Author Topic: Overheard at Work 2  (Read 301667 times)

ysette9

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1400 on: August 23, 2019, 02:21:46 PM »
Previous pregnancy my water broke just before midnight and I was going to drive myself to the hospital, but my husband called me a Lyft. I told the driver to go to Kaiser and she casually asked if I was going to work. I just as casually replied “no” and I could tell from her driving that she wanted to drop me the heck off. Once we arrived I just as casually mentioned that the only entrance open at midnight was the emergency room, so she might as well drop me there (truth). But I was fine and walked up to L&D with no incident.

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1401 on: August 23, 2019, 02:33:31 PM »

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

I don't think that's f-ed up.  The more people who take ambulances for non-emergencies the more expensive ambulances will be for the people who need it.  If you don't need a rolling hospital to transport you, take a cab why not?

magnet18

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1402 on: August 23, 2019, 02:46:51 PM »

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

I don't think that's f-ed up.  The more people who take ambulances for non-emergencies the more expensive ambulances will be for the people who need it.  If you don't need a rolling hospital to transport you, take a cab why not?
That in and of itself isn't messed up
What's messed up is when you DO need a rolling hospital, then the insurance company says both the cab and the ER they took you to were out of network, please pay bleventeen thousand dollars for your emergency appendectomy (or for crashing your car and breaking multiple ribs)

What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon

partdopy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1403 on: August 23, 2019, 03:12:00 PM »

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

I don't think that's f-ed up.  The more people who take ambulances for non-emergencies the more expensive ambulances will be for the people who need it.  If you don't need a rolling hospital to transport you, take a cab why not?
That in and of itself isn't messed up
What's messed up is when you DO need a rolling hospital, then the insurance company says both the cab and the ER they took you to were out of network, please pay bleventeen thousand dollars for your emergency appendectomy (or for crashing your car and breaking multiple ribs)

What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon

For every $1.00 billed, they can count on not collecting $0.65.  The result is that responsible people and insurance companies are expected to make up the difference.

Officials in Washington DC recently did some investigations that show around 70% of ambulance calls are for non-emergencies, and an ambulance trip costs $300-$400 (wages, vehicle expenses, supplies, insurances, etc...).  That money has to come from somewhere if people continue to abuse the system.  As an aside, insurance is required to cover your ER visit if you have a real emergency.  By law.

The problem is people abuse the system and take an ambulance to the hospital for a sore throat or sprained ankle, and don't pay the bill.  No pay = no service.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1404 on: August 23, 2019, 03:45:08 PM »


The problem is people abuse the system and take an ambulance to the hospital for a sore throat or sprained ankle, and don't pay the bill.  No pay = no service.

Ugh, this falls into the "eating out at restaurants is a waste of time" category.  Like if I have a sore throat I want to be sitting in the ER waiting room for a couple hours so a doctor can tell me to go home and rest?

Montecarlo

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1405 on: August 23, 2019, 06:58:03 PM »

I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.  I'll make my points more clear:

Manuals can be more dangerous if you suddenly need to accelerate, like an unexpected lane ending.  My little yaris doesn't pull in fifth gear very well.  It's better to simply be able to stand on the accelerator rather than downshift twice.

In traffic, stop and go is rough on the clutch and often first gear is fairly jerky switching from throttle on to vacuum, or vice versa.

You know you can skip gears, right?  And automatic transmissions on cheap cars are horrible too,

Monerexia

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1406 on: August 23, 2019, 10:47:19 PM »
I can understand private school when it fills a clear need that public does not. The public closest to us is 80% English language learners/subsidized or free lunch, so most parents who are more affluent and educated choose something else for their kids. Whether there really is a need there or not, I have no personal experience. I could be convinced that if the majority of the school population has one set of needs and your kid has a different set of needs, the kid may be netter served elsewhere. Who knows?

The second biggest need in my area that sends kids to private school is language immersion. We have a pretty diverse set of neighbors who send their kids to school in Spanish, German, French, and Mandarin. We are lucky to have found a public Mandarin program but no French or German in public yet. With one kid it probably doesn’t make a big difference but once you have two or three kids, it seems to me you would be better off selling and moving someplace that offers what you need in the public system, even if you have to pay a good bit more for housing there.

I don't understand why parents would, on the one hand, not want their children to go to school with bilingual kids ("English language learners") and then on the other hand send their kids to an immersion school where those same kids will be be bilingual and going to school in a language that they themselves are weak in ie they will be "Mandarin language learners" or whatever.

Although my kids were born here in Italy I guess you could say that they are Italian language learners as we speak 90% English at home and most media, reading etc is in English. My kids go to a heavily immigrant school and the majority of kids in both of their classes are "Italian language learners" just like my kids.  I see no negative side to this.  IMO bilingualism is a strength not a weakness.  I'm glad my kids are bilingual and I'm glad that they go to school with kids who speak a zillion different languages at home.  The kids who get the best grades in the class in Italian are both bilingual BTW.

It's the culture and poverty that comes with 80% sub lunches and english language learners. Bad personal habits of the parents, gangs, drug use, property crime, violence. Bilingualism for the win, but cultural issues make it a net loss all the way around.

Just a matter of values.

Buddy of mine is of Mexican descent and his kids speak Spanish. He makes very good money (like, living large in a HCOL area kind of money) sends his kids to public school. He sent them to public school when they lived in a small town in The Deep South, and he does it where he lives now.

Yes for sure! To each their own. I have friends who have purchased homes in some difficult neighborhoods. I visit and joke, "aren't you afraid to go outside?? Isn't everybody kidnapping everybody all the time??" They roll their eyes haha. Pretty funny.

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1407 on: August 24, 2019, 12:26:52 AM »
Yes for sure! To each their own. I have friends who have purchased homes in some difficult neighborhoods. I visit and joke, "aren't you afraid to go outside?? Isn't everybody kidnapping everybody all the time??" They roll their eyes haha. Pretty funny.

At mondays they roll the dice to decide on which day they get kidnapped.
Sunday is family day, so either you don't get kidnapped (kidnappers need a day off too) or you only get kidnapped with the whole family.


Quote
What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon
I have never heard of that (except in the case of the woman who had already called it a dozen times in the week before), but if it is so far outside that an ambulance needs hours or the heli isn't available (or no landing place) than it is also unlikely that a taxi is there.
If it is not far outside, than someone from management needs too be seriously slapped for not doing their duty. In "socialized medicine" you can at least do that. In "capitalized medicine" it was just the free market letting you sit there. Go on, nothing to be seen.

flipboard

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1408 on: August 24, 2019, 01:15:28 AM »
What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon
Sounds like every emergency in Alaska.


Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1409 on: August 24, 2019, 02:00:12 AM »
What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon
Sounds like every emergency in Alaska.

And Norway is just as remote in many places. If you choose to live in a remote location, you know what the consequences can be.

In my country (not Norway, to be clear) it's a law that a woman in labour has to be able to reach a hospital within 45 minutes of making the call. Which means that some islands have a heli permanently on standby to make sure that happens. Of course there's also some responsability on the woman to contact the emergency services in time - if you live in a big city next to a hospital like I do you can wait a little bit but if you live on an island you can't postpone calling until you are completely in labour. I'm sure sometimes happens that babies are born at home or in the heli, because labour can go fast. But that's the risk you take by choosing to live in a remote place. Of course heli and ambulance rides are not charged. We believe it's a civil duty to help someone in urgent need - if you don't you may be committing a crime.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1410 on: August 24, 2019, 10:02:56 AM »
What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon
Sounds like every emergency in Alaska.

And Norway is just as remote in many places. If you choose to live in a remote location, you know what the consequences can be.

In my country (not Norway, to be clear) it's a law that a woman in labour has to be able to reach a hospital within 45 minutes of making the call. Which means that some islands have a heli permanently on standby to make sure that happens. Of course there's also some responsability on the woman to contact the emergency services in time - if you live in a big city next to a hospital like I do you can wait a little bit but if you live on an island you can't postpone calling until you are completely in labour. I'm sure sometimes happens that babies are born at home or in the heli, because labour can go fast. But that's the risk you take by choosing to live in a remote place. Of course heli and ambulance rides are not charged. We believe it's a civil duty to help someone in urgent need - if you don't you may be committing a crime.

In Norway they are closing down more and more small, local hospitals that let women give birth locally. The women there are of course protesting against the closing down, because they didn't sign up for living far away from a hospital.

On Spitsbergen, you may not stay on the Island during the last months of your pregnancy. There is no hospital there and they don't want you to give birth on the commercial flights. So you need to stay on the mainland for the last 6-8 weeks (don't remember exactly how long).

BTDretire

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1411 on: August 24, 2019, 10:48:49 AM »
Previous pregnancy my water broke just before midnight and I was going to drive myself to the hospital, but my husband called me a Lyft. I told the driver to go to Kaiser and she casually asked if I was going to work. I just as casually replied “no” and I could tell from her driving that she wanted to drop me the heck off. Once we arrived I just as casually mentioned that the only entrance open at midnight was the emergency room, so she might as well drop me there (truth). But I was fine and walked up to L&D with no incident.

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

 When my wife said she thought it was time, ( I wasn't sure) I made her drive and I also drove, so I could go to work if she didn't have a baby, she did. It's been 27 years, she won't let me forget. :-)
 Expectant husbands---it's not a good idea!

gaja

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1412 on: August 24, 2019, 12:31:07 PM »
What's ALSO messed up, is when ambulances are free but they take multiple hours to arrive and the woman ends up giving birth before getting to the hospital, which I saw happen to a couple that decided to give birth in Norway, so I'm not totally on the socialized healthcare bandwagon
Sounds like every emergency in Alaska.

And Norway is just as remote in many places. If you choose to live in a remote location, you know what the consequences can be.

In my country (not Norway, to be clear) it's a law that a woman in labour has to be able to reach a hospital within 45 minutes of making the call. Which means that some islands have a heli permanently on standby to make sure that happens. Of course there's also some responsability on the woman to contact the emergency services in time - if you live in a big city next to a hospital like I do you can wait a little bit but if you live on an island you can't postpone calling until you are completely in labour. I'm sure sometimes happens that babies are born at home or in the heli, because labour can go fast. But that's the risk you take by choosing to live in a remote place. Of course heli and ambulance rides are not charged. We believe it's a civil duty to help someone in urgent need - if you don't you may be committing a crime.

In Norway they are closing down more and more small, local hospitals that let women give birth locally. The women there are of course protesting against the closing down, because they didn't sign up for living far away from a hospital.

On Spitsbergen, you may not stay on the Island during the last months of your pregnancy. There is no hospital there and they don't want you to give birth on the commercial flights. So you need to stay on the mainland for the last 6-8 weeks (don't remember exactly how long).

The rules you mentioned for Spitsbergen also cover other remote area in the north. We have no 45 minutes rules, it is simply not possible with the distances and weather we have. So pregnant women have to move closer to the hospitals (or find a midwife willing to go to them) for the last few months.

Some of the hospitals that are being closed down had so few births the doctors were dangerously out of training. Don’t ask me how I know.


Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1413 on: August 24, 2019, 02:12:26 PM »
Their politics are indeed questionable.  The fact that they have food service down to a perfected science, is pretty indisputable.

You'd think they'd be vulnerable to somebody else copying their customer service experience, but for some reason that escapes me I continue to get comparativley sub-par service everywhere else
(It's been 2 years since my last visit, but it's still the benchmark)

Chipotle, please take a hint

They do have service down to a science. I've noticed over the past couple of years that otherlocal  drive-thru businesses are copying CFA with the extra greetings and thanks. Competition can be good for the customer.

Tough business. I witnessed a lady at a Wendy's act like a three year old b/c they were out of something. Husband ushered her out of the store before it got any worse. Workers kept their poker faces despite the tantrum.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1414 on: August 24, 2019, 02:23:33 PM »
If your battery has a charge but the starter won't run, you should be able to get the car to fire assuming the ecu doesn't lock out since the start position at the key is not being used.
I'm not 100% certain you can't push start a new car with a dead battery.

The fuel pump, ECU, and ignition needs much less power than the starter. As long as you can power those things minus the starter, you can roll start a manual even in 2019.

We own several manual transmissions (gearhead family). The modern automatic is a nice thing but I still prefer a manual except about once a year when I go to a certain crowded town for a car show.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1415 on: August 24, 2019, 04:00:21 PM »
If your battery has a charge but the starter won't run, you should be able to get the car to fire assuming the ecu doesn't lock out since the start position at the key is not being used.
I'm not 100% certain you can't push start a new car with a dead battery.

The fuel pump, ECU, and ignition needs much less power than the starter. As long as you can power those things minus the starter, you can roll start a manual even in 2019.

We own several manual transmissions (gearhead family). The modern automatic is a nice thing but I still prefer a manual except about once a year when I go to a certain crowded town for a car show.

Good to know.  My 03 Corolla had a manual headlight switch and coil-on-plug ignition.  I once left the lights on and couldn't push start it.  Most modern cars probably have timers to shut the headlights off to prevent this.

But it still means you need adequate voltage at the ecu, something you didn't need with a points ignition.

I keep jumper cables in my car at all times anyway.

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1416 on: August 25, 2019, 10:43:33 PM »
I miss my late eighties ('86??) CRX-si. That sucker was so much fun to drive. I think Car & Driver called it a wolf in sheep's clothing, and it was. I also loved that I could easily fit my bike and gear in the hatchback.

I learned to drive a stick on a late '70's BMW 2002tii. Good memories.

And now back to our regularly scheduled topic...

PrairieBeardstache

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1417 on: August 26, 2019, 07:34:02 AM »
But this woman should probably actually try driving a manual car before she buys one.  They can be a pain in the ass, especially in the city or in emergency situations.

Why?

In the extremely rare instances that you evade a nearly car-total crash and hospital, you can always start the engine new. I would be surprised if that situation happens to anyone so frequently that they get angry about this detail.

And in the city I like that I can say how much braking my engine should do (and also saving on fuel). I don't see your problem.
I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.  I'll make my points more clear:

Manuals can be more dangerous if you suddenly need to accelerate, like an unexpected lane ending.  My little yaris doesn't pull in fifth gear very well.  It's better to simply be able to stand on the accelerator rather than downshift twice.

In traffic, stop and go is rough on the clutch and often first gear is fairly jerky switching from throttle on to vacuum, or vice versa.

Are you aware you don't need to downshift twice? You can safely skip a gear when downshifting as long as you're within that gear's range. The same is true for upshifting (but you'll always be in the gear's range when going up.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1418 on: August 26, 2019, 07:34:06 AM »
Good to know.  My 03 Corolla had a manual headlight switch and coil-on-plug ignition.  I once left the lights on and couldn't push start it.  Most modern cars probably have timers to shut the headlights off to prevent this.

But it still means you need adequate voltage at the ecu, something you didn't need with a points ignition.

I keep jumper cables in my car at all times anyway.

Oh the old cars are great for someone that likes to do the maintenance like me. I'm so glad that the modern car needs so little attention. I remember as a kid some people driving around in cars that needed a tune-up (adjustments) badly but owners back then were alot like some owners now - they ignore the car until the car won't start. Excessive tail pipe pollution and oil slicks on wet roads from leaky gaskets and crankcase vents.

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1419 on: August 26, 2019, 08:39:30 AM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.

SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1420 on: August 26, 2019, 08:56:39 AM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.

Wow.  That's as dumb as the folks who get paid monthly, but their boss pays them a week early before Christmas just to be nice, and they can't figure out how the money will last an extra week...

Kitsune

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1421 on: August 26, 2019, 09:03:26 AM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.

Wow.  That's as dumb as the folks who get paid monthly, but their boss pays them a week early before Christmas just to be nice, and they can't figure out how the money will last an extra week...

I mean, I could understand (I wouldn't have that much sympathy, but I could understand and would try to mitigate it) if she was going to be underpaid for the month, and money was just that tight. Like, ok, that happens, you're owed money, we'll get you the money you're owed, no problem.

But OMG SHE HAS THE MONEY. What she does with it once it's in her account is not my problem - my (legal, and ethical) responsibility is to ensure that she is paid what she is owed, which she has been!! At that point, what she does with it is officially her problem.

partgypsy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1422 on: August 26, 2019, 09:12:23 AM »
Previous pregnancy my water broke just before midnight and I was going to drive myself to the hospital, but my husband called me a Lyft. I told the driver to go to Kaiser and she casually asked if I was going to work. I just as casually replied “no” and I could tell from her driving that she wanted to drop me the heck off. Once we arrived I just as casually mentioned that the only entrance open at midnight was the emergency room, so she might as well drop me there (truth). But I was fine and walked up to L&D with no incident.

It seemed to make more sense to pay $40 for Lyft than $x,000 for an ambulance when it wasn’t really an emergency.

But yes, our system is f-ed up.

 When my wife said she thought it was time, ( I wasn't sure) I made her drive and I also drove, so I could go to work if she didn't have a baby, she did. It's been 27 years, she won't let me forget. :-)
 Expectant husbands---it's not a good idea!

dude not a good idea! When those contractions hit you can't do anything but roll with them. I'm glad she didn't get in an accident on the way there. Reminds me of guys having heart attacks driving themselves to the hospital. My sister's former teacher did that; they found his body in his car in the parking lot of the hospital a couple days later (well he almost made it).

Dogastrophe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1423 on: August 26, 2019, 09:12:49 AM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.

I've had employees lose their shit when 1/2 hour was missing from their pay and that they would need to wait until the next week to get it corrected ..... less than $8 before deductions.


Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1424 on: August 26, 2019, 10:00:05 AM »
We had a similar story like that at work this month. Due to reasons that were known to him for months in advance, we had to deduction a 3-figure sum from a guy's paycheck. His HR contact was sloppy and didn't inform him it was going to be this month, for which HR was repriemanded and apologies were given. But this doesn't change anything about the deduction, which was correct and expected. Guy is really pissed off now and forwarding letters that his mortgage wasn't paid this month and he's in big financial trouble now. Mind you this is not exactly a minimum wage earner.

Of course this situation sucks and the HR contact really messed up here, but I'm shocked that an expected 3-figure deduction directly leads to missing a mortgage payment for someone who earns an above average wage. Seems this guy doesn't even have €1000 in savings or even a credit card or overdraft facility he can use to pay such an important bill from.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1425 on: August 26, 2019, 10:48:12 AM »
But this woman should probably actually try driving a manual car before she buys one.  They can be a pain in the ass, especially in the city or in emergency situations.

Why?

In the extremely rare instances that you evade a nearly car-total crash and hospital, you can always start the engine new. I would be surprised if that situation happens to anyone so frequently that they get angry about this detail.

And in the city I like that I can say how much braking my engine should do (and also saving on fuel). I don't see your problem.
I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.  I'll make my points more clear:

Manuals can be more dangerous if you suddenly need to accelerate, like an unexpected lane ending.  My little yaris doesn't pull in fifth gear very well.  It's better to simply be able to stand on the accelerator rather than downshift twice.

In traffic, stop and go is rough on the clutch and often first gear is fairly jerky switching from throttle on to vacuum, or vice versa.

Are you aware you don't need to downshift twice? You can safely skip a gear when downshifting as long as you're within that gear's range. The same is true for upshifting (but you'll always be in the gear's range when going up.
I thought the synchros might not appreciate this but I guess I was wrong.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1426 on: August 26, 2019, 04:17:18 PM »
You can downshift to any gear if you can get the RPMs high enough to match the new lower gear.

You could downshift to 1st gear at highway speeds if your engine could tolerate 21,000 rpm.

Exaggerating a little there. I'd hate to load the transmission at those kinds of RPMs. Not sure what would happen if the driver wasn't very, very smooth about it. Don't know if the transmission explode. Sort of light trying to run 500 HP through a transmission designed for 150 HP. Things flex, things break, things bend. Might work the first few times and then break.

Montecarlo

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1427 on: August 26, 2019, 07:45:13 PM »
Usually if you shift too low you’ll feel some grinding in the synchros well before you can even get the shifter in place, let alone let out the clutch.  Either way, it’s easily possible to shift from 6th or 5th directly into 3rd.  The car can handle it just fine, but if you don’t rev the engine the guy tailgating you is going to be pissed.

Kris

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1428 on: August 26, 2019, 08:06:30 PM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.

Wow.  That's as dumb as the folks who get paid monthly, but their boss pays them a week early before Christmas just to be nice, and they can't figure out how the money will last an extra week...

Jesus, that’s incredibly crazy and sad.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1429 on: August 27, 2019, 12:16:25 AM »
Usually if you shift too low you’ll feel some grinding in the synchros well before you can even get the shifter in place, let alone let out the clutch.  Either way, it’s easily possible to shift from 6th or 5th directly into 3rd.  The car can handle it just fine, but if you don’t rev the engine the guy tailgating you is going to be pissed.

Apparently shifting from 6th to 2nd at 70- 80mph on the Autoroute (France, kinda an Interstate highway) will break something.
It wasn't me but I don't think the rental company liked us after that.  And other issues......   :-)

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1430 on: August 27, 2019, 12:42:26 AM »
But this woman should probably actually try driving a manual car before she buys one.  They can be a pain in the ass, especially in the city or in emergency situations.

Why?

In the extremely rare instances that you evade a nearly car-total crash and hospital, you can always start the engine new. I would be surprised if that situation happens to anyone so frequently that they get angry about this detail.

And in the city I like that I can say how much braking my engine should do (and also saving on fuel). I don't see your problem.
I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.  I'll make my points more clear:

Manuals can be more dangerous if you suddenly need to accelerate, like an unexpected lane ending.  My little yaris doesn't pull in fifth gear very well.  It's better to simply be able to stand on the accelerator rather than downshift twice.

In traffic, stop and go is rough on the clutch and often first gear is fairly jerky switching from throttle on to vacuum, or vice versa.

Are you aware you don't need to downshift twice? You can safely skip a gear when downshifting as long as you're within that gear's range. The same is true for upshifting (but you'll always be in the gear's range when going up.

I have been driving a manual gear all my adult life. Yesterday I borrowed a car and it turned out to be an automatic gear, which didn't have a gear pedal. First I panicked a bit, because I was in a hurry and this came as a surprise. But I figured out that R probably meant Reverse, N most likely Neutral and then I choose to put it into D instead of S. After driving for 5 minutes, I figured out that D probably meant Drive. I still don't know what the S was for, though.
It went well, as there isn't so much you can do wrong with an automatic gear.
I can only try to imagine how it must be for some of you to drive a manual gear for the first time.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1431 on: August 27, 2019, 01:28:44 AM »
But this woman should probably actually try driving a manual car before she buys one.  They can be a pain in the ass, especially in the city or in emergency situations.

Why?

In the extremely rare instances that you evade a nearly car-total crash and hospital, you can always start the engine new. I would be surprised if that situation happens to anyone so frequently that they get angry about this detail.

And in the city I like that I can say how much braking my engine should do (and also saving on fuel). I don't see your problem.
I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.  I'll make my points more clear:

Manuals can be more dangerous if you suddenly need to accelerate, like an unexpected lane ending.  My little yaris doesn't pull in fifth gear very well.  It's better to simply be able to stand on the accelerator rather than downshift twice.

In traffic, stop and go is rough on the clutch and often first gear is fairly jerky switching from throttle on to vacuum, or vice versa.

Are you aware you don't need to downshift twice? You can safely skip a gear when downshifting as long as you're within that gear's range. The same is true for upshifting (but you'll always be in the gear's range when going up.

I have been driving a manual gear all my adult life. Yesterday I borrowed a car and it turned out to be an automatic gear, which didn't have a gear pedal. First I panicked a bit, because I was in a hurry and this came as a surprise. But I figured out that R probably meant Reverse, N most likely Neutral and then I choose to put it into D instead of S. After driving for 5 minutes, I figured out that D probably meant Drive. I still don't know what the S was for, though.
It went well, as there isn't so much you can do wrong with an automatic gear.
I can only try to imagine how it must be for some of you to drive a manual gear for the first time.

S is for Slow.  Good thing you didn't select that since you were in a hurry

Depending on the car, I prefer to put it in H

« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 01:30:32 AM by dragoncar »

Goldielocks

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1432 on: August 27, 2019, 02:39:45 AM »


I have been driving a manual gear all my adult life. Yesterday I borrowed a car and it turned out to be an automatic gear, which didn't have a gear pedal. First I panicked a bit, because I was in a hurry and this came as a surprise. But I figured out that R probably meant Reverse, N most likely Neutral and then I choose to put it into D instead of S. After driving for 5 minutes, I figured out that D probably meant Drive. I still don't know what the S was for, though.
It went well, as there isn't so much you can do wrong with an automatic gear.
I can only try to imagine how it must be for some of you to drive a manual gear for the first time.

I borrowed a friend's jeep to (re)learn to drive standard after 20 plus years.   (Funny enough the last time I drove standard was when i worked in Norway, I drove the truck for the sewer department.  The boss swore it was automatic... automatic choke, that is, as I found out after I arrived for the job).

The first two times in the Jeep, I was panicking a bit because the dash clearly said "N" and sometimes "S", and I was sure I was in first or even second or third gears... I kept trying to ignore it but I was confused and certain I had broken their car.   

It turns out that Manual cars do not have a gear indicator on the dash,  (I did not know that) but this one did have compass directions!

Aside...
The "S" is likely for second gear.  In automatics, you can shift between D for drive, or force it to stay in second and first gear.  Mainly for snow, rough roads, or to have the engine slow you on long downhills instead of the brakes.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1433 on: August 27, 2019, 02:49:45 AM »


I have been driving a manual gear all my adult life. Yesterday I borrowed a car and it turned out to be an automatic gear, which didn't have a gear pedal. First I panicked a bit, because I was in a hurry and this came as a surprise. But I figured out that R probably meant Reverse, N most likely Neutral and then I choose to put it into D instead of S. After driving for 5 minutes, I figured out that D probably meant Drive. I still don't know what the S was for, though.
It went well, as there isn't so much you can do wrong with an automatic gear.
I can only try to imagine how it must be for some of you to drive a manual gear for the first time.

I borrowed a friend's jeep to (re)learn to drive standard after 20 plus years.   (Funny enough the last time I drove standard was when i worked in Norway, I drove the truck for the sewer department.  The boss swore it was automatic... automatic choke, that is, as I found out after I arrived for the job).

The first two times in the Jeep, I was panicking a bit because the dash clearly said "N" and sometimes "S", and I was sure I was in first or even second or third gears... I kept trying to ignore it but I was confused and certain I had broken their car.   

It turns out that Manual cars do not have a gear indicator on the dash,  (I did not know that) but this one did have compass directions!

Aside...
The "S" is likely for second gear.  In automatics, you can shift between D for drive, or force it to stay in second and first gear.  Mainly for snow, rough roads, or to have the engine slow you on long downhills instead of the brakes.

:-))

Modern manual gear cars have a digital gear indicator in the dashboard again. Our 2010 Subaru Outback has that. But before that, they didn't.  I usually don't look at it, but just listen to the motor noise.

I remember manual chokes, that was a bit of a bother. Glad that has been automated today.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1434 on: August 27, 2019, 06:48:51 AM »
I like driving stick and I'm pretty good with my shifts, I can even heel-toe in my little Yaris if I cram my feet together.  My more general point is that, in some extreme cases, an auto can be better because in an emergency situation, more thinking generally is worse than less thinking.  But it's an unlikely case, I admit.

I also did the math and found out I get approx. 41 mpg in my little car, so I'm pretty happy with that.  Almost all highway miles of course.

PrairieBeardstache

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1435 on: August 27, 2019, 07:24:30 AM »
You can downshift to any gear if you can get the RPMs high enough to match the new lower gear.

You could downshift to 1st gear at highway speeds if your engine could tolerate 21,000 rpm.

Exaggerating a little there. I'd hate to load the transmission at those kinds of RPMs. Not sure what would happen if the driver wasn't very, very smooth about it. Don't know if the transmission explode. Sort of light trying to run 500 HP through a transmission designed for 150 HP. Things flex, things break, things bend. Might work the first few times and then break.

That would be what's called a mechanical over-rev. The typical result isn't damage to the transmission, but damage to the valvetrain. Valves will begin to float and the pistons will contact them. This equals bent valves, scored cams, damaged pistons, all kinds of bad things. I mechanically over-reved my car once, luckily the tires spun and I disengaged the clutch at 10,500 RPM (the computer records over-revs). THey say damage on that car begins around 11,000 RPM. I got lucky!

joleran

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1436 on: August 27, 2019, 01:32:39 PM »
Aside...
The "S" is likely for second gear.  In automatics, you can shift between D for drive, or force it to stay in second and first gear.  Mainly for snow, rough roads, or to have the engine slow you on long downhills instead of the brakes.

Likely, could also be "sport" to give some higher RPMs and slightly different handling.

marcela

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1437 on: August 27, 2019, 01:40:49 PM »
So....anyone have any overheard at work stories?


DadJokes

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1438 on: August 27, 2019, 01:54:29 PM »
So....anyone have any overheard at work stories?

You know, in 18 months at my current job, I haven't overheard a single anti-mustachian conversation at work. I apparently work with a bunch of responsible adults. One even introduced me to MMM before retiring.

The nerve of some people!

Davnasty

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1439 on: August 27, 2019, 01:59:34 PM »
So....anyone have any overheard at work stories?

You know, in 18 months at my current job, I haven't overheard a single anti-mustachian conversation at work. I apparently work with a bunch of responsible adults. One even introduced me to MMM before retiring.

The nerve of some people!

Interesting. I wonder if he shared any stories about you before bringing you in :)

ColoAndy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1440 on: August 27, 2019, 02:40:39 PM »
I currently have an employee who is FREAKING OUT because she was overpaid by 3 hours on the last paycheque, and therefore will be underpaid by 3 hours this coming paycheque (so that, at the end of the month, the total equals the correct amount, in short).

"But this means my car insurance won't go through!!!"

Like. Kid. You've already gotten the money. The money for your car insurance is literally sitting in your bank account, unless you went on a spending spree (waaaaaaitaminute, I see the problem). The money is actually yours, and you have it, what the hell.

And this is someone who is fairly paid for their level of experience and education, making over 40K in a LCOL area. No mortgage, no kids, no student loans, and I know her parents, they're doing ok and she's not subsidizing family.

????? I do not understand.
Good grief what a mess.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1441 on: August 27, 2019, 03:29:22 PM »
So....anyone have any overheard at work stories?

My coworker financed a used SUV two years ago from one of those sketchy used car places with high interest for people with bad credit.  It developed a knock.  He traded it in for another high interest used SUV because he didn't have the money to fix it.

I think I've mentioned him before in this thread.  Has two adult children that don't work and a disabled wife that doesn't work. 

I work at an RV dealer.  No one has a money mustache.  Except the 22 year old buying mutual funds, he seems to have his head on straight.

Boll weevil

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1442 on: August 27, 2019, 03:29:49 PM »
This was a while ago and could probably be cross posted to the thread about horrible situations where people won’t be able to retire.

This is really overheard and I don’t know the surrounding circumstances to any of these stories; I heard her name but couldn’t pick her out of a lineup. Here’s what I pieced together.

She is a widow and taking care of at least two middle- or high-school aged grandchildren, at least one of whom has a probation officer and generally doesn’t seem to listen to her directions which sounded perfectly reasonable to me (stuff like go home, not to your friend’s place).

There was the time where she got a new vehicle (don’t know if it was brand new or used but new to her) but couldn’t immediately pay the insurance when she updated the policy.

And then there was the time where she called the credit union to tell them she wouldn’t be able to pay her mortgage that month. Sounded like the person who took the call didn’t know what to do with it. A few minutes later somebody else from the credit union calls her back and tells her she was actually a payment ahead so skipping the payment would just put her back on schedule.

The saddest situation I overheard, though, was when she was arguing with one of the grandkids when they wanted her to buy or pay for something and she said the only money she had was the “five bucks or whatever” that was in her wallet.

Didn’t sound like a good situation at all.


DaMa

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1443 on: August 27, 2019, 03:37:30 PM »
Here's one overheard at the gym.  Trainer who frequently mentions his Hellcat (and other cars he has owned) starts saying how a person is wasting money to pay cash for a car, because you'd be better to invest the $40k.  So I say, you can't guarantee a return high enough to offset the car loan interest.  He starts talking about investing in "spider" funds. 

Him: Invest the 40k in a spider fund, then you'll have the car and 40k and the 10% per year investment return.
Me:  You will have paid the 40k on the car loan, and only the amount of the investment return that is more than the loan interest.
Him: No, I put the 40k in the investment.
Me:  You still had to pay the 40k in payments on the car.
Him:  No, I put the 40k in the investment.
...
He didn't seem to understand that he was paying $40k + interest in the monthly car payments. 

I had to google spider fund.  He thinks he's got a 10% guarantee of an S&P 500 index. 

I had to google Hellcat, too.  Glad I didn't try to tell him about buying older used cars for real money savings.

Freedomin5

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1444 on: August 28, 2019, 04:28:33 AM »
My workplace is big on work life balance and physical/mental/emotional health. So we all have access to a free gym and free weight room and a free dance studio and free exercise classes. Anyway, last week an email went out regarding spin classes at the work place. Only USD$100/session! And you have to sign up for 15 sessions minimum. At least 10 people signed up immediately. Some of those people have talked in the past about not saving enough money and joking about having to work until they’re old. I’m like, if you stopped spending $100/day on sessions, you might be able to retire earlier. These people also pay $4 for prepackaged veggie sticks, like a little box of to-go carrot and cucumber sticks.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1445 on: August 28, 2019, 05:06:07 AM »
My workplace is big on work life balance and physical/mental/emotional health. So we all have access to a free gym and free weight room and a free dance studio and free exercise classes. Anyway, last week an email went out regarding spin classes at the work place. Only USD$100/session! And you have to sign up for 15 sessions minimum. At least 10 people signed up immediately. Some of those people have talked in the past about not saving enough money and joking about having to work until they’re old. I’m like, if you stopped spending $100/day on sessions, you might be able to retire earlier. These people also pay $4 for prepackaged veggie sticks, like a little box of to-go carrot and cucumber sticks.

Is that not a typo with a 0 too many? That is an absurd amount for a spinning session.

Freedomin5

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1446 on: August 28, 2019, 06:09:35 AM »
I just thought of another one.

My office walls are quite bare, and I’ve been wanting to put a picture or painting on the wall. My coworker has some beautiful framed paintings on her wall. She recommended her art guy. Only $200 to frame a painting, plus another couple hundred for the painting itself.

I ended up buying a paint by numbers oil painting kit. I just need something on the wall, and it’s a fun project.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1447 on: August 28, 2019, 06:15:30 AM »
Here's one overheard at the gym.  Trainer who frequently mentions his Hellcat (and other cars he has owned) starts saying how a person is wasting money to pay cash for a car, because you'd be better to invest the $40k.  So I say, you can't guarantee a return high enough to offset the car loan interest.  He starts talking about investing in "spider" funds. 

Him: Invest the 40k in a spider fund, then you'll have the car and 40k and the 10% per year investment return.
Me:  You will have paid the 40k on the car loan, and only the amount of the investment return that is more than the loan interest.
Him: No, I put the 40k in the investment.
Me:  You still had to pay the 40k in payments on the car.
Him:  No, I put the 40k in the investment.
...
He didn't seem to understand that he was paying $40k + interest in the monthly car payments. 

I had to google spider fund.  He thinks he's got a 10% guarantee of an S&P 500 index. 

I had to google Hellcat, too.  Glad I didn't try to tell him about buying older used cars for real money savings.

700hp on a public road is beyond foolish.  I hope his endocrine system is stable. 

partgypsy

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1448 on: August 28, 2019, 06:32:08 AM »
I'm going to be devil's advocate
This was a while ago and could probably be cross posted to the thread about horrible situations where people won’t be able to retire.

This is really overheard and I don’t know the surrounding circumstances to any of these stories; I heard her name but couldn’t pick her out of a lineup. Here’s what I pieced together.

She is a widow and taking care of at least two middle- or high-school aged grandchildren, at least one of whom has a probation officer and generally doesn’t seem to listen to her directions which sounded perfectly reasonable to me (stuff like go home, not to your friend’s place).
- that does sound bad. It's tough to be a single parent, let alone a grandmother-aged parent.

There was the time where she got a new vehicle (don’t know if it was brand new or used but new to her) but couldn’t immediately pay the insurance when she updated the policy.
-Could be poor planning. But If she wasn't previously driving and you get a car there are a lot of new expenses (car, registration) and insurance on top of that can be a bit of sticker shock.

And then there was the time where she called the credit union to tell them she wouldn’t be able to pay her mortgage that month. Sounded like the person who took the call didn’t know what to do with it. A few minutes later somebody else from the credit union calls her back and tells her she was actually a payment ahead so skipping the payment would just put her back on schedule.

 -I budget tight and so yeah if I accidentaly paid a month ahead that means I wouldn't have the money for mortgage when it did roll around. Maybe she budgets tight.

The saddest situation I overheard, though, was when she was arguing with one of the grandkids when they wanted her to buy or pay for something and she said the only money she had was the “five bucks or whatever” that was in her wallet.

 -maybe that was the truth but it also sounds like something I would tell my kids if I didn't want to buy them something.
Didn’t sound like a good situation at all.


kanga1622

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Re: Overheard at Work 2
« Reply #1449 on: August 28, 2019, 09:08:47 AM »
I have a coworker who is the only stable income in her household (and she makes maybe $35k). Her husband has a vending/catering business that really should be classified as a hobby. They spend every cent they bring in on this "business" to buy better equipment, lease a storefront for almost a year before opening up to business two days a week, etc. Her husband is terrible at planning ahead so they don't always have the supplies on hand for a catering job so they are running to pick up plates and napkins the day before. Or she will use her lunch break at her 8-5 job to pick up supplies in our town rather than getting a discount for a large commercial order.

And yet, this woman is always buying new clothes, needs to see medical professionals for an ongoing health issue, and their vehicles are older and always in the shop. At some point there will be no more loans/credit cards available and they will be completely maxed out. If she lost her job and the medical benefits, they'd be unable to make the payments on pretty much everything within 30 days. I just cringe every time I hear her say they got a new(er) vehicle or bought new equipment. I'm not sure they can dig themselves out of the hole they are already in.