Author Topic: More House Hunters foolishness  (Read 18114 times)

Jrr85

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #50 on: May 15, 2017, 10:54:02 AM »
Holmes is amazing, but if every house was built to his standard, they would all cost millions.

The problem is that, for most buyers, it simply doesn't matter. They might claim that they care about quality, but in the end it's location, amenities, and price. I built homes that would occasionally have inspectors saying things like, "it's been twenty or thirty years since I saw a place wired this well", or "I'm got nothing to gain by telling you this, and I'm not blowing smoke here, but you do some of the best work I have ever seen"  In the end, decades of doing that kind of work made some customers who are long time friends, got me a bit of business from other pros, and left me with a product that I could be proud of. The average customer simply doesn't give a shit how well a place is built. I have dealt with hundreds, maybe thousands, of potential customers while holding open houses for my spec. homes.  Very, very few care about quality as a top factor in pulling the trigger on a new home. Many appreciate it, but will not spend a dime more because it's there. Others will flat out tell you that it really doesn't matter.  As for costs, it's quite possible to build a superior product in a normal budget range, but it involves good choices, and competent management on site.  Unfortunately, the entire process ensures that neither are likely.

I would say the average buyer doesn't have a clue how to assess quality.  Most just want to see high end finishes.  Whatever their checklist is, hardwood floor, granite/marble countertops, crown molding, stainless steel, etc., is what matters.  They have an idea about what a nice house should look like and as long as they have those finishes, they assume that the other stuff is taken care of by being good enough to pass code inspection (or maybe they don't think about it at all).  A lot of buyers don't even notice obviously shoddy finish work on the things they care about. 

Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #51 on: May 15, 2017, 11:23:22 AM »
^This.^ DH has mad contracting skills and can read a house like a book. We brake for Open Houses and enjoy a good BRRR or Flip on occasion. We often see the most ridiculous work and then have a good laugh at how much over asking the dogshit house sells for.

Our immediate neighbors are building their dream house and things are not going well. From our vantage point, we see all kinds of not-good things happening. For example, two of the skylights are fine, but the third one is flashed incorrectly. DH has mentioned a couple of things to the neighbor, but he's been ignored. Now our lips are firmly zipped. I'm sure it will look lovely once it's done, but Dog help them and the future buyers.
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zolotiyeruki

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #52 on: May 15, 2017, 11:50:39 AM »
So here's my question: how does one go about finding tradesmen like paddedhat?  I wish there were some sort of online resource for guiding the discerning homeowner (or potential homeowner) towards contractors and trades that care about quality workmanship.

Tasty Pinecones

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #53 on: May 15, 2017, 01:22:29 PM »
Yes - b/c around here all the good ones seem to be very busy. I guess we'll have to wait until the next recession to hire people to do a couple of projects for us. ;)

Rural

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #54 on: May 15, 2017, 02:33:54 PM »
I can tell you that living in a house that's well built feels very different. We would have cared, but could never have afforded to pay someone else to do it right.

meghan88

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #55 on: May 15, 2017, 02:48:01 PM »
Re. House Hunters foolishness, how often have you heard any of the following on that show:

- ooh look honey, this walk-in closet is HUGE!! (*giggles*) but you'll need to find some other place to put your clothes because I'll need all this room for my shoes, bags and things
- ooh, look at the soaker tub - let's climb in with our shoes on and see if we fit!
- ooh, look at that ugly [pink/blue/whatever] paint on that wall - I can't live here!
- oh no ... only one sink in the bathroom ... that's a deal-breaker
- we have a 10K downpayment and we've been approved for an 400K mortgage, so our budget is 410K
- this place is 45 minutes further away from my job, but look at how nice and big this place is!

iowajes

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #56 on: May 15, 2017, 07:10:30 PM »
I can tell you that living in a house that's well built feels very different. We would have cared, but could never have afforded to pay someone else to do it right.

A nearly identical house to ours was available for almost $40k less. We could tell why. The Realtor could literally shake the gutters loose, and what looked like similar finishes were not as well installed.

But in one episode Holmes put a house in tornado alley and built it entirely of concrete. A concrete safe room is sufficient. All concrete houses would cost insane amounts compared to standard framing. (A neighbor actually has one. It cost 50% more than our house by square footage.)

LeRainDrop

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #57 on: May 15, 2017, 07:44:12 PM »
So here's my question: how does one go about finding tradesmen like paddedhat?  I wish there were some sort of online resource for guiding the discerning homeowner (or potential homeowner) towards contractors and trades that care about quality workmanship.

I'd love to know about this, too.

Yes - b/c around here all the good ones seem to be very busy. I guess we'll have to wait until the next recession to hire people to do a couple of projects for us. ;)

So true.  Right now, it's next to impossible to get a good contractor, vendor, or building consultant on site.  They all have other clients with bigger, more lucrative projects.  Ugh.

Re. House Hunters foolishness, how often have you heard any of the following on that show: . . . .

You're spot on!

startingsmall

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #58 on: May 15, 2017, 08:01:27 PM »
Holmes is amazing, but if every house was built to his standard, they would all cost millions.

The problem is that, for most buyers, it simply doesn't matter. They might claim that they care about quality, but in the end it's location, amenities, and price. I built homes that would occasionally have inspectors saying things like, "it's been twenty or thirty years since I saw a place wired this well", or "I'm got nothing to gain by telling you this, and I'm not blowing smoke here, but you do some of the best work I have ever seen"  In the end, decades of doing that kind of work made some customers who are long time friends, got me a bit of business from other pros, and left me with a product that I could be proud of. The average customer simply doesn't give a shit how well a place is built. I have dealt with hundreds, maybe thousands, of potential customers while holding open houses for my spec. homes.  Very, very few care about quality as a top factor in pulling the trigger on a new home. Many appreciate it, but will not spend a dime more because it's there. Others will flat out tell you that it really doesn't matter.  As for costs, it's quite possible to build a superior product in a normal budget range, but it involves good choices, and competent management on site.  Unfortunately, the entire process ensures that neither are likely.

I would say the average buyer doesn't have a clue how to assess quality.  Most just want to see high end finishes.  Whatever their checklist is, hardwood floor, granite/marble countertops, crown molding, stainless steel, etc., is what matters.  They have an idea about what a nice house should look like and as long as they have those finishes, they assume that the other stuff is taken care of by being good enough to pass code inspection (or maybe they don't think about it at all).  A lot of buyers don't even notice obviously shoddy finish work on the things they care about.

I would love for our next house to be a well-built house. I just need to figure out how to identify that.

Hell, I'd love to know if our current house is a well-built house. Overall, the quality seems pretty good, but the floors seem kind of iffy. There's one area of the house where the subfloor noticeably 'pops' when you walk on it  (at one end of the hallway connecting the secondary bedrooms and in approx 25% of the bedroom that's at that end of the hallway). In my daughter's room, footsteps anywhere in the room will cause items to rattle on her bookshelf (I'm a bit overweight, but seriously?!). Walking past our dresser in our bedroom causes the dresser mirror to shake pretty visibly. I feel like all of that is a bit excessive for a house that's less than 20 years old, but my husband says I'm just spoiled by growing up in Florida, where houses were typically built on a slab.

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #59 on: May 15, 2017, 08:30:07 PM »
So here's my question: how does one go about finding tradesmen like paddedhat?  I wish there were some sort of online resource for guiding the discerning homeowner (or potential homeowner) towards contractors and trades that care about quality workmanship.

I'm no sure if others found it to be the case in their specific market area, but where I did business, there was a clear set of events over the last decade that really and truly struck a death blow to the concept of having a long term supply of competent trades people. During my career, for the two decades up to the start of the great recession, for the most part I had a supply of great local subcontractors who really had skin it the game. Often because they were local multi-generational  framers, roofers, etc.... who had a stake in their local community. In the beginning of the 2000s many of these guys started to take hits from two different directions. First, our society places little value on being a tradesman, so it became more difficult for guys to convince their sons to "follow in their footsteps". When you're a kid in high school, and all you ever hear is that you will be nothing without a degree, it becomes obvious to you that working hard, swinging a hammer like dad does,  is about as far from success as it gets. Second many of the trades were severely undercut by illegals. You might be a local sheetrocker who is now third generation, and literally been at it since the shit was invented, but now you are competing with a labor force that works for a fraction of what you need to keep your decent standard of living going. Neither of these issues were absolute game changers, and everybody marched forward and did the best they could.

Then the recession hits. It hit like Katrina in my area. Two years in, and local new housing starts are down by 92% and stayed that way for several years. Now the real local craftsman are on the ropes. You have the older guys who say, screw this, it's time to retire. The next generation, the 25-55 Y.O group, ends up leaving the trades for anything reliable with a steady check.  Things like solid jobs in local school district, or municipal maintenance operations. Lots of these guys also become truck drivers. The job might suck, but they have families to feed, and it pays well and is reliable. Like we discussed, the under 25  crowd already baled before they got started. The other problem, as a general contractor,  is that the illegals held on as long as they could, but 3-4 years in, and there gone too. So, now it's 2011, 12, 13 and it's quite a wilderness out there. It's tough to find help, and it's tougher to find talented help that gives a shit.

BY the end of 2013 I had enough Cheddar stacked that I  gave up. I don't regret it for a minute, but I can't imagine how hard it would be to try to start again, in that area, and actually build a decent product. Not impossible, but painful, especially if you know how it used to be, and not too terribly long ago. The interesting part is that there are now huge unfilled opportunities out there that are just waiting for competent honest tradespeople to fill. I know several guys who are young and smart enough to go out on their own doing service work, plumbing, electrical, HVAC  and ended up with very successful businesses while still in their twenties. Fifteen years ago they would of had a huge struggle competing with all the other small players, now the work is ther for the picking. Their competition is gone, and it's either deal with an honest, well regarded local guy, or call some high pressure, low ethics outfit that spends tons on advertising, and will screw you hard if they can.

Rowellen

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #60 on: May 15, 2017, 08:51:54 PM »
Re. House Hunters foolishness, how often have you heard any of the following on that show:

- ooh look honey, this walk-in closet is HUGE!! (*giggles*) but you'll need to find some other place to put your clothes because I'll need all this room for my shoes, bags and things
- ooh, look at the soaker tub - let's climb in with our shoes on and see if we fit!
- ooh, look at that ugly [pink/blue/whatever] paint on that wall - I can't live here!
- oh no ... only one sink in the bathroom ... that's a deal-breaker
- we have a 10K downpayment and we've been approved for an 400K mortgage, so our budget is 410K
- this place is 45 minutes further away from my job, but look at how nice and big this place is!

My favourite is tiny house hunters saying, "it's so tiiiiiiny". For some reason this annoys my husband. I think it's hilarious.

Rural

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2017, 02:41:50 PM »
I can tell you that living in a house that's well built feels very different. We would have cared, but could never have afforded to pay someone else to do it right.

A nearly identical house to ours was available for almost $40k less. We could tell why. The Realtor could literally shake the gutters loose, and what looked like similar finishes were not as well installed.

But in one episode Holmes put a house in tornado alley and built it entirely of concrete. A concrete safe room is sufficient. All concrete houses would cost insane amounts compared to standard framing. (A neighbor actually has one. It cost 50% more than our house by square footage.)


Ours is poured concrete and bermed on three sides, so yes, I know what you mean.

talltexan

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #62 on: May 18, 2017, 07:50:26 AM »
I'm intrigued by the Berm-house, but our last house had some issues with flooding in the basement, so convincing my wife to go with a house that's basically all-basement is a non-starter.

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #63 on: May 18, 2017, 03:13:58 PM »
I'm intrigued by the Berm-house, but our last house had some issues with flooding in the basement, so convincing my wife to go with a house that's basically all-basement is a non-starter.

It's a shame to suffer from somebody else's bad design and or construction. Twice in my career I saw homes that were essentially built on a flowing spring, and had dry basements. The first one was one of mine. We hit a very large spring within a few feet of the basement, while digging the water line. The five foot deep trench filled so fast that it was tough to jump out in time. We continue the trench downhill, and took it out to daylight.  It then was filled with small gravel before covering with dirt. It created a lovely small stream, bubbling out of the grass,  well away from the house. The basement remains bone dry.  In another case the spring was inside the footprint of the house, but with decent drainage and some slight changes to the foundation, it too is still dry.

I really like berm houses, and they can be done well, and remain dry, but it takes a bit more diligence in design and implementation.

Rural

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #64 on: May 19, 2017, 03:42:42 AM »
Yep, good French drains all around for runoff (we're built into a hill) and 4“ gravel under the slab (which should be standard but isn't always). Bermed to direct water away from the walls and French drains. We've been in five years now and no hint of water incursions.


The place is designed as a full earth shelter though we went with a metal roof for cost reasons instead of burying it (fortuitous decision as we had to jackhammer one corner into the rock as it was - a couple feet deeper word really have sucked). But the south wall, the one above grade, is almost all windows, with an inset courtyard for light in the back of the house. The roof overhangs are designed for shade in summer, and it works- we stay cool in summer and have passive solar heat in winter.

Spiffy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #65 on: May 19, 2017, 11:27:22 AM »

[/quote]
----
I used to wonder if Chip Gaines was making commissions on the houses they feature, but since learning that the buyer must already have a house under contract, I don't think so.
---
[/quote]

Just watching an episode of Fixer Upper and Chip was wearing a shirt with Magnolia Realty.  He's a founder and co-owner.

 https://www.magnoliarealty.com/
[/quote]

Yeah, that's part of how he got his start after college/marriage. Interesting side note about them - they have never owned a TV.
[/quote]o
Well, you don't need a TV to watch stuff. I have heard Joanna in person say how much the kids like to watch themselves on the show. I am outing myself-yes, I live in Waco. And now two of Chip's "friends" are suing him because he bought them out of their share of Magnolia realty super cheap right before he announced they got he HGTV show. And a lot of the people on the show have lived in the house for years and only pretend to but it on the show. And they strong arm people to spend way more than they wanted to originally. And most of the houses from the first and second season are rentals now, because they weren't the worst house in the best neighborhood. They are just a cheap house in a bad neighborhood and no one wants to live there. Some are in just regular neighborhoods, but the spend so much redoing them, I doubt that in a few years when people are tired of Fixxer Upper, they could sell it and get their money back out. One of them is around the corner from my house. They paid about what it was worth but then put so much more into it it would never sell for even close to what they paid for it. And last week the Magnolia Trucks were parked there again. Redoing work that wasn't right the first time. Apparently it happens a lot. They get sued for it all the time. My cousin was a contractor for them but finally quit because he couldn't stand them any more.

Spiffy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #66 on: May 23, 2017, 11:16:00 AM »
I seemed to have killed this thread by spewing vitriol on Chip and Joanna. I am sorry (but they annoy me).

Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #67 on: May 23, 2017, 11:31:20 PM »
I seemed to have killed this thread by spewing vitriol on Chip and Joanna. I am sorry (but they annoy me).
Hyperbole is known to annoy people here. So is confusing anecdotes for data. Saying things like "They get sued for it all the time." with no proof kind of puts people off, too. While everyone's opinion is welcome, as long it's expressed reasonably politely, a bunch of unsupported accusations isn't going to get much traction.

Seriously, why would it be anyone's concern if Chip and Joanna Gaines annoy you? They seem to be mostly self made and very hard working. Those are badass traits that are generally admired in this crowd. I read your vitriol when it was originally posted and decided to ignore it, but since you posted again, here are my two pennies.
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paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #68 on: May 24, 2017, 09:25:06 AM »
Given the generally poor credibility of the  cable tv "fixer upper craze", with questionable versions of reality,  frequent news pieces on issues, lawsuits, and unhappiness in the local community, I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss spiffy's comments. Especially based on your version of what's acceptable dialog here.

A few things I have noted, as somebody who has done this for a living.

#1. They, particularly in the early years of the show, gravitate toward extraordinarily cheap properties in need of huge amounts of work. Now Waco may very well be an undiscovered gem, where property values are exploding, yet quaint, rehab-able Victorians are going for $35K, in great neighborhoods, or not. Personally I doubt it. Even in more recent episodes, careful camera work can't  hide the fact that they are showing some potential homes that are in commercial and industrial areas, which perhaps explains the extremely low valuations.

#2 Overall, I believe that they are a higher caliber of reality star than most, but they are far from controversy free. The huge commercial project they undertook had a lot of bad press, with neighbors bitterly complaining of everything from traffic to  exploding tax assessments base on the city's belief that the Gaines had created a gold mine, and the other businesses in the area were now worth much more.

#3  As a long term builder in a LCOL area, I'm not buying their budgets.  "Well, we are going to stabilize this 400 sq. ft. falling down addition and turn it in to a dream kitchen, so that's $25K of your budget". Sorry, but no.

Your determination that they are to be admired may be correct, but if they are anything like most who came before them in the cable game, there is far more to the story than you and I will even know, and it might tarnish your overall positive opinion of the whole deal if you had access to the whole truth.

SwordGuy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #69 on: May 24, 2017, 09:30:23 AM »

Yes - b/c around here all the good ones seem to be very busy. I guess we'll have to wait until the next recession to hire people to do a couple of projects for us. ;)

So true.  Right now, it's next to impossible to get a good contractor, vendor, or building consultant on site.  They all have other clients with bigger, more lucrative projects.  Ugh.

Make friends with landlords or builders who know the good workmen.  Then have them ask the contractors to help you out.


jinga nation

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #70 on: May 24, 2017, 09:33:12 AM »
#1. They, particularly in the early years of the show, gravitate toward extraordinarily cheap properties in need of huge amounts of work. Now Waco may very well be an undiscovered gem, where property values are exploding, yet quaint, rehab-able Victorians are going for $35K, in great neighborhoods, or not. Personally I doubt it. Even in more recent episodes, careful camera work can't  hide the fact that they are showing some potential homes that are in commercial and industrial areas, which perhaps explains the extremely low valuations.
While getting my teeth cleaned yesterday, I was flipping through the channels and saw that there was a house purchased for $580,000. I don't know what the renovation budget was. I was under the impression that there's lots of land in Waco and houses/land is cheap. Not anymore I guess.
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Chris22

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #71 on: May 24, 2017, 09:49:40 AM »
Holmes is amazing, but if every house was built to his standard, they would all cost millions.

The problem is that, for most buyers, it simply doesn't matter. They might claim that they care about quality, but in the end it's location, amenities, and price. I built homes that would occasionally have inspectors saying things like, "it's been twenty or thirty years since I saw a place wired this well", or "I'm got nothing to gain by telling you this, and I'm not blowing smoke here, but you do some of the best work I have ever seen"  In the end, decades of doing that kind of work made some customers who are long time friends, got me a bit of business from other pros, and left me with a product that I could be proud of. The average customer simply doesn't give a shit how well a place is built. I have dealt with hundreds, maybe thousands, of potential customers while holding open houses for my spec. homes.  Very, very few care about quality as a top factor in pulling the trigger on a new home. Many appreciate it, but will not spend a dime more because it's there. Others will flat out tell you that it really doesn't matter.  As for costs, it's quite possible to build a superior product in a normal budget range, but it involves good choices, and competent management on site.  Unfortunately, the entire process ensures that neither are likely.

As well it should be, no?  That's generally the only thing that can't be changed.  I've lived in a great house in a crap location and a less great house in a great location and let me tell you the location is the thing that really drives quality of life day in and day out. 

I also think there's a diminishing return on certain things.  You said inspectors tell you 'it's been twenty or thirty years since I saw a place wired this well'; I mean, that's cool and all, but as a homeowner, as long as my house is wired to code, what am I getting for all that perfect wiring?  More outlets and switches?  Or it's just prettier inside the wall where I never hope to see it anyways?   
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Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #72 on: May 24, 2017, 11:25:09 AM »
Given the generally poor credibility of the  cable tv "fixer upper craze", with questionable versions of reality,  frequent news pieces on issues, lawsuits, and unhappiness in the local community, I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss spiffy's comments. Especially based on your version of what's acceptable dialog here.

A few things I have noted, as somebody who has done this for a living.

#1. They, particularly in the early years of the show, gravitate toward extraordinarily cheap properties in need of huge amounts of work. Now Waco may very well be an undiscovered gem, where property values are exploding, yet quaint, rehab-able Victorians are going for $35K, in great neighborhoods, or not. Personally I doubt it. Even in more recent episodes, careful camera work can't  hide the fact that they are showing some potential homes that are in commercial and industrial areas, which perhaps explains the extremely low valuations.

#2 Overall, I believe that they are a higher caliber of reality star than most, but they are far from controversy free. The huge commercial project they undertook had a lot of bad press, with neighbors bitterly complaining of everything from traffic to  exploding tax assessments base on the city's belief that the Gaines had created a gold mine, and the other businesses in the area were now worth much more.

#3  As a long term builder in a LCOL area, I'm not buying their budgets.  "Well, we are going to stabilize this 400 sq. ft. falling down addition and turn it in to a dream kitchen, so that's $25K of your budget". Sorry, but no.

Your determination that they are to be admired may be correct, but if they are anything like most who came before them in the cable game, there is far more to the story than you and I will even know, and it might tarnish your overall positive opinion of the whole deal if you had access to the whole truth.
I don't disagree with you at all paddedhat! I disagreed with spiffy's unsubstantiated snark. Not the same thing. Reality TV is, after all, Reality TV. Why would anyone expect home improvement reality shows to be any more realistic than anything featuring housewives, polygamists, bachelors, singers, dancers, ad nauseum.
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paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #73 on: May 24, 2017, 01:20:55 PM »
Holmes is amazing, but if every house was built to his standard, they would all cost millions.

I also think there's a diminishing return on certain things.  You said inspectors tell you 'it's been twenty or thirty years since I saw a place wired this well'; I mean, that's cool and all, but as a homeowner, as long as my house is wired to code, what am I getting for all that perfect wiring?  More outlets and switches?  Or it's just prettier inside the wall where I never hope to see it anyways?

You get dozens of things that are to your benefit, and result in a system that is not now, nor will ever be,  overloaded, and is far more durable and less like to require expensive repairs.  You also get things that may save your life.  A few highlights include interconnected 120v /battery back up smoke alarms in all major rooms, and all bedrooms, not just one in the hall outside the bedroom doors. Smoke alarms in unfinished basements and crawl spaces.  Dedicated circuits for all kitchen loads. GFCI breaker on a dedicated circuit covering exterior receptacles, which prevent having to search the entire property to determine where the GFCI outlet that protects the rear deck receptacle is hidden. Properly spliced junction behind receptacles at wall boxes, instead of the sorry-assed practice of "push wiring" the conductors into the back of the receptacle. This alone will prevent an expensive visit by a service electrician at some point in the life of the house. Proper identification and marking of the main panel, and large switches, or disconnects, and exposed junction boxes with printed permanent labels. You get quality products from top shelf manufacturers, like SQ. D and Hubbell, not a shit grade undersized electrical panel from a  bargain brand. "Spec grade" commercial rated switches, receptacles, GFCI outlets, and unbreakable nylon covers. Fan rated ceiling boxes, wiring and switching in all major rooms for future ceiling fans and lights. Coax to all bedrooms, living room, family room. Any underground wiring to the well pump, outside lighting etc... run in conduit. Switched closet lights in all bedrooms. Recessed lighting in baths, halls and kitchen. undercounter lighting in kitchen.

Overall, you get a light commercial grade job, done to high installation standards, and something that is easily recognizable by other pros and inspectors. It's a tremendous long term benefit to the homeowner, and you are right, in the end it means absolutely nothing. I won't do it any other way, and over the years I've met a small handful other others who do the same. But it's done to do the right thing, not because it pays well, or sells a home.

 At the other extreme an install that sticks to strict code minimums is actually a pretty sorry place to live.  Multiple bedrooms on one circuit, no closet lighting, no under-counter lighting, no overhead fans or lighting in the bedrooms. Outlets stretched to the maximum spacing allowed. Cheap fixtures, worthless bathroom fans, no requirement to rough in ANY phone/data/coax etc.....  Yea, there is a huge difference, but as you say, people buy that crap every day of the week, and spend the next few years figuring out that they got screwed. Nothing like watching the cable guy pulling vinyl siding off a brand new house to hide TV cable, since the builder couldn't be bother to rough it in while the place was being built. Or, speeding $300 to have a repair electrician try to figure out why half the house is dark since a hot wire  broke off the back of a push wired $0.59 receptacle that was installed by a semi-skilled, $10 HR helper.

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #74 on: May 24, 2017, 01:33:23 PM »

I don't disagree with you at all paddedhat! I disagreed with spiffy's unsubstantiated snark. Not the same thing. Reality TV is, after all, Reality TV. Why would anyone expect home improvement reality shows to be any more realistic than anything featuring housewives, polygamists, bachelors, singers, dancers, ad nauseum.

Well if that's your issue, I would disagree. Not only was spiffy's post interesting, and provided details from somebody who actually lives right in the middle of an ongoing reality show, your comments directed at him are needless and elitist. When the conversation degrades to a tone of.  "where is your proof?  Why are you talking about lawsuits without citing case numbers, and a brief synopsis of each?  Did I miss your footnotes?  Not only does it result in eye rolling on the part of a lot of readers, but it drips of elitism. "unsubstantiated snark." seriously?  This isn't a law review journal.

Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #75 on: May 24, 2017, 09:44:18 PM »

I don't disagree with you at all paddedhat! I disagreed with spiffy's unsubstantiated snark. Not the same thing. Reality TV is, after all, Reality TV. Why would anyone expect home improvement reality shows to be any more realistic than anything featuring housewives, polygamists, bachelors, singers, dancers, ad nauseum.

Well if that's your issue, I would disagree. Not only was spiffy's post interesting, and provided details from somebody who actually lives right in the middle of an ongoing reality show, your comments directed at him are needless and elitist. When the conversation degrades to a tone of.  "where is your proof?  Why are you talking about lawsuits without citing case numbers, and a brief synopsis of each?  Did I miss your footnotes?  Not only does it result in eye rolling on the part of a lot of readers, but it drips of elitism. "unsubstantiated snark." seriously?  This isn't a law review journal.
TL;DR Alert: This is long. If you agree with paddedhat's comment above, you can just skip it.

I can't figure out how asking for facts qualifies as elitism. But I respect your opinion, paddedhat, and your words piqued my curiosity, so I looked it up. Most definitions were too brief to be useful, so what the hell, here's the whole entry from Wikipedia:

"Elitism is the belief or attitude that individuals who form an elite—a select group of people with a certain ancestry, intrinsic quality, high intellect, wealth, specialized training, experience, distinctive attributes, whose influence or authority is greater than that of others, whose views on a matter are to be taken more seriously, whose views or actions are more likely to be constructive to society as a whole, or whose extraordinary skills, abilities, or wisdom render them especially fit to govern. In America, the term "elitism" often refers to the concentration of power on the Northeast Corridor and West Coast, where the typical American elite - lawyers, doctors, high-level civil servants (such as White House aides), businesspeople, university lecturers, entrepreneurs and financial advisors in the quarternary sector - reside, often in the university towns they graduated from.

Alternatively, the term elitism may be used to describe a situation in which power is concentrated in the hands of a limited number of people. Oppositions of elitism include anti-elitism, egalitarianism, populism and political theory of pluralism. Elite theory is the sociological or political science analysis of elite influence in society: elite theorists regard pluralism as a utopian ideal.

'Elitism' also refers to situations in which an individual assumes special 'privileges' and responsibilities in the hope that this arrangement will benefit humanity or themselves. Elitism is closely related to social class and what sociologists call social stratification. Members of the upper classes are sometimes known as the social elite. The term elitism is also sometimes used to denote situations in which a group of people claiming to possess high abilities or simply an in-group or cadre grant themselves extra privileges at the expense of others. This form of elitism may be described as discrimination."

I still don't see a connection...maybe we'll just have to agree to politely disagree, paddedhat.
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paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #76 on: May 25, 2017, 06:08:34 AM »
Jesus, did the butler help you with your morning jacket, before retiring to the parlor with your leather bound, signed copy of your Oxford English Dictionary, to respond?  You once again missed the point. Who gives a rat's ass hair if I used the word elitist? Would pompous, bombastic, or self-righteous, be more suitable? Personally, I don't care for those words, as they turn a minor disagreement into a personal attack rather than an issue with tone. Which IMHO, something than a few members here can be guilty of.  It's the tone of your needless reply to Spiffy's comments that's the issue. He lives in a small town that is the center of a very successful real estate based reality show. He contributed his personal observations, and the opinion of somebody that  far more knowledgeable about the show than the rest of us commoners who reside in places other than Waco. TX.

IF spiffy was holding himself out to be an authority on a subject and presenting unsustainable opinion and undocumented claims, then your comments would be in keeping with the caliber of the information provided. In this case it was a local providing a bit of background gossip on a reality show of all things...................Ironic, perhaps? 

This is an odd place full of everything from lonely male engineers with the social skill set of a houseplant, to folks who just stumbled in the room, desperately hoping to find a solution to the crushing debt of our consumer madness, while making little income, and lacking the tools to even understand the problem. When anybody attacks another contributor based on their post not meeting standards, it creates a silent trail of folks moving on, since they don't want to be contributing, or even learning at a place where their opinion is unacceptable to the self appointed arbitrators.

Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #77 on: May 25, 2017, 06:20:18 AM »
Why is asking for facts, or in this case, substantiation of accusations, striking such a nerve with you, sir?
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paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #78 on: May 25, 2017, 06:30:23 AM »
Why is asking for facts, or in this case, substantiation of accusations, striking such a nerve with you, sir?


If you can't read all that I have carefully written, and comprehend my disdain with you attitude towards others here, then my replies are  nothing but wasted space on the forum, and shortening the life of my keyboard.  By the way, please don't flatter yourself with the delusion that you have "struck a nerve". Oh, and here's a tidbit, since dealing with the commoners seems to be a bit of a struggle, save the "sir" bit for the lads at the club. 

twbird18

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #79 on: May 25, 2017, 09:51:56 AM »

----
I used to wonder if Chip Gaines was making commissions on the houses they feature, but since learning that the buyer must already have a house under contract, I don't think so.
---
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Just watching an episode of Fixer Upper and Chip was wearing a shirt with Magnolia Realty.  He's a founder and co-owner.

 https://www.magnoliarealty.com/
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Yeah, that's part of how he got his start after college/marriage. Interesting side note about them - they have never owned a TV.
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Well, you don't need a TV to watch stuff. I have heard Joanna in person say how much the kids like to watch themselves on the show. I am outing myself-yes, I live in Waco. And now two of Chip's "friends" are suing him because he bought them out of their share of Magnolia realty super cheap right before he announced they got he HGTV show. And a lot of the people on the show have lived in the house for years and only pretend to but it on the show. And they strong arm people to spend way more than they wanted to originally. And most of the houses from the first and second season are rentals now, because they weren't the worst house in the best neighborhood. They are just a cheap house in a bad neighborhood and no one wants to live there. Some are in just regular neighborhoods, but the spend so much redoing them, I doubt that in a few years when people are tired of Fixxer Upper, they could sell it and get their money back out. One of them is around the corner from my house. They paid about what it was worth but then put so much more into it it would never sell for even close to what they paid for it. And last week the Magnolia Trucks were parked there again. Redoing work that wasn't right the first time. Apparently it happens a lot. They get sued for it all the time. My cousin was a contractor for them but finally quit because he couldn't stand them any more.

Honestly, I thought this was common knowledge - the only reason I knew the thing about the TV is I got their book with a bunch of other random bios from a black friday sale & they talk about watching it with friends. It's reality TV, none of it is true. They make interesting TV (or at least interesting enough given what I have to choose from in the middle of the day that I'm allowed to watch at work). The fact that they are being sued by their old partners right now is in the news.

Back on topic, sort of:

I am currently watching Grand Designs on Netflix & cannot believe the level of dedication people have to getting a house built a certain way in a certain episode. In episode 2(which I guess is season 13), the people spend ~4 yrs building a house for 1M pounds on ~ a tenth of an acre, but I mean why retire when you can spend your life savings on a house, right?

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #80 on: May 25, 2017, 01:17:35 PM »
Padded,

Just a Q, and I know it's kind of a silly Q because of all the factors, but what's the cost differential between a good quality job and a standard builder job? Definitely on board with most of what you list off. One of the things that probably puts you at odds with the HGTV folk is putting in stuff for overhead fans: Drew from PB doesn't even think houses should have overhead fans.

Would've loved to have a home that's properly built from the get-go, no idea what one would even cost today. All the new homes around me are in the 800k+ range for 3500 sq ft. These are on parcels that already have old homes and are purchased for 400k: I imagine homes on the lower-end are basically crap with nice finishes. Can't imagine how much it would cost to build a quality 3500 sq ft. Thoughts?

Interesting to see what my friends value, now that they are all buying homes. Most are sucked up by flashy finishes, most of which I imagine will not age well. One recently bought a ranch with only a half-basement. They could've gotten a larger ranch, with basement, on a better, larger lot, right down the street, for $50k less. I don't get that one personally. I haven't walked through the home, but looking at pictures the finishes look like they're going to scuff up like a department store dress shoe. One went massively over budget to buy a home with a major foundation crack and apparently a sealing problem, since their basement flooded badly the first year they bought the home.

Also curious about your thoughts on the best improvements for the older building stock....which I guess also depends on year and region. I know my friend is at war with his galvanized steel plumbing. Another has a house from what looks like the 70s, and is upgrading all the windows as his major priority.

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #81 on: May 25, 2017, 02:19:01 PM »
There are many significant issues with assigning value to any non-standard construction. First, obviously all real estate is local. I spent my career in a very LCOL area, and weathered the great recession, from which my market never recovered, so my numbers would look positively ridiculous in your market. Second, values are often driven by the bank. If it doesn't appraise on paper, even from blueprints, for many (most?) it's a project that will never even get started. My gut feeling however, is that building a really solid place, where all the additional funds are directed to the "bones" of the structure and mechanicals of a home, is probably a 15-20% bump. This would be a top to bottom upgrade. Poured foundation, top grade drainage, rubber exterior coating, spray foamed interior. Framing with I joist floors, Advantech, fir plywood sheathing, etc... Mechanicals to commercial standards, high level energy efficiency in everything from insulation to windows, doors. A fifty year roof, fifty year siding, etc..

I didn't know that anybody in the world of TV construction had an issue with ceiling fans? Kind of like odd. But remember, you are talking about a guy who looks at a wreck and says  "I need six weeks and seventy grand to make this a palace"  Cough, cough, me  muttering "Bullshit" under my breath.

As for older places. I have one now, a mid-century modern ranch in  a "To die for" location. That said, owning something like this is like getting handed a pillow case full of something that's wiggling around. It could be kittens, or snakes. You never know until you are the proud owner. In my case it turned out to be exterior walls of plaster on block, with a brick exterior. Durable, but totally unsuitable for a mid-atlantic climate. Much of the attic is insulated with 2" thick 1955 era. "pillows" about 4' long and 2" thick, They are made of craft paper with a thin piece of fiberglass insulation inside. They are as close to useless as it gets, and they crumble to little bits as you handle them.  When it comes to galvanized plumbing, it tends to be a lost cause after half a century of use in most locations. The best bet is to tear it out. PEX is very DIY friendly, and  glued CPVC is stupid easy. The most important part of buying old to really old homes is to have a really knowledgable pro. on hand to tell you if it has any deal breaking issues. You don't want to be dropping tens of thousands in rescue work for failed foundations, total mechanical replacements,  or other real big issues, since it's all money down the drain. It might need to be done, but it needs to be completed and paid for by the seller, not you. Good luck.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #82 on: May 25, 2017, 02:53:17 PM »
My gut feeling however, is that building a really solid place, where all the additional funds are directed to the "bones" of the structure and mechanicals of a home, is probably a 15-20% bump. This would be a top to bottom upgrade. Poured foundation, top grade drainage, rubber exterior coating, spray foamed interior. Framing with I joist floors, Advantech, fir plywood sheathing, etc... Mechanicals to commercial standards, high level energy efficiency in everything from insulation to windows, doors. A fifty year roof, fifty year siding, etc..
15-20%?  I'm sold.  It might not pay off on paper, but just think of all the things you wouldn't have to worry about!

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #83 on: May 25, 2017, 03:46:15 PM »
My gut feeling however, is that building a really solid place, where all the additional funds are directed to the "bones" of the structure and mechanicals of a home, is probably a 15-20% bump. This would be a top to bottom upgrade. Poured foundation, top grade drainage, rubber exterior coating, spray foamed interior. Framing with I joist floors, Advantech, fir plywood sheathing, etc... Mechanicals to commercial standards, high level energy efficiency in everything from insulation to windows, doors. A fifty year roof, fifty year siding, etc..
15-20%?  I'm sold.  It might not pay off on paper, but just think of all the things you wouldn't have to worry about!

I grew up in slate roof country. The family home is a 1915 four square, solid brick with a black slate roof. Amortizing the cost of that exterior, over a century, and adding the fact that it has been about as close to maintenance free as it gets, is a pretty interesting thought. My folks were there for forty years, and even adjusted to today's dollars, there is no way they spent anything close to an average of $500/YR to keep the exterior in top shape. Had the place been a wood framed, wood sided, shingled home, of the same age, it would typically be on it's fourth residing, sixth or seventh roof, and at least one total window replacement. The difference in very long term ownership costs is pretty staggering. Now, I'm sure we agree that this is also meaningless in our current environment of chipboard, vinyl, and my favorite,  particle board POS  kitchen cabinets with big slabs of granite on top, LOL.

iluvzbeach

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #84 on: May 25, 2017, 11:04:18 PM »
I used to love all the HGTV shows, but then the buyers of a place we sold did one of those shows. It was a miserable experience and I've never been able to bring myself to watch HGTV since.
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zolotiyeruki

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #85 on: May 26, 2017, 05:54:52 AM »
I used to love all the HGTV shows, but then the buyers of a place we sold did one of those shows. It was a miserable experience and I've never been able to bring myself to watch HGTV since.
Ooh, sounds interesting!  Care to share more details?

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #86 on: May 26, 2017, 07:52:59 AM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.
Much more appealing than replacing the whole thing with PEX, especially since I'd also have to dig up the village street. :/

10-15% additional cost doesn't sound too bad to me, especially if it's a custom-home that has all the features I really want anyways. I imagine an appropriately sized, well-built home would still be in the same ball-park or cheaper than a slapped together 4,000 square foot monstrosity. I also don't mind Formica finishes. :)

Part of the problem with considering long-term home costs is that Americans just don't hold homes for that long. I think median home-ownership is, what, 8 years? Basically nothing. It's longer in my particular neighborhood, but I imagine a lot of people will still be moving out in 20 years (normal roof life, hell even my 20-year old heater and appliances are still running).


My major hope is that my old home doesn't have any major structural issues that I don't know about....the front stoops slope pretty badly away from the home, but I don't see anything else major.

Other than that, I would like to have a back-up battery sump-pump, and I'd also like my sump-pump to drain properly. Mrs. ADBG doesn't get my fascination with the sump-pump, though. Insulation and windows after that, but given current cash flow, storm windows work fine.

Chris22

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #87 on: May 26, 2017, 07:57:30 AM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.
Much more appealing than replacing the whole thing with PEX, especially since I'd also have to dig up the village street. :/

10-15% additional cost doesn't sound too bad to me, especially if it's a custom-home that has all the features I really want anyways. I imagine an appropriately sized, well-built home would still be in the same ball-park or cheaper than a slapped together 4,000 square foot monstrosity. I also don't mind Formica finishes. :)

Part of the problem with considering long-term home costs is that Americans just don't hold homes for that long. I think median home-ownership is, what, 8 years? Basically nothing. It's longer in my particular neighborhood, but I imagine a lot of people will still be moving out in 20 years (normal roof life, hell even my 20-year old heater and appliances are still running).


My major hope is that my old home doesn't have any major structural issues that I don't know about....the front stoops slope pretty badly away from the home, but I don't see anything else major.

Other than that, I would like to have a back-up battery sump-pump, and I'd also like my sump-pump to drain properly. Mrs. ADBG doesn't get my fascination with the sump-pump, though. Insulation and windows after that, but given current cash flow, storm windows work fine.

FWIW, a battery backup sump pump can be purchased for ~$400 (including battery) and installed by an idiot.  I know this because installing one was one of my first-ever plumbing job and it went fine.
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A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #88 on: May 26, 2017, 09:06:07 AM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.
Much more appealing than replacing the whole thing with PEX, especially since I'd also have to dig up the village street. :/

10-15% additional cost doesn't sound too bad to me, especially if it's a custom-home that has all the features I really want anyways. I imagine an appropriately sized, well-built home would still be in the same ball-park or cheaper than a slapped together 4,000 square foot monstrosity. I also don't mind Formica finishes. :)

Part of the problem with considering long-term home costs is that Americans just don't hold homes for that long. I think median home-ownership is, what, 8 years? Basically nothing. It's longer in my particular neighborhood, but I imagine a lot of people will still be moving out in 20 years (normal roof life, hell even my 20-year old heater and appliances are still running).


My major hope is that my old home doesn't have any major structural issues that I don't know about....the front stoops slope pretty badly away from the home, but I don't see anything else major.

Other than that, I would like to have a back-up battery sump-pump, and I'd also like my sump-pump to drain properly. Mrs. ADBG doesn't get my fascination with the sump-pump, though. Insulation and windows after that, but given current cash flow, storm windows work fine.

FWIW, a battery backup sump pump can be purchased for ~$400 (including battery) and installed by an idiot.  I know this because installing one was one of my first-ever plumbing job and it went fine.

Sounds like a fun weekend project. I'll have to get a thread over in the DIY section just so I'm not doing anything too stupid.

Chris22

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #89 on: May 26, 2017, 09:13:38 AM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.
Much more appealing than replacing the whole thing with PEX, especially since I'd also have to dig up the village street. :/

10-15% additional cost doesn't sound too bad to me, especially if it's a custom-home that has all the features I really want anyways. I imagine an appropriately sized, well-built home would still be in the same ball-park or cheaper than a slapped together 4,000 square foot monstrosity. I also don't mind Formica finishes. :)

Part of the problem with considering long-term home costs is that Americans just don't hold homes for that long. I think median home-ownership is, what, 8 years? Basically nothing. It's longer in my particular neighborhood, but I imagine a lot of people will still be moving out in 20 years (normal roof life, hell even my 20-year old heater and appliances are still running).


My major hope is that my old home doesn't have any major structural issues that I don't know about....the front stoops slope pretty badly away from the home, but I don't see anything else major.

Other than that, I would like to have a back-up battery sump-pump, and I'd also like my sump-pump to drain properly. Mrs. ADBG doesn't get my fascination with the sump-pump, though. Insulation and windows after that, but given current cash flow, storm windows work fine.

FWIW, a battery backup sump pump can be purchased for ~$400 (including battery) and installed by an idiot.  I know this because installing one was one of my first-ever plumbing job and it went fine.

Sounds like a fun weekend project. I'll have to get a thread over in the DIY section just so I'm not doing anything too stupid.

I will caveat it that it is dependent on your existing pump being done correctly; you mentioned something about having the current sump pump drain right.  If the current pump is wrong the backup will be too because you just install it in line on the existing plumbing.
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paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #90 on: May 26, 2017, 01:02:42 PM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.


PEX is pretty much standard as supply lines in many parts of the country anymore. It is literally 80% cheaper than copper, indestructible, and very DIY friendly.  Pulling a pipe through a sewer or water line is a great old trick, but it's a pretty unusual use for PEX.  Most PEX is much smaller, at 1/2 and 3/4" trade sized and used for water supply and radiant heating.

TomTX

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #91 on: May 28, 2017, 12:33:39 PM »
Holmes is amazing, but if every house was built to his standard, they would all cost millions.

Not at all, and there are builders who do just that - http://holmesapprovedhomes.com/about-us

While there are quite a few in Canada, there is literally one listed for the entire USA.
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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #92 on: May 28, 2017, 07:38:24 PM »
House hunters: 30 year old couple is looking for a $950k house, their first home
Me: wow! I wonder what kind of jobs they have to be able to afford something like that!
House hunters: "Our budget is $950,000 because that was the maximum the bank would approve us for, so that is what we can afford".

Wow, such sound logic. What could go wrong?

LeRainDrop

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #93 on: May 28, 2017, 08:19:46 PM »
I just saw this one on Facebook:


Rowellen

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #94 on: May 28, 2017, 08:20:57 PM »
House hunters: 30 year old couple is looking for a $950k house, their first home
Me: wow! I wonder what kind of jobs they have to be able to afford something like that!
House hunters: "Our budget is $950,000 because that was the maximum the bank would approve us for, so that is what we can afford".

Wow, such sound logic. What could go wrong?


Wow. That is just crazy. My DH and I were told we could borrow $500k for our first home just over 10 years ago. Instead we borrowed  $130k for a 1 bed unit. It was a great decision. We knew from doing our own budget that we couldn't afford $500k. At the time we spoke about how many people would see the banks offer and take it without doing their own sums. We believe this practice by the banks has contributed significantly to the ridiculous house prices in Australia. I know they are capitalising on people's stupidity legally but morally...SMH.  Commissions to mortgage brokers are a bad idea too. It rewards them for offering loans that are higher than people can afford.

Abo345

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #95 on: May 30, 2017, 07:24:45 PM »
I saw a house hunters episode recently where the wife needed a house with a large picture window so she could display a Christmas tree in the window one month a year. She needed to see the tree through the window before you enter the house, that was a deal breaker. The first 2 houses did not have picture windows, so they were out. The 3rd house had the picture window, but no dog door. The husband wants to have a dog one day, this house will never work!! Ummm why can't you install a dog door on your own?

Also saw a married couple, no kids, each needed their own hobby room. Wife needed a craft room, husband needed a video game room, plus they need a guest room, plus rooms for future kids. So minimum 5 bedroom house. Because 'merica.

Dicey

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #96 on: May 30, 2017, 07:44:29 PM »
I saw a house hunters episode recently where the wife needed a house with a large picture window so she could display a Christmas tree in the window one month a year. She needed to see the tree through the window before you enter the house, that was a deal breaker. The first 2 houses did not have picture windows, so they were out. The 3rd house had the picture window, but no dog door. The husband wants to have a dog one day, this house will never work!! Ummm why can't you install a dog door on your own?

Also saw a married couple, no kids, each needed their own hobby room. Wife needed a craft room, husband needed a video game room, plus they need a guest room, plus rooms for future kids. So minimum 5 bedroom house. Because 'merica.
LOL, I really dislike that show, along with Property Virgins. Gah! I will watch HH International, because of the armchair traveler aspect, but only in limited doses.
I did it! I have a journal!
A Lot Like This
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #97 on: May 31, 2017, 09:20:15 AM »
Huh, didn't realize PEX could be used for supply. I suggested it to my friend and he still prefers copper. He's been ripping out the galvanized and replacing as budget permits.  I know the Roto-Rooter guy  suggested PEX for the main house drain. All pipes in this area are clay and trees bust through them over the year. He mentioned they can actually shoot PEX the whole length of the pipe from inside your home, without having to dig up your whole front yard.


PEX is pretty much standard as supply lines in many parts of the country anymore. It is literally 80% cheaper than copper, indestructible, and very DIY friendly.  Pulling a pipe through a sewer or water line is a great old trick, but it's a pretty unusual use for PEX.  Most PEX is much smaller, at 1/2 and 3/4" trade sized and used for water supply and radiant heating.

Any thoughts on the supposed bio-static properties of copper?

paddedhat

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness
« Reply #98 on: May 31, 2017, 01:46:42 PM »
I actually had to look that one up. Basically, it boils down to copper having natural anti-bacterial properties that plastics lack. Pretty much a total non-issue IMHO. If you have city water, it's probably clorinated. If you have well water, it travels through hundreds of feet of black polyethelene pipe and sits in a tank with a rubber pressure bladder, before it hits your water lines. Both option have countless locations for bacterial growth on surfaces other than copper.

aurora5

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Re: More House Hunters foolishness - Living Alaska
« Reply #99 on: June 04, 2017, 04:16:40 PM »
Anyone watching Living Alaska? Jaw dropping beauty. The homes look great, but some are in very remote areas, even for Alaska. I've seen episodes with families moving to Alaska from Alabama, Texas, and California. The homes on the show are expensive - $585K. Many don't even seem to have garages or mudrooms which would seem to be a necessity. Most recent show did have a hot tub upstairs in front of a picture window so you could soak and look at the view. Not understanding the people buying homes on this show at all.