-work for a few weeks due to health issues. 'I'll lose my car! I'll get evicted!'

... guess that was worth the 40$/month savings, huh.

(I'm trying to sympathize, but... this is the explicit result of a choice you made.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on April 11, 2019, 01:40:02 PM
3 months ago, one of our employees switched off the company health insurance plan because a different private plan was a bit cheaper - because it had no peripheral services or coverage for short-term disability.

Today, PANIC - she needs to be off-work for a few weeks due to health issues. 'I'll lose my car! I'll get evicted!'

... guess that was worth the 40$/month savings, huh.

(I'm trying to sympathize, but... this is the explicit result of a choice you made.)

I can sympathize with the wanting to cut expenses, and the problem with not being able to understanding these complex plans. I don't think you really know how much coverage you have until you have to use it. The brochures and marketing make it sound like you have great coverage, the small print has all the limitations, and exceptions. 
 
I heard a similar story this morning from a colleague who's son (University grad so not dumb) called his cell phone service provider to get a better/cheaper monthly plan. They offered a new plan which he got and now pays $15 less per month. The next month after he changed he received a $1000 plus invoice from the service provider. Apparently changing the package even though it was with the same service provider for the same contract term triggered the "buy out" at full retail cost of his phone. If he had known that he would not have switched. He is in the process of trying to get this reversed and go back to his original plan. So far he is getting the run around told they are investigating. 

I think he made a bad decision when he picked out the "FREE" IPhone and signed up for a long term contract in person at the service provider store. However, I think it is pretty shady for the service provider to not provide the details or warning that changing the plan would trigger such a large expense. It's one thing to sign a contract in person with the paper in front of you, but just talking on the phone to the company there is no way you can see the small print or know the impacts of what they are offering you unless they tell you.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kitsune on April 11, 2019, 04:17:34 PM
I get what you're saying, but I processed the paperwork for her insurance change, and made sure she knew what wasn't covered with the private plan (and therefore the reason for the cost difference). Her response was "I'm young, I'm not gonna get sick." So... it wasn't ignorance in this case.

Also, I do sympathize with a desire to save money. And when I was 25 and had many months of living expenses in the bank, that was the call I made. But if you're so close to the edge that 2-3 weeks of missed income is an actual crisis, snipping off your own safety net is maybe not the most prudent option.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: GreenToTheCore on April 11, 2019, 06:53:05 PM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
@katethekitcat, don't leave us in suspense, what did he say to demonstrate the impossibility?!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: economista on April 12, 2019, 07:48:18 AM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
@katethekitcat, don't leave us in suspense, what did he say to demonstrate the impossibility?!

I had a similar conversation to this with my brother in law once. In some instances he has been open to mustacian ideas and when we visit he usually asks me budget questions. One time I mentioned that our eating out budget for the month was $200 but we usually kept it to around $150. He was floored and tried arguing that one meal eating out for 2 people was $200. My in laws are not fancy people and live in a really rural place, so eating out for them is Buffalo Wild Wings or Chili’s. But, when you have at least 2-3 cocktails or beers per person, plus an appetizer or two plus two main courses plus a desert or two, you are still at $200. Craziness. I pointed out that #1 - we never drink anything but water when we go out and #2 - we tend to eat healthier foods and smaller portions. We can each have a large bowl of pho (we do every Sunday after church) for $19 after tip. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Unique User on April 12, 2019, 08:06:14 AM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
@katethekitcat, don't leave us in suspense, what did he say to demonstrate the impossibility?!

I had a similar conversation to this with my brother in law once. In some instances he has been open to mustacian ideas and when we visit he usually asks me budget questions. One time I mentioned that our eating out budget for the month was $200 but we usually kept it to around $150. He was floored and tried arguing that one meal eating out for 2 people was $200. My in laws are not fancy people and live in a really rural place, so eating out for them is Buffalo Wild Wings or Chili’s. But, when you have at least 2-3 cocktails or beers per person, plus an appetizer or two plus two main courses plus a desert or two, you are still at $200. Craziness. I pointed out that #1 - we never drink anything but water when we go out and #2 - we tend to eat healthier foods and smaller portions. We can each have a large bowl of pho (we do every Sunday after church) for $19 after tip.

I can't wrap my head around a $200 dinner for two at a place like Buffalo Wild Wings or Chili’s.  We're going out to dinner tomorrow at a fancy pants steakhouse and will easily spend $200, but it's a mystery shop and the reimbursement is $200.  It would be really difficult for me to justify spending that on my own at any restaurant. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kitsune on April 12, 2019, 08:26:51 AM
Yesterday my manager mentioned how it's impossible to go out for dinner for under $200 for two people. I was legitimately shocked and told him that - AT MINIMUM - that was 4 nice dinners out for a couple. He proceeded very seriously to argue with me and "demonstrate" why it was impossible in an urban area.
@katethekitcat, don't leave us in suspense, what did he say to demonstrate the impossibility?!

I had a similar conversation to this with my brother in law once. In some instances he has been open to mustacian ideas and when we visit he usually asks me budget questions. One time I mentioned that our eating out budget for the month was $200 but we usually kept it to around $150. He was floored and tried arguing that one meal eating out for 2 people was $200. My in laws are not fancy people and live in a really rural place, so eating out for them is Buffalo Wild Wings or Chili’s. But, when you have at least 2-3 cocktails or beers per person, plus an appetizer or two plus two main courses plus a desert or two, you are still at $200. Craziness. I pointed out that #1 - we never drink anything but water when we go out and #2 - we tend to eat healthier foods and smaller portions. We can each have a large bowl of pho (we do every Sunday after church) for $19 after tip.

I can't wrap my head around a $200 dinner for two at a place like Buffalo Wild Wings or Chili’s.  We're going out to dinner tomorrow at a fancy pants steakhouse and will easily spend $200, but it's a mystery shop and the reimbursement is $200.  It would be really difficult for me to justify spending that on my own at any restaurant.

My husband and I used to spend roughly 150$CAD on a meal for my birthday (which was also my birthday present - gorgeous restaurant, 6-course meal, amazing food, wine, in a Victorian house near the fireplace in winter (or, if we waited till summer, out in the herb garden)... Basically an excuse to sit and chat over amazing food and wine for the better part of 4 hours (and leave the kids with the in-laws, so a KID-FREE 4 hours of conversation). Let's just say that's not an every weekend kind of dinner, and even then we're nowhere near 200$US
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Montecarlo on April 12, 2019, 10:45:23 AM
I recently took my team out to dinner after work.  5 adults at a pretty nice German spot.

Two appetizers, two rounds of drinks, 5 meals - $235

I acknowledge it's really easy to spend $200 on dinner for two.

It's also really easy not to.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 12, 2019, 01:34:14 PM
We were having lunch with a group of coworkers and a few of them started complaining about a couple they all know (I don't). Apparantly they are succesful hard working professionals, but they only work short term well paid temp contracts. Then every time they've saved enough money they move out of their rental and sell all of their furniture and travel until their money is gone. Then they find a new place and get new stuff from the thrift store. They didn't have kids and have done this for decades. Everyone seemed shocked about what this would do to their pension, how they were scroungers, how they would never have any certainty in their life. I tried to bring up (closeted mustachian) that it sounded like they were living a good life and certainly didn't harm anyone with their life choices, but everyone else agreed their life can't be meaningful this way and was a very stupid choice that they would regret when they're old.
That's pretty funny. I have friends who do this too.  They love to travel (but they travel on the cheap - think  hostels, etc.)  They met while world traveling.  They dated while world traveling (would meet up for a few months of traveling).  They got married and kept traveling.  They would both work long enough to get itchy, then travel.

They settled down, had a kid, bought a condo.  Took an extended 3 month vacation.  Had a second kid.  Rented out the condo, quit the job, took BOTH kids on a year round world tour (mostly staying cheaply, again - Thailand, other areas of the So Pacific, some areas of China, etc.)  Came back to the condo for kindergarten.  Lasted 3 months - left again on ANOTHER tour. 

Finally came back.  Kid #1 just started kindergarten a year late (common in their school district anyway).  Not sure if Dad's found a job yet, but mom starts up soon (she hasn't worked since kid #1 was born 7 years ago).

TWICE they said "no, we are done doing that kind of travel" and did it again.  I won't be surprised if they do it again.  Save up enough to afford slow travel, then travel.

I'd love to see their budget and how they do this...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Epor on April 12, 2019, 01:54:23 PM
acquaintance has 7 TVS,  hubbie bought a $400 LIGHT saber for halloween (for him to use), they bought new SUV,

she got temporary raise for 3 months, and took her infant son and in-laws to LAS Vegas to blow the $

Seven tvs? How big is their house? I live in a 3-bed, Kitchen + Living room. If I place a tv in each room, that's 5. I guess I could add a tv in the bathroom = 6. Maybe another in the basement?

Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 12, 2019, 02:00:42 PM
Don't forget the deck/porch and the garage. I didn't know that outside deck TVs were a thing for a long time. My brain kept repeating "theft risk" followed by "water damage". I don't know - I guess alot of people leave $350+ stainless steel BBQ grilles outside too.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Jouer on April 12, 2019, 03:09:31 PM
Don't forget the deck/porch and the garage. I didn't know that outside deck TVs were a thing for a long time. My brain kept repeating "theft risk" followed by "water damage". I don't know - I guess alot of people leave $350+ stainless steel BBQ grilles outside too.

Don't they bring in the TV when not using it?

I leave my bbq outside year round in Canada. Tough as nails, that thing. (was way less than $350, too)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: debtfreejess on April 12, 2019, 04:01:19 PM
I just started a new job (yay!). The folks in the office have been awesome and nice, but not particularly mustachian.

1. Most people drive to work (except two people on my team and myself) despite the fact that it sits on top of an incredibly convenient subway system and is located in the most congested part of the city, traffic-wise.
2. Almost no one actually brings their lunch to work. In an office of about 50, I think I’ve only seen five of us in the break room eating food from home.
3. The first couple of times my boss saw me with my lunch, he started laughing uncontrollably. When I made the comment that I’ve got a mortgage to pay, he joked that he was getting foreclosed on because of his lunch habit. (I want to stop to say that my boss has been super great and has been nothing but kind and funny to me. I just never had my lunch laughed at before)

On the flip side, the company itself is pretty mustachian. It reimburses everyone who takes the metro for work, pays for part of our gym memberships, and provides a good amount of healthy snacks (fruit, granola bars, trail mix, oatmeal, etc.) And despite the lunch habits, it appears that most of my coworkers are happy to drink the free office coffee instead of visiting the coffee shop in the lobby like other folks on this board, so win some lose some.

Also bummed to learn that I don’t qualify for the match my first year. Still worth it for the $10k pay bump though, haha.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Qwertykid18 on April 12, 2019, 05:14:15 PM
Co worker has a 700 dollar truck payment and talks about how he’s trying to buy a house currently. He makes 2000 dollars a month. SMH
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: exterous on April 12, 2019, 08:26:41 PM
We have a work "for sale" email distribution list. Sometimes has some great deals like the free leaf blower I got because the guy got tired of using an extension cord and bought a battery powered one.

Sometimes wedding rings and engagement rings show up on it too..

But the one that blew me away recently was the one for a used refrigerator for $2400. Seeing it was a standard size I read on, shocked and fascinated. Apparently it's was $4000 new. They say it has "all the bells and whistles" but didn't seem particularly flashy except a little excessively doored. (French door with two bottom drawers ).
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 12, 2019, 11:12:50 PM
Oh I've finally got one!  My wife's union has been out of contract for a couple years, so she hasn't gotten even a COL raise since negotiations started.  I personally think that sucks, and is a bit ridiculous.  But one of her coworkers sent an email to the CEO and everyone else complaining that she is looking for other jobs and moonlighting because she can't afford anything.  She sent a detailed chart showing how her out-of-pocket healthcare expenses have gone from around 2% of income to 6% over the last decade.  Without commenting on whether 6% is too much, a quick google tells me that the average in the US is around 15%.  And this lady makes 2-3x the average household income in our county.  And apparently she just moved to San Francisco from the suburbs.  So while I do wish the employer was doing the right thing, the whole tone of the email came off incredibly spoiled and out of touch.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 14, 2019, 03:40:12 PM
We have a work "for sale" email distribution list. Sometimes has some great deals like the free leaf blower I got because the guy got tired of using an extension cord and bought a battery powered one.

Sometimes wedding rings and engagement rings show up on it too..

But the one that blew me away recently was the one for a used refrigerator for $2400. Seeing it was a standard size I read on, shocked and fascinated. Apparently it's was $4000 new. They say it has "all the bells and whistles" but didn't seem particularly flashy except a little excessively doored. (French door with two bottom drawers ).

I can only wonder what they replaced it with assuming this was part of an upgrade. .
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on April 14, 2019, 05:17:33 PM

But the one that blew me away recently was the one for a used refrigerator for $2400. Seeing it was a standard size I read on, shocked and fascinated. Apparently it's was $4000 new. They say it has "all the bells and whistles" but didn't seem particularly flashy except a little excessively doored. (French door with two bottom drawers ).

Our most recent rental came with a fancy refrigerator.   I opened it up and was completely startled because I thought I had broken the door!

The door handle has a special feature.  If you grip it one way it door opens normally.  If you grip it a different way, the door opens but the shelves "attached" to the door stay in place.   Never seen that before! 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: six-car-habit on April 14, 2019, 06:24:36 PM
  **Co worker has a 700 dollar truck payment and talks about how he’s trying to buy a house currently. He makes 2000 dollars a month. SMH **

  Ha ha, when i had a car payment like that , i called it my "Second Mortgage" . But the bright spot was I had already purchased a house [payment] before buying the vehicle.
   You may want to tell your co-worker, this is generally a better order in which to finance things.  Roof over your head 1st, then luxuries....
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 14, 2019, 10:08:48 PM

But the one that blew me away recently was the one for a used refrigerator for $2400. Seeing it was a standard size I read on, shocked and fascinated. Apparently it's was $4000 new. They say it has "all the bells and whistles" but didn't seem particularly flashy except a little excessively doored. (French door with two bottom drawers ).

Our most recent rental came with a fancy refrigerator.   I opened it up and was completely startled because I thought I had broken the door!

The door handle has a special feature.  If you grip it one way it door opens normally.  If you grip it a different way, the door opens but the shelves "attached" to the door stay in place.   Never seen that before!

I’m really into the ones where you knock and a light comes on so you can see what’s inside.  Not to buy for myself, but pretty novel at friends house.  I can only imagine the window is terrible for efficiency
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on April 15, 2019, 07:09:06 AM
  **Co worker has a 700 dollar truck payment and talks about how he’s trying to buy a house currently. He makes 2000 dollars a month. SMH **

  Ha ha, when i had a car payment like that , i called it my "Second Mortgage" . But the bright spot was I had already purchased a house [payment] before buying the vehicle.
   You may want to tell your co-worker, this is generally a better order in which to finance things.  Roof over your head 1st, then luxuries....

You silly!!!    A big, huge, shiny, MANLY truck ***IS*** a necessity.    How else would his coworkers know he's manly?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on April 15, 2019, 08:49:33 AM
The tall Texan household is now into week seven with no car payments, but the tax bill that was due hasn't allowed us to properly enjoy it, yet. I cannot imagine having a $700 one.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: six-car-habit on April 15, 2019, 09:48:35 AM
  **Co worker has a 700 dollar truck payment and talks about how he’s trying to buy a house currently. He makes 2000 dollars a month. SMH **

  Ha ha, when i had a car payment like that , i called it my "Second Mortgage" . But the bright spot was I had already purchased a house [payment] before buying the vehicle.
   You may want to tell your co-worker, this is generally a better order in which to finance things.  Roof over your head 1st, then luxuries....

You silly!!!    A big, huge, shiny, MANLY truck ***IS*** a necessity.    How else would his coworkers know he's manly?

  Maybe a set of those horrid plastic-rubber "truck-Nutz" scrotum things hanging off the back of his used Prius ?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on April 15, 2019, 09:55:33 AM
acquaintance has 7 TVS,  hubbie bought a $400 LIGHT saber for halloween (for him to use), they bought new SUV,

she got temporary raise for 3 months, and took her infant son and in-laws to LAS Vegas to blow the $

Seven tvs? How big is their house? I live in a 3-bed, Kitchen + Living room. If I place a tv in each room, that's 5. I guess I could add a tv in the bathroom = 6. Maybe another in the basement?
TV en banos is becoming a "feature" in homes being sold in my area.
Need an angry shit: switch to <crazy news channel>
Need a relaxing one: switch to channel showing beautiful landscapes and nature
Sorted!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: JLee on April 15, 2019, 10:47:40 AM
Don't forget the deck/porch and the garage. I didn't know that outside deck TVs were a thing for a long time. My brain kept repeating "theft risk" followed by "water damage". I don't know - I guess alot of people leave $350+ stainless steel BBQ grilles outside too.

Outdoor TVs are actually a thing - they're expensive.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uiSq6KLhqU
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kookaburra Risotto on April 15, 2019, 12:45:51 PM
Last year many of my colleagues (and me) were on strike due to proposed changes to our pension. The amount of people who didn't strike for even one day because they couldn't afford to lose even a single day's pay was astonishing. Their choice if they don't want to strike but to be living so close to the bone that you can't afford it for even one day is scary.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on April 15, 2019, 01:29:41 PM

I can sympathize with the wanting to cut expenses, and the problem with not being able to understanding these complex plans. I don't think you really know how much coverage you have until you have to use it. The brochures and marketing make it sound like you have great coverage, the small print has all the limitations, and exceptions. 
 
I heard a similar story this morning from a colleague who's son (University grad so not dumb) called his cell phone service provider to get a better/cheaper monthly plan. They offered a new plan which he got and now pays $15 less per month. The next month after he changed he received a $1000 plus invoice from the service provider. Apparently changing the package even though it was with the same service provider for the same contract term triggered the "buy out" at full retail cost of his phone. If he had known that he would not have switched. He is in the process of trying to get this reversed and go back to his original plan. So far he is getting the run around told they are investigating. 

I think he made a bad decision when he picked out the "FREE" IPhone and signed up for a long term contract in person at the service provider store. However, I think it is pretty shady for the service provider to not provide the details or warning that changing the plan would trigger such a large expense. It's one thing to sign a contract in person with the paper in front of you, but just talking on the phone to the company there is no way you can see the small print or know the impacts of what they are offering you unless they tell you.

I got an update to this one from my co-worker.  Turns out after hours and hours of calling and talking to a bunch of supervisors his son was able to roll-back to his original plan and they reversed the buyout of his phone. They even admitted their mistake ,but didn't offer to doing anything to make up for it other than reinstating the original plan.  He even found out that the new contract they had wrongfully signed him up for was going to give him another new phone (again with a high buyout).  The first solution they offered was he just sell one of the phones himself. They must be able to get away doing this with a number of clients who just give up and stop fighting. I assume this is what happens when a company uses incentives for selling products to their support/call centre staff rather than helping clients. My co-worker and son are going out of their way to tell everyone they know not to do business with this company. Being one of the large Canadian Telco companies I am sure they are not too worried about their customer service levels or profit focused business practices.

Spoiler: show
Bell Canada
 
 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: RetiredAt63 on April 15, 2019, 02:17:30 PM
Being one of the large Canadian Telco companies I am sure they are not too worried about their customer service levels or profit focused business practices.

Spoiler: show
Bell Canada


I'm cynical about them all.  When I lost my phone I got no help from my company.   They only cared when I switched providers - too late, I'll check you out when this contract expires in 2 years.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: solon on April 17, 2019, 01:31:41 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on April 17, 2019, 01:42:56 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I was reusing empty milk bags for my lunch for a while and got the same type of comment. I am now using a reusable fabric bag I had lying around so nobody comments, but if something in my lunch leaks it more of a pain and I can't just throw out my lunch bag like I did in the past. Peer pressure why did I let it affect me?  Keep using your grocery sack Solon!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: eljefe-speaks on April 17, 2019, 02:31:41 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

Hmmmm, I dunno, a plastic bag is kind of sad. I carry my lunch to work in a leather shoulder bag that DW got me for Christmas. My buddy carries his lunch to work in a plastic bag and gives me grief constantly because I wear a "purse." The plastic bag is apparently the masculine option.   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on April 17, 2019, 04:51:24 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I was reusing empty milk bags for my lunch for a while and got the same type of comment. I am now using a reusable fabric bag I had lying around so nobody comments, but if something in my lunch leaks it more of a pain and I can't just throw out my lunch bag like I did in the past. Peer pressure why did I let it affect me?  Keep using your grocery sack Solon!

Can you line the fabric bag with a milk bag? That way if something leaks you can just throw away the liner bag.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jps on April 17, 2019, 05:24:04 PM
A co-worker was talking about how they might get rid of their one car, since they live in a walk-able area with good transit.

"We would save about $400/month without the car payment or insurance, so we could spend that on whatever we wanted!"

Oh, so close.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Miss Piggy on April 17, 2019, 07:27:15 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I was reusing empty milk bags for my lunch for a while and got the same type of comment. I am now using a reusable fabric bag I had lying around so nobody comments, but if something in my lunch leaks it more of a pain and I can't just throw out my lunch bag like I did in the past. Peer pressure why did I let it affect me?  Keep using your grocery sack Solon!

Can you line the fabric bag with a milk bag? That way if something leaks you can just throw away the liner bag.

@techwiz - I have to ask: What the heck is a "milk bag"? (I guess it seems obvious, but I've never heard of it.)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 17, 2019, 08:59:42 PM
Thank you for asking. The only milk bags I know of are the small freezer bags for nursing mothers who pump.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Dee on April 17, 2019, 09:24:24 PM
In many parts of Canada, including Ontario, milk is packaged in bags; there's an exterior plastic bag (that's smaller than a plastic grocery bag) and within that bag are 3 plastic pouches of milk, for a total content of 4 litres of milk. You buy a reusuable jug into which you insert one pouch at a time. You can read more about it, and more importantly, get a visual, here: https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/ (https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Montecarlo on April 17, 2019, 09:41:08 PM
In many parts of Canada, including Ontario, milk is packaged in bags; there's an exterior plastic bag (that's smaller than a plastic grocery bag) and within that bag are 3 plastic pouches of milk, for a total content of 4 litres of milk. You buy a reusuable jug into which you insert one pouch at a time. You can read more about it, and more importantly, get a visual, here: https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/ (https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/)

We had milk bladders on my submarine.  They fit into a dispenser, but the nipple was always exposed to room temperature.

I lived in Ottawa for two years and never encountered milk bags or bladders there.  Then again, I may have gone the entire two years without drinking milk.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 17, 2019, 09:42:03 PM
Interesting!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 18, 2019, 12:58:37 AM
Drink it straight from the cow like a real badass
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gerard on April 18, 2019, 06:05:52 AM
"milk bag"?

Google "Danny Green" and "milk bag" to see (a) how odd other folks find our milk bags and (b) how apparently invested we are in them as a symbol of Canadian-ness!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on April 18, 2019, 07:00:26 AM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

Got plenty of people at my work site (govt buildings) who bring food and beverages in "homeless lunch bag". Many of them make over 100k in a MCOL area.
The plastic bag is efficient, tie up your waste in it end of day and chuck it in the huge trashcans or trash bins before you go home. You don't want to leave trash in an uncovered bin here.

We don't have cleaning crews due to the nature and sensitivity of data in the workplace. Each person is responsible for keeping his/her area clean, common areas we all take turns or work together and clean up in <10 mins every other week.

I use a lunch cooler bag, but fuck those uppity people who call a plastic grocery bag a homeless bag.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: techwiz on April 18, 2019, 03:54:30 PM
Quote
@techwiz - I have to ask: What the heck is a "milk bag"? (I guess it seems obvious, but I've never heard of it.)

(https://junkdrawer67.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/milk-bag.jpg)

(https://resources.salewhale.ca/products_sales_images/retailer_3/2016-04-28/p1_1461830559.2269/4l-bag-sealtest.jpg) cheapest way to buy milk up here in Canada.  Unless of  course you have your own cow but then the feeding and vet bills really add up.   
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 18, 2019, 04:18:18 PM
Drink it straight from the cow like a real badass
I did that once, mostly. I went to an agricultural fair in Paris long ago and one of the displays was a cow that got milked in front of us. I whipped out my empty water bottle and got it filled with milk fresh and warm directly from the source.

It tasted delicious. My gastrointestinal tract was most displeased.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 18, 2019, 04:20:05 PM
Drink it straight from the cow like a real badass
I did that once, mostly. I went to an agricultural fair in Paris long ago and one of the displays was a cow that got milked in front of us. I whipped out my empty water bottle and got it filled with milk fresh and warm directly from the source.

It tasted delicious. My gastrointestinal tract was most displeased.

You gotta pasture-ize the cow first
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: DadJokes on April 18, 2019, 07:04:10 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I not only carry my lunch in a plastic bag- I use the same plastic bag everyday. I haven’t received any negative comments and don’t think i will. My coworkers and bosses are generally fairly sensible and polite.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: caleb on April 18, 2019, 08:02:54 PM
I'm really confused about why putting your lunch in a plastic bag is weird.  I usually bring leftovers in a tupperware container that I wrap in a plastic shopping bag in case something leaks.  The alternative would be to use a new ziplock, I guess?  Why would I do that when I already have a perfectly good bag to be reused and kept out of the landfill/ocean/belly of a whale?

Or do you mean that you're putting leftovers directly into an old plastic bag?  I probably wouldn't do that, mostly because I have to imagine a reused shopping bag isn't super sanitary.  Eating last night's spaghetti directly out of a plastic shopping bag from the bodega somehow seems like a bridge too far for me personally.  A food grade milk bag might be different, though.

So tell us more about your bag usage.  I'm leaning toward "not weird," but need to know more.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: solon on April 18, 2019, 09:12:15 PM
I'm really confused about why putting your lunch in a plastic bag is weird.  I usually bring leftovers in a tupperware container that I wrap in a plastic shopping bag in case something leaks.  The alternative would be to use a new ziplock, I guess?  Why would I do that when I already have a perfectly good bag to be reused and kept out of the landfill/ocean/belly of a whale?

Or do you mean that you're putting leftovers directly into an old plastic bag?  I probably wouldn't do that, mostly because I have to imagine a reused shopping bag isn't super sanitary.  Eating last night's spaghetti directly out of a plastic shopping bag from the bodega somehow seems like a bridge too far for me personally.  A food grade milk bag might be different, though.

So tell us more about your bag usage.  I'm leaning toward "not weird," but need to know more.

The alternative to a plastic grocery sack would be a lunch box. The ones I've seen are big - bigger than a 6-pack - and insulated, so they take up a lot of space in the fridge. They're reusable, which is an advantage over a grocery sack. But you'd have to use a lot of grocery sacks to equal the cost of a lunch box.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SerenaDarrin on April 18, 2019, 10:56:10 PM
  A food grade milk bag might be different, though.

As someone else who uses milk bags,. . . that's exactly it.  It's food grade plastic.  It's not your usual plastic bags.  My grandmother would cut open the tops of the milk bags, wash them out thoroughly, and then use them as freezer bags.  They work quite well (honestly, the plastic is a bit heavier then usual commercial freezer bags which is nice), and if you're worried about freezer burn, a twist tie or elastic seals them up nicely.

So, I'm lucky enough to have never bought a freezer bag/sandwich bag in my life.  It's always been re-used milk bags.  (Thank you, Nani!)

You can wash/reuse the milk bags relatively indefinitely (the only time I don't re-use them is if they've had raw meat or such packed in them, because I'm not sure I'd get that clean enough). 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Imma on April 19, 2019, 03:32:02 AM
I'm really confused about why putting your lunch in a plastic bag is weird.  I usually bring leftovers in a tupperware container that I wrap in a plastic shopping bag in case something leaks.  The alternative would be to use a new ziplock, I guess?  Why would I do that when I already have a perfectly good bag to be reused and kept out of the landfill/ocean/belly of a whale?

Or do you mean that you're putting leftovers directly into an old plastic bag?  I probably wouldn't do that, mostly because I have to imagine a reused shopping bag isn't super sanitary.  Eating last night's spaghetti directly out of a plastic shopping bag from the bodega somehow seems like a bridge too far for me personally.  A food grade milk bag might be different, though.

So tell us more about your bag usage.  I'm leaning toward "not weird," but need to know more.

The alternative to a plastic grocery sack would be a lunch box. The ones I've seen are big - bigger than a 6-pack - and insulated, so they take up a lot of space in the fridge. They're reusable, which is an advantage over a grocery sack. But you'd have to use a lot of grocery sacks to equal the cost of a lunch box.

Simple basic lunch boxes aren't a thing there? Everyone I know has one. Reusing bread bags is definitely something I do when I don't want to carry around an empty lunch box, but when there are multiple family members taking lunch to work/school you're bound to run out of bags.

I have owned the same lunch box for 10 years and I'm sure it cost less than €10. It's similar to this one https://www.wehkamp.nl/mepal-take-a-break-lunchbox-midi-16041548/?CC=C23&SC=BTS&KAC=BRT&artikelNummer=233154&MaatCode=0000&BC=GOA&BAC=ALG&cm_mmc_o=7BBTkwCjC-kTwFwwECVyBpAgfkblfbETzplCjCPyBBpfyBFFwkC1AEgtCCjCoxnNNvDS&scid=scplp862331540000&sc_intid=862331540000&gclsrc=aw.ds&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItNno-erb4QIV6LvtCh1cQQRmEAQYASABEgJ5jvD_BwE&NavState=%7B"fi"%3A%7B"p_MRK"%3A%5B"mepal"%5D%7D%7D&PI=001 and roughly the size of a book. It's not insulated but I don't need that. When I eat a hot lunch I heat it in the microwave.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Hula Hoop on April 19, 2019, 03:54:20 AM
I got a really cute plastic bento box style lunch box at IKEA about 5 years ago for 5 euro.  I use it nearly every day and it's good as you can separate out the various things you bring.  I usually put salad in one half, cheese or ham in another section and something like olives or leftover chicken etc in the other section.  I have crackers, yoghurt, nuts etc at work and I also bring fruit.  If you have IKEA where you live, Solon, I'd recommend this kind of lunch box.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ScreamingHeadGuy on April 19, 2019, 06:15:30 AM
In many parts of Canada, including Ontario, milk is packaged in bags; there's an exterior plastic bag (that's smaller than a plastic grocery bag) and within that bag are 3 plastic pouches of milk, for a total content of 4 litres of milk. You buy a reusuable jug into which you insert one pouch at a time. You can read more about it, and more importantly, get a visual, here: https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/ (https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/why-do-canadians-drink-bagged-milk/)
They are available in IA, MN, and WI, too, at the convenience store/gas station/cum-supermarket chain Kwik Trip.  Have been since at least the early 90s.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: merula on April 19, 2019, 07:27:58 AM
They are available in IA, MN, and WI, too, at the convenience store/gas station/cum-supermarket chain Kwik Trip.  Have been since at least the early 90s.

Live in Minnesota, can confirm. Actually, this is a sore spot in my parents' marriage. My mom loves bagged milk because it's cheap, my dad thinks the bags are weird and difficult to use. (They do have the special pitchers, Dad just doesn't like them.)

So Mom will occasionally buy cartons of milk, and then rinse those out to pour bagged milk into. This is also the woman who would put store-brand cereal in brand-name cereal boxes.

Yes, I have trust issues, why do you ask?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: LennStar on April 19, 2019, 11:36:01 AM

So Mom will occasionally buy cartons of milk, and then rinse those out to pour bagged milk into. This is also the woman who would put store-brand cereal in brand-name cereal boxes.

It is a well known fact of psychology that wine tastes better when it comes out of an expensive bottle, even if it is the same bottle and you just tell the people it was expensive instead of telling them it was cheap. 

Putting cheap stuff into an expensive box is the fast and way of getting expensive-tasting stuff on your table ;)
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: FIRE 20/20 on April 19, 2019, 03:16:04 PM
Drink it straight from the cow like a real badass
I did that once, mostly. I went to an agricultural fair in Paris long ago and one of the displays was a cow that got milked in front of us. I whipped out my empty water bottle and got it filled with milk fresh and warm directly from the source.

It tasted delicious. My gastrointestinal tract was most displeased.

You gotta pasture-ize the cow first

Ha!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 19, 2019, 03:49:27 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

Hmmmm, I dunno, a plastic bag is kind of sad. I carry my lunch to work in a leather shoulder bag that DW got me for Christmas. My buddy carries his lunch to work in a plastic bag and gives me grief constantly because I wear a "purse." The plastic bag is apparently the masculine option.

So get a flannel lunch bag - duh!   /s

Also, you could sell the car and ride the cow to work...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: horsepoor on April 20, 2019, 01:48:22 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

Hmmmm, I dunno, a plastic bag is kind of sad. I carry my lunch to work in a leather shoulder bag that DW got me for Christmas. My buddy carries his lunch to work in a plastic bag and gives me grief constantly because I wear a "purse." The plastic bag is apparently the masculine option.

So get a flannel lunch bag - duh!   /s

Also, you could sell the car and ride the cow to work...

I was thinking canvas seems more manly, so on a whim I Googled Carhartt lunch box, and sure enough:  https://www.carhartt.com/products/carhartt-black-friday-bags-sale/Deluxe-Lunch-Cooler-358100B?selectedAttribute=7000000000000000005_7000000000000000105

I like that at the top it clarifies that this is a unisex lunch box, just in case there are questions.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 20, 2019, 01:55:42 PM
They are available in IA, MN, and WI, too, at the convenience store/gas station/cum-supermarket chain Kwik Trip.  Have been since at least the early 90s.

Live in Minnesota, can confirm. Actually, this is a sore spot in my parents' marriage. My mom loves bagged milk because it's cheap, my dad thinks the bags are weird and difficult to use. (They do have the special pitchers, Dad just doesn't like them.)

So Mom will occasionally buy cartons of milk, and then rinse those out to pour bagged milk into. This is also the woman who would put store-brand cereal in brand-name cereal boxes.

Yes, I have trust issues, why do you ask?

Are these bags refrigerated?  I know in South America they use the bags, but it's usually ultra-pasteurized and shelf-stable.  Not refrigerated. 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: RetiredAt63 on April 20, 2019, 03:47:00 PM
They are available in IA, MN, and WI, too, at the convenience store/gas station/cum-supermarket chain Kwik Trip.  Have been since at least the early 90s.

Live in Minnesota, can confirm. Actually, this is a sore spot in my parents' marriage. My mom loves bagged milk because it's cheap, my dad thinks the bags are weird and difficult to use. (They do have the special pitchers, Dad just doesn't like them.)

So Mom will occasionally buy cartons of milk, and then rinse those out to pour bagged milk into. This is also the woman who would put store-brand cereal in brand-name cereal boxes.

Yes, I have trust issues, why do you ask?

Are these bags refrigerated?  I know in South America they use the bags, but it's usually ultra-pasteurized and shelf-stable.  Not refrigerated.

No, the ultra-pasteurized comes in cartons.  Bagged milk has to be refrigerated.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 20, 2019, 09:06:22 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

Hmmmm, I dunno, a plastic bag is kind of sad. I carry my lunch to work in a leather shoulder bag that DW got me for Christmas. My buddy carries his lunch to work in a plastic bag and gives me grief constantly because I wear a "purse." The plastic bag is apparently the masculine option.

So get a flannel lunch bag - duh!   /s

Also, you could sell the car and ride the cow to work...

I was thinking canvas seems more manly, so on a whim I Googled Carhartt lunch box, and sure enough:  https://www.carhartt.com/products/carhartt-black-friday-bags-sale/Deluxe-Lunch-Cooler-358100B?selectedAttribute=7000000000000000005_7000000000000000105

I like that at the top it clarifies that this is a unisex lunch box, just in case there are questions.
Good thing they clarified because lunch is such a gendered activity.....
~eye roll~
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Channel-Z on April 21, 2019, 05:39:15 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I do the same thing. I use the sack until it develops a hole, then use the next sack.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: BTDretire on April 21, 2019, 09:06:19 PM
This milk bags thing could have gone a whole different way, but for the good taste of mustachians!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 21, 2019, 09:35:05 PM
I bring my lunch to work every day in a plastic grocery sack.

Today my boss said, "Here's solon and his homeless lunch bag!" (Meaning, the kind of lunch bag a homeless person would carry.)

I do the same thing. I use the sack until it develops a hole, then use the next sack.

Put a straw in the sack dear solon dear solon
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Enigma on April 22, 2019, 06:51:58 AM
A couple of weeks ago (Apr 8th) there was a new employee hired at my IT/computer company.  He sits two desks down from me.  His first week was a roller coaster because he had planned baseball games as the coach for his son's team.  The days he worked he made up for missing the times he couldnt work pulling 12 hour days when he could.  Couldn't take the days off financially (I would assume)

This weekend:
New Coworker: What did you do this weekend?
Me: Hung out with my parents & sister-n-law's parents for Easter
New Coworker: I bought a brand new $70,000 RV.
Me: <Confused><Thinking>
New Coworker: <Showing pictures to me and the other coworkers>
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Just Joe on April 22, 2019, 07:20:58 AM
That one has lots of confidence in his future at your company... Perhaps he could have waited six months to see how it likes the company and how the company likes him.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Gremlin on April 22, 2019, 08:43:06 PM
A couple of weeks ago (Apr 8th) there was a new employee hired at my IT/computer company.  He sits two desks down from me.  His first week was a roller coaster because he had planned baseball games as the coach for his son's team.  The days he worked he made up for missing the times he couldnt work pulling 12 hour days when he could.  Couldn't take the days off financially (I would assume)

This weekend:
New Coworker: What did you do this weekend?
Me: Hung out with my parents & sister-n-law's parents for Easter
New Coworker: I bought a brand new $70,000 RV.
Me: <Confused><Thinking>
New Coworker: <Showing pictures to me and the other coworkers>

Did "New Coworker" announce that it was $70k RV?  Or that he bought a new RV and you happen to know that it was $70k?  'Cos the latter is cringeworthy, but the former is truly ugly.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Enigma on April 23, 2019, 09:32:31 AM
Did "New Coworker" announce that it was $70k RV?  Or that he bought a new RV and you happen to know that it was $70k?  'Cos the latter is cringeworthy, but the former is truly ugly.

The new coworker announced that it was a $70k RV and stated it was the cheapest that the dealership offered.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: TVRodriguez on April 23, 2019, 11:34:16 AM
A couple of weeks ago (Apr 8th) there was a new employee hired at my IT/computer company.  He sits two desks down from me.  His first week was a roller coaster because he had planned baseball games as the coach for his son's team.  The days he worked he made up for missing the times he couldnt work pulling 12 hour days when he could.  Couldn't take the days off financially (I would assume)


See, I would assume that as a new employee he wanted not to slack off on his first week, while still keeping the promise he had made to his son and the rest of the team.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: talltexan on April 24, 2019, 09:50:52 AM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Kashmani on April 24, 2019, 11:10:43 AM
Quote
@techwiz - I have to ask: What the heck is a "milk bag"? (I guess it seems obvious, but I've never heard of it.)

(https://junkdrawer67.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/milk-bag.jpg)

(https://resources.salewhale.ca/products_sales_images/retailer_3/2016-04-28/p1_1461830559.2269/4l-bag-sealtest.jpg) cheapest way to buy milk up here in Canada.  Unless of  course you have your own cow but then the feeding and vet bills really add up.

Man, I miss living in Ontario. When I had a child in diapers (we used washable cloth diapers), I would never leave the house without an array of cut-open milk bags in which to store the wet diapers. Perfect size.

Although admittedly on my first day in Ontario I had a very confused look on my face when I asked the supermarket clerk what people put the milk in. After a very conspicuous eye-roll, he pointed to a plastic jug just like the one above.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Xlar on April 24, 2019, 02:24:22 PM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.

Wow! That is horrifyingly bad advice!
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: mavendrill on April 25, 2019, 09:38:06 AM
One of my co-workers (about 50 years old) is about to buy a home. He just emigrated here and is correctly renting a home. The and his wife have money from selling their previous home. So far, so good.

He talked to a bank to get a preapproval for a mortgage, which is something you need here to make an offer on a home. The bank was presenting him the option of the flexi-mortgage. This is just an amount of credit that the bank gives you, based on the value of your home and you need to pay it back on a certain date, e.g. after 30 years. You need to pay a monthly interest, but you can decide not to pay that fee for several months as often as you like. As long as you pay it in the end with all the extra interest. You can also take out a big sum when the mortgage is partly paid down, to buy a car or a new kitchen, and just use the same mortgage. The mortgage has a higher interest rate than a traditional mortgage.
My co-worker thinks this sounds as a good alternative. He likes to be able to not pay the monthly interest for some months and then catch up later when he receives a lump sum out of a savings fund.

From me he just wanted to know whether this was something safe to bet on. I have heard a sincere financial expert speaking about this type of mortgage, who said it was a good alternative for people who are financially responsible, something my co-worker says he is.

I really had to keep my mouth shut for the rest of my thoughts. I would not get a mortgage with higher interest than necessary. I would also not choose to not pay the monthly fee for some months, because that means paying extra interest later. I really had to keep in mind that for my co-worker, it might be a good alternative, even though it means he won't be paying down his mortgage any time soon.

The good thing is that the bank has pre-qualified him for a mortgage that is twice as high as he asked for and he is not planning to get such a high mortgage. Good for him.
Reading this I felt like you were both bobbling an active hand grenade.  So many dangerous decisions available.  Hopefully it works out great.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on April 25, 2019, 10:09:19 AM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.

Wow! That is horrifyingly bad advice!

WTF?  i always ask ppl if they act as a fiduciary
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: SwordGuy on April 25, 2019, 02:33:55 PM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.

Wow! That is horrifyingly bad advice!

WTF?  i always ask ppl if they act as a fiduciary

I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 25, 2019, 05:52:12 PM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.

Wow! That is horrifyingly bad advice!

WTF?  i always ask ppl if they act as a fiduciary

I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.

If you want some non fiduciary advice, start here: https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/top-is-in/
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Montecarlo on April 25, 2019, 06:17:01 PM
I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.

I talked with a financial adviser that charged 2% fees who said they were a fiduciary.  Not saying they aren't, it wasn't like they steered people into high commission funds or anything.  The products they had were reasonable.  But just the fact of charging 2% seems unfiduciary like.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 25, 2019, 08:02:27 PM
“Unfiduciary like” is mild.
“Highway robbery” is more accurate.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 25, 2019, 10:43:34 PM
I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.

I talked with a financial adviser that charged 2% fees who said they were a fiduciary.  Not saying they aren't, it wasn't like they steered people into high commission funds or anything.  The products they had were reasonable.  But just the fact of charging 2% seems unfiduciary like.

If these are upfront management fees and not hidden fund fees, there’s nothing unfiduciarylike about it. Advisors need to make money, so better full disclosure how you make it instead of simply steering people towards shady products.  Anyone who doesn’t feel they are worth the fee can easily avoid signing up
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dude on April 26, 2019, 12:17:51 PM
I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.

I talked with a financial adviser that charged 2% fees who said they were a fiduciary.  Not saying they aren't, it wasn't like they steered people into high commission funds or anything.  The products they had were reasonable.  But just the fact of charging 2% seems unfiduciary like.

If these are upfront management fees and not hidden fund fees, there’s nothing unfiduciarylike about it. Advisors need to make money, so better full disclosure how you make it instead of simply steering people towards shady products.  Anyone who doesn’t feel they are worth the fee can easily avoid signing up

I don't know about that -- a 2% drag on one's portfolio is very hard to overcome, and no advisor, fiduciary or not, is going to beat the market by 2% with any consistency, if at all. I get your point, but 2% is a red flag. Better to find a fee-only fiduciary that charges set rates for various services.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: tralfamadorian on April 26, 2019, 12:36:04 PM
Co-worker told me she met a financial advisor. He suggested she take a loan against her 401(K), and invest it in making hard money loans to real estate developers in a metro area about 100 miles west of us. I told her to run away.

Wow! That is horrifyingly bad advice!

+1mil

Holy shit! I think this is the worst financial advise I've ever heard from a professional.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dragoncar on April 26, 2019, 12:59:55 PM
I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won't do that, run.   If they don't know what you're talking about, run.

And, honestly, probably best to just run anyway.   Plenty of good advice available elsewhere.

I talked with a financial adviser that charged 2% fees who said they were a fiduciary.  Not saying they aren't, it wasn't like they steered people into high commission funds or anything.  The products they had were reasonable.  But just the fact of charging 2% seems unfiduciary like.

If these are upfront management fees and not hidden fund fees, there’s nothing unfiduciarylike about it. Advisors need to make money, so better full disclosure how you make it instead of simply steering people towards shady products.  Anyone who doesn’t feel they are worth the fee can easily avoid signing up

I don't know about that -- a 2% drag on one's portfolio is very hard to overcome, and no advisor, fiduciary or not, is going to beat the market by 2% with any consistency, if at all. I get your point, but 2% is a red flag. Better to find a fee-only fiduciary that charges set rates for various services.

It’s not an offer I would take up, but being a fiduciary is about loyalty, not raw profits.  There is a class of clients who would probably pay 2% for the right level of service (something beyond VTSAX, possibly with access to private equity).  Consider that you might pay 10% of rents to someone to manage your real estate holdings.  At the 2% rule that works out to be around 2% of your holdings.

For 2% I’d expect more “wealth management” than “financial advice”
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Playing with Fire UK on April 26, 2019, 02:13:35 PM
For 2% I’d expect more “wealth management” than “financial advice”

For 2% I'd expect the Philosopher's Stone and Fountain of Youth.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 26, 2019, 03:54:58 PM
Finally got one to share.

I gave my boss a ride home from a group lunch this afternoon. He recently purchased a new construction townhome close to work. Some snooping on Zillow indicates it likely is in the $1.4-1.8M range. Expensive, but fairly average for our area. On the car ride over he talked about his second house in China (he came over for work a couple of years ago). His first house in China is apparently rented and he didn't mention what it is worth, but the second house, which sits empty, is worth 15M RMB. At current exchange rates that is about $2.3M US, though the figure he used in our conversation was $3M. Regardless, the point is the same. He has a multi-million dollar asset that sits unoccupied most of the time except for when his mother-in-law wants to visit the city where it is located on occasion.

I half-jokingly suggested he could sell the second house and retire tomorrow. He said he would be bored.

The up side is that I shared this with a coworker who expressed the opinion that he isn't going to work a day more than he has to, and that our boss is a case of failure of imagination.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: jinga nation on April 29, 2019, 07:10:35 AM
Finally got one to share.

I gave my boss a ride home from a group lunch this afternoon. He recently purchased a new construction townhome close to work. Some snooping on Zillow indicates it likely is in the $1.4-1.8M range. Expensive, but fairly average for our area. On the car ride over he talked about his second house in China (he came over for work a couple of years ago). His first house in China is apparently rented and he didn't mention what it is worth, but the second house, which sits empty, is worth 15M RMB. At current exchange rates that is about $2.3M US, though the figure he used in our conversation was $3M. Regardless, the point is the same. He has a multi-million dollar asset that sits unoccupied most of the time except for when his mother-in-law wants to visit the city where it is located on occasion.

I half-jokingly suggested he could sell the second house and retire tomorrow. He said he would be bored.

The up side is that I shared this with a coworker who expressed the opinion that he isn't going to work a day more than he has to, and that our boss is a case of failure of imagination.

If he's comparing to his peers with a very high $$$ reference point, he's "poor". So he needs to exist in the rat race.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: letsdoit on April 29, 2019, 08:34:59 AM
re: the 2% fiduciary.  it may be worth it for a billionaire who is trying to do aggressive real estate moves: buying islands or mines or what not. 
 
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on April 29, 2019, 04:40:12 PM
Finally got one to share.

I gave my boss a ride home from a group lunch this afternoon. He recently purchased a new construction townhome close to work. Some snooping on Zillow indicates it likely is in the $1.4-1.8M range. Expensive, but fairly average for our area. On the car ride over he talked about his second house in China (he came over for work a couple of years ago). His first house in China is apparently rented and he didn't mention what it is worth, but the second house, which sits empty, is worth 15M RMB. At current exchange rates that is about $2.3M US, though the figure he used in our conversation was $3M. Regardless, the point is the same. He has a multi-million dollar asset that sits unoccupied most of the time except for when his mother-in-law wants to visit the city where it is located on occasion.

I half-jokingly suggested he could sell the second house and retire tomorrow. He said he would be bored.

The up side is that I shared this with a coworker who expressed the opinion that he isn't going to work a day more than he has to, and that our boss is a case of failure of imagination.

If he's comparing to his peers with a very high $$$ reference point, he's "poor". So he needs to exist in the rat race.

My first thought was: How is he able to own two homes in China? I thought that was  illegal, but I think it’s only illegal in some cities. I mean, the prez of China did say that homes were for living in, not for speculation. My second thought was: It’s actually wise for him not to rent out his house, not unless he wants it completely destroyed by renters. The amount of money floating around in China in some social circles is ridiculous.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Tracyl-5 on April 29, 2019, 07:42:24 PM
We recently went through a contract change which resulted in several people losing their jobs.  I was lucky enough to find a new job that I started after just a two-week hiatus.  This past weekend I got together with a former co-worker and were discussing a mutual friend who still hasn't found a job after almost three months now.  Then my co-worker said, "but OMG, she has $250K in her retirement accounts, that's amazing!"  Never mind our friend is 60 and we live in a HCOL area, so that's not THAT great at all...  I tried to gently remind her that that money is for retirement though, she shouldn't spend it now, but she was too flabergasted that anyone had that much money put away to acknowledge that...  I just stopped trying and nodded along...  She's 68 and is planning to work until at least 70 so she can get her max social security.  SMH...
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: ysette9 on April 29, 2019, 09:32:27 PM
Finally got one to share.

I gave my boss a ride home from a group lunch this afternoon. He recently purchased a new construction townhome close to work. Some snooping on Zillow indicates it likely is in the $1.4-1.8M range. Expensive, but fairly average for our area. On the car ride over he talked about his second house in China (he came over for work a couple of years ago). His first house in China is apparently rented and he didn't mention what it is worth, but the second house, which sits empty, is worth 15M RMB. At current exchange rates that is about $2.3M US, though the figure he used in our conversation was $3M. Regardless, the point is the same. He has a multi-million dollar asset that sits unoccupied most of the time except for when his mother-in-law wants to visit the city where it is located on occasion.

I half-jokingly suggested he could sell the second house and retire tomorrow. He said he would be bored.

The up side is that I shared this with a coworker who expressed the opinion that he isn't going to work a day more than he has to, and that our boss is a case of failure of imagination.

If he's comparing to his peers with a very high $$$ reference point, he's "poor". So he needs to exist in the rat race.

My first thought was: How is he able to own two homes in China? I thought that was  illegal, but I think it’s only illegal in some cities. I mean, the prez of China did say that homes were for living in, not for speculation. My second thought was: It’s actually wise for him not to rent out his house, not unless he wants it completely destroyed by renters. The amount of money floating around in China in some social circles is ridiculous.
I have no idea how that works. You could be right but then if it were illegal, would he be talking about it do openly?
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: cloudsail on April 30, 2019, 04:07:02 AM
The limit on buying second homes in China is pretty recent, not in all cities, and there are ways to get around it. Considering the value of the house, it was probably purchased many years ago.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: Freedomin5 on May 01, 2019, 08:08:39 PM
The limit on buying second homes in China is pretty recent, not in all cities, and there are ways to get around it. Considering the value of the house, it was probably purchased many years ago.

That could be. Or people just don't think they will get caught. My landlord owns at least four apartments in a city where it is illegal to own more than one; most of the ownership details fall in the "gray zone". Landlord frequently posts pictures and talks about all of his available units on WeChat.

The unit I live in is registered to someone else, so when I go to register at the police station, landlord told me to show someone else's ID card as the owner (they have paperwork showing this other random guy is the owner), but I pay rent to the landlord. We rented this place from an authorized, large, housing rental company, so I know things are all in the open on our end. I'm not sure (and don't want to know and probably wouldn't even understand it if it was explained to me) how things work on their end.
Title: Re: Overheard at Work 2
Post by: dogboyslim on May 02, 2019, 12:45:23 PM
I would suggest that you get it in writing that they are acting on your behalf as a fiduciary.   If they won