Author Topic: Overheard at Work 2  (Read 497582 times)

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2200 on: February 10, 2020, 12:02:49 PM »
Overheard via Text:

Friend: I was doing a balance transfer from one card to two others to get 0% and I hit the button too many times so the balance transferred was actually twice what it should have been. I called all the card companies and they said they can't reverse it at this time so I will have to wait until it is complete to request an overage check. It may turn out to be a good thing though as I will use the check to pay off another card that's leaving the 0% period soon.

Us: *Facepalm*

sherr

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2201 on: February 10, 2020, 01:38:54 PM »
Overheard via Text:

Friend: I was doing a balance transfer from one card to two others to get 0% and I hit the button too many times so the balance transferred was actually twice what it should have been. I called all the card companies and they said they can't reverse it at this time so I will have to wait until it is complete to request an overage check. It may turn out to be a good thing though as I will use the check to pay off another card that's leaving the 0% period soon.

Us: *Facepalm*

This actually doesn't sound too bad to me. Intentionally credit-card-hacking to give yourself a 0% loan can actually be pretty Mustachian, depending on what you do with the money. More work than I'm willing to put in, but some people here do.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 02:44:35 PM by sherr »

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2202 on: February 10, 2020, 01:57:03 PM »
it would be one thing if it was on purpose, but this was completely accidental. Then there is the issue that they had to split one card onto two others because of balances, and the implication that they have a fourth card that they will be using to pay off/pay down. This was the same person who told me that they couldn't save $7500 for a down payment for a home when they make over $70K a year(probably closer to $80K). Knowing this person they are not likely making much more than minimum payments so the transfer fees are eating an interest rate savings.

spartana

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2203 on: February 10, 2020, 10:59:05 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.
This sounds vaguely like my ex-BF ;-). 

TomTX

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2204 on: February 11, 2020, 08:02:33 AM »
Overheard via Text:

Friend: I was doing a balance transfer from one card to two others to get 0% and I hit the button too many times so the balance transferred was actually twice what it should have been. I called all the card companies and they said they can't reverse it at this time so I will have to wait until it is complete to request an overage check. It may turn out to be a good thing though as I will use the check to pay off another card that's leaving the 0% period soon.

Us: *Facepalm*

This actually doesn't sound too bad to me. Intentionally credit-card-hacking to give yourself a 0% loan can actually be pretty Mustachian, depending on what you do with the money. More work than I'm willing to put in, but some people here do.

Usually those 0% loans come with a 3-5% balance transfer fee.

alienbogey

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2205 on: February 11, 2020, 03:08:31 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.

That could be a good plan, but only if you already have a motorcycle for riding.

spartana

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2206 on: February 11, 2020, 03:26:28 PM »
Overheard via Text:

Friend: I was doing a balance transfer from one card to two others to get 0% and I hit the button too many times so the balance transferred was actually twice what it should have been. I called all the card companies and they said they can't reverse it at this time so I will have to wait until it is complete to request an overage check. It may turn out to be a good thing though as I will use the check to pay off another card that's leaving the 0% period soon.

Us: *Facepalm*

This actually doesn't sound too bad to me. Intentionally credit-card-hacking to give yourself a 0% loan can actually be pretty Mustachian, depending on what you do with the money. More work than I'm willing to put in, but some people here do.

Usually those 0% loans come with a 3-5% balance transfer fee.
And if you can't pay them off by the due date, or even are late on some other bill by a day, they will jack the interest rate up to 25% or 30%.

spartana

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2207 on: February 11, 2020, 03:34:11 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.

That could be a good plan, but only if you already have a motorcycle for riding.
But but but....that means it'll get dirty and we can't have that now can we. I mean if we are talking clown motorcycles then they must be shiny and bug free ALL the time or how will people know you are so rich ;-).

I use to commute to my job on an old beater motorcycle which was apparently not fancy enough for the fancy Harley guys I worked with. Oh well. I FIREd and could ride whenever I wanted, for as long as I wanted, and they are still taking their 2 week vacation at Sturgis and doing the 9 to 5 the rest of the year with their bikes sitting unused in their garages. But they are shiny!
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 03:39:54 PM by spartana »

Threshkin

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2208 on: February 11, 2020, 04:31:26 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.
This sounds vaguely like my ex-BF ;-).

You had a project BF?  :D

Kris

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2209 on: February 11, 2020, 04:40:02 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.
This sounds vaguely like my ex-BF ;-).

You had a project BF?  :D

Ha — many of us have had those... we just didn’t know it for a while! :D

TVRodriguez

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2210 on: February 11, 2020, 04:53:16 PM »
Buy a "project bike". That way you get all the benefits of having a motorcycle - except the riding it part... You can stand around and admire it, polish it, brag about it, and spend money on it. It won't move under it's own power so it is absolutely safe and no insurance or license is required.

That could be a good plan, but only if you already have a motorcycle for riding.
But but but....that means it'll get dirty and we can't have that now can we. I mean if we are talking clown motorcycles then they must be shiny and bug free ALL the time or how will people know you are so rich ;-).

I use to commute to my job on an old beater motorcycle which was apparently not fancy enough for the fancy Harley guys I worked with. Oh well. I FIREd and could ride whenever I wanted, for as long as I wanted, and they are still taking their 2 week vacation at Sturgis and doing the 9 to 5 the rest of the year with their bikes sitting unused in their garages. But they are shiny!

And Sturgis is fun.  But definitely filled with lots of shiny bikes.  I have no bike but happened to be visiting the Black Hills on a road trip during the Sturgis bike event.  I was there in an old Toyota Camry.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2211 on: February 11, 2020, 08:45:52 PM »
A couple weeks ago my employer had an investment guy come in and talk to us about basic saving/investing, as well as the company RRSP matching program.  I work at an RV dealership.

It wasn't very informative since it was very general, but I learned some tax stuff.  Anyway, the first slide and first ten minutes were spent talking about how debt is terrible, and the guy called it "cancer" probably six or seven times.  The air got pretty thick in the room for that bit.  He was talking about how car loans, credit card debts and financing too much stuff are terrible for your finances and I found it refreshing to hear this attitude inside the walls of my dealership. 

Not really deriding anyone in this post, as is the tradition for this thread, but it was an interesting moment and I'm glad someone else was finally around to tell me the financial equivalent of "gravity is real", after years of hearing how it isn't.

I hope some of the people in the room learned something and left feeling more empowered in their financial situation.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2212 on: February 12, 2020, 04:31:39 AM »
It wasn't very informative since it was very general, but I learned some tax stuff.  Anyway, the first slide and first ten minutes were spent talking about how debt is terrible, and the guy called it "cancer" probably six or seven times. 

hm... I somehow had "sound of silence" spring up in my mind. Maybe someone could make a song "Sound of Debt"?
"Debt like a cancer grows
Hear my words so that I might teach you..."

MissNancyPryor

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2213 on: February 12, 2020, 06:49:49 AM »
The irony of that is funny-  I would bet the majority of the RVs are sold there with debt attached so it is kind of like a company health consultant coming into Budweiser declaring to the employees how alcohol is pure poison.  Their consultant rails against the thing the company has to deliver daily, that had to be awkward.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2214 on: February 12, 2020, 11:56:14 AM »
The irony of that is funny-  I would bet the majority of the RVs are sold there with debt attached so it is kind of like a company health consultant coming into Budweiser declaring to the employees how alcohol is pure poison.  Their consultant rails against the thing the company has to deliver daily, that had to be awkward.

As the advisor said, debt is okay if it's readily serviceable.  I wouldn't pay interest on toys, but that's just me.  You're right though, tons of debt in rvs.  20+ year terms have kept the industry going, to my benefit.

happyuk

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2215 on: February 16, 2020, 05:51:43 AM »
Overheard at work during lunch

Colleague 1: "I always take out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "Me too.  I've always taken out loans when I needed a new car"
Colleague 1: "I don't know anyone who has never taken out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "I don't know anyone who has actually paid the full amount for a new car"
Colleague 1: "It was 35 grand for the Model 3 Tesla, waiting for it to be shipped from San Francisco"

And so on and so on, with slight variations on the main topic theme of taking out loans for new cars.

What makes it doubly perplexing is that people I am talking and with whom I work every day are not fools, being in senior technical positions and used to tackling difficult engineering problems.

I didn't chime in by saying I never take out loans for cars (or indeed anything) and never will.  They would have looked at me like I'm from Venus or something.  I'm simply glad I was able to happily sit and listen with respectful indifference to their anecdotes of finance deals, interest rates, payback "deals" and so forth.

I often feel sometimes like I was put on the wrong planet.  Do others feel the same?
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 06:05:42 AM by happyuk »

Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2216 on: February 16, 2020, 09:01:49 AM »
Yes, absolutely @happyuk .

I work with people who are in senior finance positions and have degrees in finance / accounting / economics etc. For some reason, even though these people work with large sums of company money every single day and perfectly understand concepts like interest calculation, many seem to be totally incapable of applying them to their own private life.

We were discussing health insurance a while back. In my country the standard deductible is about €400, but you can choose a higher deductible of up to €800 and then you get a discount on your premium. The break-even point is two years. My partner is in very good health and has had a high deductible for 10 years. That means he saves €400 on health insurance premiums. As several coworkers are also in very good health (I'm not) I asked them if they had a high deductible. They looked at me as if I had 3 heads when I told them about my partner's choice. "But what if he gets a health issue?" Well, then we pay €800. "But where would you get the money so quickly?" Well, we've saved €400 every year over the past couple of years so it's not an issue. "But what if he gets a long term illness?" Then he will choose not have a high deductible next year. In the end, they couldn't understand me, I couldn't understand them, they just walked off shaking their heads at my financial irresponsibility - I am known for that, since we also both work parttime and we don't have a car. [FYI: we just did a back of the envelope calculation and if we include the value of our home and resell value of our business equipment, our joint NW is now officially in 6-figure territory. I'm 29]. It's like they somehow think money evaporates when it's not being spent.

Also, interest is a big thing. Some coworkers have talked about aggressively paying off their student loans, because everyone knows student loans are baaaad. While paying off loans is at least better than spending money on consumer crap, I really don't get why 0% interest student loans have such a bad reputation while they happily get new car loans and higher mortgages. This financially irresponsible Milennial has applied for the maximum loan I could get to pay for grad school tuition because the government's offer is so good: 0% interest, income based repayment over 30 years, even though I had the money in my bank account. I have just signed a quote for further insulation of our old house which I will pay from my savings instead.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2217 on: February 16, 2020, 10:24:48 AM »
I didn't chime in by saying I never take out loans for cars (or indeed anything) and never will.

I once took out a 53€ "loan" for 3 weeks (unluckyly 2 bigger things got broken at nearly same time and the money just wasn't enough) since I was too lazy to go to the bank and put my cash reserves on the account. Cost me 34 cent in interest until next money came in. (I shudder every time I think about people who always live in that dispo credit area.) 

Since I still remember that from 10 years ago you may be able to guess how many other loans I had ;)


trashtalk

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2218 on: February 16, 2020, 11:05:24 AM »
Overheard at work during lunch

Colleague 1: "I always take out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "Me too.  I've always taken out loans when I needed a new car"
Colleague 1: "I don't know anyone who has never taken out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "I don't know anyone who has actually paid the full amount for a new car"
Colleague 1: "It was 35 grand for the Model 3 Tesla, waiting for it to be shipped from San Francisco"

And so on and so on, with slight variations on the main topic theme of taking out loans for new cars.

What makes it doubly perplexing is that people I am talking and with whom I work every day are not fools, being in senior technical positions and used to tackling difficult engineering problems.

I didn't chime in by saying I never take out loans for cars (or indeed anything) and never will.  They would have looked at me like I'm from Venus or something.  I'm simply glad I was able to happily sit and listen with respectful indifference to their anecdotes of finance deals, interest rates, payback "deals" and so forth.

I often feel sometimes like I was put on the wrong planet.  Do others feel the same?

A wise woman on here once said "My Mustachian Person Problem is that sometimes I wish I could go back in the Matrix." It's definitely isolating to be financially (or otherwise) countercultural.

happyuk

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2219 on: February 16, 2020, 01:07:55 PM »
Overheard at work during lunch

Colleague 1: "I always take out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "Me too.  I've always taken out loans when I needed a new car"
Colleague 1: "I don't know anyone who has never taken out a loan for a new car"
Colleague 2: "I don't know anyone who has actually paid the full amount for a new car"
Colleague 1: "It was 35 grand for the Model 3 Tesla, waiting for it to be shipped from San Francisco"

And so on and so on, with slight variations on the main topic theme of taking out loans for new cars.

What makes it doubly perplexing is that people I am talking and with whom I work every day are not fools, being in senior technical positions and used to tackling difficult engineering problems.

I didn't chime in by saying I never take out loans for cars (or indeed anything) and never will.  They would have looked at me like I'm from Venus or something.  I'm simply glad I was able to happily sit and listen with respectful indifference to their anecdotes of finance deals, interest rates, payback "deals" and so forth.

I often feel sometimes like I was put on the wrong planet.  Do others feel the same?

A wise woman on here once said "My Mustachian Person Problem is that sometimes I wish I could go back in the Matrix." It's definitely isolating to be financially (or otherwise) countercultural.

Ah yes.  Of course!  Mustachians are the ones that have decided to swallow the red pill and see the world as it is in all it awfulness.  We don't want to be comfortably numb.

Fish Sweet

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2220 on: February 16, 2020, 07:20:43 PM »
I recently left my job with nothing lined up.  The not-quite-truth I told the company is that I was returning to school full time to pursue a change of career.  The actual truth is more complicated, but the gist of it is that I was tired of working and wanted to take a break, had the savings to do so, wanted to focus on my art & growing my tiny business, and did want to go back to school and change careers... eventually, when I felt like it.

My coworkers were lovely, supportive people, but some of them were clearly very worried about me.  One of them even asked, "but how will you survive??"  I'm pretty sure she thought of the both of us as being in similar financial boats (student debt, car loan, paycheck to paycheck, tons of expenses, barely able to make minimum contributions to retirement), and I've never given her any reason to think otherwise.  I smiled and told her that I had saved up some money and would take out student loans as needed to cover the rest (I won't be taking out any student loans) and her look of shock was.... I don't know.   Not to get up on some snooty MMM high horse, but it just made me feel bad for her. 

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2221 on: February 17, 2020, 08:41:29 AM »
I worked at a place where some people were unhappy but didn't feel they could survive the more or less month between the old and new employer's paychecks. It was really sad. Its a good education for a new employee to see. Its an important topic I share with young folks when I get the opportunity. Savings = freedom.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2222 on: February 17, 2020, 10:20:39 AM »
I recently left my job with nothing lined up.  The not-quite-truth I told the company is that I was returning to school full time to pursue a change of career.  The actual truth is more complicated, but the gist of it is that I was tired of working and wanted to take a break, had the savings to do so, wanted to focus on my art & growing my tiny business, and did want to go back to school and change careers... eventually, when I felt like it.

My coworkers were lovely, supportive people, but some of them were clearly very worried about me.  One of them even asked, "but how will you survive??"  I'm pretty sure she thought of the both of us as being in similar financial boats (student debt, car loan, paycheck to paycheck, tons of expenses, barely able to make minimum contributions to retirement), and I've never given her any reason to think otherwise.  I smiled and told her that I had saved up some money and would take out student loans as needed to cover the rest (I won't be taking out any student loans) and her look of shock was.... I don't know.   Not to get up on some snooty MMM high horse, but it just made me feel bad for her. 


Overheard at work during lunch
*snip*
I didn't chime in by saying I never take out loans for cars (or indeed anything) and never will.  They would have looked at me like I'm from Venus or something.  I'm simply glad I was able to happily sit and listen with respectful indifference to their anecdotes of finance deals, interest rates, payback "deals" and so forth.

I often feel sometimes like I was put on the wrong planet.  Do others feel the same?

I understand the reason to behave this way around others, but I generally try to avoid doing this.  If people are making bad decisions, they might benefit from the suggestion that they have other options.  Especially when many people in my experience tend to finance stuff because "everyone else is doing it".  Those people need to hear your story!

Obviously you have to be cautious about how you do it.  I don't judge people but I also try to avoid materialistic thinking.  Many people I work with can tell I'm frugal, so they're not surprised when I say I'm willing to spend a lump sum on occasion, like buying a new car or taking a trip somewhere.  But I don't show up with fancy clothes or a fancy car or anything like that.  If it's obvious you're not spending a lot of money, you might inspire others to do similarly.

You might invite resentment, but that's coming from someone's insecurity, not your personal inadequacy, so you can treat it like a symptom, not a disease.

Cassie

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2223 on: February 17, 2020, 10:47:01 AM »
Wrench, I agree that people need to be honest and maybe it will help others.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2224 on: February 17, 2020, 04:59:27 PM »
Just overheard a couple of workmates bitching behind my back about what a cruel parent I am/was. I unwisely opened my mouth during a conversation about pocket money. I used to give my son $100 in cash, in small notes, every week. Every week he would hand back money to be banked for savings, as well as for rent, power, phone, food, medical, clothing, transportation etc etc. He'd be left with $10 or so at ten years old. Sometimes there were tearful arguments about paying things next week, because he wanted to buy something, but he learned he would have to save up. Imagine the cruelty of preparing your progeny for life in the actual world, and not some lovely bubble of  "everyone is special" childhood!

RWTL

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2225 on: February 17, 2020, 05:05:35 PM »
Just overheard a couple of workmates bitching behind my back about what a cruel parent I am/was. I unwisely opened my mouth during a conversation about pocket money. I used to give my son $100 in cash, in small notes, every week. Every week he would hand back money to be banked for savings, as well as for rent, power, phone, food, medical, clothing, transportation etc etc. He'd be left with $10 or so at ten years old. Sometimes there were tearful arguments about paying things next week, because he wanted to buy something, but he learned he would have to save up. Imagine the cruelty of preparing your progeny for life in the actual world, and not some lovely bubble of  "everyone is special" childhood!

I think this is brilliant.

Gremlin

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2226 on: February 17, 2020, 05:09:45 PM »
Just overheard a couple of workmates bitching behind my back about what a cruel parent I am/was. I unwisely opened my mouth during a conversation about pocket money. I used to give my son $100 in cash, in small notes, every week. Every week he would hand back money to be banked for savings, as well as for rent, power, phone, food, medical, clothing, transportation etc etc. He'd be left with $10 or so at ten years old. Sometimes there were tearful arguments about paying things next week, because he wanted to buy something, but he learned he would have to save up. Imagine the cruelty of preparing your progeny for life in the actual world, and not some lovely bubble of  "everyone is special" childhood!

I think this is brilliant.
+1

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2227 on: February 17, 2020, 05:15:40 PM »
Just overheard a couple of workmates bitching behind my back about what a cruel parent I am/was. I unwisely opened my mouth during a conversation about pocket money. I used to give my son $100 in cash, in small notes, every week. Every week he would hand back money to be banked for savings, as well as for rent, power, phone, food, medical, clothing, transportation etc etc. He'd be left with $10 or so at ten years old. Sometimes there were tearful arguments about paying things next week, because he wanted to buy something, but he learned he would have to save up. Imagine the cruelty of preparing your progeny for life in the actual world, and not some lovely bubble of  "everyone is special" childhood!

I think this is brilliant.

Thanks, but apparently we are both mistaken. Actually it's burdening small children with adult concerns and not really any different to discussing things like bankruptcy and divorce in front of them. Not sure where the bankruptcy and divorce came into it, but if workplace dipshits think these things are related, who am I to question it???

I'm already jobhunting, so no real drama going forward.

DadJokes

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2228 on: February 17, 2020, 05:35:16 PM »
Well your job as a parent is to prepare them to be adults one day.

SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2229 on: February 17, 2020, 05:49:15 PM »
Just overheard a couple of workmates bitching behind my back about what a cruel parent I am/was. I unwisely opened my mouth during a conversation about pocket money. I used to give my son $100 in cash, in small notes, every week. Every week he would hand back money to be banked for savings, as well as for rent, power, phone, food, medical, clothing, transportation etc etc. He'd be left with $10 or so at ten years old. Sometimes there were tearful arguments about paying things next week, because he wanted to buy something, but he learned he would have to save up. Imagine the cruelty of preparing your progeny for life in the actual world, and not some lovely bubble of  "everyone is special" childhood!

I think this is brilliant.

Thanks, but apparently we are both mistaken. Actually it's burdening small children with adult concerns and not really any different to discussing things like bankruptcy and divorce in front of them. Not sure where the bankruptcy and divorce came into it, but if workplace dipshits think these things are related, who am I to question it???

I'm already jobhunting, so no real drama going forward.

All the kids I know who had parents get divorced figured out that their parents didn't live together anymore and didn't necessarily want to, either.   Might as well talk to them about it, it might even be helpful if that's the intent (as opposed to attacking the ex).   I wonder why that's so hard for them to understand.

I'm pretty sure that when parents go bankrupt their kids figure out something is wrong, it's not particularly hard to, after all.   Jeesh.

You keep up the good work.

Job #1 is to raise children to be (a) good people worth knowing and (b) be able to take care of themselves.    Everything else is a distant second place at best.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2230 on: February 17, 2020, 09:08:32 PM »
Colleague spent all of last week complaining that her dad suggested she start paying her own phone bill.

Colleague is 27.

Colleague went shopping on her lunch break and came back with two new pairs of heels. "They were on sale!"

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2231 on: February 17, 2020, 09:11:08 PM »
Colleague spent all of last week complaining that her dad suggested she start paying her own phone bill.

Colleague is 27.

Colleague went shopping on her lunch break and came back with two new pairs of heels. "They were on sale!"

But wait, there's more!

Another colleague complimented her on the new shoes.

"Thanks! I got a bag and some earrings as well. Put it all on Afterpay!"

Travis

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2232 on: February 18, 2020, 03:42:08 AM »
Just finished a Town Hall on base and the question was raised "We have X housing units, and X assigned parking spaces. What do we do if we have two cars?"  The garrison commander responded (in the most polite tone possible) "We don't have a parking problem, we have a walking problem." He then listed off over 100 additional parking spaces within a block of the apartment towers.

merula

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2233 on: February 18, 2020, 06:56:35 AM »
All the kids I know who had parents get divorced figured out that their parents didn't live together anymore and didn't necessarily want to, either.   Might as well talk to them about it, it might even be helpful if that's the intent (as opposed to attacking the ex).   I wonder why that's so hard for them to understand.

I'm pretty sure that when parents go bankrupt their kids figure out something is wrong, it's not particularly hard to, after all.   Jeesh.

You keep up the good work.

Job #1 is to raise children to be (a) good people worth knowing and (b) be able to take care of themselves.    Everything else is a distant second place at best.

I tell my kids that my job is to make them "good grown-ups". I think the above method is brilliant as a way of teaching money management along with the scope of the money. My kids get allowance, but they don't have any real perspective on how much anything costs besides what they want to buy.

Case in point, my grandparents sent my kids $2 each in a Valentine's card. The 7 y/o then had the audacity to ask my parents why the Valentine from them didn't have any cash in it. This comes 2 weeks after my parents took my kids to Disneyland. (I wasn't doing so good on the "good grownups" front that day.)

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2234 on: February 18, 2020, 07:57:33 AM »
Colleague spent all of last week complaining that her dad suggested she start paying her own phone bill.

Colleague is 27.

Colleague went shopping on her lunch break and came back with two new pairs of heels. "They were on sale!"

I hate that phrase, "it was on sale!"

Usually it should say, "I got bamboozled!"

talltexan

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2235 on: February 18, 2020, 08:19:06 AM »
If your kids find a deal to save $15/month on your home internet, how much of the savings do you pass on to them for this exercise?

Fish Sweet

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2236 on: February 18, 2020, 01:01:15 PM »
I recently left my job with nothing lined up.  The not-quite-truth I told the company is that I was returning to school full time to pursue a change of career.  The actual truth is more complicated, but the gist of it is that I was tired of working and wanted to take a break, had the savings to do so, wanted to focus on my art & growing my tiny business, and did want to go back to school and change careers... eventually, when I felt like it.

My coworkers were lovely, supportive people, but some of them were clearly very worried about me.  One of them even asked, "but how will you survive??"  I'm pretty sure she thought of the both of us as being in similar financial boats (student debt, car loan, paycheck to paycheck, tons of expenses, barely able to make minimum contributions to retirement), and I've never given her any reason to think otherwise.  I smiled and told her that I had saved up some money and would take out student loans as needed to cover the rest (I won't be taking out any student loans) and her look of shock was.... I don't know.   Not to get up on some snooty MMM high horse, but it just made me feel bad for her. 
I understand the reason to behave this way around others, but I generally try to avoid doing this.  If people are making bad decisions, they might benefit from the suggestion that they have other options.  Especially when many people in my experience tend to finance stuff because "everyone else is doing it".  Those people need to hear your story!

Obviously you have to be cautious about how you do it.  I don't judge people but I also try to avoid materialistic thinking.  Many people I work with can tell I'm frugal, so they're not surprised when I say I'm willing to spend a lump sum on occasion, like buying a new car or taking a trip somewhere.  But I don't show up with fancy clothes or a fancy car or anything like that.  If it's obvious you're not spending a lot of money, you might inspire others to do similarly.

You might invite resentment, but that's coming from someone's insecurity, not your personal inadequacy, so you can treat it like a symptom, not a disease.
If I were truly leaving for FIRE, I think I might have been more truthful, but since I do plan on returning to the workforce (and relying on references from my manager/coworkers) down the line, I didn't want to risk any weirdness or resentment cropping up if I could help it.  Doesn't help that I'm pretty young to be jobless (late twenties) and that the coworker in question is several decades older and definitely better paid than me.

It's not just the 'finance everything, we're all in debt!' cultural mindset that's pervasive, but also the 'YOUR JOB IS YOUR LIFE' attitude that's everywhere.  I think if I had told them that I just wanted to take a break from work (and could afford to), I would have also gotten a lot of "what are you, lazy?" "why don't you want to work for a living?" attitude.  It's weird... we're all in the same boat getting excited for weekends and long holidays and vacations, talking about how tired we are and how we wish we could just be at the beach on a sunny day, but in a WORK WORK WORK culture, actually vocalizing that you just don't want to work is the same as announcing, "I'm an irresponsible lazy fuckup!"

And I am. :)  But I'm not telling my coworkers that.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2237 on: February 18, 2020, 03:05:40 PM »
I recently left my job with nothing lined up.  The not-quite-truth I told the company is that I was returning to school full time to pursue a change of career.  The actual truth is more complicated, but the gist of it is that I was tired of working and wanted to take a break, had the savings to do so, wanted to focus on my art & growing my tiny business, and did want to go back to school and change careers... eventually, when I felt like it.

My coworkers were lovely, supportive people, but some of them were clearly very worried about me.  One of them even asked, "but how will you survive??"  I'm pretty sure she thought of the both of us as being in similar financial boats (student debt, car loan, paycheck to paycheck, tons of expenses, barely able to make minimum contributions to retirement), and I've never given her any reason to think otherwise.  I smiled and told her that I had saved up some money and would take out student loans as needed to cover the rest (I won't be taking out any student loans) and her look of shock was.... I don't know.   Not to get up on some snooty MMM high horse, but it just made me feel bad for her. 
I understand the reason to behave this way around others, but I generally try to avoid doing this.  If people are making bad decisions, they might benefit from the suggestion that they have other options.  Especially when many people in my experience tend to finance stuff because "everyone else is doing it".  Those people need to hear your story!

Obviously you have to be cautious about how you do it.  I don't judge people but I also try to avoid materialistic thinking.  Many people I work with can tell I'm frugal, so they're not surprised when I say I'm willing to spend a lump sum on occasion, like buying a new car or taking a trip somewhere.  But I don't show up with fancy clothes or a fancy car or anything like that.  If it's obvious you're not spending a lot of money, you might inspire others to do similarly.

You might invite resentment, but that's coming from someone's insecurity, not your personal inadequacy, so you can treat it like a symptom, not a disease.
If I were truly leaving for FIRE, I think I might have been more truthful, but since I do plan on returning to the workforce (and relying on references from my manager/coworkers) down the line, I didn't want to risk any weirdness or resentment cropping up if I could help it.  Doesn't help that I'm pretty young to be jobless (late twenties) and that the coworker in question is several decades older and definitely better paid than me.

It's not just the 'finance everything, we're all in debt!' cultural mindset that's pervasive, but also the 'YOUR JOB IS YOUR LIFE' attitude that's everywhere.  I think if I had told them that I just wanted to take a break from work (and could afford to), I would have also gotten a lot of "what are you, lazy?" "why don't you want to work for a living?" attitude.  It's weird... we're all in the same boat getting excited for weekends and long holidays and vacations, talking about how tired we are and how we wish we could just be at the beach on a sunny day, but in a WORK WORK WORK culture, actually vocalizing that you just don't want to work is the same as announcing, "I'm an irresponsible lazy fuckup!"

And I am. :)  But I'm not telling my coworkers that.

It's a strong argument.  Ideally your future hirer would appreciate that you value a work/life balance.  And ideally your former employer won't hold your priorities against you, assuming you're competent.  I can understand your choice here.

gaja

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2238 on: February 19, 2020, 04:48:14 AM »
If your kids find a deal to save $15/month on your home internet, how much of the savings do you pass on to them for this exercise?
We have delegated authority for selected categories to the kids (13 and 12 y.o.):

The oldest is a spender, and we are trying to motivate her to save. She gets a relatively large food budget each month, and it is her responsibility to plan menus and make shopping lists. If the rest of us spend outside the food budget, she gets to yell at us. Whatever is left over at the end of the month, she gets to keep. We urge her to save some of it, but don't force her.

The youngest is a lazy saver. She is motivated by having more free time, and sends all of her money to the savings account. Her job is to wash and put away all the clothes. We plan to increase her duties gradually to include handling the clothes budget, teaching her to mend clothes, etc. She gets paid a flat rate now, but if she starts caring about money I plan to give her bonuses for hanging clothes to dry instead of using the dryer. So far, having her responsible for washing clothes has resulted in fewer loads of laundry being washed, because the kids now use their clothes more before they declare them dirty.

TL/DR: if my kids found a way to save $15/month, they would get 100 % of it.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2239 on: February 20, 2020, 07:40:36 AM »
Just finished a Town Hall on base and the question was raised "We have X housing units, and X assigned parking spaces. What do we do if we have two cars?"  The garrison commander responded (in the most polite tone possible) "We don't have a parking problem, we have a walking problem." He then listed off over 100 additional parking spaces within a block of the apartment towers.
That is awesome, and deserves posting in the anti-antimustachian overheard at work thread.

mm1970

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2240 on: February 20, 2020, 01:57:47 PM »
Just finished a Town Hall on base and the question was raised "We have X housing units, and X assigned parking spaces. What do we do if we have two cars?"  The garrison commander responded (in the most polite tone possible) "We don't have a parking problem, we have a walking problem." He then listed off over 100 additional parking spaces within a block of the apartment towers.
Ha this is amazing.

Long ago and far away, we lived in family student housing, with one big parking lot, and it wasn't close to most of the apartments.  Now,  you couldn't really get another spot without paying for a campus parking permit.  And that permit would be a very long way away.  So we only had one car.

We learned quickly to get a cart to get groceries to the apartment from the car, and luckily for us no kids yet at that time.  (Our apartment was on the 2nd and 3rd floors, and a walk-up).

Within a block though?  That's really sad.

Freedomin5

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2241 on: February 20, 2020, 06:28:43 PM »
Our company recently offered a stipend to compensate for additional costs due to the coronavirus. Basically, many employees have had to spend extra to purchase face masks or self-funded flights out of China. It was a very generous ~$2000-$6000 usd depending on the size of your family.

The very next day, one employee (who is always broke and could barely afford a $5 replacement face mask) messaged the employee group chat talking about getting a flight to Japan for a week-long vacation. They were quickly reminded that Japan would likely put them under two-week quarantine since they were flying from China, and that many countries are closing their borders to non-residents. While Japan is still semi-open, these border changes are implemented with little to no prior warning. But now I know why they always seem to be strapped for cash.

Mairuiming

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2242 on: February 21, 2020, 06:43:36 AM »
It was a very generous ~$2000-$6000 usd depending on the size of your family.

That is certainly a very generous offer.

My employer offered to upgrade medical insurance policy for foreign workers at employer's expense. (costing ~ US$ 500).

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2243 on: February 21, 2020, 07:32:02 AM »
Case in point, my grandparents sent my kids $2 each in a Valentine's card. The 7 y/o then had the audacity to ask my parents why the Valentine from them didn't have any cash in it. This comes 2 weeks after my parents took my kids to Disneyland. (I wasn't doing so good on the "good grownups" front that day.)

Disclaimer: I have 7 years to go before I have a 7 year old, and it has been about 23 years since I was 7 myself, so my frame of reference here for how "with it" 7 year olds are is off...

But is this really "not doing so good on the 'good grownups' front"? From what I imagine a 7-year old's mindset is, great-grandparents and grandparents are sort of the same thing. If they get a card with cash in it, maybe the expect all cards from grandparents to have cash in it. Additionally, I don't think that a 7 year old will necessarily be able to recognize the huge cost of a family vacation.

I suppose it depends on the tone, and if there was a sense of entitlement with it, but on the surface it seems like a teaching opportunity rather than impertinence. After all, a 7 year old has 10-15 years before they're a grown up.



As an aside, now I'm smiling thinking about my Grandparents. Every time I came to visit, Grandpa wait til we were alone - could have been just passing in the hall - and slip me a bill or 4. Could have been $5, could have been $100, depended on what he had with him and how old I was and all that, but you could tell he always felt like a big shot doing it. And all of us grandkids thought he was too, because for us, he was. He told us all that the "walking around money" was over once we were 18, but I don't think that was true for any of us as he bent the rules every time, and if he didn't, Grandma did in cards... Halloween Cards, Easter Cards, Thanksgiving Cards, St. Patricks Day cards (we're not Irish, or even "Irish on St. Patricks Day")... I think I once got a Flag Day card from her with a tenner in it. Had no clue there was such thing as a Flag Day card.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2020, 09:33:58 AM by mtn »

BlueHouse

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2244 on: February 21, 2020, 07:50:02 AM »
Oh my.  The custodian guy was complaining to my office-mate about how tired he was.  He hadn't slept at all because he couldn't get on some gaming platform until midnight and then he played until 4am.  Then he catches the bus to get here by 6am. 

Custodian:  "I want to be a gamer but this job is interfering with that"

I know nothing about gaming (other than board game night with my pals), so I don't know whether he has a future in it or not, but I do know the same custodian believed the broom challenge but didn't want to try it himself because he missed the date.  He also thinks that women can control and even hold off the flow of their periods, especially in the first day or two. 

Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2245 on: February 21, 2020, 08:00:59 AM »
Oh my.  The custodian guy was complaining to my office-mate about how tired he was.  He hadn't slept at all because he couldn't get on some gaming platform until midnight and then he played until 4am.  Then he catches the bus to get here by 6am. 

Custodian:  "I want to be a gamer but this job is interfering with that"

I know nothing about gaming (other than board game night with my pals), so I don't know whether he has a future in it or not, but I do know the same custodian believed the broom challenge but didn't want to try it himself because he missed the date.  He also thinks that women can control and even hold off the flow of their periods, especially in the first day or two.

I know a tiny bit about gaming, as a job. Let's just say the odds are very much against him.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2246 on: February 21, 2020, 08:42:33 AM »
Is it like pro-athletics where companies sponsor players?

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2247 on: February 21, 2020, 08:45:11 AM »
Oh my.  The custodian guy was complaining to my office-mate about how tired he was.  He hadn't slept at all because he couldn't get on some gaming platform until midnight and then he played until 4am.  Then he catches the bus to get here by 6am. 

Custodian:  "I want to be a gamer but this job is interfering with that"

I know nothing about gaming (other than board game night with my pals), so I don't know whether he has a future in it or not, but I do know the same custodian believed the broom challenge but didn't want to try it himself because he missed the date.  He also thinks that women can control and even hold off the flow of their periods, especially in the first day or two.

A woman who is on the old-fashioned pill form of birth control (a pill a day keeps the pregnant away) can elect to bust out a new package of pills and continue with the hormone replacement instead of continuing with the usual cycle of placeholder pills.

PrairieBeardstache

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2248 on: February 21, 2020, 08:45:47 AM »
Is it like pro-athletics where companies sponsor players?

Yes

happyuk

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #2249 on: February 21, 2020, 09:03:05 AM »
Wrench, I agree that people need to be honest and maybe it will help others.

I absolutely hear what you say Wrench, and don't strongly disagree.  But I have sometimes found to my cost that even when these things are pointed out in a friendly and diplomatic way (ie don't borrow money when you shouldn't) they can still cause enormous offence to worldly persons, almost like you insulted their wife or something.  I find that now I tend to not offer a counter-opinion for this very specific topic, unless I am specifically asked, even though I am happy to wade in with contrarian opinions on other subjects.

As one one bearded hippy guy from the Middle East (who allegedly knew a thing or two) once said

"Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast
ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them
under their feet, and turn again and rend you."