Author Topic: No, I won't buy into your MLM  (Read 90110 times)

Travis

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #150 on: April 29, 2017, 07:04:34 PM »
It feels like exploiting something so precious--relationships--I always say no and then have to work hard to not judge the person and resent them for using friendship for financial gain.

That's MLM marketing strategy in a nutshell.  The parent company is counting on your inability to say no to a friend since the majority of their down-trace vendors don't know how to do actual marketing.
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StockBeard

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #151 on: April 30, 2017, 12:15:59 PM »
BTW: I've always been curious but what do people actually make from these schemes.

It is now well documented that more than 95% of the participants in these schemes lose money.
Of the 5% remaining, the vast majority makes well below minimum wage.
In some countries like Canada these companies have a legal obligation to release their numbers so you can easily find numbers. And these are never pretty, even though they try really hard to fudge them by not counting what they call "inactive members". For the MLMs that don't release their numbers, you have to assume the numbers are even worse.

My little brother is with one of them, peddling Aloe vera gloop. The only reason he believes he is making money is because he is not counting his own consumption ( which is pretty much compulsory for him to qualify for commissions) as an expense.

LiveLean

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #152 on: April 30, 2017, 06:05:10 PM »
At 24, in 1994, a then-girlfriend of mine got roped into a Mary Kay party at a mall. I went along. One of those hideous women said, "She'll be making more than you in no time." I was doing really well at the age of 24 and said, "Great. I make X. At what point will she be making that?" The woman quickly found someone else to talk to. (Dropped that GF for a number of reasons related to poor judgment and finances.)

Circa 2003, wife and I get invited to a wine party -- I had no concept of at-home MLM parties at the time. Our oldest is a year old, one of our first times out, paid for a sitter for the first time. I thought one brought a bottle of wine, so I grabbed a bottle from our stash. Walked in a little late right into the sales pitch. Stared darts at the douche husband the whole time, never spoke to them again.

Circa 2006, lots of friends selling Mona Vie. Said it gave them great energy, blah, blah, blah. I told them if some $60 fruit juice made that dramatic of an effect on their well-being, they must have some pretty crappy diets that could be improved in a lot of other areas for far less money.

In recent years, I co-authored a book with a guy who didn't want to do any sort of promotion. Said he found it cheesy. A month later his wife got into Rodan & Fields and she is relentless on FB . She got the Lexus, like some of the Mona Vie people who did well early. But just as $60 snake oil fruit juice goes away, so too will overpriced skin care.

Here's my rule for family and friends: You may mention your MLM to me once and I will forgive you for your stupidity. Second time, you're dead to me.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2017, 06:09:56 PM by LiveLean »
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Gone_Hiking

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #153 on: April 30, 2017, 10:21:24 PM »
It feels like exploiting something so precious--relationships--I always say no and then have to work hard to not judge the person and resent them for using friendship for financial gain.

That's MLM marketing strategy in a nutshell.  The parent company is counting on your inability to say no to a friend since the majority of their down-trace vendors don't know how to do actual marketing.

A while back, I met a woman who was selling Mary Kay or something like that.  She seemed really into me and I had no idea why.   One day she wanted to meet me for ice cream.  When I got there, she was not alone.  With her sat a woman who was her sales lead.  Out of the blue, the sales lead started recruiting me hard for sales position.  Was I making enough money?  Would I like more?  She mentioned the absolutely fabulous cruise.  She suggested I could be very effective among immigrant women like myself.  Because I have that immigrant entrepreneurial work ethics.   Nothing like being patronizing and playing a little stereotype to convince people to your position, no?  I got up and left as soon as I finished my ice cream.

I learned then how one advances in these organizations: by recruiting people and getting a cut of what the recruits sell.  The woman was so much into me because she thought I was going to make her money.   Fake friends I need not, and neither does anybody else.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #154 on: April 30, 2017, 10:47:20 PM »
How does the "Lexus gift" work with R+F anyway? I saw on Reddit something about how you get the Lexus but if you don't meet sales goals any given month you're on the hook for the payment(s). LOL. I'm not sure why anyone would sign up for this without researching it more... or if they claim they did their "research" I wonder what sources they used.

ooeei

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #155 on: May 01, 2017, 06:46:12 AM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

iowajes

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #156 on: May 01, 2017, 07:03:12 AM »
Sadly, those vacation plans aren't a new thing.

I'd complain to TGIF. A waiter should not be able to do that!

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #157 on: May 01, 2017, 08:59:33 AM »
*sigh* with FB apparently people can add you to groups without your consent and until you go in and "unfollow or leave" you will get all the group notifications. One "consultant" had the gall to PM me because my friend is hosting a party and "invited" me. Note, I did NOT accept this event request. I might not have minded if I had joined, but, just, no.

Can we start a FI MLM? for every person we convert, we get a % of the money they save, and their family saves and on and on...? ;)

Seriously, it frustrates me because a lot of the people I see doing this are good and relatively smart, but either they can't say "no" to a friend or family member who is a consultant. Or they see this as a way of building equality in a relationship and self-worth.  These people would be much, much better off if they spent their time learning how to properly manage the money that does come into the household instead of spending the huge amount of time/effort/energy/money to try and bring in income through an MLM.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #158 on: May 01, 2017, 09:05:48 AM »
*sigh* with FB apparently people can add you to groups without your consent and until you go in and "unfollow or leave" you will get all the group notifications. One "consultant" had the gall to PM me because my friend is hosting a party and "invited" me. Note, I did NOT accept this event request. I might not have minded if I had joined, but, just, no.


Crap like this is why I have pretty much quit FB.  It seems to be turning into one big 'business tool' for people to exploit.

 

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #159 on: May 03, 2017, 08:57:56 AM »
I took an Uber this weekend and the driver gave me a business card for his MLM "business"! My guess is he is cobbling together a bunch of side hustles to try to make a living.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #160 on: May 03, 2017, 09:26:13 AM »
I took an Uber this weekend and the driver gave me a business card for his MLM "business"! My guess is he is cobbling together a bunch of side hustles to try to make a living.

LOL Uber is a great side-channel for spreading your MLM! I'll keep that in mind for if I ever get suckered into selling skincare products, because you know: "men need skincare too" (true statement but it seems less palatable when an R+F associate starts pointing it out)

jeromedawg

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #161 on: May 03, 2017, 09:28:58 AM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

I would write TGIF corporate and complain about that behavior: solicitation of personal business from a waiter on the job. That's awful and super unprofessional. That waiter should be fired so he can focus full-time on his MLM scam.

ooeei

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #162 on: May 03, 2017, 12:03:30 PM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

I would write TGIF corporate and complain about that behavior: solicitation of personal business from a waiter on the job. That's awful and super unprofessional. That waiter should be fired so he can focus full-time on his MLM scam.

Well I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt because I wasn't there. 

My girlfriend and her friend tend to bring people way out of their normal comfort zones somehow, and get everyone to act informal around them.  I could easily see them asking about what his hobbies or what else he does are during a 5 minute conversation, and then excitedly pressing him for more info when he brought up a side business.  If I go to a restaurant and a waiter unprovoked tries to sell me on an MLM, you bet I'll be calling in a complaint.

jeromedawg

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #163 on: May 03, 2017, 01:18:48 PM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

I would write TGIF corporate and complain about that behavior: solicitation of personal business from a waiter on the job. That's awful and super unprofessional. That waiter should be fired so he can focus full-time on his MLM scam.

Well I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt because I wasn't there. 

My girlfriend and her friend tend to bring people way out of their normal comfort zones somehow, and get everyone to act informal around them.  I could easily see them asking about what his hobbies or what else he does are during a 5 minute conversation, and then excitedly pressing him for more info when he brought up a side business.  If I go to a restaurant and a waiter unprovoked tries to sell me on an MLM, you bet I'll be calling in a complaint.

LOL I know what you mean - my parents are like that too... getting kind of nosy with other peoples' business.

MgoSam

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #164 on: May 03, 2017, 02:18:21 PM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

I would write TGIF corporate and complain about that behavior: solicitation of personal business from a waiter on the job. That's awful and super unprofessional. That waiter should be fired so he can focus full-time on his MLM scam.

Well I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt because I wasn't there. 

My girlfriend and her friend tend to bring people way out of their normal comfort zones somehow, and get everyone to act informal around them.  I could easily see them asking about what his hobbies or what else he does are during a 5 minute conversation, and then excitedly pressing him for more info when he brought up a side business.  If I go to a restaurant and a waiter unprovoked tries to sell me on an MLM, you bet I'll be calling in a complaint.

LOL I know what you mean - my parents are like that too... getting kind of nosy with other peoples' business.

Yup, I used to be like that but I've learned to caution my interest because some people can't stop once they get started or they'll ask for your help for something that is way too personal and I got tired of declining (I know we seem to be getting along but I just met you dude, I'm not going to babysit your cats and/or your child for a week).

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #165 on: May 03, 2017, 02:34:47 PM »
I got a friend request on Facebook this morning.  The name didn't look familiar, so I checked out the profile - maybe it's a married name from an old schoolmate.  Nope.  The profile was wide open, so I was able to scroll through her posts.  A lot of posting about how psychiatry is a scam - red flag #1.  Then I saw the real reason I was targeted.  She's with LuLaRoe!  Yeah, nope!  Request deleted.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #166 on: May 03, 2017, 03:21:52 PM »
*sigh* with FB apparently people can add you to groups without your consent and until you go in and "unfollow or leave" you will get all the group notifications. One "consultant" had the gall to PM me because my friend is hosting a party and "invited" me. Note, I did NOT accept this event request. I might not have minded if I had joined, but, just, no.


Crap like this is why I have pretty much quit FB.  It seems to be turning into one big 'business tool' for people to exploit.

I even complained to FB about it.  I'm sure my opinion went nowhere.

jeromedawg

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #167 on: May 04, 2017, 10:16:15 AM »
It seems MLMs are getting even more bold about not even worrying about products anymore.  My girlfriend and her friend were hit up by a waiter at TGI Fridays last week about a "vacation discount program" where you pay $600 to get discounts on vacations for a year.  You get better discounts the more people you recruit.  She said the waiter was noticeably less friendly after they declined.

I would write TGIF corporate and complain about that behavior: solicitation of personal business from a waiter on the job. That's awful and super unprofessional. That waiter should be fired so he can focus full-time on his MLM scam.

Well I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt because I wasn't there. 

My girlfriend and her friend tend to bring people way out of their normal comfort zones somehow, and get everyone to act informal around them.  I could easily see them asking about what his hobbies or what else he does are during a 5 minute conversation, and then excitedly pressing him for more info when he brought up a side business.  If I go to a restaurant and a waiter unprovoked tries to sell me on an MLM, you bet I'll be calling in a complaint.

LOL I know what you mean - my parents are like that too... getting kind of nosy with other peoples' business.

Yup, I used to be like that but I've learned to caution my interest because some people can't stop once they get started or they'll ask for your help for something that is way too personal and I got tired of declining (I know we seem to be getting along but I just met you dude, I'm not going to babysit your cats and/or your child for a week).

The issue with my parents is that they're not only nosy but they become over-invested in people and way too soon. To the point that they meet them one day and are 'best friends' the next. For example, my dad met this kid on the bus who apparently was fresh out of college or something. They started talking about jobs and IT etc - somehow it came up that the kid was looking for a job or something. My dad immediately assumed the role of mentor, advising him on what he should and shouldn't do and told all of us that he would be meeting with this kid next week to talk more. I know he's trying to be super helpful or whatever, but sometimes it's too much - just stop over-involving yourself with everyone and everything, thinking that you know what's best for them! He probably feels like he'll project onto others what he couldn't do with his sons - instead of waiting for us to come to him or asking us if we want his advice, he just tries to fish for the information and lays it on us (he'll often ask about my job and I've never liked talking about work, and he knows it. Yet he'll continually ask about it. With my WFH job he threw out his unsolicited opinions about how I really need face time and I should try to find an office to work out of with people in it....). It's all in good intention but I've never considered his advice as particularly sage wisdom either, therefore I tend not to take most of it. It's just super annoying when he tries to impart unsolicited wisdom on us.

It could also be for the agenda of somehow getting something out of that person too, and once they've gotten what they want they drop communication and pretend like they never knew them. Super fickle and extremely annoying. My brother lives near them and interacts daily with them as well as sees their interactions with others - he's the one who tells me most of these things. I've seen it on several occasions as well. I'm just glad they never got suckered into MLM crap, because if they did I think a lot of people would really hate them.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 10:20:43 AM by jeromedawg »

Dr.Jeckyl

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #168 on: May 17, 2017, 10:21:08 AM »
Ughhh....

I guess I'm a bit into a pyramid scheme myself. After all when I put more money into my index funds they then create employees (dividends and returns) and then those employees bring in even more employees.

But seriously, my old neighbor is seriously into these. The wife and I went to one of her wine and cheese parties and bought a couple bottles of wine, why not. But since then she has gotten into some company that signs you up for utilities, cable companies, and cell phones. She told my wife how much she could save us on our phone bill and my wife replied that would mean we'd almost pay nothing for our plans (pre-paid). She then invited my wife over to hang out. My wife then got the hard pitch about finance and helping us out of debt. To this my wife replied that we don't have debt (we do but how do you justify paying off student loans that are 2.5%) and that I could teach her how to get out of debt, invest, and retire early. She is now with some company that gives you a Jeep and "pays for it". She is always posting about insurance and financial planning on FB.

Just Joe

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #169 on: May 17, 2017, 02:57:20 PM »
I'd love to peer into the thought process of people like that. Well, then again maybe it would be an experience that would give me long lasting mental scars. These people's ideas just don't add up logically.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #170 on: May 17, 2017, 04:49:35 PM »
Ughhh....

I guess I'm a bit into a pyramid scheme myself. After all when I put more money into my index funds they then create employees (dividends and returns) and then those employees bring in even more employees.

But seriously, my old neighbor is seriously into these. The wife and I went to one of her wine and cheese parties and bought a couple bottles of wine, why not. But since then she has gotten into some company that signs you up for utilities, cable companies, and cell phones. She told my wife how much she could save us on our phone bill and my wife replied that would mean we'd almost pay nothing for our plans (pre-paid). She then invited my wife over to hang out. My wife then got the hard pitch about finance and helping us out of debt. To this my wife replied that we don't have debt (we do but how do you justify paying off student loans that are 2.5%) and that I could teach her how to get out of debt, invest, and retire early. She is now with some company that gives you a Jeep and "pays for it". She is always posting about insurance and financial planning on FB.

ooooh,  can you share what the company name is?

LadyMuMu

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #171 on: May 17, 2017, 05:37:48 PM »
Primerica?

Abo345

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #172 on: May 17, 2017, 10:33:51 PM »
I always am amused by acquaintances who do the MLM thing are constantly posting on Facebook about "how easy" it is and how close they are to becoming a director/ regional lead/ VP of the world etc. with their "easy" sales.

One person I know was always posting about Mary-Kay. She is already a Mary Kay DIRECTOR! She has a team! She makes money soooo easy! I especially loved the photos she always posted on FB of the Mary Kay conventions: posing next to the pink SUV, a Kate spade handbag, or fancy price of jewelry with the caption "I will be coming back for these gifts shortly! On track to earn them this year!"

All the while, she was also posting on the same Facebook account about how her day job as a yoga instructor got her hours cut, she can't afford to make rent, does anyone know of an apartment available with cheaper rent ASAP?? Is anyone looking for a roommate she can't afford this months rent on her own? She's looking to move to a different city but can't afford to rent a place on her own, does anyone know anyone with an empty room to rent in this new city?

But wait, what about that "easy" Mary Kay money miss big boss director lady?? Needless to say, I wasn't interested in joining her sales team.

Just Joe

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #173 on: May 18, 2017, 07:59:02 AM »
Why don't these people compartmentalize their business from their personal lives online? Do they think that people can't put two and two together?

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #174 on: May 18, 2017, 08:03:28 AM »
Why don't these people compartmentalize their business from their personal lives online? Do they think that people can't put two and two together?

If they were acting smart enough to do that they would probably also be smart enough to not take part in a MLM scheme.

BeanCounter

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #175 on: May 18, 2017, 12:27:12 PM »
Why don't these people compartmentalize their business from their personal lives online? Do they think that people can't put two and two together?
Because they need to leverage their personal relationships.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #176 on: May 18, 2017, 12:48:41 PM »
Why don't these people compartmentalize their business from their personal lives online? Do they think that people can't put two and two together?
Because they need to leverage their personal relationships.

Yep. Otherwise they won't sell any products or recruit anyone for their downline.

Direct marketing is only sustainable or even marginally profitable for people with a massive network of friends, family, and neighbors who for some reason can't or won't use online options or for whom product related get-togethers are actually a source of entertainment. In a situation like that, hosting or performing at a sales party isn't considered an imposition on the guests, who come wanting to actually buy.
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KodeBlue

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #177 on: May 19, 2017, 06:17:24 AM »
I heard an ad on the radio this morning for a LaLuRoe event happening at a local convention center this w/e. Like lambs to the slaughter...

BeanCounter

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #178 on: May 19, 2017, 06:23:40 AM »
I heard an ad on the radio this morning for a LaLuRoe event happening at a local convention center this w/e. Like lambs to the slaughter...

when will the world finally have enough leggings with crazy patterns with oversized shirts?

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #179 on: May 19, 2017, 08:12:56 AM »
I read that it takes $6k to start with Lulularoe. 6K!!! I hate that people let themselves be roped into risking that kind of money. A friend of mine does it, but I decline all her invites about it.

If anyone ever mentions MLMs to me, I just say, "I don't buy things." Then they go away.

Apples

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #180 on: May 22, 2017, 09:15:40 AM »
Anyone here remember 31 bags?  They actually had quality bags (I was given 2 as gifts, and we use them a lot), but the company was based on Proverbs 31, which I'm not churchy enough to remember what that line is.  My cousin sold them, and my mom bought a bunch from her to give out as Christmas presents to all the women in the family.  While nice, it was also done to "support" this cousin.  Who needed support.  And a real job.  And was already living with my parents for several months while searching for said job. sigh.

Also, LulaRoe is apparently not all sunshine and rainbows.  This website has lots of consultants sending her dirt:  http://www.mommygyver.com/single-post/2017/05/11/Get-In-Good-With-the-Warehouse

mm1970

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #181 on: May 22, 2017, 11:06:31 AM »
I heard an ad on the radio this morning for a LaLuRoe event happening at a local convention center this w/e. Like lambs to the slaughter...

when will the world finally have enough leggings with crazy patterns with oversized shirts?
I know, right?  I actually got my very first invite to an online LLR party a month ago or so.  I can't believe it took that long.  Thing is, a few of my friends have cute leggings.  They are comfy, and I can see the appeal.

But how many do you need?  I have four pairs of leggings for running, and a pair of comfy shorts for lounging at home.  I don't need leggings with ... hearts, unicorns, etc.

jeromedawg

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #182 on: May 22, 2017, 11:28:26 AM »
Anyone here remember 31 bags?  They actually had quality bags (I was given 2 as gifts, and we use them a lot), but the company was based on Proverbs 31, which I'm not churchy enough to remember what that line is.  My cousin sold them, and my mom bought a bunch from her to give out as Christmas presents to all the women in the family.  While nice, it was also done to "support" this cousin.  Who needed support.  And a real job.  And was already living with my parents for several months while searching for said job. sigh.

Also, LulaRoe is apparently not all sunshine and rainbows.  This website has lots of consultants sending her dirt:  http://www.mommygyver.com/single-post/2017/05/11/Get-In-Good-With-the-Warehouse

LOL! https://www.mythirtyone.com/ - never heard of them till you mentioned it. The premise of Proverbs 31 is basically about the wife being virtuous and hard-working.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #183 on: May 22, 2017, 12:07:43 PM »
Sister in law of friend selling LulaRoe says she is making $20k per month doing it. Is that really even possible? She did get in very early. Is it sustainable?
I don't know if that's gross revenue or net income. But damn that's pretty good!

dreaming

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #184 on: May 22, 2017, 12:20:59 PM »
Sister in law of friend selling LulaRoe says she is making $20k per month doing it. Is that really even possible? She did get in very early. Is it sustainable?
I don't know if that's gross revenue or net income. But damn that's pretty good!

Yes, I think for some it is.  MY SIL is raking it in also and she has only been doing it for a year.  She is very good at marketing herself and she has a group of gals who just don't know when to say when.  I swear some are changing over their whole wardrobe (leggings, shirts, dresses, skirts, etc to LLR) to the tune of thousands of dollars.  I have not bought one piece of it and I never will.  Soft  - yes.  Fun patterns - some, yes.  Poor quality - yes.  Overpriced - HELL YES!

Sustainable - yes and no.  Due to mostly Facebook parties, I would say yes to being able to sell forever because you can reach anyone with an account.  No more needing it to be local because you have to drive to their house for the party.  No because the trend will die or the company will have too much growth too fast and it will implode.  Either scenario would be good! 

StockBeard

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #185 on: May 22, 2017, 12:28:19 PM »
Sister in law of friend selling LulaRoe says she is making $20k per month doing it. Is that really even possible? She did get in very early. Is it sustainable?
I don't know if that's gross revenue or net income. But damn that's pretty good!
1) Don't trust any revenue numbers from MLM members unless they show you their tax returns
2) They are taught to "fake it until they make it" meaning it is very likely the numbers they give you are inflated (if not completely false)
3) In general the numbers being shared are gross revenue, not counting personal expenses or cost of buying the product. In the same line of thoughts, an Amazon affiliate can tell you they shipped $300'000 worth of products in a year, not telling you they only get a 3% commission out of that number. My brother pretended he was doing $800 a month in an MLM. But he had to pay for more than $1000 in product (and kept pretending it was different because he would "buy it anyway"), so, you get the idea.
4) A very tiny percentage (1% or less) of people who "got in very early" do indeed make a lot of money. They do this by exploiting their bottom line, it's up to you to understand if your friend's SIL is lying to you or to hundreds of people, whichever is easier to believe.

Goldielocks

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #186 on: May 22, 2017, 05:49:07 PM »
Anyone here remember 31 bags?  They actually had quality bags (I was given 2 as gifts, and we use them a lot), but the company was based on Proverbs 31, which I'm not churchy enough to remember what that line is.  My cousin sold them, and my mom bought a bunch from her to give out as Christmas presents to all the women in the family.  While nice, it was also done to "support" this cousin.  Who needed support.  And a real job.  And was already living with my parents for several months while searching for said job. sigh.

Also, LulaRoe is apparently not all sunshine and rainbows.  This website has lots of consultants sending her dirt:  http://www.mommygyver.com/single-post/2017/05/11/Get-In-Good-With-the-Warehouse

LOL! https://www.mythirtyone.com/ - never heard of them till you mentioned it. The premise of Proverbs 31 is basically about the wife being virtuous and hard-working.

Even better, it is about a wife running her own business and making and managing her own money, owning her own land and property, for the benefit of (her) and her family.

MsPeacock

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #187 on: May 23, 2017, 05:42:06 PM »
I participate on some mom's boards and MLM topics always result in a flame war. About 10% of the posters see them (as I do) as exploitative of the sales people, a scam, a way to lose money, annoying to all who are entrapped by their "friends" into parties selling overpriced stuff, etc. 40% don't care one way or the other. The other 50% participate in some MLM and insist that they "own their own business" and that they will get rich and that anyone who says differently is wrong, and that buying from them is "supporting a local business" etc. 

The only thing I think of any quality that I've gotten from an MLM is Tupperware. But Rubbermaid is a very close second, at 1/3 of the cost, and available easily at Target (e.g. none of the sales pressure).

Goldielocks

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #188 on: May 23, 2017, 05:58:51 PM »
Horray!  SIL has finally "seen the light" and stated that she makes very little money from the MLM she was a rep for, especially on an hourly basis.   She will keep it up with the internet orders (no inventory), but will not market it any more.

This told to me by my MIL, while I was standing in her laundry room, surrounded by a vast number of MLM items she has bought from SIL from 2-3 years ago, not yet used.   (scented handsoaps, expensive kitchen small appliances, etc).   When MIL stopped buying from SIL, I think SIL's profits tanked.  Of course, SIL used her "profits" to take the low cost "vacations" to MLM conferences previously...

Anyway, so very happy now.


clarkfan1979

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #189 on: May 25, 2017, 10:16:40 PM »
In 1999, I sold Excel long distance to my family and friends. It was an easy sell because their rates were lower than the local phone company. Much lower.

I saved my friends and family money and I made around $3000. I think the buy-in was $150.

The hardest part was getting a small business to sign up. However, my step-dad had many small business owners in his social network, so it wasn't that hard. 

It was an MLM, but I didn't try to get any of my friends to sell it.

Did anyone else do this?

lchu

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #190 on: May 30, 2017, 07:13:57 AM »
Horray!  SIL has finally "seen the light" and stated that she makes very little money from the MLM she was a rep for, especially on an hourly basis.   She will keep it up with the internet orders (no inventory), but will not market it any more.

Excited for you, although apparently the MLM bug has spread to my SIL.  She isn't a sales consultant (yet) but she's hooked on MLM referral programs that allow her to earn free merchandise for persuading people to make purchases at parties she hosts.  Fortunately, I live out of state so I'm out of the direct line of fire, but I still get included on all the Facebook invites (so that I feel included!  Haha!) and watching the drama unfold is like watching a train wreck.  I can't look away!

She's held a weekly MLM "purchase party" almost every weekend for the last few months and she became very miffed that the majority of her invitees showed little or no interest in attending.

So, she moved onto the "sneak attack" MLM party where she invites people over and they find out when they arrive that the main entertainment is the MLM consultant ("Girls night" turned out to be an Avon cosmetics sales party; "Margarita night" turned out to be a Party Time Mixes cocktail mix sales party; etc, etc).  This has apparently worked a surprising number of times, until somebody finally had the balls to just walk out at the beginning of the sales pitch which led to a mass exodus and zero sales.

So, the most recent variation was the "sneak & block" debacle: she had the consultant arrive last and "block in" the other cars to make it extremely awkward for people to leave before the MLM person had reached the end of the presentation.  Yeah, someone drove over their front lawn to leave.

As far as I can tell, a third of her friend group is no longer friendly with her over the whole sneak party issue, another third is planning an intervention (we can still be friends but none of us are ever coming to your house again, for any reason), and the final third apparently doesn't have an issue.


I'm sad that she's so trapped in the consumerist mindset that what she already owns is never enough, that she's willing to sacrifice her relationships with other people over the opportunity to get more stuff that doesn't do anything to make her happier.  I hope the friend intervention (or the loss of friends) serves as a wake-up call for her.

jeromedawg

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #191 on: May 30, 2017, 10:32:13 AM »
Horray!  SIL has finally "seen the light" and stated that she makes very little money from the MLM she was a rep for, especially on an hourly basis.   She will keep it up with the internet orders (no inventory), but will not market it any more.

Excited for you, although apparently the MLM bug has spread to my SIL.  She isn't a sales consultant (yet) but she's hooked on MLM referral programs that allow her to earn free merchandise for persuading people to make purchases at parties she hosts.  Fortunately, I live out of state so I'm out of the direct line of fire, but I still get included on all the Facebook invites (so that I feel included!  Haha!) and watching the drama unfold is like watching a train wreck.  I can't look away!

She's held a weekly MLM "purchase party" almost every weekend for the last few months and she became very miffed that the majority of her invitees showed little or no interest in attending.

So, she moved onto the "sneak attack" MLM party where she invites people over and they find out when they arrive that the main entertainment is the MLM consultant ("Girls night" turned out to be an Avon cosmetics sales party; "Margarita night" turned out to be a Party Time Mixes cocktail mix sales party; etc, etc).  This has apparently worked a surprising number of times, until somebody finally had the balls to just walk out at the beginning of the sales pitch which led to a mass exodus and zero sales.

So, the most recent variation was the "sneak & block" debacle: she had the consultant arrive last and "block in" the other cars to make it extremely awkward for people to leave before the MLM person had reached the end of the presentation.  Yeah, someone drove over their front lawn to leave.

As far as I can tell, a third of her friend group is no longer friendly with her over the whole sneak party issue, another third is planning an intervention (we can still be friends but none of us are ever coming to your house again, for any reason), and the final third apparently doesn't have an issue.


I'm sad that she's so trapped in the consumerist mindset that what she already owns is never enough, that she's willing to sacrifice her relationships with other people over the opportunity to get more stuff that doesn't do anything to make her happier.  I hope the friend intervention (or the loss of friends) serves as a wake-up call for her.

Whoa, that sounds *drastic*! Running over the lawn to escape!!! Like something out of a movie hahahaha. That is pretty awesome though. It's crazy how passive-aggressive someone can get over doing this sneak-parties and going as far as attempting to block them from leaving! No wonder she pissed all her "friends" off - I'd be furious too if my wife had a "friend" like that. Maybe she should get into used car sales :D

Goldielocks

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #192 on: May 30, 2017, 11:26:50 AM »
Excited for you, although apparently the MLM bug has spread to my SIL.  She isn't a sales consultant (yet) but she's hooked on MLM referral programs that allow her to earn free merchandise for persuading people to make purchases at parties she hosts.  ...

She's held a weekly MLM "purchase party" almost every weekend for the last few months and she became very miffed that the majority of her invitees showed little or no interest in attending.

So, she moved onto the "sneak attack" MLM party where she invites people over and they find out when they arrive that the main entertainment is the MLM consultant ("Girls night" turned out to be an Avon cosmetics sales party; "Margarita night" turned out to be a Party Time Mixes cocktail mix sales party; etc, etc).  This has apparently worked a surprising number of times, until somebody finally had the balls to just walk out at the beginning of the sales pitch which led to a mass exodus and zero sales.


This made me laugh!

pachnik

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #193 on: May 30, 2017, 11:31:41 AM »
Excited for you, although apparently the MLM bug has spread to my SIL.  She isn't a sales consultant (yet) but she's hooked on MLM referral programs that allow her to earn free merchandise for persuading people to make purchases at parties she hosts.  ...

She's held a weekly MLM "purchase party" almost every weekend for the last few months and she became very miffed that the majority of her invitees showed little or no interest in attending.

So, she moved onto the "sneak attack" MLM party where she invites people over and they find out when they arrive that the main entertainment is the MLM consultant ("Girls night" turned out to be an Avon cosmetics sales party; "Margarita night" turned out to be a Party Time Mixes cocktail mix sales party; etc, etc).  This has apparently worked a surprising number of times, until somebody finally had the balls to just walk out at the beginning of the sales pitch which led to a mass exodus and zero sales.


This made me laugh!

Me too.  But I also wonder what kind of a person basically uses their friends like this.  I can't imagine being invited somewhere without being told it was a MLM event.  Kind of like throwing your friends/family under the bus.   

dreadmoose

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #194 on: May 30, 2017, 12:37:43 PM »
It's funny how some have aligned with the FIRE goals that I am excited about.

I have a few friends (Juice+) that advertise constantly about being retired early (and their insanely healthy lifestyles due to fruit skin pills).

Is this what happens when you get enough down-lines, they stop allowing you to sell or increase them? I can't imagine it's sustainable long term, so why wouldn't they maximize as much as they can while it's big. Not to mention there appears to be mandatory conferences and "vacations" to business towns and hotel meeting rooms every week, so I question the authenticity of the ER dream.
Just starting on my FIRE journey, hopefully posting here creates accountability and eventually lowers my very anti-mustachian life habits.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #195 on: May 30, 2017, 02:48:30 PM »
It's funny how some have aligned with the FIRE goals that I am excited about.

I have a few friends (Juice+) that advertise constantly about being retired early (and their insanely healthy lifestyles due to fruit skin pills).

Is this what happens when you get enough down-lines, they stop allowing you to sell or increase them? I can't imagine it's sustainable long term, so why wouldn't they maximize as much as they can while it's big. Not to mention there appears to be mandatory conferences and "vacations" to business towns and hotel meeting rooms every week, so I question the authenticity of the ER dream.

I think the people who make money in direct marketing are either people with fantastic networks and few other delivery options who are able to avoid MLM schtick, or else MLM'ers who get in early on the ground floor so that everyone else is "downline". Aside from that it appears to me that the vast majority of money is in the "tools" sales, which is generally done through a separate company. That's who rakes in the green from all the mandatory conferences, tape of the week, and book of the month sales. A person could hit ER pretty well if they skipped any MLM involvement themselves and just focused on tools and motivational speeches.
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onehair

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #196 on: May 30, 2017, 03:18:10 PM »
I confess my brother is in an MLM it's called ACN.  He adores it and claims to make money off it.  My mother and I have agreed to support him but never buy from it or sell anything from it it's a fair compromise I think.  My stepfather dabbled in it too.  I used to be a half a**sed Avon rep when the one in my building left but after that business fell off and I became afraid of being busted for solicitation so I stopped since it's a federal building and people can be vindictive or turn you in off hand.



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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #197 on: May 30, 2017, 03:25:17 PM »
The sneak attack MLM party is the absolute worst!

Funny story: when I was engaged my husband was in the air force in Ohio, and I still lived in Texas for school. I visited him for 4 weeks in the summer. The second day I was there the women in his group of friends were all having a get together, and I was invited too. I had never met any of them. It was a sex toys sales party. I did not go. That was not how I wanted to meet the group. Even after I was good friends with them all, I still skipped the sex toys party. Call me a prude, or call me cheap. Either is true.

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #198 on: May 30, 2017, 03:48:00 PM »
The sneak attack MLM party is the absolute worst!

Funny story: when I was engaged my husband was in the air force in Ohio, and I still lived in Texas for school. I visited him for 4 weeks in the summer. The second day I was there the women in his group of friends were all having a get together, and I was invited too. I had never met any of them. It was a sex toys sales party. I did not go. That was not how I wanted to meet the group. Even after I was good friends with them all, I still skipped the sex toys party. Call me a prude, or call me cheap. Either is true.

Yuck. That's not how I'd want to meet other folks in a social circle either.

Having a mental image of a new friend using some of that stuff is just not my idea of social bonding. "Oh, that's Jeff, he's the one with the Hello Kitty butt plug." Meanwhile they'd all be thinking something similar about me: "I wonder what Grim is going to do with all of that scythe lube; it does seem like an excessive amount."

In fact, now that I think of it, I'd pay a significant (for me) amount of money to avoid that situation.
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dreadmoose

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Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #199 on: May 30, 2017, 03:48:27 PM »

I think the people who make money in direct marketing are either people with fantastic networks and few other delivery options who are able to avoid MLM schtick, or else MLM'ers who get in early on the ground floor so that everyone else is "downline". Aside from that it appears to me that the vast majority of money is in the "tools" sales, which is generally done through a separate company. That's who rakes in the green from all the mandatory conferences, tape of the week, and book of the month sales. A person could hit ER pretty well if they skipped any MLM involvement themselves and just focused on tools and motivational speeches.

I've always wondered how icky I would feel going this route. I have some family that swears by Primerica and the freedom it's given them (though I haven't noticed any overwhelming wealth and they all have multiple side-jobs going). I just can't imagine doing what they've done and charging to put people into overpriced insurance and mutual fund options. They've had multiple friends over the years simply "disappear" after huge falling outs and I think I know why..

That said, what kicked me into looking in to better investment options and eventually to MMM was when I inquired about money I'd invested from my first job at 13 and noticed MER's around 4%. Nothing like legally stealing money from a child (luckily it didn't sour me to investing altogether).
Just starting on my FIRE journey, hopefully posting here creates accountability and eventually lowers my very anti-mustachian life habits.